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A Lady's Ruminations



"Jane was firm where she felt herself to be right." -Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice



Last Build Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2013 02:02:48 +0000

 



Thoughts on Egypt & Libya

Tue, 22 Feb 2011 07:18:00 +0000

Hooray for freedom! It is what every human heart yearns for and everyone aspires to reach. Here in the United States we are blessed with such freedom. Most of the world has nothing even close. It is our duty, as the most free and blessed humans ever, to help our fellow man gain his freedom.

This is what we have done throughout our history. All over the place. Most recently, we helped people in Afghanistan and Iraq overthrow their tyrannical, evil governments.

The fight for freedom does not end simply because bad people are removed from power. There will always be bad people---in every single country or region---and they will always try to take power back. Sometimes they continue using guns and bombs and doing bad things to citizens. Sometimes they manage to get themselves elected legally and then take and keep power and oppress the people who foolishly elected them.

Even here in the United States we continue fighting for our freedom. We mostly do it in a more civil and respectful way, but people try to take our freedoms away every day.

I'm very glad for the people of Egypt, who said "NO MORE" to "their" government. I pray that they continue to work for a true and open democracy.

I am also praying for the people of Libya, who are currently trying to tell "their" government "NO."

What really makes me mad is all the people out there on the internet, breathlessly gushing on and on about these efforts and freedom and posting quotes from movies and books and raving on and on about how humans yearn for freedom, when a few years ago, President Bush was giving speech after speech about man's yearning for freedom and was ACTUALLY SUPPORTING AND FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM ROUND THE GLOBE, and these same people derided him, said he was speaking nonsense, that not all humans want freedom, that efforts to aid those seeking freedom were pointless. Hypocrites. Open your eyes and shut your mouths. Now you want the US to say and do all sorts of things (except, apparently, actually act with force when needed) and you go about paraphrasing President Bush who you called things like "Bushitler" and burned in effigy.

How do you compare the honorable and wonderful man President Bush is with men like Hitler and the "leaders" of these nations? Your viewpoints are completely skewed and, frankly, you have no right to speak on freedom at all. Please shut your mouths and let the real grownups, who have always supported freedom, continue on and perhaps you will learn a thing or two about reality.(image)



Happy New Year!

Sat, 01 Jan 2011 08:21:00 +0000

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Auld Lang Syne
Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll take a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne
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Please Vote!

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 01:30:00 +0000

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Remembering 9/11: 8 Years Later

Fri, 11 Sep 2009 23:03:00 +0000

I cannot believe it has been 8 years since the events of 9/11/01. What a horrible day. I still remember it so vividly. It is seared into my memory. The way so many of our fellow Americans were murdered. The way the Twin Towers fell. The hole in the Pentagon, symbol of our military might, and that crater in the field in Pennsylvania. Those terrorist attacks were an act of war, not a crime, and we should continue to treat them that way. I am so thankful for our military, who keep us safe by dealing with the bad guys (and they are the bad guys) in far off lands, away from their families. We haven't had a terrorist attack on our homeland in 8 years, thanks to President Bush and our military. I am so thankful for that. On 9/11/01, I thought we would be attacked and attacked and attacked. I woke every morning for ages after that wondering if we would be attacked again. I remember how all planes were grounded for at least 3 days and the skies were so silent. But, when planes started flying again, they all sounded SOOOO close and loud and I always looked up expecting to see one crashing. That's now how we live in the United States. We are blessed that way. And I want us to stay that way. And I want the world to be that way. But it doesn't become that way through talking, talking, talking. That's what got us to 9/11. So today I remember all who were murdered, all who died saving lives, all who fought the good fight, all who mourn still, all who stand up and fight, and, especially Barbara Olson, who was one of my favorite political commentators and was on the flight that hit the Pentagon. A couple of years ago I participated in the 2,996 Tribute, where bloggers were given someone who died on 9/11 to write about. I keep reposting my tribute, to Betty Ann Ong, Flight Attendant, Flight 11, every year.This is my tribute to Betty Ann Ong. Please read it and remember Betty and the other victims/heroes of 9/11. God bless us all. ___________________________________________________This is dedicated in Memory of Betty Ong and in Honor of the Ong Family. May God bless you all.2,996 is a tribute to the victims of 9/11.On September 11, 2006, 2,996 volunteer bloggerswill join together for a tribute to the victims of 9/11.Today, September 11, 2006, I remember Betty Ong, Flight Attendant, American Airlines, Flight 11.On September 11, 2001, Betty Ong was just doing her job . . . a job she loved. She was a flight attendant for American Airlines, on Flight 11, which was going from Boston, Massachusetts, to Los Angeles, California. Betty had been with American for 14 years and loved her job andwas a tireless worker. Whenever she worked a late night flight, she would never sit down and relax. Even when passengers were sleeping, she would walk down the aisles and softly talk to the passengers who were awake and provide blankets to those who were asleep. It would not be unusual to find Betty caring for a passenger's baby while their parent's rested. (Source)She was a people person and it was safe to say people loved her too.Betty didn't start out life as a flight attendant. She was born in San Francisco, California, on February 5, 1956 to a family with four children. Betty and her siblings grew up in Chinatown and she attended George Washington High School (Source). She had a special place in her heart for children and senior citizens:She paid special attention to them whenever they were aboard a flight she was working. On many occasions, Betty would drive a half hour from her home, into Boston, to have lunch and take walks with senior citizens. She shared stories about her far away travels with the neighboring children and often had trinkets to give them. (Source)Betty's loving personality made her a perfect candidate to be a flight attendant:She was feminine, very humorous, very caring, and she loved people," said Cathie Ong, [Betty's sister]. "She saw the humor and loved to bring out the humor. And she just loved to laugh. She had this habit, when she laughed, it was ju[...]



