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Preview: Drools - Business Logic integration Platform

Drools & jBPM



All things Artificial Intelligence related: Rules, Processes, Events, Agents, Planning, Ontologies and more :)



Last Build Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2017 23:12:21 +0000

 



Watch all the sessions from Red Hat Drools Day LIVE from your desktop or mobile, Sept 26th

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:28:00 +0000

We will be streaming all the sessions of the Drools Day in NYC, on Sep 26th, live!

Use the following link to watch:

http://red.ht/2wuOgi1

Or watch it here:

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Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day: September 26 / 28, 2017 (NY / Washington)

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 22:13:00 +0000

Red Hat is organizing a Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day in New York and Washington DC later this year to show how business experts and citizen developers can use business processes, decisions and other models to develop modern business applications.
This free full day event will focus on some key aspects and several of the community experts will be there to showcase some of the more recent enhancements, for example:
  • Using the DMN standard (Decision Model and Notation) to define and execute decisions
  • Moving from traditional business processes to more flexible and dynamic case management
  • The rise of cloud for modeling, execution and monitoring
IT executives, architects, software developers, and business analysts who want to learn about the latest open source, low-code application development technologies.

Detailed agenda and list of speakers can be found on each of the event pages.

Places are limited, so make sure to register asap !
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Is Optimization AI or OR?

Wed, 06 Sep 2017 19:26:00 +0000

With the renewed interest in AI the same conversations are starting to come up again, about what is or isn't AI.  My recent discussion was on whether optimisation products, such as OptaPlanner, are considered AI as some considered it more Operations Research (OR). For some background, OptaPlanner started out as a Tabu Solver implementation, but has since added other techniques like Simulated Annealing.Although I'd like to add that no single technique is AI, they are all tools and techniques that are quite typically used together in a blended, hybrid or integrated AI solution. So it's the right tool or tools for the job.The answer is that Optimisation is both an AI and an OR problem. It is a technique used and researched by both groups,  the two different disciplines tend to take different approaches to the problem, having differing use cases and have historically used different techniques, with a lot of cross pollination from both sides.I'll start with a consumer oriented answer to the question. StaffJoy has a nice blog article on the overlap of OR and AI, and I'll quote from that below:https://blog.staffjoy.com/how-operations-research-and-artificial-intelligence-overlap-b128a3efee2e"Startups are using OR techniques in products like OnFleet, Instacart, and Lyft Line. However, when similar techniques are being exposed externally as services, they are often described as AI — e.g. x.ai, Atomwise, and Sentient. Very few companies describe algorithms that they sell as optimization (with the exception of SigOpt) because the end goal of customers is automating decisions. With StaffJoy, we have found that customers better understand our product when we describe it as an “artificial intelligence” tool rather than an “optimization” or “operations” tool. We think that this is because customers care more about what a product achieves, rather than the means it uses to achieve it."In short consumers do not see the difference between OR and AI, when applied to real world problems and it is commonly marketed as AI.I'll go a little more technical now, to further demonstrate it's more than just marketing - as that side is only touched on in the above blog post.While the two groups (OR and AI) may have once been distinct, it's been well established that the OR and AI groups overlap in this space and have collaborated for years. Glover (1986) states them as "the recent remarriage of two disciplines that were once united, having issued from a common origin, but which became separated" - see final paper link at end.A cursory google with terms "operations research" and "artificial intelligence" will more than prove this. Some techniques, like Linear Programming, are strongly on the OR side, others like Local Search (which OptaPlanner falls under) are shared. Optimisation, and local search (along with other techniques), is a core fundamental taught in every AI course without fail, and will be covered in every general AI book, used in schools - such as "AI:  A Modern Approach"- see chapter 4, page 120http://aima.cs.berkeley.edu/contents.htmlThe book "Artificial Intelligence Methods and Applications" also makes it clear the two (OR and AI) are linked:"Local search, or local optimisation, is one of the primitive forms of continuous optimisation in a discrete problem space. It was one of the early techniques proposed during the mid sixties to cope with the overwhelming computational intractability of NP-hard combinatorial optimisation problems. Unlike continuous optimisation techniques, local search has often been used in AI research and has established a strong link between AI and the operational research area."https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=0a_j0R0qh1EC&pg=PA67&lpg=PA67&dq=%22local+search%22+operations+research+artificial+intelligence&source=bl&ots=h2jGquBm4d&sig=2V7CKRIs3ZL-NKzqL3Dnkx33_NI&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22local%20search%22%20operations%20research%20artificial%20intelligence&f=falseLastly I[...]



Capture your decisions with DMN

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 22:27:00 +0000

Donato Marrazzo published a very nice and comprehensive introduction to DMN with Drools and Trisotech.

It is worth a read for anyone interested in DMN:

Capture your decisions with DMN

Happy Drooling!

