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Preview: APM: Marketplace Morning Report - First Edition

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio



News happens while you sleep. Marketplace Morning Report gives you a head start, with three updates throughout the morning. Host David Brancaccio shares the latest on markets, money, jobs and innovation, providing the context you need to make the smartest



Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Public Media
 



04/20/2018: All eyes on the New York Fed's new president

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 10:27:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) When it comes to the market, traders look at three influential figures: the chair of the Fed, its vice chair, and the president of the New York Fed. We'll talk to Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, about why some were "disturbed" by what John Williams, the next NY Fed president, recently had to say at a press conference in Madrid. Afterwards, we'll look at one major domestic appliance company that could come out ahead amid all this tariff talk. Whirlpool may have an advantage thanks to a protective tariff on foreign washing machines. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/20/mmr_20180420_pod3_64.mp3




04/20/2018: The cannabis brand wars

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 07:12:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) There are reports that Wells Fargo is close to a $1 billion settlement with federal regulators after charging customers for car insurance they didn't need. On today's show, we'll recap the controversy. Afterwards, we'll talk to Drake Sutton-Shearer, CEO of PROHBTD Media, about how quality cannabis brands could start emerging within the next decade, Wall Street's valuation of the industry, and his push to change the "stoner" stereotypes surrounding the product. Plus: A look at the financial struggles General Electric is facing. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/20/mmr_20180420_pod2_64.mp3




04/20/2018: India’s youngest billionaire sees windfall as mobile payments catch on

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 06:15:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The head of one of Australia’s largest financial institutions has resigned after revelations the company lied to regulators for a decade about customer charges. Then, a tiny Philippines' tourist hot spot is facing a sudden six-month closure for infrastructure upgrades. But it’s not a popular decision among the island’s residents whose livelihoods depend on the $1 billion in tourism revenue they see each year.  Afterward, the more than 1 billion people who live in India use a lot of cash, but there hasn’t been much of it in recent years to go around. We head to New Delhi to chat with the country’s youngest billionaire who’s made a windfall trying to get mobile payments to catch on. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/20/mmr_20180420_pod1_64.mp3




04/19/2018: The world is in more debt than we've ever seen

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 10:56:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) The International Monetary Fund — which gets called to the rescue when economies melt down — meets in Washington. We'll talk to Diane Swonk, chief economist at the firm Grant Thornton, about one especially big worry that's looming: world debt. And the leader of that happens to be the U.S. Afterwards, we'll look at why rivals Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions, and then we'll explore how a rise in trawlers off the coast of Senegal is causing local fishermen to lose their livelihoods.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/19/mmr_20180419_pod3_64.mp3




04/19/2018: It's getting hard for many students to finish college

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 06:58:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) Central bankers and finance ministers from around the world are in Washington this week for the International Monetary Fund and World Bank's annual spring meeting. We'll look at some of the major concerns likely to be addressed, which include government debt. Afterwards, a conversation between Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary and Puerto Rico's governor, Ricardo Rossello, about why Puerto Rico underwent an island-wide power blackout this week. And then to cap off today's show, we'll discuss some of the reasons it's becoming difficult for students to finish school and how the pathway to entry-level jobs is changing. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/19/mmr_20180419_pod2_64.mp3




04/19/2018: What thousands of striking Zimbabwean nurses mean for the economy

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 06:04:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New leadership in Zimbabwe hasn’t brought a new economic reality. This week, thousands of nurses went on strike and they’re threatening legal action if they aren’t reinstated. Then, a changing of the guard in Cuba and the first time in decades a Castro won’t be at the nation’s helm. But what does it mean for the country’s citizens and economic well-being? 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/19/mmr_20180419_pod1_64.mp3




04/18/2018: China's tariff threats aren't coming at the best time

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 12:20:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) With the S&P up more than 2 percent this week, the markets aren't doing too badly. According to expert Susan Schmidt, they are on the "positive side of neutral." On today's show, we'll look at some of the factors helping keep volatility at bay. Afterwards, with the House Agriculture Committee considering the Farm Bill today, we'll discuss how cutting crop insurance funding could be a problem if China makes good on its tariff threats. Plus: we talk with Mark Walsh, a veteran Supreme Court watcher and contributor to SCOTUSblog, on how things are looking for South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc — a case about whether states can force out-of-state online retailers to pay local and state taxes.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/18/mmr_20180418_pod3_64.mp3




04/18/2018: Senior living in style

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 07:32:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) Tax Day has changed thanks to some frozen software. After its website crashed, the IRS decided to give people a one-day extension on filing their tax returns. On today's show, we'll give some context surrounding the issue, which may have to do with the agency's shrinking budget. Afterwards, we'll look at what the selection of Cuba's new president could mean for the country's future, and then we'll talk about how baby boomers are reshaping "senior living." Think sophisticated sensors and restaurant-style dining. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/18/mmr_20180418_pod2_64.mp3




