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KUOW Seattle News and Information



Stories and features from the KUOW newsroom.



Last Build Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 08:25:44 +0000

 



Still crazy about Betty after all these years

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 00:13:24 +0000

There are many reasons to be thankful for the life and work of author Betty MacDonald. If you have a love/hate relationship with chickens, her best-seller “The Egg and I” will satisfy both passions. If you have children in your life, her “Mrs. Piggle Wiggle” series will likely delight and challenge them. And if you suffer from self-doubt her book about finding work in the Depression, “Anybody Can Do Anything,” may help.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/becker_podcast.mp3




With victory near, Obamacare supporters rally in Bothell

Sat, 25 Mar 2017 00:03:02 +0000

Supporters of Obamacare woke up Friday morning thinking they still needed to defend the law from Republican efforts to replace it. As the political drama played out in the other Washington, a handful of advocates held signs outside Congresswoman Suzan DelBene’s district office in Bothell. They said they came to thank DelBene, a Democrat, for opposing the GOP legislation.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/NEWS_20170324_aca_rally.mp3




Volkswagen settlement fuels a fight to phase out dirty old diesel engines

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 21:44:18 +0000

The decision by Volkswagen to cheat on diesel emissions tests means Oregon and Washington are in line for a big payday. The states plan to turn millions of dollars from the company’s settlement into cleaner air by replacing dirty old diesel engines. Some say the money presents a golden opportunity to start phasing them out altogether. The difference between a dirty old diesel truck and a new, clean one is up to 95 percent less pollution coming out of the exhaust pipe.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/20170324_NEWS_diesel.mp3




This week we're figuring it out as it happens

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 18:17:26 +0000

The fate of President Trump's health care plan comes down to the wire. We get into the pros and cons of Seattle's proposed soda tax and homeless levy. How generous might Washington state get when it comes to paid leave? And some people are pretty surprised to find out that their car tabs are way more expensive this time around.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/WIR_20170324_2.mp3




How should communities respond to development?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 16:33:19 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with Kristen Bryant, Dennis Box and Johna Thomson about the controversy surrounding a planned development in Black Diamond. Bryant is a member of Save Black Diamond, an organization that opposes the development. Thomson is a community volunteer who thinks the town would be better off if citizens worked with developers to make the best of inevitable change. Reporter Dennis Box has been following the development fight.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170322_BLACKDIAMOND.mp3




Rising rents are pushing Seattle seniors into poverty

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:21:52 +0000

In just over 20 years from now, it's expected that one in four adults in King County will be 60 or older. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says the city needs to do more to address the issues faced by this growing population. And one of the biggest challenges is affordability.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/NEWS_20170323_KingCoAging.mp3




If WA doesn’t require paid family leave, Seattle may try

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:26:05 +0000

Some states have paid family leave. Not Washington, though. That could change.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/NEWS_20170323_FamilyLeave.mp3




I lived in my car in Ballard for three years

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:08:01 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with Robert Loomis about his experience of homelessness in Seattle and how he wants the city to help him and other Seattle residents who don't have a stable home.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170323_LOOMIS.mp3




The Record: Thursday, Mar 23, Full Show

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 20:46:28 +0000

The Republican health care overhaul is in trouble. Today, the so-called Freedom Caucus -- very conservative House members -- said no deal. But the White House says "Yes, deal. It's not dead." We'll tell you the latest. And you'll find out why the outcome matters so much to people with disabilities in Washington state. Plus, when Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz vowed to hire 10,000 refugees, was he being too political?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170323_FULLSHOW.mp3




Seattle-area grew so much last year, we grew a Bellingham

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:30:23 +0000

New Census Bureau data shows our metropolitan region is one of the fastest-growing in the US. Seattle-Tacoma gained 88,000 people from July 2015 to July 2016, according to the Bureau’s estimates. That’s like gaining a whole new Bellingham or Federal Way.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/NEWS_20170323_Census.mp3




Do you believe the stars influence your life?

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:03:05 +0000

Some people check their horoscopes and where the planets are positioned every day, while others think it's all "quack babble." RadioActive youth producers Livi Thrift and Mimi Hubbard explore what has drawn people to zodiac signs for thousands of years across different cultures.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/20170323_RA_zodiac.mp3




This is one way Medicaid cuts could affect people with disabilities

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 18:47:56 +0000

Bill Radke talks with AtWork! CEO Christina Brandt about how Medicaid cuts could affect people with disabilities. AtWork! is a non-profit organization that helps people with disabilities find jobs.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/atwork_.mp3




Bold women tell stories of global struggles for equal rights

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 16:54:39 +0000

What difference can a day make? For half of the world’s population who struggle with social, economic, and political inequity, a day honoring women may be only symbolic, but could be life changing.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/womens_day_podcast.mp3




The great Starbucks tent revival, er, shareholder meeting

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:14:12 +0000

The scene at Seattle’s McCaw Hall had the feel of a tent revival meeting. There was gospel music. "Lord, please let me go ... take me to the river, I want to go," Leon Bridges sang. And there were testimonials — by employees, praising the policies and positions that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has taken.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/NEWS_20170323_Starbucks.mp3




The surprisingly complex history of women and public bathrooms

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 22:24:40 +0000

Bill Radke talks with Shannon Keating, LGBT editor for Buzzfeed, about how the relationship between gender and bathrooms goes far beyond the modern controversies over transgender rights. Keating explains how through the years the women's room has represented misogyny and racism. She also details how some of Hollywood's most iconic horror scenes are filmed in the bathroom.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170322_BATHROOMS.mp3




One Washington state senator's fight to keep paid family leave alive

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 22:12:15 +0000

Bill Radke talks to state Senator Joe Fain (R-Auburn) about the bipartisan Senate bill he is working on with Sen. Karen Keiser (D-Burien) that would require paid family and sick leave in Washington state.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170322_PAIDLEAVE.mp3




Will another $275 million fix Seattle's homeless epidemic?

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:37:56 +0000

Bill Radke speaks with Safe Seattle's Harley Lever and Daniel Malone of the Downtown Emergency Service Center about tackling Seattle's homeless epidemic. Lever argues that there is too much bureaucracy already, and that are solutions to homeless issues that don't require another tax. Malone details what he's seen while working with the homeless and explains why this money is crucial to successfully house them.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RecordA20170321_01.mp3




The Record: Wednesday, March 22, Full Show

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:06:06 +0000

There are states where employers have to give workers paid family leave. Washington state is not among them -- we'll tell you why that might soon change. Change is also coming to your local bathroom. Beyond transgender rights, we just might not separate bathrooms by gender at all. And here's a way to deal with a crisis of opioid overdoses -- free heroin.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170322_FULLSHOW.mp3




A onetime Vietnamese refugee on the complex road to American greatness

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:54:26 +0000

Before Viet Thanh Nguyen became the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the novel “The Sympathizers,” he was a 4-year-old boy uprooted from war-torn Vietnam and transported to a refugee camp in the United States. Nguyen’s experience as a refugee marked his journey towards becoming an American in crucial ways. He describes the experience of being both a refugee and an American as being “split in two.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/nguyen_edit_mixdown.mp3




He helped deport thousands. Now he shelters immigrants in his church

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 23:29:49 +0000

Bill Radke talks with Father Antonio Illas of Auburn's Saint Matthew-San Mateo Episcopal Church. Before entering the priesthood, he worked for 25 years as a federal immigration agent in New York City.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kuow/audio/2017/03/RECORD_20170321_FATHERANTONIO.mp3