Subscribe: Nancy Pearl Book Reviews Podcast
http://www.kuow.org/podcasts/regulars/nancy_pearl.asp
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
college  county  king county  king  kuow  new  school  seattle  state  training  washington state  washington  youth detention  youth   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Nancy Pearl Book Reviews Podcast

KUOW Seattle News and Information



Stories and features from the KUOW newsroom.



Last Build Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2018 22:30:34 +0000

 



What would you want in a Highway 99 toll? (Besides no toll at all)

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 22:26:52 +0000

Drivers will have a free ride on the State Route 99 tunnel in Seattle when it first opens this fall. After a few months, however, expect to pay a toll of $1.00-$2.50 for each trip. The Washington State Transportation Commission has proposed multiple tolling options and will present them in public meetings this spring.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180419_TunnelToll.mp3




Homeless, and now campless, in Seattle's Ravenna neighborhood

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 19:31:30 +0000

Charlie Blackwood was running off three hours of sleep and seven cups of coffee when he packed up his belongings. He had been living with seven other people in a plot of woods in Ravenna, in northeast Seattle, when city crews arrived with trucks and shovels to clear it out.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180419_Eviction.mp3




Tribes take Washington to Supreme Court over salmon-blocking culverts

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 18:03:56 +0000

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professor Robert Anderson about a U.S. Supreme Court case involving Native American fishing rights in Washington state. At issue is whether Washington state should pay to fix culverts, which block the passage of salmon.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180418_CULVERTS.mp3




The good, young days: Nostalgia’s effect on college-bound seniors

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 15:14:12 +0000

Nostalgia — that universal bittersweet longing for times gone by — hits hardest during our most important life transitions. But how does nostalgia arise? And can it ever go too far? In this discussion, Maya Konz and Patrick Liu delve into the origin, psychology and unique effects of nostalgia, especially for high school seniors on the dramatic verge between childhood and adulthood.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/20180418_nostalgia_podcast.mp3




A professor talks about public education in the Trump-DeVos era

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 15:09:06 +0000

If Diane Ravitch were running for office, her opponent might attack her for being "for Common Core before she was against it." Ravitch served as an assistant secretary of education in the George W. Bush administration, and was originally a proponent of standardized testing, school choice, common core standards and the No Child Left Behind Act.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/sforum_041918_ravitch_podcast.mp3




Own a house in Seattle? It might have a racist past

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 14:58:11 +0000

In 1965, Ralph and Elaine Hayes tried to put a down payment on a friend's home in Ravenna. "And in April of '66 the United Federal Savings Bank, I think it was called, sent our check back," Elaine Hayes said. She and her husband didn't find out why for 15 years.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20080418_Housing.mp3




Another Seattle property tax? This one's for preschool and college

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 07:15:59 +0000

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan has proposed a new, bigger education levy that would take city dollars from elementary schools. That money would instead go to adding preschool slots, two years of free community college and counseling for high school students.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180419_Levy_0.mp3




The Record: Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 01:43:24 +0000

Starbucks is going dark for an afternoon, as 8,000 stores across the US close to give employees racial bias training. But does the training work? How can you really measure impact? Bill asked Rachel Godsil, co-founder and director of research at the Perception Institute at Rutgers University. She studies implicit bias, racial anxiety, and stereotype threat. King County is building a new juvenile justice center. State law mandates that we have one, and the old facility is crumbling. Voters have approved the money, construction has begun, but the debate on the youth jail is still alive and well. Yesterday we heard from King County Executive Dow Constantine. Today we spoke with former mayoral candidate Nikkita Oliver about why the new center is a bad bet, and what she’d like to see in its place. Bill also spoke with KUOW reporters Austin Jenkins about the hunger strike at the Washington State Penitentiary, and Eilis O’Neill about the thorny question the US Supreme Court is hearing today.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/RECORD_20180418_FULLSHOW.mp3




