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Last Build Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 05:39:52 +0000

 



Afternoon Newscast for April 21, 2017

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 22:50:56 +0000

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Will Receive $10 Million to Fight Opioid Addiction Buckle Up: No Major Funding Increase for Fixing Missouri's Roads, Bridges Boone County, Jefferson City Backup 911 Services Agreement Moves Closer MU Student Groups Ask UM System for Fossil Fuel Divestment


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/0421_pm_0.mp3




Boone County, Jefferson City Backup 911 Services Agreement Moves Closer

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 22:44:38 +0000

An agreement between Boone County and Jefferson City, which would allow their emergency services to answer each other’s 911 calls, will receive a vote next week.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/0421calls.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 21, 2017

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 16:05:41 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: - Missouri House Delays Vote on Workplace Discrimination Bill - Missouri Politicians, EPA Administrator Convene - The Latest: Missouri Senate Panel Approves Budget Plan - MU to Honor Memory of Students at Ceremony


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/APR21AM.mp3




Global Journalist: India's 'Missing Children' Problem

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:49:50 +0000

The movie "Lion" won enormous popular acclaim in 2016 for its heartrending tale about a 5-year-old Indian boy who loses his family after boarding the wrong train. The movie has helped shed light on the huge problem of missing and abducted children in India. By one estimate, 180 children go missing in India each day. Many become victims of human trafficking, and end up being sexually exploited or forced to work in factories or as household servants. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the growing problem of child abduction and trafficking in India.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/20170420GLOBAL.mp3




MU to Honor Memory of Students at Ceremony

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 13:47:39 +0000

COLUMBIA -- The University of Missouri will honor the nine MU students who have died since April 2016 in a ceremony Friday afternoon. The MU Remembers ceremony will honor Emily Bamberger, Dariana Byone, Monica Hand, Caden Hastie, Kyle Hirsch, Kendall Overton, Tyler Romaker, Kelly White and R. Peyton White. The event is put on each year by the Missouri Students Association and the Graduate Professional Council.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/APR21AM_01.mp3




Time with Jon Olshefski

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 22:46:41 +0000

Jon Olshefski, a director who spent a decade gathering footage of his subjects, discusses time as an ingredient in documentary filmmaking. His film, QUEST, was the recipient of the 2017 True Life Fund.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/JOHNFINAL.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Choosing Church

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 22:33:10 +0000

This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris visited with two members of a Columbia family who are active in their faith community. Sumit Gupta and his family attend Shanthi Mandir in Columbia. During a time when fewer Americans are choosing to regularly attend church , learn what keeps Gupta bringing his family back to Columbia's Hindu temple.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/sumit_and_parth_gupta_for_web.mp3




Off the Clock - Local Author and Unbound Book Festival Planner Balances Life, Career and Community

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 18:48:49 +0000

Alex George is a lawyer by day, and an author by even earlier in the day. The author of six books, including Setting Free the Kites – published by Penguin in February, is also organizing the Unbound Book Festival, in its second year running this April. The festival will bring acclaimed writer Salman Rushdie, author of such books as Midnight’s Children and The Satanic Verses to Columbia. George said that as the festival organizer, he was glad to bring someone of Rushdie’s celebrity to Unbound and is excited to see Rushdie in front of an audience.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/otc_show_webmp3.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 19, 2017

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:45:51 +0000

Rally Celebrates Columbia's First Sanctuary Congregation CoMo Connect Copyright Case to Keep Moving Forward


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/anchor_newscast_mixdown.mp3




CoMo Connect Copyright Case to Keep Moving Forward

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:16:09 +0000

Columbia’s public transit program can still call itself CoMo Connect – at least for now. A federal judge ruled the bus system’s name can stay as is despite a copyright claim from another Co-Mo branded company. CoMo Connect can mean two things: Columbia’s bus system or an internet, TV and phone provider owned by the Co-Mo Electric Cooperative. The co-op sued in October saying having two CoMo Connects was too confusing for mid-Missourians. Jeffery Simon is a lawyer for the company.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/BUS0419W.mp3




