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Last Build Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 18:29:28 +0000

 



Morning Newscast for June 22, 2017

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:46:15 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including Politically Speaking: St. Charles County's Two State Senators Praise Special Session Judge Hears Update on Ferguson, Justice Department Agreement Missouri Governor to Ban Sex Offenders by Kids' Museums


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/0622AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for June 21, 2017

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 22:40:35 +0000

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Sues Pharmaceutical Companies Over Role in Opioid Epidemic Audit Shows Missouri Faces $3 Billion Tax Credit Liability Choi: University of Missouri Works to Reduce Cost of Class Materials for Students Missouri Governor Signs Bill on College Police Training


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/0621PM.mp3




Views of the News: Was Megyn Kelly's Segment on Alex Jones Worth the Hype?

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 20:08:16 +0000

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? Also, rumors Sean Spicer is searching for his replacement, Fox News drops its iconic “Fair & Balanced” slogan, and coverage of the Cosby mistrial. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/20170621views.mp3




How The Buzz Of Bees Could Predict Harvest Size For Farmers

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 20:07:13 +0000

See a bee; hear a buzz. That’s what researchers studying the declining bee population are banking on. A new technique based on recording buzzing bees hopes to show farmers just how much pollinating the native bee population is doing in their fields. Vegetable and fruit growers depend on pollinators to do a lot of work in their greenhouses and fields. Pollinators, like bees, flutter about the blossoms on plants and orchard trees, transferring pollen from plant to plant and ensuring that those organisms have a chance at reproducing.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/bees_buzz.mp3




Farm Your Yard: When a Weed is Not a Weed

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 16:13:10 +0000

Daily life is comprised of a series of tasks that depending upon your natural outlook on life, could be considered tedious, or rewarding. For example, say you love to bake, and making a cheesecake for your loved ones is your definition of a good time.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/farm_your_yard_for_web_06212017.mp3




Discover Nature: National Pollinator Week

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 15:00:22 +0000

From tiny ants to bats, birds, bees, and butterflies, we depend on pollinators to produce our food, and protect biodiversity. This week on Discover Nature, we celebrate national pollinator week.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/dn_202_national_pollinator_week_for_web_0.mp3




Commentary: Wendy Noren Did Her Job the Right Way

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 21:14:42 +0000

In the last six months Boone County has seen two exemplary public servants step down. In January Karen Miller left the Southern District County Commission seat she had held for 24 years. Last week Wendy Noren resigned from her position as Boone County Clerk after 35 years.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/TPSHOW.mp3




Audio Postcard: Sounds and Voices from a Boonville Truck Stop

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:53:07 +0000

We all drive past, or visit, truck stops while traveling the long, open stretches of Missouri highway. KBIA’s Blake Tarrants takes us inside one Boonville truck stop that has many of the things long-range travelers need, like a convenience store, restaurant, showers and game room. There we meet clerk Brittany, waitress Marilyn and truck driver Glen.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/AudioPostcard_mixdown_0.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: You, Too, Can Help Feed the Hungry in Boone County

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 16:36:01 +0000

It’s one of the best things we do as a community, feeding our hungry neighbors. I hope you read the Missourian report Thursday in which Jiwon Choi described the summer programs that provide lunch for kids of all ages. The most troubling fact in that article, I thought, was that even with 19 locations in Columbia, the programs still leave children without enough to eat. You can consider this a follow-up. As penance for a career in journalism, I’ve been a volunteer at the Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri for more than a dozen years. This week I had the opportunity to spend a couple of mornings at the Central Pantry, which is our main retail outlet. Located for about eight years on Big Bear Boulevard, the pantry is really a grocery store — with one important difference. Nobody pays... Read the complete column online at the Missourian.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/Kennedy14.mp3




Morning Newscast for June 19, 2017

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 14:12:13 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Closed-Door Negotiations Produce Abortion Bill No Missouri Legislator Is Happy With Tensions High Between Missouri Governor, Lawmakers On the Trail: Democrats Mull Whether Anti-Abortion Rights Candidates Would Regain Political Ground University to Encourage Adoption of Research Animals


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/0619AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscasts for June 16, 2017

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 22:55:58 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: · Circuit Court Judge Christine Carpenter will Retire this Fall · After 35 Years, Wendy Noren Resigns as Boone County Clerk


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/0616Online_0.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: 'Mostly Wonderful News' from Columbia's City Manager