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Talking about Rule Engines at Software Engineering Radio

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 01:08:00 +0000

I had the pleasure of talking to Robert Blumen, at Software Engineering Radio, about Drools and Rule Engines in general.

http://www.se-radio.net/2017/08/se-radio-episode-299-edson-tirelli-on-rules-engines/

If you don't know this podcast, I highly recommend their previous episodes as well. Very informative, technically oriented podcast.

Hope you enjoy,
Edson(image)



Drools Canonical Model - Pure Java Rules

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 17:30:00 +0000

Rule engines, like Drools, typically  make use of a custom languages to define a set of rules. For example, he Drools compiler translates a drl file to an internal representation (the KiePackages) that is subsequently used to generate the ReteOO/Phreak network that will perform the rules evaluation.This internal representation was never really intended to be generated or consumed by end users. This complication makes it difficult to write rules programmatically and the suggestion is instead to generate text rules at the DRL level.  This means that drl itself is currently the only practical formal notation to define a set of rules in Drools.Drools internals were developed with several assumptions at the time, that are no longer true or desirable. Prior to Java 8, perm gen was a concern, so various solutions were utilized to address this - such as MVEL for reflective based evaluation. Java 8 now puts code on the heap, so this is no longer necessary.  A the engine level it also inspected and produced indexes, which tied it to the expressions produced by DRL - this makes polyglot impractical. Lastly it liberally uses classloaders and reflection, which makes it difficult to transpiler for execution on different environments.An engine independent rule modelTo overcome this limitation and offer the possibility of programmatically define a set of rule in pure Java we developed a model aimed to provide a canonical representation of a rule set and a fluent DSL to conveniently create an instance of this model. The model itself is totally independent from Drools and could in theory be re-used by other engines, It also introduces layers that fully separates the engine from having to be aware of any language. For example it will not inspect and generate indexes, instead it expects to be provided those indexes, from the layers above. Another advantage is it now means Drools has a developer friendly view of what it's executing, as it's all just pure low-level pojo rules.This model, other than giving to all Java developers a clean way to write rules in plain Java, will also enable our team to experiment with new features faster, freeing us from the burden of also implementing the corresponding parser and compiler parts that integrate the new feature with the drl notation. Let's see a practical example of the model of a rule defined using the before mentioned DSL: Rule rule = rule( "Persons older than Mark" )    .view(        expr("exprA", markV, p -> p.getName().equals("Mark"))            .indexedBy( String.class, ConstraintType.EQUAL, Person::getName, "Mark" )            .reactOn( "name", "age" ),         expr("exprB", olderV, p -> !p.getName().equals("Mark"))            .indexedBy( String.class, ConstraintType.NOT_EQUAL, Person::getName, "Mark" )            .reactOn( "name" ),        expr("exprC", olderV, markV, (p1, p2) -> p1.getAge() > p2.getAge())            .indexedBy( int.class, ConstraintType.GREATER_THAN, Person::getAge, Person::getAge )            .reactOn( "age" )    )    .then(on(olderV, markV)         .execute((p1, p2) -> System.out.println( p1.getName() + " is older than " + p2.getName())));This is the equivalent of the following rule expressed in drl: rule "Persons older than Mark" when    $p1 : Person(name == \"Mark\")    $p2 : Person(name != \"Mark\", age > $p1.age)then    System.out.println($p2.getN[...]



Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day: September 26 / 28, 2017 (NY / Washington)

Tue, 01 Aug 2017 23:00:00 +0000

Red Hat is organizing a Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day in New York and Washington DC later this year to show how business experts and citizen developers can use business processes, decisions and other models to develop modern business applications.
This free full day event will focus on some key aspects and several of the community experts will be there to showcase some of the more recent enhancements, for example:
  • Using the DMN standard (Decision Model and Notation) to define and execute decisions
  • Moving from traditional business processes to more flexible and dynamic case management
  • The rise of cloud for modeling, execution and monitoring
IT executives, architects, software developers, and business analysts who want to learn about the latest open source, low-code application development technologies.

Detailed agenda and list of speakers can be found on each of the event pages.

Places are limited, so make sure to register asap !(image)



Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner are switching to agile delivery!