Rally Celebrates Columbia’s First Sanctuary Congregation

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:55:58 +0000

More than a hundred people gathered to celebrate the new sanctuary status of Columbia’s Unitarian Universalist Church (UUCC) this Tuesday. The church members voted last week to become what it calls a sanctuary congregation. Under this status, the church says it will take civil initiative to protect immigrants and refugees facing deportation. “Becoming a sanctuary congregation means first that we are taking a public stand in solidarity with our immigrants and refugee members of the community,” Reverend Molly Housh Gordon said. “We're going to be engaging in public activism for more just policy and a more dignified approach to immigration.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/CHURCH0419_AUDIOFORWEB.mp3




Views of the News: Bill O'Reilly Fired From Fox News

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:06:59 +0000

Fox News ousts Bill O'Reilly amid sexual harassment allegations. Video posted of a brutal murder in Cleveland forces Facebook to address the question again: is it a media company? What obligation does it have to monitor for criminal or violent content? Also, the White House’s decision not to make visitor logs public, can a commercial for McDonald’s be effective without any mention of McDonald’s and why Boston’s Fox affiliate is dropping network branding. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/20170419VIEWS.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 19, 2017

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 15:18:46 +0000

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: Narrower-than-proposed version of St. Louis Zoo tax bill passes in House Missouri House Passes Changes to Student Transfer Policy Center for Missouri Studies Breaks Ground MU Staff Members Question Administrators About Potential Layoffs


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/WebAPR19AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 18, 2017

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 23:37:56 +0000

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: Former Ag Secretary Vilsack Worried About Lack of Rural Focus in Trump Cabinet Jefferson City Raises Tobacco Purchasing Age to 21 Missouri Mine and Cave Survey Shows Bat Population Dive State Historical Society to Break Ground in Columbia MO Attorney General's Office Recused From Supreme Court Case Involving Columbia Church


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/0418PMaudio_mixdown.mp3




Missouri Cave and Mine Survey Shows Bat Population Dive

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 22:39:19 +0000

Results from a 2017 survey of Missouri caves and mines show that the population of a bat species previously common in the state dropped dramatically from previous years. The survey results reveal that the number of northern long-eared bats in Missouri has taken a dramatic hit due to White-Nose Syndrome. The syndrome is caused by a fungus, which can disturb bats’ hibernation and cause them to die from starvation. In the 2015 survey of 375 caves and mines, surveyors found 2,684 northern long-eared bats. For 2017, just seven bats of that species were found in 500 caves and mines.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/Bats0418wrap.mp3




Discover Nature: Flowering Dogwood

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:33:09 +0000

In Missouri’s woods this time of year, there’s something new to see every day. For weeks, redbud blooms have stolen the show, painting pink streaks through the understory, but this week, Missouri’s state tree takes the spotlight.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/50.mp3




Intersection - Mayor Brian Treece Talks Zoning, Infrastructure and Downtown Parking

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 17:39:22 +0000

This week on Intersection, Columbia Mayor Brian Treece joins us to discuss the Unified Development Ordinance, which took effect at the end of March. The new zoning code is the biggest comprehensive reform to zoning in Columbia since the 1950s. Treece says some of the changes include strengthening protections for neighborhoods and increasing parking requirements for large residential developments. Listen here:


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/intersection_47.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 18, 2017

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:20:24 +0000

City Council Swears-in Two Council Members Supreme Court Will Interpret Religious Freedom in Trinity Lutheran Church Case Boone County Ranks Low on Health Behaviors Lawmakers Consider More Protections for Student Journalists


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/am_newscast_0418_mixdown.mp3




Commentary: Democratic Dilemmas

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:41:43 +0000

Here are three things Democrats should not do if they want to regain the majority. They should not be like Donald Trump and use profanity in public. Last week it was reported that the Democratic National Chairman said in public one of the words you can’t say on TV, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York said one of the other ones, in its gerund form. Lots of Millennials talk this way and for some reason Trump can get away with talking this way. But “I am authentic because I am vulgar” is not a winning strategy for Democrats. Neither is fighting the culture wars. Conservatives just love it when Democrats man the barricades over transgender bathrooms and sanctuary cities. While these may be noble issues, and the fight may feel good, the issues are secondary and are certainly not the economic battles Democrats should be fighting. And they should not be threatening other Democrats, those in red states who have to vote with Republicans occasionally. Three Senators in states carried


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/TPSHOW.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 17, 2017

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 22:56:52 +0000

Regional News Coverage Including: Lawmakers Consider More Protections for Student Journalists Former Missouri Governor Details Time in Office in Booklet House Votes to Block New State Parks


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/04/pm_newscast_0417.mp3