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:47:00 +0000

Mike Matthes began his sixth State of the City address Wednesday by telling a packed City Council chamber that he was bringing “mostly wonderful news.” Both the adjective and the adverb proved accurate. He reported that Columbia is making progress on a number of important fronts . Poverty and unemployment are down and high school graduation is up, especially for black Columbians. New employers are coming to town. The airport is adding capacity and flights. He was clearly pleased with improvements he could report in the three sections of town targeted for attention in the “strategic plan” he proposed and the City Council adopted a couple of years ago . In those areas, where the minority population is concentrated, crime is down from the previous year in seven of eight categories... Read the complete column at the Missourian.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/KENNEDYSHOW13.mp3




Feral Hogs Can Damage Missouri Agriculture - And They're Not Easy to Catch

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 19:30:08 +0000

A lumpy field of mud interrupts an otherwise untouched grassy meadow in a remote section of Mark Twain National Forest near Rolla. Just to the right stands a large, circular cage made of metal. The day before, a 200-pound feral hog followed a trail of corn through the cage’s small opening.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/feral_hog_7.24_mixdown_0.mp3




Global Journalist: Renewed Threat from Chemical, Biological Weapons

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 03:34:06 +0000

In April, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's air force dropped bombs containing sarin nerve gas on a rebel area in northern Syria. Around 100 people were killed and hundreds more injured, including a number of children. The slaughter highlighted the renewed threat of chemical and biological weapons. Both Assad's forces and rebel groups have used chemical weapons in Syria, demonstrating the dangers of proliferation. Meanwhile new gene editing technologies allow for the creation of more virulent and deadly bio-weapons. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the history and future of chemical and biological weapons.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/20170615GLOBAL.mp3




Rene Powell and Traci Wilson-Kleekamp on Life with Disabilities

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 22:05:25 +0000

Columbia resident Rene Powell spoke with her friend Traci Wilson-Kleekamp about what life has been like with a disability. They also spoke about how life has changed for Rene as her disabilities have become more visible - as she started using a walker recently to assist with her mobility. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/MHTSHOW_1.mp3




Voice with Deborah Stratman (THE ILLINOIS PARABLES)

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 21:54:32 +0000

Deborah Stratman discusses developing the voice of a region in her film The Illinois Parables (True/False 2016).


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/TFPodcast_Voice.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for June 14, 2017

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 22:09:29 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Pro-Abortion Rights Supporters Rally During Special Session MU Reduces Hours of Student Center, Recreation Center and Unions Bipartisan Call to Investigate Governor Won't Advance During Special Session Ameren Study Finds No Problem with City Using Right of Way for Power Lines


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/0614PMAudio.mp3




Views of the News: Megyn Kelly criticized for Alex Jones Interview

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 20:01:22 +0000

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread this beliefs? Also, an Oregon newspaper’s decision to report on a prominent college athelete’s sexual molestation conviction, Montana Congressman-elect Greg Gianforte pleads guilty to misdemeanor assault for taking down the Guardian’s Ben Jacobs in a headlock, and the media circus around the Comey and Sessions senate hearings. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jeimmie Nevalga: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/20170614VIEWS.mp3




Commentary: Trump's Imprint

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 17:01:41 +0000

Please indulge a few seconds of personal history. One of the reasons Columbia College, where I teach, has prospered in recent years is its online program. I have been heavily involved in online from its first days in the late 1990s and now teach online classes. I also update courses previously developed by other faculty. As I speak I am redeveloping our online class on the presidency. There are some, uh, challenges in updating a college course on the presidency in the summer of 2017. Until January of this year there were a lot of things that were permanent about the presidency. Everything in the Constitution about the president is fixed: he’s the chief executive officer of the country; he’s chosen by the Electoral College, not the popular vote; he is commander in chief; he vetoes legislation or signs it into law; he grants pardons and reprieves; proposes treaties; receives ambassadors; and appoints judges and other federal officials. The list is short and vague. The Founding Fathers


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/TERRY0613.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Scott Charton

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 18:31:00 +0000

Scott Charton, who reported on Missouri politics for many years with the Associated Press, was a recent guest on Thinking Out Loud. Charton discussed his years covering several administrations through a series changing political tides. He also recalled his early years as a journalist including his interview with then-Arkansas Attorney General Bill Clinton.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/06/scott_charton_for_web_06062017.mp3