04/18/2018: AMC preps for Saudi Arabia cinema debut

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 06:15:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Facebook lays out how it will comply with strict European privacy regulations, but what does it mean for the future of advertising? Then, after a reportedly secret US visit to North Korea, are tensions between the two nations actually thawing? Afterwards, Saudi Arabia’s first cinema in four decades opens today with a screening of Black Panther. We talk to AMC’s boss about what to expect on opening night…and he reassures us there will be popcorn.  


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/18/mmr_20180418_pod1_64.mp3




04/17/2018: We just aren't building enough homes in the U.S.

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 10:29:08 -0500

(Markets Edition) Starting today, the Supreme Court will hear a case on whether out-of-state businesses should pay South Dakota state and local taxes if they ship a product to a state. We'll take a brief look at the advantage online retailers have in not charging sales taxes, and why Amazon might actually be at a disadvantage here. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report showing that we're not building new homes fast enough to meet demand in 22 states. Plus, following the arrest of two black men at a Starbucks in Philadelphia, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson has called for its managers to undergo unconscious bias training. We'll talk to customer service expert Jeanne Bliss about whether this type of training actually works. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/17/mmr_20180417_pod3_64.mp3




04/17/2018: Getting middle schoolers to give up their cellphones

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 07:21:02 -0500

(U.S. Edition) President Trump is blocking economic sanctions on Russia proposed by U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley. We'll recap what the sanctions included and the reason Haley wanted to impose them. Afterwards, as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gets ready to meet Trump today, we'll discuss what might be on the agenda. Possible topics: The Trans-Pacific Partnership and planned U.S. tariffs on aluminum and steel. Then to cap off today's show, we'll talk to filmmaker Delaney Ruston — director of the documentary "Screenagers" — about the tough choices parents and schools have to make when monitoring their kids' cellphone usage. There's now a campaign called "Away for the Day" aimed at getting middle schoolers off their cellphones while at school.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/17/mmr_20180417_pod2_64.mp3




04/17/2018: France's president urges defense of EU democracy

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 06:04:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After years of debt binges, bail-outs and sluggish growth, the European economic recovery is gaining traction. Now, French President Emmanuel Macron has laid out his vision for the future of Europe in a major speech. Macron called on policymakers to defend democracy in the European Union and work harder to build up the eurozone's defenses against another economic meltdown. But with political deadlock in Italy and populism on the rise, is Macron’s grand plan destined to fail? We also take a look at financial market reaction as China releases its latest growth figures. Plus, a London-based company is teaming up with America's Department of Homeland Security to make long border queues a thing of the past. We find out how it works.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/17/mmr_20180417_pod1_64.mp3




04/16/2018: Making the most of your credit card reward points

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 11:04:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) 2017: spectacular year for global economic growth. 2018: not so much. We'll talk to economist Julia Coronado from MacroPolicy Perspectives about whether our lackluster first quarter is just hitting a few bumps in the road, or whether the global economy has plateaued. Afterwards, we'll chat with travel aficionado Mark Orlowski about the best ways to turn your credit card reward points into airline tickets.   


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/16/mmr_20180416_pod3_64.mp3




04/16/2018: Using public-private partnerships to pay for infrastructure

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 07:15:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) Can states force online retailers to collect sales taxes? That question is at the heart of a case headed to the Supreme Court tomorrow. We'll talk about the players involved and how much states and local governments are losing in tax dollars. Afterwards, we'll find out why the new GOP tax bill is confusing small business owners. Plus, with public-private partnerships a key part of the Trump administration's infrastructure plan, we'll look at a $2.3 billion project in Central Florida that both state and private companies are working on.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/16/mmr_20180416_pod2_64.mp3




04/16/2018: The boss of the world's biggest ad firm has resigned. What's next for the industry?

