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Last Build Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:47:26 +0000

 



Afternoon Newscast for August 17, 2017

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:58:28 +0000

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Regulators Reject Massive Midwest Wind Power Line St. Louis, Black Firefighters Group Settle Promotions Suit Schmitt Will Not Run for U.S. Senate, Backs Hawley Initial Numbers Show Higher Enrollment in Columbia Public Schools


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/NEWSCAST0816.mp3




Commentary: Mind Your Own Business

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:41:42 +0000

As children we were all told by someone – another kid, a parent, a teacher – to “Mind your own business.” Usually good advice, not always heeded, of course. Kids who frequently didn’t mind their own business often grew up to become lawyers. Just kidding.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/TPSHOW0817.mp3




Discover Nature: Total Solar Eclipse

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 15:45:30 +0000

On summer evenings, as day turns to night, insects and wildlife undergo a routine changing-of-the-guard. This week on Discover Nature, we take a look at what to expect in nature as a rare total solar eclipse casts a shadow across the middle of Missouri.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/dn_206_for_web_0.mp3




Here Comes The Eclipse: How Will Midwest Livestock, Crops React?

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 13:37:43 +0000

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun. But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen. "It's never really been studied systematically," says Angela Speck , director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. "We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they're receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?" Speck says a different part of the Earth experiences a total eclipse about once a year and that makes tracking changes in animal and plant behavior challenging. "The place that gets to see that total eclipse is only about 0.1 percent of the surface of the Earth," she says. "So even though they happen every year in a given location, they are very rare." On Aug. 21, a 70 mile-wide ribbon from Oregon to South Carolina called the " path


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/eclipseresearchhpmweb.mp3




Here Comes The Eclipse: How Will Midwest Livestock, Crops React?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 16:04:05 +0000

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun. But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen. “It's never really been studied systematically,” says Angela Speck , director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. “We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they’re receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/EclipseResearchForWeb.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 15, 2017

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:21:39 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: St. Louis Tourism Official: NAACP Advisory Hurting Hotels University of Missouri Adjusts to Budget Cuts Attorney for Missouri Death Row Inmate Requests Stay of Execution over New DNA Evidence Missouri District Strips 2 Gay Students' Yearbook Quotes


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0815AM_0.mp3




Intersection - Exploring the 'Most Watched Celestial Event' with Astrophysicist Angela Speck

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 21:35:51 +0000

Central Missouri is on the path of totality for the upcoming solar eclipse. That means that the sun will completely disappear from view for a few minutes during the middle of the day. Intersection's Sara Shahriari and Harvest Public Media reporter Kris Husted talk with Mizzou Professor and Director of Astronomy Angela Speck about studying animal reactions, citizen data gathering and exactly how the moon and the sun line up to create total daytime darkness.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/INTERSECTION_mixdown_0.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: Unless Districts are Redrawn, Missouri Will Stay Red

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:12:56 +0000

It was certainly no surprise that Republican Sara Walsh won Tuesday’s special election in the legislative district that covers southern Boone County and parts of Cole, Cooper and Moniteau counties. The surprise was that Michela Skelton came within 300 votes of taking the seat for the Democrats. After all, Ms. Skelton was the first Democrat to even run for that office since the redistricting of 2011. If more than 25 percent of the Boone County electorate had turned out, she might have won, since she got 58 percent of this county’s vote. The outcome leaves Boone County represented by three Republicans and two Democrats in the state House of Representatives and a Republican in the state Senate. It seems reasonable to ask how that can be, given that Boone is, in national and statewide elections, a Democratic island of blue in the sea of Republican red that covers the state between Kansas City and St. Louis. Read the complete column online at the Missourian.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/kennedy_16_0.mp3




Retired Doctor Holds on to Dwindling African American Farming Tradition

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 15:36:19 +0000

About 65 cattle roam Dr. Thomas Cooper’s 100-acre farm. Walnut trees and cow patties dot the pasture, which dips into a small lake in the middle. Off in the distance Interstate 70 and signs for a Motel 6 and an Arby’s provide a gentle reminder of the nearby town. But on Cooper’s farm, it’s easy to forget the traffic. Things feel older and quieter. Cars are replaced with the hum of a tractor. Cows come running when Cooper calls. Black farmers operate less than 1% of all of Missouri’s farms, and the number of Blacks in agriculture nationwide has generally been on the decline since the 1920s. Many left positions as sharecroppers in the South and Missouri’s Bootheel to escape discrimination and chase opportunity in Northern cities. Others faced discrimination by the USDA and were unable to secure loans available to whites to purchase equipment or seed. At 70 years old, Dr. Thomas Cooper is one of only 324 Black farmers in Missouri.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/Farmers_mixdown.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 14, 2017

