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Last Build Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2017 15:50:22 +0000

 



Intersection - United and Divided: Stories on Bridging the Urban-Rural Divide

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 15:09:14 +0000

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided , a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media . In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better. Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/INTERSECTION.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 19, 2017

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:26:27 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: City Hires Two Consultants to Evaluate Electric System More Protests Set for Tuesday After Quite Night in St. Louis Final Budget Approved After Council Votes to Increase Water Rates State Audit Shows Missouri's Legal Expense Fund is Underfunded


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP19AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 18, 2017

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:45:32 +0000

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Health Centers Win Grant to Fight Opioid Addiction Fulton Medical Center to Hold Open House With New Owners City Council to Vote on Utility Rate Hike Columbia Kids Will Get Free Flu Shots Westminster College to Host Annual Symposium "Just Our Presence is Powerful": Protestors Start 4th Day of Action With Silent March Downtown


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/0918PMaudio_mixdown.mp3




Missouri Health Centers Win Grant to Fight Opioid Addiction

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 22:51:16 +0000

The Health and Resources Services Administration has awarded $3.9 million to twenty-four health centers in Missouri, according to a press release issued Friday. There are a total of twenty-nine health centers in Missouri. The grant is a part of the Access Increases for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (AIMS) awards. The total amount was determined by Congress in the Omnibus Budget Act earlier this year. The grant is a part of the HRSA's five point strategy to fight opioid abuse across the country. The strategy includes advancing better practices for pain management and improving access to treatment and recovery services.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/GRANT0918a_0.mp3




Missouri Task Force One Returns from Texas

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 21:01:30 +0000

KBIA's Hannah Haynes spoke with Missouri Task Force One's Terri Cassel about his and his team's experience working in Texas with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/TASKFORCE0918_01.mp3




Elizabeth Modde and Sam McMillen: ‘It's Having People You Care About - and Who Care About You’

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:30:25 +0000

Sam McMillen and Elizabeth Modde are both medical students at the University of Missouri. They both work or have worked with MedZou – a free community health clinic run by medical staff and students. Sam is currently the Director of Patient Advocacy and Referrals, and he sat down with Elizabeth in May to discuss some of the healthcare struggles their homeless patients face, and how their relationships with patients has changed them. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/MHTSHOW.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 18, 2017

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:20:34 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Police Chief Ken Burton talks about racial profiling, community policing and why he's so frustrated The Latest: Several Arrested After St. Louis Vandalism Fulton Medical Center Sold And Will Stay Open Popularity Brings End to Traditional Lupus Chili Festival


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP18AMNews.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 15, 2017

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 23:25:26 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Closing of Fulton Medical Center will leave people further from medical care Greitens' administration clashes with house budgeters Farm Bill to be looked at by Congress Education Secretary Betsy DeVos makes a stop in Kansas City


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEPT15PM.mp3




Local Art Therapist Uses Art to Heal

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:00:00 +0000

As Dareth Goettemoeller cleaned up her art space at Orr Street Studios, she hugged a doll. It was a giant, Raggedy-Anne-like doll, with a message over the heart that read, “Hug me.” She said she made them for patients that just needed a hug.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/otcshow.mp3




Global Journalist: Europe's Immigration Quagmire

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:15:44 +0000

Back in 2015, the immigration crisis in Europe was in headlines all over the world. Since then the numbers of people crossing the by sea to the continent has declined from more than 1 million annually to just 126,000 through early September of this year, according to the U.N.'s migration agency. But many problems remain unresolved. Not least for the tens of thousands of migrants who arrived in Europe over the past few years and still find themselves in legal limbo. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at Europe's tortured efforts to address the problem, and get an up close view at conditions for migrants in France and Greece.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/global_091417.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 15, 2017

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:06:16 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Columbians with Active Warrants Will be Offered Amnesty on Traffic Tickets or Ordinance Violations Columbia's ACT scores outshine the state average Medical Examiner Report Completed in Missouri Man's Death Hickman High School to Dedicate Pavilion to Former Coach Arnel Monroe


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP15AMNews.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 14, 2017

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 22:16:26 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Farm Income Stabilizes, Tamping Down Fears of Rural Economic Collapse Greitens, Lawmakers Clash on Money for Prescription Program Council Considers Higher Parking Fees to Reduce Congestion in Neighborhoods near Downtown Pesticides Can Have Negative Effects on Babies Born to Mothers Living near Farm Fields National Guard on Standby in Case of Protests Following St. Louis Judge's Ruling


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/newscastpm0914.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Growing Up with the Missouri River

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:38:54 +0000

Dan and Connie Burkhardt were guests of Darren Hellwege on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud. The Burkhardt's discussed their recent book, Growing Up with the River in advance of their September 19 lecture on the MU campus.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/thinktues_for_web_09142017.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 14, 2017

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 13:16:27 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri's Public Pension System Facing Funding Crisis, Treasurer Says Lawmakers Back to Drawing Board for Funding In-Home Health Care Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal's Punishment for Trump Comment: A Written Reprimand Federal Appeals Court Agrees to Rehear Ferguson Lawsuit


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP14AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 13, 2017

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 23:31:11 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri's Public Pension System Facing Funding Crisis, Treasurer Says Federal Appeals Court Agrees to Rehear Ferguson Lawsuit Missouri Lawmaker to Face Ethics Probe over Hanging Remark MU Campus Climate Survey Results Show Room for Improvement Missouri Legislators Want to Reverse Cuts to Elderly and Disabled


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/newscast0913.mp3




MU Campus Climate Survey Results Show Room for Improvement

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 23:01:19 +0000

Administrators at the University of Missouri held two town forums on Sept. 12 and 13 to discuss the results of the Campus Climate Survey conducted in 2016. They say the survey reflects room for improvement. The survey, conducted by the independent agency Rankin & Associates, included responses from nearly 10,000 MU students, faculty and staff. It shows that high percentages of students, faculty and staff at MU have “seriously considered leaving” the university, with more than 40 percent of students considering it in their first and second years each. UM System President Mun Choi says the survey shows that the reasons for this are mostly interactions or experiences with peer groups and coworkers.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/CLIMATE0913A_1.mp3




Views of the News: Is It Time To Bring Reporters In Out Of The Storm?

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 20:39:09 +0000

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/20170913VIEWS.mp3




Talking Politics: Missouri Annual Veto Session Explained

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 17:56:59 +0000

In this episode of Talking Politics, Prof. Mark Horvit explains what’s in store for as Missouri lawmakers meet for their annual veto session this week. Mark Horvit is a professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and leads the school’s state government reporting program. Of all the vetoed bills, one of the most talked about is a measure that would fix funding cuts to in-home and nursing home care for seniors.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/tpshow__1_.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 13, 2017

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 12:47:21 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Union Representing Black Officers Urges Officer's Conviction Campus Climate Survey Shows MU Community Isn't as Comfortable as National Average Springfield GOP Rep. Elijah Haahr to be House Speaker in 2019 2017 Missouri Veto Session May be Much Ado About Nothing


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP13AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for Septmeber 12, 2017

Tue, 12 Sep 2017 23:06:28 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: · Greitens: Peaceful Protesters Will Be Protected · Callaway County Prepares for Hospital Closure · Missouri Public Defender Disciplined for Neglecting Clients · Greitens Appoints Board to Consider Marcellus Williams Case


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/0912PMNewscast.mp3