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 06:34:00 -0500

(Global edition) From the BBC World Service … The boss of WPP, the world’s biggest advertising firm, quit Saturday amid allegations of personal misconduct. What does his departure signal for the future of the ad business, and is there a chance he could return to the industry? Then, the U.S. is weighing a third round of sanctions against Russia today, targeting companies with links to chemical weapons use in Syria. But is Russia ready to flex its own retaliation muscles – and who will it hurt more? Plus, China’s microblogging site, Weibo, reversed a decision to remove all gay content after a backlash from users. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/16/mmr_20180416_pod1_64.mp3




04/13/2018: Consumers are feeling good about the economy, but they're not spending

Fri, 13 Apr 2018 10:41:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) Every five years or so, the Farm Bill — which sets the country's food and agriculture policy — goes up for renewal. Much of its funding is related to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, also known as food stamps. House Republicans want to add work requirements for SNAP recipients, which would include working or enrolling in job training at least 20 hours a week. We'll talk to the vice chairman of the House Agriculture Committee — Glenn Thompson (R-PA) — about why they're pushing for these requirements. Afterwards, we'll chat with Chris Low — chief economist at FTN Financial — about the disconnect between consumer confidence and consumer spending. While confidence is at record highs, spending not so much...    


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/13/mmr_20180413_pod3_64.mp3




04/13/2018: Who'd be the winners and losers if America rejoined the TPP?

Fri, 13 Apr 2018 06:58:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) One of President Trump's first acts in office was pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Now he may just re-enter the deal. While talks are still in their early stages, we'll discuss who the potential winners and losers would be if the U.S. were to rejoin the agreement. Afterwards, we'll look at another major free trade announcement: 44 African countries have signed up for the African Continental Free Area, which would create one of the largest free-trade zones in the world. Plus: We talk about the huge reorganization plans happening at VW. The company has named a new CEO — Herbert Diess — to succeed Matthias Müller. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/13/mmr_20180413_pod2_64.mp3




04/13/2018: How VW’s new boss will lead in post diesel-crisis era

Fri, 13 Apr 2018 05:53:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … A C-suite shakeup overnight at VW: Who’s in, who’s out, and what’s next for the automaker as it turns another page on its 2015 diesel-emissions scandal.  Then, what will President Trump’s absence from the Summit for the Americas in Peru mean for the U.S. relationship with Latin American leaders?  Afterward, if your Friday-night plans involve a stop off at the local bar, you might be surprised to find more and more patrons sipping on non-alcoholic beer and cocktail lookalikes. One of our reporters explores the growing trend of the non-boozy buzz. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/13/mmr_20180413_pod1_64.mp3




04/12/2018: A small sigh of relief for the markets

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 11:14:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) While President Trump tweeted yesterday that missiles "will be coming" to Syria, he's now saying an attack  could happen "very soon or not so soon at all!" That had investors breathing a small sigh of relief. We'll talk to Susan Schmidt, senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group, about why she thinks the markets are facing a "confused moment." Afterwards, we'll look at how Delta's business is doing ahead of the release of its first-quarter earnings report. Then to cap off today's show, we'll discuss the controversy surrounding the U.K.'s new passport colors. It's moving away from the burgundy-colored European Union passport, and reverting to traditional blue and gold. But the contract to produce the new passport might be taken away from a British company and given to a firm in continental Europe.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/12/mmr_20180412_pod3_64.mp3




04/12/2018: Europe's top antitrust official says competition will never take place without regulation

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 07:34:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) The World Trade Organization is out with new data showing global commerce is off to a strong start. But there's a stark warning that governments should refrain from a retaliatory trade measure. Who could they possibly be talking about? Afterwards, we'll chat with Margrethe Vestager, Europe's top antitrust official who's gone after the world's biggest tech companies. Following Mark Zuckerberg's testimony on Capitol Hill, she joined us to talk about why privacy is such an important issue to her and why she thinks regulation isn't a disadvantage for smaller companies. Plus: Why 2018 is shaping up to be a good year for the big banks.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/12/mmr_20180412_pod2_64.mp3




04/12/2018: Dozens of countries are about to compete to make the best pizza in the world

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 06:17:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde warned that while China’s Belt and Road Initiative might be a critical infrastructure investment, the nation should be wary of “problematic increases in debt.” So, how do you strike the right balance between stimulating economic growth without creating huge payment challenges? Then, today New Zealand banned all future offshore oil and gas exploration in the name of tackling climate change. Industry players, though, say they were blindsided by the move. We’ll explore what impact the decision will have on future production. Afterward, we take you to Parma, Italy, ahead of this year’s world pizza championships. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/12/mmr_20180412_pod1_64.mp3




04/11/2018: Global markets are keeping an eye on Syria

Wed, 11 Apr 2018 09:54:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) After a suspected chemical attack in Syria, Trump said missiles "will be coming"  toward the country and that Russia should get ready. We'll look at the market reaction to all this with Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives. Afterwards, we'll discuss some of the pitfalls of getting a gas station credit card, and then talk about one of the upsides of Facebook in the midst of the Cambridge Analytica controversy. Despite the privacy issues many users have raised, some groups rely heavily on them to organize, including Native Americans. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/11/mmr_20180411_pod3_64.mp3




04/11/2018: Fifty years after the Fair Housing Act, where do we stand?