Mon, 03 Jul 2017 22:48:00 +0000

Today we would like to give everyone in the community a heads up at some upcoming changes that we believe will be extremely beneficial to the community as a whole.The release of Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner version 7.0 a few weeks ago brought more than just a new major release of these projects.About a year ago, the core team and Red Hat started investing on improving a number of processes related to the development of the projects. One of the goals was to move from an upfront planning, waterfall-like development process into a more iterative agile development.The desire to deliver features earlier and more often to the community, as well as to better adapt to devops-managed cloud environments, required changes from the ground up. From how the team manages branches to how it automates builds and how it delivers releases. A challenge for any development team, but even more so to a team that is essentially remote with developers spread all over the world.Historically, Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner aimed for a cadence of 2 releases per year. Some versions with a larger scope took a bit longer, some were a bit faster, but on average that was the norm.With version 7.0 we started a new phase in the project. We are now working with 2-week sprints, and with an overall goal of releasing one minor version every 2 sprints. That is correct, one minor version per month on average.We are currently in a transition phase, but we intend to release version 7.1 at the end of the next sprint (~6 weeks after 7.0), and then we are aiming to release a new version every ~4 weeks after that.Reducing the release timeframe brings a number of advantages, including:More frequent releases gives the community earlier access to new features, allowing users to try them and provide valuable feedback to the core team. Reducing the scope of each release allows us to do more predictable releases and to improve our testing coverage, maintaining a more stable release stream.Bug fixes as usual are included in each release, allowing users more frequent access to them as well. It is important to note that we will continue to maintain backward compatibility between minor releases (as much as possible - this is even more important in the context of managed cloud deployments as well where seamless upgrades are the norm) and the scope of features is expected to remain similar to what was before. That has two implications:If before, we would release version 7.1 around ~6 months after 7.0, we now will release roughly 6 new versions in those 6 months (7.1, 7.2, ..., 7.6 ), but the amount of feature will be relatively equivalent. I.e., the old version 7.1 is roughly equivalent in terms of features as the scope of the new versions 7.1,..., 7.6 combined. It just splits the scope in smaller chunks and delivers earlier and more often.Users that prefer to not update so often will not lose anything. For instance, a user that updated every 6 months can continue to do so, but instead of jumping from one minor version to the next, he will jump 5-6 minor versions. This is not a problem, again, because the scope is roughly the same as before and the backward compatibility between versions is the same.This is of course work in progress and we will continue to evolve and adapt the process to better fit the community's and user's needs. We strongly believe, though, that this is a huge step forward and a milestone on the project maturity level. [...]



RuleML+RR with DecisionCamp - July 12-14 201, London

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 15:23:00 +0000

RuleML, Web Rules and Reasoning as well as DecisionCamp are all coming together (as well as being collocated with BICOD) this year in London.RuleML+RR home, schedule, registrationDecisionCamp home, schedule, registrationExplore that latest AI happenings at RuleML+RR and keep up to date with the latest Decision Model and Notation (DMN) at Decision Camp. When: July 12-14 2017 Where: Birkbeck, University of London, London, UKMalet St, London WC1E 7HX, UK A number of Red Hat Engineers will be there and presenting:Mark Proctor - Drools co-founder, BRMS and BPMS Platform Architect: The Effectiveness of DMN for Cross Vendor InteroperabilityEdson Tirelli - Drools project lead: DMN Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK), Demystifying the Decision Model and Notation SpecificationGeoffrey De Smet - OptaPlanner founder, project lead: Real-time Constraint Solving with OptaPlanner DecisionCamp:"DecisionCAMP-2017 will include presentations from leading decision management authorities, vendors, and practitioners. The event will explore the current state in Decision Management, the real-world use of the DMN standard, and solutions to various business problems using Decision Management  tools and capabilities. The event will include a special Open Discussion “What you Like and What you Do Not Like about DMN” and a QnA Panel “Real-world Business Decision Management: Vendor and Practitioner Perspectives”.RuleML+RR:"2017 is the leading international joint conference in the field of rule-based reasoning, and focuses on theoretical advances, novel technologies, as well as innovative applications concerning knowledge representation and reasoning with rules."Keynotes and Speeches:Bob Kowalski (Imperial College London): Logic and AI – The Last 50 YearsStephen Muggleton (Imperial College London): Meta-Interpretive Learning: Achievements and ChallengesJordi Cabot (IN3-UOC, Barcelona): The Secret Life of Rules in Software Engineering (sponsored by EurAI)Jean-Francois Puget (IBM): Machine Learning and Decision OptimizationElena Baralis (Politecnico di Torino): Opening the Black Box: Deriving Rules from Data [...]



