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Preview: APM: Marketplace Morning Report - First Edition

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio



News happens while you sleep. Marketplace Morning Report gives you a head start, with three updates throughout the morning. Host David Brancaccio shares the latest on markets, money, jobs and innovation, providing the context you need to make the smartest



Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Public Media
 



02/23/2018: Can "Black Panther" shake up Hollywood?

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 12:30:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) The big financial story of this week: what the guardians of interest rates said about future interest rates. Christopher Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, stopped by to talk with us about how difficult it is to forecast inflation. Afterwards, we'll discuss news that the Chinese government has seized control of Anbang, the firm that owns some famous U.S. properties. Plus: We talk about whether "Black Panther" will help create more opportunities in Hollywood for black actors.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/23/mmr_20180223_pod3_64.mp3




02/23/2018: The biggest challenge to organized labor in years

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 07:18:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) The Chinese government has seized the control of Anbang, a firm that owns some high-profile U.S. properties. We'll look at Anbang's origins and why China is cracking down on it. Afterwards, we'll discuss a major Supreme Court case that could affect economic mobility. The case questions whether public-sector unions have a right to collect fees from government workers who refuse to join. Plus: A look at upgrades to the Real ID, and what could happen if states don't comply with their requirements.  


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/23/mmr_20180223_pod2_64.mp3




02/23/2018: Donald Trump Jr.'s business with India

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 06:39:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The Royal Bank of Scotland turned its first profit in 10 years, but we’ll explain why looming fears about the bank’s actions in the run up to the financial crisis are hitting the bank’s share price today. Then, Donald Trump Jr. is in India today meeting buyers of his firm’s luxury real-estate business…the same day a new report says inequality in the country has risen sharply for the last three decades. Afterwards, royal waters have plenty to look forward to this year with two weddings and a baby on the way. Britain’s pottery makers are hard at work prepping for 2018’s big events. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/23/mmr_20180223_pod1_64.mp3




02/22/2018: The trillion-dollar flask of liquor smuggled into the U.S. economy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 11:32:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) The Fed has hinted that it wants to tap the economic brakes again. We'll talk to economist Diane Swonk about why the Fed is so worried about the economy. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report that shows more Americans are prioritizing savings. Over half say they now have more emergency savings than credit card debt. Plus: A debate in France over how to pay for saving crumbling cathedrals.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/22/mmr_20180222_pod3_64.mp3




02/22/2018: The struggle to buy nutritious food

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 07:37:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) The Federal Reserve recently issued a statement that we've translated to mean: the U.S. economy has strengthened to the point that the Fed might want to move interest rates even higher than they thought. On today's show, we'll discuss why the markets are getting spooked by this possibility. Afterwards, we'll look at how the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) is failing to provide households with enough nutritious meals, and then talk about how clothing brands putting in more effort to make clothing for people with disabilities.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/22/mmr_20180222_pod2_64.mp3




02/22/2018: Will a German court deliver the ‘kiss of death’ to diesel?

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 06:18:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… A court in Germany will rule whether a ban on polluting cars is a legitimate way of cleaning up air quality. Some are calling it the “kiss of death” for diesel – what could such a decision mean for other countries? Afterward, diesel aside, traffic is a global problem. We’ll take you to Dakar where residents spend three hours a day getting to and from the city center. Then, after launching its oil-backed virtual currency earlier this week, Venezuela is trying to boost the Petro’s uptake – now saying it will accept it in a range of transactions from aviation fuel to fees charged in embassies.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/22/mmr_20180222_pod1_64.mp3




02/21/2018: What the Fed has been saying behind closed doors

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 10:05:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) The group at the Federal Reserve that makes key decisions about interest rates is getting ready to release minutes from its latest meeting. We'll talk with Susan Schmidt — senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group — about some of the factors that may influence them. Next, we'll look at how Texas funds its higher education system, and then discuss the harsh conditions that builders have to face in the winter.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/21/mmr_20180221_pod3_64.mp3




02/21/2018: Parkland, Florida students mobilize

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 06:47:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) A group of survivors from the Parkland, Florida mass shooting last week are lobbying for gun control laws, and they're getting a lot of financial support. We'll take a look at some of the steps they've taken to mobilize, along with some of the donors who are supporting the cause. Afterwards, we'll examine the criteria Texas uses to fund its colleges and universities, and then we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about why he thinks there was that big drop in markets earlier this month. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/21/mmr_20180221_pod2_64.mp3




02/21/2018: How dangerous is artificial intelligence?

