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Last Build Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 06:06:37 +0000

 



Afternoon Newscast for September 25, 2017

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 23:09:57 +0000

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Prisons Could Soon Be Smoke-Free Ameren Missouri Looking to Reduce Emissions By Solar and Wind Food Trucks Looking for More Space in Downtown Columbia Attorney General Calls for Investigation Regarding Stockley Verdict Columbia's NAACP To Host Event On Improving Policing


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/0925PM_mixdown.mp3




Susie McGee and Bev Borgeson on the Evolving Needs of Their Consumers

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 21:26:08 +0000

Susie McGee and Bev Borgeson both work for Audrain Developmental Disability Services. Susie works as the Community RN - proving nursing care - and Bev is the Quality Assurance Coordinator, which according to Susie means she wears “many hats.” They spoke about how the needs of the people they work with, who they call “consumers,” are changing. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/MHTSHOW_3.mp3




Farm Your Yard: Early Fall in the Garden

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 18:02:23 +0000

I love this time of year: the leaves on the trees are just beginning to change, the nights and mornings are cooler, and my summer vegetable garden is starting to slow down. Lots of non-gardeners think that September is the harvest month. That is true, but if you have an intensively planted garden like I do, May, June, July, and August are also the harvest months.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/fyy_for_web_09252017.mp3




Charter School Expansion Possible in Missouri

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 17:26:42 +0000

A Missouri House bill has the potential to change public education across Missouri. Missouri House Bill 634 expands charter schools options throughout the state. Right now, charter schools are only allowed in Kansas City and St. Louis. If the bill were to pass, it could mean charter schools could open anywhere in the state.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/EXAMSHOW.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 25, 2017

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 13:58:43 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: As Attempts to Hack Missouri Public School Records Rise, Officials Discuss Cybersecurity Community Mural Unveiled at Optimist Park MU Evaluating New Title IX Guidelines But No Immediate Changes Expecte d Inmate Wins Order Forcing Missouri Prisons to Ban Smoking


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP25AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 22, 2017

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 23:34:18 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: MKT trail to be closed for bridge repair Initiative to improve cyber security at Missouri schools is working, education officials say ACLU sues city of St. Louis UM System keeps on public relations firm


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/newscast09222017.mp3




Following the Trail of the Monarch Butterflies: An Interview with Sara Dykman

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 22:00:00 +0000

It’s a hot day at Cooper’s Landing. The Missouri River stretches to the right. A bluegrass band and crickets hum in the background. And people are scattered about listening, drinking beer and fanning away the heat. I glance around for Sara Dykman, who’s just arrived from Jefferson City by bike and who’s heading toward Mexico. I don’t see her, but I do see her bicycle. The bike is bright pink and loaded down with stuff. Suddenly, Sara appears with a Mr. Pibb in hand, catching me in the middle of snapping photos. “My bike looks like a homeless person met a car wreck and it doesn't look pretty it looks like just a bunch of junk piled together that's slightly breaking so only the most interesting people are brave enough to talk to me,” Sara says when I ask her if she’s met any interesting people on her trip. She’s right, the bike doesn’t exactly look pretty, but it does look sturdy. She’s fashioned two kitty litter buckets to use as semi-waterproof storage for her stuff. And little


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/otcshow_0.mp3




Intersection Preview - Photographing the Legacy of Lead in Missouri's Old Lead Belt

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:47:36 +0000

Next week on Intersection, we look at Missouri's legacy of lead. In this preview of our upcoming show, Intersection host Sara Shahriari talks with photographer Benjamin Hoste about his images from Missouri's old lead belt. Hoste's photographs from the old lead belt are on display at the Greg Hardwick Gallery at Columbia College through September 27.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/Hoste.mp3




Missouri's Elusive Tropical Fruit Attracts Enthusiasts

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:01:07 +0000

Late summer and early fall might not seem like a very tropical time in Missouri, but it is the best season to find one of the last remaining pieces of the state’s tropical past. I’m talking about the largest edible native fruit in North America – the elusive paw paw. Despite the fruit’s uniquely exotic flavor, and the fact that it grows throughout the Midwest, you won’t find the paw paw in most groceries, which means if you want to taste it, you have to set off into the woods, which is exactly what I did on a recent afternoon.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/moenv09122017_mixdown.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 22, 2017

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 14:04:09 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: St. Louis Police to Get Body Cameras Columbia City Council Unanimously Approves Resolution to Support Standing Rock Ragtag Cinema to Screen Ferguson Documentary For Free This Weekend University of Missouri Official Enrollment Figures Show Expected Decline