New KIE persistence API on 7.0

Mon, 29 May 2017 22:35:00 +0000

This post introduce the upcoming drools and jBPM persistence api. The motivation for creating a persistence api that is to not be bound to JPA, as persistence in Drools and jBPM was until the 7.0.0 release is to allow a clean integration of alternative persistence mechanisms to JPA. While JPA is a great api it is tightly bound to a traditional RDBMS model with the drawbacks inherited from there - being hard to scale and difficult to get good performance from on ever scaling systems. With the new api we open up for integration of various general NoSQL databases as well as the creation of tightly tailor-made persistence mechanisms to achieve optimal performance and scalability.At the time of this writing several implementations has been made - the default JPA mechanism, two generic NoSQL implementations backend by Inifinispan and MapDB which will be available as contributions, and a single tailor made NoSQL implementation discussed shortly in this post. The changes done in the Drools and jBPM persistence mechanisms, its new features, and how it allows to build clean new implementations of persistence for KIE components is the basis for a new soon to be added MapDB integration experimental module. The existing Infinispan adaptation has been changed to accommodate to the new structure. Because of this refactor, we can now have other implementations of persistence for KIE without depending on JPA, unless our specific persistence implementation is JPA based. It has implied, however, a set of changes:Creation of drools-persistence-api and jbpm-persistence-api In version 6, most of the persistence components and interfaces were only present in the JPA projects, where they had to be reused from other persistencies. We had to refactor these projects to reuse these interfaces without having the JPA dependencies added each time we did so. Here's the new set of dependencies:  org.drools  drools-persistence-api  7.0.0-SNAPSHOT  org.jbpm  jbpm-persistence-api  7.0.0-SNAPSHOTThe first thing to mention about the classes in this refactor is that the persistence model used by KIE components for KieSessions, WorkItems, ProcessInstances and CorrelationKeys is no longer a JPA class, but an interface. These interfaces are:PersistentSession: For the JPA implementation, this interface is implemented by SessionInfo. For the upcoming MapDB implementation, MapDBSession is used.PersistentWorkItem: For the JPA implementation, this interface is implemented by WorkItemInfo, and MapDBWorkItem for MapDBPersistentProcessInstance: For the JPA implementation, this interface is implemented by ProcessInstanceInfo, and MapDBProcessInstance for MapDBThe important part is that, if you were using the JPA implementation and wish to continue doing so with the same classes as before. All interfaces are prepared to work with these interfaces. Which brings us to our next pointPersistenceContext, ProcessPersistenceContext and TaskPersistenceContext refactorsInterfaces of persistence contexts in version 6 were dependent on the JPA implementations of the model. In order to work with other persistence mechanisms, they had to be refactored to work with the runtime model (ProcessInstance, KieSession, and WorkItem, respectively), build the implementations locally, and be able to return the right element if requested by other components (ProcessInstanceManager, SignalManager, etc)Also, for components like TaskPersistenceContext there were multiple dynamic HQL queries used in the task service code which wouldn’t be implementable in anoth[...]



An Executable DMN Solution for Business Users - bpmNEXT presentation

Wed, 10 May 2017 14:15:00 +0000

The video recording from the bpmNEXT presentation we did a few weeks ago is up!

In this presentation, Bruce and myself do a demo of the end-to-end, full (level 3) DMN solution built in partnership with Trisotech and Method&Style.




Here it is:

width="320" height="266" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/JZp8EgKoXzg/0.jpg" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JZp8EgKoXzg?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>

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End to end BPM (with a splash of DMN)

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 22:13:00 +0000

Red Hat Summit next week is shaping up to be one of the best ever!And if you are a Drools or jBPM enthusiast, you will be busy: another top presentation that we have lined up for you comes from a partnership between Signavio and Red Hat. Duncan Doyle and Tom Debevoise will be driving the show on this one with a great example of how do model processes (and a few decisions) with the BPMN and DMN standards using the awesome tools from Signavio, and then deploying those models into the solid Drools and jBPM engines for execution!This is End to End BPM: from Process Modeling to Execution with Signavio and Red Hat !Join us on Wednesday, May 3rd, at 3:30pm!And here is some extra detail from Tom:End to End BPMFor nearly a decade designing processes in Business Process Model Notation (BPMN) has been a best practice for aligning business and technical objectives. With BPMN, the business analyst or subject matter expert can precisely define the interactions of customers, systems and trading partners with the activities and events that drive them. Because the notation is a standard, the meaning of the process model is unambiguous. Business uses BPMN to define·       The roles of the participants·       Their responsibilities·       The timing and sequence of events·       How to handle errors and exceptionsFigure1 Example BPMN process in SignavioWith the Signavio Process Manager, all stakeholders can collaborate on the process model using an ability to commutate comments and concerns and a shared definition of terms. As shown in the figure 1, BPMN activities can denote where forms, services and scripts are needed. BPMN is more than a drawing convention. Compliant software can export the diagram in an XML format that other systems can read. Signavio and Red Hat have leveraged this capability so that processes and more can be exchanged.Figure 2, the same BPMN process in BPM Suite’s KIE WorkbenchTo create an executable process, the technical team would then and the code for user forms, scripts and services. So processes in the Signavio Process Manager can be exported to the BPM Suite for this objective.Most business analysts are not concerned with ‘Code’, except in the areas of compliance where very detailed logic, including quantities, dates and computational logic is critical. Recently BPMN has been extended to include decision modeling with the decision modeling notation (DMN). While separate from BPMN, DMN has been designed to work with BPMN. With decision modeling the business analysts can control a process by determining the logic for:·       What needs to be done next·       Who need to do it·       When and where it is done ·       And importantly, were any important rules brokenFigure 3, Decision logic for the process in DMNDecision logic can be exported from the Signavio Process Manager and incorporated into the KIE workbench. The process in figure 1 and 2 is controlled by the decision in figure 3. The teamwork of Signavio and Red Hat is a perfect separation of concerns between the business and IT. Because it is designed to be easy to use and collaborative, the Signavio Process Manager is the perfect environment for developing the business view of a process or a decision. Similarly, because it can leverage the power and scalability of the entire Red Hat middleware stack, the BPM Suite is the perfect environment for turning these decisions into an executable form and hosting them. [...]