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 06:23:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The world’s biggest mining companies are seeing a boost to their bottom lines thanks to rising global commodity prices. We’ll tell you how the battery revolution is helping shape the overall market. Then, India is opening up its coal industry, allowing foreign companies to bid for coal mines in the country. But will more investment from some of the world’s biggest companies translate into better quality of life for residents there? Afterward, a conversation about whether growing use of artificial intelligence presents a looming danger. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/21/mmr_20180221_pod1_64.mp3




02/20/2018: The black market for food carts

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:54:05 -0600

(Markets Edition) Bond yields on the 10-year Treasury note are at their highest level in four years. On today's show, we'll look at whether their rise will continue. Afterwards, we'll talk about Venezuela's decision to pre-sell a cryptocurrency known as the "petro," which is backed by the country's oil reserves. Plus: We dive into the illegal black market for food carts in New York City. The number of legal street food permits issued by the city has barely increased since the '80s. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/20/mmr_20180220_pod3_64.mp3




02/20/2018: Splurging during Chinese New Year

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 07:18:05 -0600

(U.S. Edition) The grocery chain Albertsons is planning to buy part of Rite Aid in a $24 billion deal. On today's show, we'll look at the tough supermarket landscape that big chains have to face these days. Afterwards, we'll discuss Walmart's venture into new apparel brands so that it can compete with Amazon, and then find out what some people in China are planning to splurge on this Chinese New Year.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/20/mmr_20180220_pod2_64.mp3




02/20/2018: Could lack of pension reform lead to economic chaos in Brazil?

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:19:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The World Bank says pensions will consume Brazil’s entire federal budget by 2030 …but the country today shelved a vote on reform. What does it mean for a nation recovering from financial crisis, and will October elections bring light at the end of the tunnel? Then, a new cryptocurrency launches today, this time backed by Venezuelan oil. We’ll explain who’s investing — and who’s not. Afterward, to Spain where a key business witness will give evidence today in ongoing Spanish corruption investigations.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/20/mmr_20180220_pod1_64.mp3




02/19/2018: Why young people aren't thinking about the stock market

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 10:05:16 -0600

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/19/mmr_20180219_pod3_64.mp3




02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:53:48 -0600

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/19/mmr_20180219_pod2_64.mp3




02/19/2018: Latvia central bank boss detained by anti-corruption agency

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:56:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … There are calls for the boss of Latvia’s central bank to step down after he was detained over the weekend by the nation’s anti-corruption agency while his home and offices were raided. We’ll explain what’s next for the country’s banking system. Then, new details as a $1.7 billion fraud at India’s Punjab National Bank continues to unravel after the story came to light late last week. Afterwards, how De Beers is using blockchain technology to help make diamonds conflict free.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/19/mmr_20180219_pod1_64.mp3




02/16/2018: China's backing away from America's debt

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:54:10 -0600

(Markets Edition) Foreign countries hold about $6 trillion of the $20 trillion worth of Treasury bills, notes and bonds that the U.S. government has issued. China is one of them, but it turns out that U.S. debt is becoming less attractive to China and other countries. We'll talk to Chris Low — chief economist at FTN Financial — about why they're starting to back off. Plus: How one Seattle nieghborhood is fighting airplane noise.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/16/mmr_20180216_pod3_64.mp3




02/16/2018: Who's paying for those pop songs at the Olympics?