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP22AMmixdown.mp3




Global Journalist: Yemen Crisis Fueled by War, Outsiders

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 02:38:10 +0000

The civil war in Yemen has garnered many superlatives since it began in force in March 2015. It's generated the world's most dire humanitarian crisis and the largest cholera outbreak in a single year ever recorded – even Forbes ranked its economy as the world's worst . Yet despite a conflict that has left 7 million on the brink of starvation, there is little end in sight to fighting between Iranian-backed Houthi rebels and the country's Saudi-backed government. Attempts to spur a U.N. investigation into war crimes committed by both sides have so far failed. Complicating efforts is support for the Saudi-backed government by the U.S., U.K. and France. On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Yemen's humanitarian crisis, the collapse of independent media in the country and the role of outsiders in fueling a conflict that has generated startling levels of human suffering.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/global_09212017.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 21, 2017

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 21:36:41 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Columbia City Council Unanimously Approves Resolution to Support Standing Rock Fatal Shootings on the Rise in St. Louis This Year Hair Braiders Appeal Against Missouri Licensing Requirements Rural Economy Continues to Struggle in Missouri


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/newscastpm0921_mixdown_1.mp3




Morning Newscast for September 21, 2017

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 12:34:00 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: New St. Louis Mayor Navigates Racial Strife After Acquittal MU's Freshman Enrollment Continues Decline, But More Than Expected Arrive on Campus St. Louis Board OKs 1-year Trial of Police Body Cameras C olumbia City Council Unanimously Approves Resolution to Support Standing Rock


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP21AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 20, 2017

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 22:57:13 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: City Council Votes to Eliminate Para-Transit Route Wentworth Alumni Win Battle Over Doughboy Statue 2 More Municipalities Join Drug Monitoring Effort Jefferson City Prepares for 'Street-Scaping' with Sewer Tests


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/newcast0920b1_0.mp3




Views of the News: A Week on the Fault Line, In Three Parts

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 20:52:41 +0000

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against # Trump ; and will Ken Burns ' latest documentary about the # VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/20170920VIEWS.mp3




Discover Nature: Early Fall Colors

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:17:09 +0000

This week on Discover Nature, get outside to enjoy early autumn weather, and keep an eye out for the first signs of fall color.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/early_fall_colors_for_web_0.mp3




Morning Newscast September 20, 2017

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 14:11:42 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: City Council Votes to Eliminate Bus Route St. Louis Mayor and Police Investigate Officers Chanting Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Proposes Spending Hike


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/SEP20AM.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: MU's Climate is Challenged, But Changing

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:01:07 +0000

You’ve read, I hope, the Missourian’s excellent coverage this week of the “climate survey” that was conducted a year ago to assess attitudes and behaviors of students, faculty and staff throughout the University system. If you have, you know that the findings revealed fairly high levels of discomfort among students and discontent among faculty and staff at MU. Only two-thirds of the nearly 5,000 MU students who responded to the survey said they felt comfortable on campus. Forty percent of freshmen and 44 percent of sophomores were seriously considering leaving. Sixty percent of faculty respondents and about half the staff said they were serious about seeking other jobs. Minority, female and gay respondents were especially unhappy. Read the complete column online at the Missourian.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/KENNEDYSHOW_0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for September 19, 2017

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 22:47:39 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Rock Bridge Christian Church Votes to Become Sanctuary Church Final Budget Approved After Council Votes to Increase Water Rates Meeting Thursday to Discuss MKT Trail Renovations Third Greitens' Appointee to Board of Education Withdraws


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/Newscast0919PM.mp3




Talking Politics: Police Chief Ken Burton Gives His Take on Racial Desparity in Traffic Stops

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:56:46 +0000

Traffic stop data released by the Missouri Attorney General's office shows a disparity between black and white drivers in Columbia, but not everyone agrees as to what the numbers mean. Black drivers in Columbia were pulled over at a rate almost four times higher than white drivers in 2016. Some local groups, like Race Matters, Friends, say this is clear evidence of racial profiling and called for changes in the police department. Some have even called for the resignation of Police Chief Ken Burton, who has voiced skepticism about the traffic stop data. The Columbia Missourian’s Katherine Reed and Noah McGee spoke in-depth with Burton to get his take on the data and how the department can be improved.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/09/TPSHOW_01.mp3