Just a few... million... rules... per second!

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 15:41:00 +0000

How would you architect a solution capable of executing literally millions of business rules per second? That also integrates hybrid solutions in C++ and Java? While at the same time drives latency down? And that is consumed by several different teams/customers?

Here is your chance to ask the team from Amadeus!

They prepared a great presentation for you at the Red Hat summit next week:

Decisions at a fast pace: scaling to multi-million transactions/second at Amadeus

During the session they will talk about their journey from requirements to the solution they built to meet their huge demand for decision automation. They will also talk about how a collaboration with Red Hat helped to achieve their goals.

Join us for this great session on Thursday, May 4th, at 3:30pm!



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DMN demo at Red Hat Summit

Mon, 24 Apr 2017 23:52:00 +0000

We have an event packed full of Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner content coming next week at the Red Hat Summit, but if you would like to know more about Decision Model and Notation and see a really cool demo, then we have the perfect session for you!

At the Decision Model and Notation 101 session, attendees will get a taste of what DMN brings to the table. How it allows business users to model executable decisions using a fun, high level, graphical language, that promotes interoperability and preserves their investment preventing vendor-lock-in.

But this will NOT be your typical slideware presentation. We have prepared a really nice demo of the end-to-end DMN solution announced by Trisotech a few days ago. During the session you will see a model being created with the Trisotech DMN Modeler, statically analyzed using the Method&Style DT Analysis module and executed in the cloud using Drools/Red Hat BRMS.

Come an join us on Tuesday, May 2nd at 3:30pm.

It is a full 3-course meal, if you will. And you can follow that up with drinks at the reception happening from 5pm-7pm at the partner Pavillion where you can also talk to us at the Red Hat booth about it and anything else you are interested in.

Happy Drooling!



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DMN Quick Start Program announced

Wed, 12 Apr 2017 22:43:00 +0000

Trisotech, a Red Hat partner, announced today the release of the DMN Quickstart Program.

Trisotech, in collaboration with Bruce Silver AssociatesAllegiance Advisory and Red Hat, is offering the definitive Decision Management Quick Start Success Program. This unique program provides the foundation for learning, modeling, analyzing, testing, executing and maintaining DMN level 3-compliant decision models as well as best practices to incorporate in an enterprise-level Decision Management Center of Excellence. 

The solution is a collaboration between the partner companies around the DMN standard. This is just one more advantage of standards: not only users are free from the costs of vendor lock-in, but it also allow vendors to collaborate in order to offer customers complete solutions.

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An Open Source perspective for the youngsters

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 18:40:00 +0000

Please allow me to take a break from the technical/community oriented posts and talk a bit about something that has been on my mind a lot lately. Stick with me and let me know what you think!Twenty one years ago, Leandro Komosinski, one of the best teachers (mentor might be more appropriate) I had, told me in one of our meetings:"- You should never stop learning. In our industry, if you stop learning, after three years you are obsolete. Do it for 5 years and you are relegated to maintaining legacy systems or worse, you are out of the market completely. "While this seems pretty obvious today, it was a big insight to that 18 years old boy. I don’t really have any data to back this claim or the timeframes mentioned, but that advice stuck with me ever since.It actually applies to everything, it doesn’t need to be technology. The gist of it: it is important to never stop learning, never stop growing, personally and professionally.That brings me to the topic I would like to talk about. Nowadays, I talk to a lot of young developers. Unfortunately, several of them when asked “What do you like to do? What is your passion?” either don’t know or just offer generic answers: “I like software development”."But, what do you like in software development? Which books have you been reading? Which courses are you taking?" And the killer question: "which open source projects are you contributing to?"The typical answer is: “- the company I work for does not give me time to do it.” Well, let me break it down for you: “this is not about the company you work for. This is about you!” :) What is your passion? How do you fuel it? What are you curious about? How do you learn more about it?It doesn’t need to be software, it can be anything that interests you, but don’t waste your time. Don’t wait for others to give you time. Make your own time.And if your passion is technology or software, then it is even easier. Open Source is a lot of things to a lot of people, but let me skip ideology. Let me give you a personal perspective for it: it is a way to learn, to grow, to feed your inner kid, to show what you care for, to innovate, to help.If you think about Open Source as “free labour” or “work”, you are doing it wrong. Open source is like starting a masters degree and writing your thesis, except you don’t have teachers (you have communities), you don’t have classes (you do your own exploratory research), you don’t have homework (you apply what you learn) and you don’t have a diploma (you have your project to proudly flaunt to the world). It doesn’t matter if your project is used by the Fortune 500 or if it is your little pet that you feed every now and then. The important part is: did you grow by doing it? Are you better now than you were when you started?So here is my little advice for the youngsters (please take it at face value):- Be restless, be inquisitive, be curious, be innovative, be loud! Look for things that interest you in technology, arts, sociology, nature, and go after them. Just never stop learning, never stop growing. And if your passion is software development, then your open source dream project is probably a google search away.Happy Drooling,Edson [...]