Why Highway 99 got pulled from our seismic lifeline — despite the new tunnel

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 00:44:39 +0000

Soon, state Route 99 — and the rest of us —will have a new asset: a completed Alaskan Way tunnel. The $3.2 billion tunnel provides an earthquake-safe route under our downtown. However, the state highway department says it’s taken the highway off its list of Seismic Lifeline routes .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180419_TunnelQuake.mp3




Why organizers say no to a new youth detention center in King County

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 22:08:13 +0000

Bill Radke talks to Nikkita Oliver, Seattle attorney and organizer with No New Youth Jail Coalition about why community organizers and activists want the county to re-think the building of a new multi-million dollar youth detention center and instead redistribute the money to more community services.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/RECORD_20180418_YOUTHJAIL.mp3




Taxi drivers protest ultimatum at Sea-Tac Airport

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 05:48:38 +0000

The taxi business ain’t what it used to be. That's partly why cabbies picketed at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on Tuesday, fighting back against a new ultimatum from one cab company.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180418_JR_Taxis.mp3




This iconic south Seattle pastry school may be shuttered

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 05:29:14 +0000

Most Seattle bakeries have employed graduates from South Seattle College’s Pastry and Baking Arts program. The school is a pipeline for notable restaurants and bakeries like Macrina, Bakery Nouveau, and Grand Central. But now the college is looking to cut $1 million, and the baking program is a target.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/0418_atc_fea_pastry.mp3




Would you rather be hit by a taxi or an Uber?

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 05:20:38 +0000

Last spring, an Uber heading north in Seattle hit another car so hard it was cut in half . That brings us to today's KUOW listener question: Who has more insurance coverage to handle your medical bills in case of a crash — an Uber driver or a taxi driver?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180418_DH_UberInsurance.mp3




Starbucks will close stores for racial-bias training. Is it enough?

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 23:55:29 +0000

Starbucks will close 8,000 stores late next month so employees can attend an afternoon-long training about racial bias. That follows an incident in Philadelphia where employees called police on two African American men who were waiting for a friend but hadn’t purchased anything. So, will one afternoon of training work? We asked an expert.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180418_JM_StarbucksClose.mp3




The Record: Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 23:14:57 +0000

King County: Our goal is zero youth detention. Also King County: We're building a new youth jail. Are these two perspectives at odds? King County Executive Dow Constantine joined Bill Radke in studio to try and square that circle. They also discussed everything from affordable housing to traffic stops.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/RECORD_20180417_FULLSHOW.mp3




Here's what happens when you talk to the other side about guns

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 21:09:51 +0000

The gun control debate has become a polarizing experience for many Americans. It’s unusual to hear civil discussions between the opposing sides. The KUOW “Ask A…” series brought together gun owners and non-gun owners on March 31 to share their points of view at the Hillman City Collaboratory. Sonya Harris talked to some of them about those conversations.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/ask_a_gun_owner_feature_2-_interviews.mp3




Oh, the people you'll meet on Seattle's most crowded bus line

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 18:28:54 +0000

The RapidRide E Line is Seattle's most crowded bus route, with more than 17,000 boardings each weekday. It connects Aurora Avenue North to downtown.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180416_kw_eline.mp3




How a Seattle artist found his future by examining his past

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 18:18:39 +0000

Like so many children of immigrants, Che Sehyun was raised to pursue the traditional American dream: college and a professional career. “That was, to me, to be a doctor,” he says. Things didn’t quite work out that way.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180418_CHE.mp3




It's the only legal help some immigrants have — and it's getting scrapped

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 00:42:27 +0000

Every day at detention centers around the country, lawyers give "know your rights" presentations to immigrants facing deportation. For many, it’s the only legal help they’ll get. And the feds just pulled the money for the program.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180417_Liz_Immigration.mp3




Self-driving vehicles are coming to Bellevue. One reason? Safety

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 23:59:14 +0000

Kim Malcolm talks with Steve Marshall about Bellevue's plan to implement electric, self-driving van pools and shuttles. Marshall is transportation technology partnership manager for the city of Bellevue.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2018/04/NEWS_20180416_SELFDRIVING.mp3