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 07:17:41 -0600

(U.S. Edition) A group of Chinese-based companies has been trying to buy the Chicago Stock Exchange, but the Securities and Exchange Commission has finally given an answer and it's...no. On today's show, we'll look at why the SEC is putting a halt to the deal, and what the Chicago Stock Exchange's parent company could do next. Afterwards, we'll discuss the state of the housing industry, and then find out how figure skaters at this year's Winter Olympics are getting the chance to skate to pop songs. Who pays for the rights to use them?


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/16/mmr_20180216_pod2_64.mp3




02/16/2018: Has the lost generation of home buyers finally been found?

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 06:38:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Young buyers have long been considered the “lost generation” when it comes to home buying. But we’ll delve into new figures out this morning that show that while that might be true in Britain, the trend has actually started to reverse in America. Then, the growing economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela has led to tens of thousands of residents to flee to the north of Brazil. We’ll explain why authorities there are now declaring a state of social emergency to cope with the high number of immigrants. Afterwards, how was your commute this morning? Any coffee spills, late trains, or traffic jams on the route? For some in Sweden, none of those are things to fear because, as we’ll explore, rather than hopping in a car or boarding mass transit … they ice skate to the office.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/16/mmr_20180216_pod1_64.mp3




02/15/2018: The case for packing up and moving to Germany

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:33:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) Amid all the hubbub about the Consumer Price Index's inflation figures yesterday, retail sales were looking a little low. Diane Swonk, chief economist at accounting firm Grant Thornton, joined us to explain why and what tax refund delays may have to do with it. Afterwards, we'll talk to Stephan Richter — editor in chief of the publication The Globalist — about the cheap costs of living in Germany. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/15/mmr_20180215_pod3_64.mp3




02/15/2018: The tax-dodging device known as bitcoin

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:38:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) Cyril Ramaphosa will take power as South Africa's president after Jacob Zuma stepped down amid corruption allegations. On today's show, we'll look at Ramaphosa's political experience, along with the type of economy Ramaphosa will inherit. Afterwards, we'll discuss how people who own cryptocurrencies aren't disclosing their gains on their tax returns. Plus: A conversation with New York University law professor Barton Beebe — co-author of a study called "Are We Running Out of Trademarks?" — about how new companies are having an increasingly hard time finding good names to call themselves.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/15/mmr_20180215_pod2_64.mp3




02/15/2018: A heavy-handed response from Iranian authorities as Rial drops

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:08:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After months of pressure to resign, embattled South African president Jacob Zuma will leave office today. We’ll tell you what’s next for the nation and how its new leader will try to revive the battered economy.  Then, Iranian authorities have arrested nearly 100 currency traders and shut foreign exchange bureaus – all aimed at trying to stop the Rial falling in value amid concerns the nuclear deal with the U.S. could collapse. Afterwards, custom-tailored clothing is nice to have, but can hit your wallet hard. But thanks to the Internet, some European companies are offering bespoke items at a lower price tag. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/15/mmr_20180215_pod1_64.mp3




02/14/2018: What next, Jay Powell?

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 10:17:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) It turns out inflation is running higher, based on new data from the Consumer Price Index. We'll talk to Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group, about whether we should worry about these figures and what we should expect from the Federal Reserve. Afterwards, we'll look at allegations that the VIX Index, a measure of the stock market's expectations of volatility, is rigged. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/14/mmr_20180214_pod3_64.mp3




02/14/2018: The employee is always right

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 07:23:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) We'll get a reading on inflation today with the release of the Consumer Price Index, which looks at the prices on goods including food, gas and clothing. Let's dive into the causes of inflation and how it's affected the markets. Afterwards, we'll take a look at how Trump's infrastructure plans calls to boost workforce training programs, and then we'll chat with Brad Grossman — creator of the Zeitguide, a periodical that gives advice to C-suite leaders — about why employers are starting to put a greater emphasis on employee satisfaction.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/14/mmr_20180214_pod2_64.mp3




02/14/2018: The City of Love’s new push to ‘Choose France’