A sneak peek into what is coming! Are you ready?

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 23:53:00 +0000

As you might have guessed already, 2017 will be a great year for Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner! We have a lot of interesting things in the works! And what better opportunity to take a look under the hood at what is coming than joining us on a session, side talk or over a happy hour in the upcoming conferences?Here is a short list of the sessions we have on two great conferences in the next month! The team and myself hope to meet you there!Oh, and check the bottom of this post for a discount code for the Red Hat Summit registration!Santa Barbara, California April 18-20, 2017April 19th, 09:00: An Executable DMN Solution for Business Users - Bruce Silver and Edson TirelliApril 20th, 09:30: Supporting Unstructured Work - Kris VerlaenenMay 2nd, 10:15: Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite Primer: Capabilities, Vision and Roadmap - Mark Proctor, Phil Simpson, Prakash AradhyaMay 2nd, 11:30: It’s all about the process: How Red Hat IT is using JBoss BPM Suite - Kris Verlaenen, Michael Cirioli and Maciej SwiderskiMay 2nd, 15:30: Decision Model and Notation (DMN) 101 - Edson Tirelli and Denis GagnéMay 2nd, 15:30: Show me the money! Optimize your business with JBoss BRMS Business Resource Planner - Geoffrey De Smet and Duncan DoyleMay 3rd, 10:15: Preview BPM Suite 7 And meet the brains behind it - Roger Palleja and Mark ProctorMay 3rd, 15:30: Advanced Drools - Mark Proctor and Mario FuscoMay 3rd, 15:30: End to End BPM: From process modeling to execution with Signavio and Red Hat - Duncan Doyle and Tom DebevoiseMay 3rd, 16:30: Deep dive on case management - Kris Verlaenen and Maciej SwiderskiMay 4th, 10:15: Case management applications with BPM - Kris Verlaenen, Andrew Bonham and Michelle KeloMay 4th, 15:30: Decisions at a fast pace: scaling to multi-million transactions/second at Amadeus - Tarek Zaigouche, Edson Tirelli, Gabriel Bechara and Matteo CasalinoMay 4th, 15:30: Dawn of the Citizen Developer: Low Code Application Development Made Easy in BPMS/BRMS 7 - Alexandre Porcelli and Mark Proctor [...]



DMN 1.1 XML: from modeling to automation with Drools 7.0

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 15:10:00 +0000

I am a freelance consultant, but I am acting today as a PhD student. The global context of my thesis is Enterprise Architecture (EA), which requires to model the Enterprise. As one aspect of EA is business process modeling, I am using BPMN from years, but this notation is not very appropriate to represent decision criteria: a cascade of nested gateways becomes quickly difficult to understand then to modify. So, when OMG published the first version 1.0 Beta of DMN specification in 2014, I found that DMN was a very interesting notation to model decision-making. I succeeded in developing my own DMN modeling tool, based on DMN metamodel, in using the Sirius plugin for Eclipse . But even the next “final” version 1.0 of DMN specification was not very accomplished.The latest version 1.1 of DMN, published in June 2016, is quite good. In the meantime, software editors (at least twenty) have launched good modeling tools, as Signavio Decision Manager (free for Academics) used for this article. This Signavio tool was already able to generate specific DRL files for running DMN models on the BRMS Drools current version 6. In addition to the graphics, some editors added recently the capability to export DMN models (diagram & decision tables) into “DMN 1.1 XML” files, which are compliant with the DMN specification. And the good news is that BRMS like Drools (future version 7, available in Beta version) are able to run theses DMN XML files for automating decision-making (a few lines of Java code are required to invoke theses high level DMN models).This new approach of treating “DMN 1.1 XML” interchange model directly is better for tool independency and model portability. Here is a short comparison between the former classic but specific solution and this new and generic solution, using the tool Signavio Decision Manager (latest version 10.13.0). MDA (Model Driven Architecture) and its three models CIM, PIM & PSM gives us the appropriate reading grid for this comparison: 3 MDA models Description Classic specific DMN solution from Signavio Decision Manager to BRMS Drools CIM (Computation Independent Model) Representation model for business, independent of computer considerations DRD (Decision Requirements Diagram) + Decision Tables PIM (Platform Independent Model) Design model for computing, independent of the execution platform û PSM (Platform Specific Model) Design model for computing, specific to the execution platform DRL (Drools Rule Language) + DMN Formulae Java8-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar The visible aspect of DMN is its emblematic Decision Requirements Diagram (DRD) which can be completed with some Decision Tables for representing the business logic for decision-making. A DRD and its Decision Tables compose a CIM model, independent of any computer considerations.Then, in the classic but specific DMN solution, Signavio Decision Manager is able, from a business DMN model (DRD diagram and Decision Tables), to export a DRL file directly for a Drools rules engine. So, this solution skips the intermediate PIM level, that is not very compliant with MDA concept. Note that this DRL file needs a specific Signavio’s jar library with DMN formulae. 3 MDA models Description New generic DMN solution from Signavio Decision Manager(or other tools) to BRMS Drools (or other BRMS) CIM (Computation Independent Model) Representation model for business, independent of computer considerations DRD (Decision Requirements Diagram) + Decision Tables PIM (Platform Independent Model) Design model for computing, independent of the exe[...]