Wed, 11 Apr 2018 07:44:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg began testifying in front of Congress yesterday following revelations that Cambridge Analytica harvested data to target users during the 2016 election. On today's show, we'll recap some of the highlights. One of the main takeaways is that Facebook's business model probably won't change, but it could see more regulation. Afterwards, we'll preview another testimony happening on Capitol Hill: Mick Mulvaney, acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, gives his first report to Congress. Plus: On the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, we'll discuss how source of income can be a barrier for people trying to obtain housing. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/11/mmr_20180411_pod2_64.mp3




04/11/2018: More uncomfortable questions for Zuckerberg on Capitol Hill

Wed, 11 Apr 2018 05:00:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… Facebook’s boss is facing day two on Capitol Hill, but there are still many unanswered questions about handling data protection. We hear from one of the company’s co-founders, Chris Hughes, about what the social network needs to consider. Then, Marriott International says it’s opening a hotel every 13 or 14 hours, but with growing competition from online booking sites like Airbnb, where is the hotel chain looking for growth and diversification opportunities? 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/11/mmr_20180411_pod1_64.mp3




04/10/2018: How to make technology work for you

Tue, 10 Apr 2018 10:58:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) With Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg set to testify before Congress in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, we'll look at some of the steps Facebook has taken to increase transparency. Afterwards, we'll talk to Penny Pritzker with the Council on Foreign Relations, also secretary of commerce from 2013 to 2017, about whether the U.S. has failed people whose jobs have been replaced by automation.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/10/mmr_20180410_pod3_64.mp3




04/10/2018: How workplace expectations play a role in the gender pay gap

Tue, 10 Apr 2018 07:24:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) China has filed a World Trade Organization challenge over the Trump administration's steel and aluminium tariffs, essentially taking the U.S. to trade court. On the heels of this news, we'll discuss how the idea of "economic security" has become "national security" for Trump. Afterwards, we'll look at how small businesses are faring at finding new workers, and then we'll talk about how expectations in the workplace may play a role in the gender pay gap. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/10/mmr_20180410_pod2_64.mp3




04/10/2018: China heads to the World Trade Organization over America’s proposed tariffs

Tue, 10 Apr 2018 06:01:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Just hours after Chinese President Xi Jinping vowed to open his country’s auto and banking industries and reduce car-import tariffs, China took the first step in making a WTO complaint about U.S. steel and aluminium tariffs. Then, Russia’s currency is taking another plunge today after a sharp drop Monday. We’ll explain what’s spooked markets and what it means for the average citizen there. Afterward, a look at why Uber isn’t being welcomed with such open arms in Barcelona. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/10/mmr_20180410_pod1_64.mp3




04/09/2018: Income sharing — the new alternative to student loans?

Mon, 09 Apr 2018 11:11:00 -0500

(Markets Edition) The Trump administration is proposing to cut nearly $130 billion over a decade to SNAP, the country's federal food stamp program. We'll look at what this could mean for brick-and-mortar stores that sell groceries. Afterwards, we'll explain why gas prices are higher during the summer, and then talk with Sheila Bair — former chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. — about an alternative to student debt that would have you paying a percentage of your income.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/09/mmr_20180409_pod3_64.mp3




04/09/2018: The housing crisis might be even bigger than we thought

Mon, 09 Apr 2018 06:47:00 -0500

(U.S. Edition) The U.S. has imposed new sanctions on Russian oligarchs and government officials, which has sent their country's markets tumbling. We'll take a brief look at some of the restrictions they're facing. Afterwards, we'll talk to Princeton sociologist and MacArthur genius grant winner Matthew Desmond about a new set of data he's just released, showing evictions around the country are comparable to foreclosures at the height of the financial crisis. Plus: With Tax Day coming up, we'll discuss some of the free-filing programs available for people with low incomes. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/09/mmr_20180409_pod2_64.mp3




04/09/2018: Deutsche Bank gets its fourth boss in four years

Mon, 09 Apr 2018 06:14:00 -0500

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … A C-suite shakeup at Deutsche Bank is sending shares sharply higher this morning. We’ll tell you what a new chief executive means for the future of Germany’s biggest bank. Then, shipping and aviation weren’t part of the Paris climate agreement, but the world’s maritime leaders are meeting in London this week to try and hammer out new emissions rules. We talk to the world’s largest international shipping association about what they hope to see by the end of the week.  Afterward, a look at how Brazil is trying to rebuild trust with investors essential for the country’s economy. 


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceFirstEdition/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/morning_report/2018/04/09/mmr_20180409_pod1_64.mp3