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 13:58:22 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Columbia Gathers to Show Support for Charlottesville Community Missouri Gov. Greitens to Join Other State Leaders in Drawing Attention to Corrections Workers Lawsuit Challenges Legality of St. Louis Arena's Makeover


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0814AM.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 11, 2017

Fri, 11 Aug 2017 13:40:30 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Democratic Political Newcomer Plans Challenge to McCaskill Missouri-Kansas City Chancellor Leaving a Year Early Unions Plan to Turn in 300K Signatures, Likely Putting Missouri’s ‘Right-to-Work’ Law in Limbo University Responds to NAACP Advisory Against Travel to Missouri


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0811AM_0.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Eclipse 101 with Dr. Angela Speck

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 21:36:06 +0000

The total solar eclipse is now less than two weeks away. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege talked with Dr. Angela Speck about the science behind the eclipse. Also on the program, Professor Emeritus of Physics Dr. H.R. Chandrasekhar shares an ancient Hindu explanation for the eclipse.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/angela_speck_for_web.mp3




Global Journalist: Film Highlights Syrian Generation's Demise

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 16:34:05 +0000

The level of violence against civilians in the Syrian civil war has made it extraordinarily difficult for journalists to cover. That's meant many of the images we have from inside Syria come from citizen journalists documenting the conflict on their smartphones. That technique is used to great effect in "The War Show," a documentary about the conflict that screened at the True/False Film Festival in Missouri and premiered on U.S. television on PBS last month. Yet rather than focus on the war's gruesome violence, "The War Show" shines a light on the emotional toll of the conflict on its protagonist Obaydah and other young Syrians. On this special edition of Global Journalist we present an extended interview with producer and Syrian refugee Alaa Hassan. In the interview, Hassan discusses how the internal lives of Syria's young people changed as hope-filled protests turned to a dark cycle of violence.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/20170330GLOBAL.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 10, 2017

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:00:55 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Audit Finds Tiny Missouri Hospital Served as ‘Shell’ for $90 Million Billing Scheme Bichelmeyer Named UMKC Interim Chancellor McCaskill Plans Another Round of Rural Missouri Town Halls Makeshift Memorial Rebuilt to Note Brown's Shooting Death Republicans Win 2 Special Elections for Missouri Legislature


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0810AM.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 9, 2017

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 12:55:37 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Man Charged with Killing Missouri Officer Arrested Kansas City Voters Approve Minimum Wage Hike Police: Bones Found at Kansas City Construction Site Human Sara Walsh Elected , Voters Extend Sales Tax


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG09AM.mp3




Discover Nature: Ruby Throated Hummingbird

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 19:52:39 +0000

This week on Discover Nature, watch – and listen – for a tiny, feathered pollinator that sings with its wings.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/ruby_throated_hummingbird_for_web_0.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 8, 2017

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 13:10:23 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: St. Louis County NAACP Now Supports Missouri Travel Advisory Kansas City Voters to Weigh Minimum Wage Hike Tuesday Audit Says Former Missouri Gov. Nixon Overspent on Office State Rep. Race and New Tax Proposal on the August Boone County Ballot


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG08AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscasts for August 7, 2017

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 00:20:29 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including St. Louis County NAACP now Supports Missouri Travel Advisory Kansas City Voters to Weigh Minimum Wage Hike Tuesday Audit says Former Missouri Gov. Nixon Overspent on Office State Rep. Race and New Tax Proposition on the August Boone County Ballot


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0807NEWSCASTS_0.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 7, 2017

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 15:22:12 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Cuts Funding for Prison Education Programs Kansas City Mayor Threatens Council Members Over Leaks Columbia Utility Rates to Increase Missouri Observatory Reopens After Renovations


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0807AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for August 4, 2017

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 23:04:38 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: American Medical Association President - and Rural Missouri Physician - On Healthcare Reform 183 St. Louis Teachers Retirement-Eligible Under New Law Local NAACP Pushes Back Against Missouri Travel Advisory MU Research Centers to Perform Experiments During Eclipse


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0804PM_0.mp3