DroolsJBPM organization on GitHub to be renamed to KieGroup

Sun, 12 Mar 2017 14:56:00 +0000


   In preparation for the 7.0 community release in a few weeks, the "droolsjbpm" organization on GitHub will be renamed to "kiegroup". This is scheduled to happen on Monday, March 13th.

   While the rename has no effect on the code itself, if you have cloned the code repository, you will need to update your local copy with the proper remote URL changing it from:


   To:


   Unfortunately, the URL redirect feature in GitHub will not support this rename, so you will likely have to update the URL manually on your local machines.

   Sorry for the inconvenience. 
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AI Engineer - Entando are Hiring

Thu, 02 Feb 2017 20:41:00 +0000

Entando are looking to hire an AI Engineer, in Italy, to work closely with the Drools team building a next generation platform for integrated and hybrid AI. Together we'll be looking at how we can build systems that leverage and integrate different AI paradigms for the contextual awareness domain - such as enhancing our complex event processing,  building fuzzy/probability rules extensions or looking at Case Based Learning/Reasoning to help with predictive behavioural automation.

The application link can be found here.
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Drools & jBPM are Hiring

Thu, 02 Feb 2017 20:22:00 +0000

The Drools and jBPM team are looking to hire. The role requires a generalist able work with both front-end and back-end code. We need a flexible and dynamic person who is able to handle what ever is thrown at them and relishes the challenge of learning new things on the fly. Ideally, although not a requirement, you'll be able to show some contributions to open source projects. You'll work closely with some key customers implementing their requirements in our open source products.

This is a remote role, and we can potentially hire in any country there is a Red Hat office, although you may be expected to do very occasional travel to visit clients.

The application link for the role can be found here:

Mark
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DMN runtime example with Drools

Sun, 08 Jan 2017 22:25:00 +0000

As announced last year, Drools 7.0 will have full runtime support for DMN models at compliance level 3.The runtime implementation is, at the time of this blog post, feature complete and the team now is working on nice to have improvements, bug fixes and user friendliness.Unfortunately, we will not have full authoring capabilities in time for the 7.0 release, but we are working on it for the future. The great thing about standards, though, is that there is no vendor lock-in. Any tool that supports the standard can be used to produce the models that can be executed using the Drools runtime engine. One company that has a nice DMN modeller is Trisotech, and their tools work perfectly with the Drools runtime.Another great resource about DMN is Bruce Silver's website Method & Style. In particular I highly recommend his book for anyone that wishes to learn more about DMN.Anyway, I would like to give users a little taste of what is coming and show one example of a DMN model and how it can be executed using Drools.The Decision Management Community website periodically publishes challenges for anyone interested in trying to provide a solution for simple decision problems. This example is my solution to their challenge from October/2016.Here are the links to the relevant files:* Solution explanation and documentation* DMN source file* Example code to execute the exampleI am also reproducing a few of the diagrams below, but take a look at the PDF for the complete solution and the documentation.Happy Drooling! [...]