One Month Until Bobby Long's Seattle Show!!

Fri, 10 Jul 2009 08:28:00 +0000

Those of you who know me know I am a huge fan of English singer/songwriter/musician Bobby Long. You might also know Bobby's coming on tour this summer and his Seattle show is only one month from today!!!

I am the Street Team leader for the Washington & Idaho Land of Dreamers, so this show is a big deal to me & I want to do all I can to help Bobby sell it out!

So, I'm posting the show info! Please come! Tell your friends! And repost if you want to!

Singer - Songwriter Bobby Long Comes to Seattle for one night only!

UK Singer/Songwriter Bobby Long will be embarking on his first major U.S. tour on July 26 in N.Y.C. Bobby first came to national attention for co-writing "Let Me Sign" for the film "Twilight". Although Bobby Long became known due to the movie's success, his music speaks for itself and is winning new fans all over the world. Bobby has recently topped the ITUNES Charts with his 1st single "Left to Lie" which charted at number 8. Bobby Long played a three city sold out tour of taste maker shows in April this year, during which he recorded his new single "Being A Mockingbird" at Arlene's Grocery NYC.

Check out www.myspace.com/musicbobbylong

The Seattle show is expected to sell out, so buy now or get there very early!

Bobby Long will be playing Seattle on Monday August 10,
at the El Corazon
109 Eastlake Ave E
Seattle Wa, 98109
8:00p.m.
$15 advance tickets

Pre-sale tickets www.elcorazonseattle.com
All Ages/Bar with ID


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Bobby has 3 singles on iTunes right now: "Left to Lie," "Being A Mockingbird-Live from Arlene's NYC," and "The Bounty of Mary Jane." Go buy, buy for your friends, & tell everyone!(image)



Happy Independence Day!

Sat, 04 Jul 2009 07:18:00 +0000

I'm so thankful to live in the greatest country every to grace this earth. God has blessed us with so many things, chiefly, FREEDOM. I am thankful for all the men and women who have fought for, sacrificed for, lived & died for our Freedom, Faith, and Way of Life. We owe them more than we can give. And we mustn't let this country, of the people, by the people, and for the people, slip away into the ever-widening pit of socialism. I am not going to sit around while it is happening. Let's fight for our Freedom.

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God Bless America.
Happy Independence Day!
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Wednesday Hero

Fri, 22 May 2009 04:32:00 +0000

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Sgt. Christian E. Bueno-Galdos
25 years old from Paterson, New Jersey
3rd Battalion, 66th Armor Regiment, 172nd Infantry Brigade
May 11, 2009
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On Mother's Day, Eugenia Gardos made a tabletop shrine to her recently deceased mother, surrounding her photograph with silk roses, a small white rosary cross, two votive candles and a prayer card of Senor de los Milagros, the patron saint of Peru.

The next day, May 11, she added her son's picture to the shrine for the dead.

Sgt. Gardos was killed along with five fellow servicemen; Army Spc. Jacob D. Barton, Army Maj. Matthew P. Houseal, Navy Cmdr. Charles K. Springle and Army Pfc. Michael E. Yates Jr. in the attack on Camp Liberty.

