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Preview: Nancy Pearl Book Reviews Podcast

KUOW Seattle News and Information



Stories and features from the KUOW newsroom.



Last Build Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2017 19:40:27 +0000

 



Asking an African American if you can touch their hair can mean you're racist

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 18:11:22 +0000

Racism takes many forms — it could be a white supremacist rally or a racial slur — but more subtle forms, called microaggressions, happen every day. Dr. Jonathan Kanter wanted to learn more about microaggressions from a white person's point of view. The associate psychology professor and his research team at the University of Washington found that people who are more likely to make subtle racist statements are also more racist in other ways. He told KUOW's Emily Fox that the researchers began by asking black students what they thought were microaggressive behavior.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/microaggressions_2way_0.mp3




John Nichols: Trump's inner circle is the 'biggest grifter convention in modern times'

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 18:03:33 +0000

Who are the most dangerous people in America? According to author John Nichols, the answer to that question includes the following: Betsy DeVos, Scott Pruitt, Stephen Miller, Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions, Elaine Chao, Kris Kobach and Rex Tillerson. The list goes on to include over 40 members of President Donald Trump’s inner circle.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/sforum_09212017_nichols_podcast_0.mp3




Seattle's the bogeyman in this state Senate race

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 17:10:06 +0000

The political attack ad starts with the image of a dirty heroin needle. "Heroin destroys lives and threatens our community," the narrator says. “Now Seattle politicians wants safe injection sites around King County.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170921_Bogeyman.mp3




Thick brows were not invented by your favorite Instagram star

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 15:27:03 +0000

What’s up with eyebrows? Eyebrows take up such a small part of our bodies but hold a special place in our hearts. They also make up a multimillion dollar industry.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/20170921_ra_eyebrows.mp3




Stop signs aren't all they're cracked up to be, Seattle

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 05:53:04 +0000

As traffic has worsened in the Seattle area, drivers have taken to side streets to beat the brake lights. This prompted one of our most popular Local Wonder questions: Why doesn’t Seattle have more stop signs?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170921_StopSigns.mp3




Jailed immigrants paid $1 per day: Wash. state sues

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 03:28:32 +0000

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson is suing the company that runs the immigration detention center in Tacoma. The lawsuit claims that GEO Group, Inc., the second-largest private prison operator in the nation, has been violating the state's minimum wage law for over a decade.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170921_WAsuesGEO.mp3




The Record: Wednesday, September 20

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 23:52:25 +0000

Fifteen years ago, it looked so sparkly. An unfolding renaissance in American cities like Seattle. Author Richard Florida wrote about the promise of those cities that can attract innovators, designers, urban tech. Now Florida has a new book about how all that has worked out. It's less sparkly.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170920_FULLSHOW.mp3




'We need more options.' Two sides on safe consumption sites

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 23:33:41 +0000

Bill Radke talks to Turina James who supports safe consumption sites and Corri Durrant who opposes them about how drug abuse has affected their lives and informed their position on King County's proposal to open two safe consumption sites.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170920_CONSUMPTION.mp3




Washington submits education plan to replace No Child Left Behind

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 23:20:26 +0000

The federal government is just beginning to enforce the Obama-era education rule called Every Student Succeeds Act . The measure replaces the No Child Left Behind Act.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170919_Education.mp3




Seattle is in the eye of the housing affordability storm

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 23:13:15 +0000

The rising cost of housing in America's most desirable "creative" cities troubles Richard Florida, urbanist thinker and author. In those cities, the cost of housing is affordable only to the creative class themselves. The rest of the working population — those in service industry or manufacturing — struggle to keep up with rising housing prices. Florida says what's happening in Seattle, specifically, is surprising even to someone like him, "supposedly in the know."


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170920_FLORIDA_0.mp3




Should the owner of this $15 million Seattle mansion pay a luxury tax?

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 22:20:58 +0000

The Sam Hill mansion on Capitol Hill is the most expensive real estate listing in Seattle . Should the owner have to pay a luxury sales tax? It's one of the big proposals in this year's Seattle mayor's race.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170919_LUXURYTAXfix_0.mp3




Drug site could open in Seattle's U-District — before approval

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 20:29:10 +0000

At a King County council meeting earlier this month, Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles sought to allay fears about supervised drug consumption sites being imposed on unwilling neighborhoods.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170920_SafeConsume.mp3




If bike share has people skipping the helmet, it's not leading to tickets

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:26:14 +0000

It's illegal to ride a bike without wearing a helmet in Seattle and greater King County. Since three bike sharing companies launched in the city, however, there's been a lot of talk about how that law is enforced.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170918_BikeHelmets.mp3




For children of refugees, re-examining the Vietnam War is painful — and necessary

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:45:28 +0000

Bill Radke talks with Thanh Tan and James Hong about the lasting impact of the Vietnam War on the children of Vietnamese refugees. Tan is host of KUOW's new podcast Second Wave . Hong is executive director of Seattle's Vietnamese Friendship Association . In the latest episode of Second Wave, Tan interviews filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick about their new documentary "The Vietnam War."


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170919_SECONDWAVE.mp3




Turns out Siri might be racist

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:08:30 +0000

We use speech recognition every day, like providing captions on video for the hard of hearing and voice-to-text apps on our smart phones. But when it comes to how well the software understands various accents or dialects, Caucasian speakers are understood much better than people of color.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/speech_recognition_bias__0.mp3




A homeless man meets the developer who pushed him out. Surprisingly, they like each other

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:05:49 +0000

When an old apartment building goes on the market, all of a sudden, everybody starts doing the math.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/NEWS_20170920_Homeless_man_meets_developer.mp3




The Record: Tuesday, September 19, Full Show

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 21:00:45 +0000

Today you'll meet Seattle's new mayor, before the new new mayor comes later this fall. Also, what do you think you know about Vietnamese-Americans? You'll find out why your mental images of the Vietnam War are probably not helping. And, have you seen "the punch"? A man wearing a swastika armband in downtown Seattle was punched and knocked out cold. With that armband this man associated himself with murderers. Does that make it ethical to physically attack him? And what does that achieve?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170919_FULLSHOW.mp3




Good guys, bad guys

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 11:00:00 +0000

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick join Thanh Tan, host of our new podcast Second Wave , to discuss the new documentary, "The Vietnam War."


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/SW1.2_kenburnsV2_web_0.mp3




The Record: Monday, September 18, Full Show

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:30:26 +0000

Today, Seattle will get its third mayor in under a week. What have we learned from this whole unwanted experiment? Also, a new Seattle start up launches today. They'll help pay for your down payment — if you'll agree to become an Airbnb host. And we'll ask Puget Sound newcomers to tell us a story -- what did you expect it to be like here and what is it actually like here?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170918_FULLSHOW.mp3




How does an Army Ranger end up robbing a Tacoma bank?

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:21:39 +0000

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ben Blum about his new book "Ranger Games: A Story of Soldiers, Family, and Inexplicable Crime." The book tells the story of his cousin, Alex Blum, and how he turned from an Army Ranger to a bank robber.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/09/RECORD_20170918_RANGERGAMES.mp3