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Last Build Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2018 13:50:44 +0000

 



Missouri House Advances Bill Criminalizing Revenge Porn

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 13:46:31 +0000

The Missouri House of Representatives heard and advanced a bill Tuesday night that would criminalize the practice of revenge porn. The bill makes it a felony when an image that would reasonably be understood as private, is intentionally shared without the knowledge or consent from the other party.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0220REVENGE.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for February 20, 2018

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:31:40 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Columbia City Council Unanimously Approves Community-Oriented Policing Resolution Rural Missouri County Going to Privatized Public Defenders Proposal to Upgrade Water Distribution Infrastructure Approved by City Council


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0220PM_mixdown.mp3




Proposal to Upgrade Water Distribution Infrastructure Approved by City Council

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 23:25:32 +0000

The Columbia City Council unanimously approved a proposal Monday night to upgrade the water distribution infrastructure along Bryant and Switzler streets.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/upgrade0220_mixdown_1_0.mp3




Discover Nature: Walleye

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 22:23:50 +0000

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move. These slender, yellowish or olive-brown fish have large mouths with prominent teeth, and especially reflective eyes. Residing in large streams and reservoirs throughout the state, these nocturnal fish feed in shallow water at night, and retreat to deeper pools during the day. One of the first fish to spawn in spring, walleye move onto gravel shoals, rocky points, or along the rocky face of dams to begin their reproductive process. Here, they will deposit eggs among the rocks, and leave them to develop without any parental care. Fry eat small crustaceans and insects, and, in turn, are predated upon by many larger fish. Those that survive may grow to more than two feet in length, often becoming the “big fish” of their waters. Watch for these prized game fish as their spawning activity picks up from now through April in


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/50.mp3




The Cultivator: Have We Backed Ourselves Into A Corner With Pesticides?

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 18:16:43 +0000

Pesticide drift during the 2017 growing was historic -- about 3.6 million acres of soybeans were damaged by the weed killer dicamba. The Environmental Protection Agency and several states have slapped on stricter guidelines for the 2018 growing season, but enough damage has been done that stakeholders across the industry are worried that we've forced farmers into a cycle of always needing a stronger chemical to combat weeds that have grown resistant to what's already on shelves. It's gotten so bad that one farmer has been murdered and lines have been drawn in rural communities across the U.S. In this episode of The Cultivator, host Kris Husted takes a look at how we got here and what can be done to make sure U.S. agriculture doesn't head down a destructive path but remains sustainable for the future farmers and food supply.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/FinalMix_021918_ForWeb.mp3




Morning Newscast for February 20, 2017

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 14:37:51 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: MU Researchers Work Toward Earlier Detection of Autism Former St. Louis Judge Has Joined Governor's Legal Team Missouri House Votes to Restrict Child Marriages Community Policing Resolution Approved Despite Lingering Criticism


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0220_am.mp3




Afternoon Newscast For February 19, 2018

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 23:59:38 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom including, Columbia Housing Programs Plans to Submit Resolution for New Task Force Conversation Divided on Whether Prevailing Wage Helps or Hurts Missouri Workers Matthes Appoints Officier to Lead Community Policing Initiative Agriculture Drives Midwest Climate Change


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/FEB19PMNEWSCASTFINAL_mixdown.mp3




Unity Drives Newly Created High School Drum Line

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:44:10 +0000

A recent rehearsal of Columbia's newest drum line began with a barn dance. Hickman High School senior Rachel Keneipp stood by herself at the front of the Battle High School gym, playing "Turkey in the Straw" on marimba. Behind her, the other 17 members of Columbia Percussion United, all wearing cowboy hats, formed a circle and began line dancing. Then they moved to their instruments and joined in playing the American folk song.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/drumline0206_final.mp3




Commentary: The 2020 Election is Important, But Maybe Not For The Reason You Think

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:35:50 +0000

Despite all the bad press, the Republican Party is riding high, holding more state legislative seats and governorships than any time since 1922. They control all three elected branches of the national government. By contrast, Democrats are fractured, leaderless and outvoted at every turn. The GOP is certainly not without problems. The Trump base is, shall we agree, firm. But it’s only one-third of the electorate. Establishment Republicans lurch between taking advantage of their current dominance plus Democratic disarray and plotting Trump work-arounds, often very cynically. Evangelicals, 81 percent of whom voted for Trump, are discredited by their tolerance of Trump’s stormy assortment of misbehaviors. Republican women are especially conflicted.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/TPSHOW0219.mp3