"The first time he left for Iraq, when they would read the lists of the dead on the news, we used to hold our breath, praying he wasn't on it," his mother said. "I don't understand how he could have died this way. I just don't understand it."

Sgt. Galdos had emigrated with his family from Mollendo, Peru, as a child and had been a U.S. citizen since high school. His mother, two older brothers and older sister recalled how he used to hand out candy to children in Iraq the same way he always did in Paterson, never making a trip to the corner bodega without a group of neighborhood children tailing behind, knowing he would buy them candy or a soda.

"We were all here at home," Carlos Bueno, Sgt. Galdos's father, said. "I was getting ready to go to bed when I heard screaming downstairs. I ran downstairs and everyone had thrown themselves to the floor, thrashing around, screaming."

Bueno said he does not feel bitterness toward the man accused in the shootings, whom he described as "mentally ill."

"We want people to know we're proud of our son's Army, but if my son had died in war we would be able to handle that," he said. "But not to die in this manner."


All Information Was Found On And Copied From MilitaryCity.com

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Thu, 09 Apr 2009 04:46:00 +0000

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Cpl. Aaron L. Seal
23 years old from Elkhart, Indiana
6th Engineer Support Battalion, 4th Marine Logistics Group, Marine Forces Reserve
October 1, 2006
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With sleet gushing from gunmetal gray clouds, some 30 Marines standing in three trim lines saluted the U.S. flag that four of their brethren used to christen a new pole.

A large engraved stone set at the base of the 38-foot pole explained the occasion: "In memory of Corporal Aaron L. Seal. Who gave his life for our country. 1982-2006."

The Marines from Engineer Company B joined several dozen community residents and well-wishers at a ceremony Wednesday honoring Seal, the 23-year-old Elkhart reservist who died last fall in Iraq. Seal's family also attended the 20-minute tribute at Elkhart Community Schools' administration building adjacent to Memorial High School -- the fallen Marine's alma mater.

Read the rest of the story here.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:44:00 +0000

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Spc. Jeffrey Scantlin, Sgt. 1st Class Erich Phillips, Sgt. John Hayes, 1st Lt. Aaron Thurman, Sgt. Hector Chavez and Spc. Tyler Hanson
2nd Platoon, Chosen Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment
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In the early morning hours of July 13, 2008, Soldiers from Chosen Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment were not thinking about medals as they fought off roughly 200 insurgents attacking their vehicle patrol base in Afghanistan.

No Soldier in combat does.

The Army, however, takes pause afterward to honor those who distinguish themselves in battle and recognizes them before their peers.

Read the rest of the story.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 25 Mar 2009 18:09:00 +0000

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Elena

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Chief Master Sergeant Paul Wesley Airey
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"Chief Airey was an Airman's Airman and one of the true pioneers for our service," said Gen. Norton Schwartz, Air Force Chief of Staff. "He was a warrior, an innovator, and a leader with vision well ahead of his time. His legacy lives today in the truly professional enlisted force we have serving our nation, and for that we owe him a debt of gratitude."

Chief Airey was born in Quincy, Mass., on December 13, 1923. At age eighteen, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December, 7, 1941, Airey quit high school to enlist in the Army Air Forces on November 16, 1942. He later earned his high school equivalency certificate through off-duty study. During World War II he flew as a B-24 radio operator and additional duty aerial gunner. On his 28th mission, then-Technical Sergeant Airey and his fellow crewmen were shot down over Vienna, Austria, captured, and held prisoner by the German air force from July 1944 to May 1945. During his time as a prisoner of war he worked tirelessly to meet the basic needs of fellow prisoners, even through a 90-day forced march.

Chief Airey held the top enlisted from April 3, 1967 to July 31, 1969. During his tenure he worked to change loan establishments charging exorbitant rates outside the air base gates and to improve low retention during the Vietnam Conflict. Chief Airey also led a team that laid the foundation for the Weighted Airman Promotion System, a system that has stood the test of time and which is still in use today. He also advocated for an Air Force-level Senior Noncommissioned Officer Academy. His vision became reality when the academy opened in 1973, becoming the capstone in the development of Air Force Senior NCOs. Chief Airey retired August 1, 1970. He continued advocating for Airmen's rights by serving on the boards of numerous Air Force and enlisted professional military organizations throughout the years. He was a member of the Board of Trustees for the Airmen Memorial Museum, a member of the Air Force Memorial Foundation and the Air University Foundation.