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 06:05:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… Japan notched its eighth-straight quarter of growth – the longest such streak since the 1980s. Though it was a slower pace than earlier in 2016, we explain what’s propelling growth forward. Afterward, in the wake of Hollywood’s Harvey Weinstein scandal, the British film industry is setting out new guidelines to tackle sexual harassment and bullying in the UK entertainment industry. Then, French President Emmanuel Macron has pushed through key labor and corporate tax cuts. Now, he’s pushing a new online marketing drive urging investors to “Choose France.” 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/14/mmr_20180214_pod1_64.mp3




02/13/2018: The race to get the next generation of wireless

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 10:38:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) The Trump administration wants to roll back Obama-era climate emission regulations, which could result in companies drilling on federal lands to let more methane get out into the atmosphere. We'll look at the potency of the gas, and the Trump administration's pursuit of energy dominance. Afterwards, we'll look at the amount of money the 2019 presidential budget is allocating to combat the opioid epidemic, and then discuss how countries around the world are racing to implement a 5G wireless system.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/13/mmr_20180213_pod3_64.mp3




02/13/2018: The world's top business leaders are using this meditation technique

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 07:09:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) Point72 Asset — the investment firm of billionaire Steven Cohen — is facing a lawsuit alleging sex discrimination. On today's show, we'll look at the claims and discuss how Wall Street banks have ways of keeping issues like these quiet. Afterwards, we'll look at the possibility that Unilever — one of the world's biggest advertising spenders — will pull its ads from sites like Google and Facebook, citing racism and sexism. Plus: Our conversation with Bob Roth — CEO of the David Lynch Foundation and author of "Strength in Stillness" — about the merits of transcendental meditation. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/13/mmr_20180213_pod2_64.mp3




02/13/2018: Raising $88 billion to help Iraq rebuild after war

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 05:55:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After a marathon session, South Africa’s ruling ANC party decided to recall President Jacob Zuma, giving him 48 hours to respond or else launch a parliamentary vote of no confidence. Then, Iraqi officials estimate the country needs about $88 billion to rebuild after it was seized by the Islamic State in 2014. We’ll take you to a donor conference taking place in Kuwait and explain where the money is likely to come from and how it could be spent. Afterward, a trip to Sierra Leone where the peace diamond was one of the largest gems ever discovered in west Africa. But how is the poor village where it came from faring after the rock sold for $6.5 million? 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/13/mmr_20180213_pod1_64.mp3




02/12/2018: In this Chinese province, you better sort your trash if you want a good credit score

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:24:00 -0600

(Markets Edition) President Trump is releasing his 2019 budget proposal today, which will call for $4 trillion in spending. We'll take a look at where the White House is allocating some of this money. Afterwards, we'll talk to economist Julia Coronado from MacroPolicy Perspectives about this week's upcoming temperature reading on inflation, and then discuss  China's social credit system, which punishes people who engage in behavior deemed "anti-social."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/12/mmr_20180212_pod3_64.mp3




02/12/2018: Will the real Jerome Powell please stand up?

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 06:50:00 -0600

(U.S. Edition) Now that Congress has struck a budget deal and passed a tax bill, President Trump is moving on to infrastructure. We'll look at where the White House plans to get the money for its projects and why it'll be tough. Afterwards, we'll discuss the billions that this flu season could cost in lost productivity, and then talk to five people named Jerome Powell about their thoughts on the economy.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/12/mmr_20180212_pod2_64.mp3




02/12/2018: Australia’s biggest banks face landmark inquiry

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 05:52:00 -0600

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Australia’s biggest banks, among the world’s most profitable, are being accused of exploiting customers and corporate fraud. We’ll explain what a landmark inquiry is looking into. Then, the latest developments after a World War II-era bomb discovered in the River Thames brought London’s City Airport – frequented by European business travelers – to a standstill this morning. Afterward, how migration and the rise of the far right have become big issues for Italians heading to the polls for national elections next month.  


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/02/12/mmr_20180212_pod1_64.mp3