The Breakdown: Mahlik Hall on "The Ring"

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 21:56:02 +0000

Producer Mahlik Hall, better known as IMAX, breaks down his song The Ring, and how he built a song around variation and anticipation.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/TBD_01_Mahlik_Final.mp3




Columbia Housing Programs Plans to Submit Resolution for New Task Force

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 21:24:54 +0000

The Fair Housing task force will focus on implementing new policies to promote fair housing. The task force will consist of 15 members from different organizations and backgrounds. The National Fair Housing Alliance reports 28,181 complaints in regards to discrimination in 2016. “Columbia directly correlates with the national average, which is why we want to implement this task force,” says Columbia Housing Programs Supervisor Randy Cole. “The city needs to look inward at what the landscape of our community is in terms of fair housing, access to opportunity, jobs and quality of housing,” says Cole.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/HOUSING0219FINAL_mixdown_01.mp3




'One of My Biggest Worries is that I'm Not Going to Get to Say Goodbye Because You Can't Hear Me.'

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 20:19:25 +0000

Lonnie Kessler and Kimberly Ruiz are a couple that lives in Moberly. Lonnie has intractable epilepsy and Kimberly is a disabled vet – and they both advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana in the state. They sat down at the Little Dixie Regional Library in Moberly, and spoke about their relationship and about how both of them having disabilities has influenced and strengthened their relationship. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0215MHTSHOW_1.mp3




Morning Newscast for February 19, 2018

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 14:20:08 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Centralia Juvenile Detained with Gun at School Police Say Two Pedestrians Killed on Same Stretch of I-70 Missouri Mental Health Department Admits to Mailing Error Missouri Bill Would Ease Restrictions on Felons in Workplace Columbia Man Loses Lawsuit Claiming Reese's Didn't Give Him Enough Pieces


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/am_newscast__0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for February 16, 2018

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 23:36:13 +0000

Total Ban On Texting And Driving Heard By Senate Committee Blunt: Trump To Nominate Garrison As US Attorney


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0216PMnewscast.mp3




Morning Newscast for February 16, 2018

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:26:50 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Lawmakers Questioned about Greitens as Part of Inquiry Missouri Senate Passes Electric Rate Legislation Jobless Benefits Could Shrink to 13 Weeks Under Bill Passed by the Missouri House Moms Demand Action to Lobby Proposed Gun Legislation


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0216am_newscast.mp3




Jobless Benefits Could Shrink to 13 Weeks Under Bill Passed by the Missouri House

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 13:25:52 +0000

Republican lawmakers are working to shorten the amount of time out-of-work Missouri residents can receive unemployment benefits. The Missouri House Thursday passed legislation to create a sliding scale , in which the unemployment rate would have to be nine percent or higher in order to receive benefits for 20 weeks. Benefits would only be available for 13 weeks when the jobless rate is below six percent.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0215UnempW.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for February 15, 2018

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 22:49:18 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: School Board Member Talks School Safety Missouri Public Defender's System Asks for Funding Kansas City Attorney Announces Independent Senate Bid Columbia's 2017 Citizen Survey Shows Low Satisfaction with Police


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/0215pm_0.mp3




Global Journalist: After ISIS, the Kurdish Question

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 22:38:34 +0000

The Kurds have played a key role in the Syrian war. With U.S. military aid, a Kurdish militia called the YPG has done a large share of the ground fighting that has led to the near-defeat of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Still it’s not clear that these military gains have brought the Kurds any closer to their dream of a Kurdish nation. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at the prospects and aspirations of the Kurds after the defeat of ISIS, and what may become of thousands of captured ISIS fighters.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/20180215GLOBAL.mp3




True/False 2018 Films Preview

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 16:51:00 +0000

True/False programmers Chris Boeckmann and Abby Sun give the inside scoop on can't miss films, revamped shorts programs and this year's True Vision Award recipient: director Dieudo Hamadi.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/TFPodcast_FilmsPreview.mp3




Morning Newscast for February 15, 2018

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:46:01 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Russia Used Twitter to Spread Misinformation during the 2015 MU Protests Proposed Bill Would Limit Gubernatorial Appointment Abilities Boone County Fire District Seeks Reimbursement through Legislation Utility Bill That Ended in Filibuster Still in Negotiations


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/02/am_0215_1.mp3