Introducing Drools Fiddle

Sat, 17 Dec 2016 13:35:00 +0000

Drools Fiddle is the fiddle for Drools. Like many other fiddle tools, Drools Fiddle allows both technical and business users to play around with Drools and aims at making Drools accessible to everyone. The entry point to Drools Fiddle is the DRL editor (top left panel), which allows to define and implement both fact models and business rules, using the Drools Rule Language. Once the rules are defined, they can be compiled into a KieBase by clicking on the Build button.If the KieBase is successfully built, the visualization panel on the right will visualize the fact types as well as the rules as graph nodes. For instance, this DRL will be displayed as follows: declare MyFactType    value : intendrule "MyRule"when   f : MyFactType(value == 42)then   modify( f ) {setValue( 41 )}endAll the actions that are performed on the working memory will be represented by arrows in this graph. The purpose of the User icon is to identify all the actions performed directly by the user. For example, let's see how we can dynamically insert fact instances into the working memory. After the KieBase compilation, the Drools Facts tab is displayed on the left:This form allows you to create instances of the fact types that have been previously declared in the DRL. For each instances inserted in the working memory a blue node will be displayed in the Visualization tab. The arrow coming from the User icon shows that this action was performed manually by the user.Once your working memory is ready, you can trigger the fireAllRules method by clicking on the Fire button. As a result, all the events occurring in the engine: rule matching, fact insertion/update/deletion are displayed in the visualization tab.In the above example, we can see that the fact inserted by the user in step 1 triggered the rule "MyRule" which in turn modified the value of the fact from 42 to 41.Some additional features have been implemented in order to enhance the user experience: Step by step debugging of the engine events.Persistence: the Save button associates a unique URI to a DRL snippet in order to share it with the community, e.g.: http://droolsfiddle.tk/#/VYxQ4rW6So far, only the minimum set of functionalities have been implemented to showcase the Drools Fiddle concept but there are still a lot of exciting features in the pipe:Multi tabbed DRL editorDecision  table supportSequence diagram representation of rule engine eventsFact history visualizationImprovement of log events visualizationKieSession persistence to resume stateful sessionsIntegration within Drools WorkbenchThe source code of Drools Fiddle is available on GitHub under Apache v2 License and you can access the application at http://droolsfiddle.tk. Should you wish to contribute, pull requests are welcome ;)We would love to have the feedback of the Drools community in order to improve the fiddle and make it evolve in the right direction.by Julien Vipret & Matteo Casalino [...]



New 6.5.0.Final tags for community Docker images

Mon, 05 Dec 2016 17:43:00 +0000

The latest Docker community image tags for 6.5.0.Final are now available on Docker Hub.

More information at the following links:

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Red Hat BRMS and BPMS Roadmap Presentation (Nov 22nd, London)

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 02:17:00 +0000

Original Link :  http://www.c2b2.co.uk/red_hat_brms_and_bpms_roadmap_presentationFeaturing Drools, jBPM, OptaPlanner, DashBuilder, UberFire and ErraiFor our second JBUG this November we’re delighted to welcome back Red Hat Platform Architect, Mark Proctor who will be part of a panel of speakers presenting roadmap talks on each component technology.We’re fortunate to have this opportunity for so many project leads to be in one room at the same time, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to come along and ask questions about the future plans for BRMS and BPMS.The talk will look at how the 7 series is shifting gears, presenting a vision for low-code application development in the cloud - with a much stronger focus on quality and maturity over previous releases.Key topics will include:The new Rich Client PlatformThe new BPMN2 DesignerNew Case Management and ModellingImproved Advanced Decision Tables and new Decision Model NotationImproved Forms and Page buildingFully integrated DashBuilder reportingNew OptaPlanner features & performance improvementsThere will be opportunities for questions and the chance to network with the team over a beer and slice of pizza.RegistrationAttendees must register at the Skills Matter website prior to the meet-up. Please – only register if you intend to come along. Follow this link to register: https://skillsmatter.com/meetups/8489-jboss-november-meetup.Agenda18:30 – 18:45     Meet up at Skills Matter with a beer at the bar18:45 – 19:45     Part One19:45 – 20:00     Refreshment break20:00 – 20:30     Part Two20:30                    Pizza, beer and networkingSpeakersMark ProctorMark is a Red Hat Platform Architect and co-creator of the Drools project - the leading Java Open Source rules system. In 2005 Mark joined JBoss as lead of the Drools project. In 2006, when Red Hat acquired JBoss, Mark’s role evolved into his current position as platform architect for the Red Hat JBoss BRMS (Business Rules Management System) and BPMS (Business Process Management System) platforms - which incorporate the Drools and jBPM projects.Kris VerlaenenKris is the JBoss BPM project lead, and is interested in pretty much everything related to business process management. He is particularly fascinated by healthcare - an area that has already demonstrated the need for flexible business processes.Geoffrey De SmetGeoffrey is the founder and project lead of OptaPlanner (http://www.optaplanner.org), the leading open source constraint satisfaction solver in Java. He started coding Java in 1999, regularly participates in academic competitions, and enjoys assisting developers in optimizing challenging planning problems of real-world enterprises. He is also a contributor to a variety of other open source projects.Mauricio SalatinoMauricio Salatino is a Drools/jBPM Senior Software Engineer in Red Hat, and author of the jBPM5 and jBPM Developer Guide, and the Drools 6 Developer Guide. His main task right now is to develop the next generation cloud capability for the BRMS and BPMS platforms - which includes the Drools and jBPM technologies.Max BarkleyMax is a Software Engineer at Red Hat and the Errai project lead. Joining Red Hat as an intern in 2013, he took on his current role after graduating H.B.Sc. Mathematics from the University [...]