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Preview: Nancy Pearl Book Reviews Podcast

KUOW Seattle News and Information



Stories and features from the KUOW newsroom.



Last Build Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2017 22:28:43 +0000

 



The Record: Monday, Feb 27, Full Show

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 22:04:28 +0000

Should we bring grizzly bears back to the North Cascades? That might depend whether you graze sheep in the North Cascades. We'll also tell you about the risks and promise of new genetic testing of unborn babies. And the new all-time high scorer in women's college basketball plays in Seattle. We'll find out what it's like to watch her play up close.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170227_FULLSHOW.mp3




What a new soda tax could mean for Seattle

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 21:40:55 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about a new proposal to tax soda and other sugary drinks in Seattle.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170227_TALTON.mp3




To bear or not to bear? That is the question for the North Cascades

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 21:37:48 +0000

There are fewer than 10 grizzly bears in the North Cascades, according to government estimates. U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the National Parks Service has a plan to bring them back. There are four possible options with choices range from do nothing at all to capturing bears from surrounding areas and placing them here in Washington.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170227_BEARS.mp3




Seattle may get a renters' commission to advise City Council

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 20:18:52 +0000

Just over half the households in Seattle are renters. And they may soon get a formal voice at City Hall. Legislation to be introduced to the City Council this week would create a 15-member commission to advise on issues of development and affordability and represent tenant rights.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170227_Renters.mp3




Do we have enough land for all the people moving to Washington state?

Sun, 26 Feb 2017 00:50:24 +0000

Do we have enough land for all the people moving to Washington state? There’s a bill working its way through Olympia that would change how planners would answer that question. It’s backed by builders and realtors.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170227_BuildLands.mp3




Previously: Daffodil Princess. Now: healthcare activist

Sun, 26 Feb 2017 00:31:49 +0000

Being a Daffodil Princess in Pierce County is not about winning a pageant. Kelty Pierce, 19, is emphatic on that point.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170227_Healthcare.mp3




Behind the scenes of the protest targeting Republican Congressman Dave Reichert

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 19:59:02 +0000

In a Fremont conference room, about a dozen people pored over a hand-drawn map of the area around Republican Congressman Dave Reichert's office over in Issaquah. This is the specter currently haunting President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress: a left-wing Tea Party movement – led by paid protesters – that aims to disrupt their Town Halls and other public events across the country.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170224_8thDistProt_0.mp3




Under Trump, will Seattle tech firms be targeted for immigration raids?

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 18:27:36 +0000

Kim Malcolm talks with Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Ashley Stewart about Tuesday's immigration inspection of the Redmond cloud company Sysgain . Some lawyers are worried that immigration raids of tech firms will become more common under the Trump administration.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170224_TECHRAID.mp3




This week was faster than baseball and funnier than constitutional law

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:46:59 +0000

Is it a big deal for a member of Congress to skip a town hall with angry voters? Will the Trump Administration go after Washington state's legal marijuana business? Should Seattle tax soda and other sugary drinks? And is America's national pasttime too slow and boring?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/WIR_20170224.mp3




This artist is Navajo, but don't call his work 'Native American art'

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 16:54:22 +0000

John Feodorov is Native American. And he’s an artist. But don’t call his work “Native American art.” “Not everything I want to say needs to be adorned with beads and feathers,” he says.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170227_FEODOROV.mp3




How a 4,000 person town feels about getting 15,000 new neighbors

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:49:10 +0000

Residents of Black Diamond, Washington tell KUOW Producer Posey Gruener about their hometown and what they think of a planned development that will significantly change it.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170223_BDarrival.mp3




Progress and pushback: The history of equal rights in education

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:45:14 +0000

“Are you ready to go back in history?” Professor Joy Williamson-Lott asks that question early on in this talk. She’s encouraging the audience, exciting us, but also challenging us. The history of public education in the United States, her area of focus, is rife with deeply troubling inequality and injustice.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/joy_williamson_lott_podcast.mp3




This woman is fighting to save her hometown from developers. Some townsfolk wish she wouldn't

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:36:09 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with Kristen Bryant, member of the development watchdog group Save Black Diamond , about why she continues to fight a near-inevitable development and what she thinks of those in town who criticize her efforts.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170223_BRYANT_0.mp3




The Record: Thursday, Feb 23, Full Show

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 23:23:11 +0000

Usually when Congress members are home on recess, they have Town Hall meetings with constituents. But some Republicans are skipping them because they've seen their colleagues get yelled at. Washington Congressman Dave Reichert is opting instead for a Facebook Live event. Is that good enough? Also, Black Diamond is about to get King County's biggest development in a long time. You'll meet a former Black Diamond resident who'd like to retire there, but worries her hometown is being ruined. And a Seattle filmmaker couldn't stand his liberal bubble anymore. So he drove his Prius to Lynden, Washington to the home of the Trump voter. He'll tell you what happened there.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170223_FULLSHOW.mp3




Why was there an empty chair for Dave Reichert in Cashmere?

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 23:15:22 +0000

Congressman Dave Reichert (R-8th Dist.) is not holding a Town Hall meeting, unless you count a Facebook Live event he's doing Thursday where he'll answer questions that you can submit online or by email. Reichert said he's worried a Town Hall could turn into a shouting match, as others have nationwide. And he's concerned about the safety of his staff.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170223_REICHERT.mp3




Lessons from getting out of the Seattle bubble to meet Trump supporters

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 23:06:44 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker James Allen Smith about his latest project to meet Trump supporters. Smith recently drove his Prius from Seattle to Lynden to talk with people who voted for Trump. He is posting those conversation on his YouTube channel .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/RECORD_20170223_BUBBLE.mp3




Rental discrimination is alive and well in oh-so liberal Seattle

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 18:19:16 +0000

When people of color try to rent housing in Seattle, they’re treated differently from white people.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170223_HousingFEA_1.mp3




Mayor Ed Murray promises a lot to young black men in Seattle, but can he deliver?

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 17:51:09 +0000

During his "State of the City" address, Seattle mayor Ed Murray announced a new initiative called Our Best. It focuses on improving the lives of young black men in the city. Chris Porter is part of the African American Male Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools. Kim Malcolm talks to him about his thoughts on the announcement.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170223_OurBest2wy.mp3




Teen birth rate down by 55 percent in King County

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 01:31:33 +0000

Teen birth rates fell by 55 percent in King County between 2008 and 2015, according to officials. County Executive Dow Constantine credits expanded access to long-lasting birth control and preventive care, as well as greater insurance coverage.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170223_TeenBirth.mp3




Mark your calendars: Apollo 11 capsule is coming to Seattle in 2019

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:58:47 +0000

The command module that took humans to the moon for the first time is coming to Seattle. The Apollo 11 module went to the moon in 1969. It's coming to Seattle's Museum of Flight in 2019 for the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/02/NEWS_20170223_Apollo11.mp3