On the north wall of the Air Force Memorial in Washington D.C., Chief Airey's thoughts on Airmen are immortalized, "When I think of the enlisted force, I see dedication, determination, loyalty and valor." The Air Force Association honored Airey with its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007.

Chief Airey passed away on March 11, 2009 at his home in Panama City, Florida


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Items of Interest

Tue, 10 Mar 2009 00:32:00 +0000

AP: UK survivor of WWI trenches given French honor---LONDON – The last British survivor of World War I's grinding trench warfare was made an officer of the French Legion of Honor on Monday.French Ambassador Maurice Gourdault-Montagne awarded 110-year-old Harry Patch the medal at a ceremony in Patch's nursing home in Wells, 120 miles (190 kilometers) west of London, Britain's Ministry of Defense said in a statement. Patch, who served as a machine-gunner in the 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, told Gourdault-Montagne he was proud of the honor."Ambassador, I greatly appreciate the way your people respect the memory of those who fell, irrespective of the uniform they wore," he said in a raspy, deliberate voice. "I will wear this medal with great pride and when I eventually rejoin my mates it will be displayed in my regimental museum as a permanent reminder of the kindness of the people of France."Patch is one of only two surviving British veterans of World War I, according to the Ministry of Defense. The second, 112-year-old Henry Allingham, served as an airman. AP: Did a Bard contemporary brush up on Shakespeare?---LONDON – The Bard, or not the Bard? That is the question posed by Monday's unveiling of a centuries-old portrait of a dark-eyed, handsome man in Elizabethan finery.Experts say it is the only portrait of William Shakespeare painted during his lifetime — in effect, the sole source of our knowledge of what the great man looked like.But they can't be certain. In the shifting sands of Shakespeare scholarship, where even the authorship of the plays is sometimes disputed, nothing is written in stone. And also of interest in that article:In separate discoveries that are solving other Shakespeare-related mysteries, Museum of London archaeologists said they had uncovered the foundations of the long-buried theater where Shakespeare wrote and performed as an actor.Museum officials said the rudimentary playhouse, simply called The Theatre, was built in 1576 by actor and theater promoter James Burbage. The site, where Shakespeare performed from 1594 to 1597, now houses an abandoned warehouse.Experts believe "Romeo and Juliet" was performed there.The playhouse remains were found on the site of an unused warehouse in Hackney on the eastern outskirts of London. Scholars say the theater there was dismantled and moved to the site of the more famous Globe Theater after a dispute between Burbage and the landlord in 1597.Searchers even found pottery shards decorated with the image of a man who resembled Shakespeare, but experts said this was only a passing coincidence, not an indication that the show business merchandising craze had already begun.And an addition from 10 March 2009:AP: Collector: Lincoln photo uncovered in Grant album---WASHINGTON – A collector believes a photograph from a private album of Civil War Gen. Ulysses S. Grant shows President Abraham Lincoln in front of the White House and could be the last image taken of him before he was assassinated in 1865.If it is indeed Lincoln, it would be the only known photo of the 16th president in front of the executive mansion and a rare find, as only about 130 photos of him are known to exist. A copy of the image was provided to The Associated Press.Grant's 38-year-old great-great-grandson, Ulysses S. Grant VI, had seen the picture before, but didn't examine it closely until late January. A tall figure in the distance caught his eye, although the man's facial features are obscured.He called Keya Morgan, a New York-based photography collector and Lincoln aficionado, who helped identify it as Lincoln.And more: AP: Museum reveals engraving hidden in Lincoln watch[...]



Wednesday Hero

Thu, 26 Feb 2009 03:45:00 +0000

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Spc. Ross A. McGinnis
19 years old from Knox, Pennsylvania
1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division
December 4, 2006
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His mission was to patrol the streets of Adhamiyah in northeast Baghdad and find a place to put a 250-kilowatt generator that would provide electricity for more than 100 homes. But it's a mission he wasn't able to accomplish.

Shortly after Pfc. McGinnis's convoy left the compound, and less than a mile from FOB Apache, an insurgent standing on a nearby rooftop threw a grenade into the sixth, and last, Humvee. "Grenade!" yelled McGinnis, who was manning the vehicle's M2 .50-caliber machine gun. He tried to deflect the grenade but it fell into the Humvee and lodged between the radios.

"McGinnis turned and looked down and realized no one in the truck knew where the grenade was," said Capt. Michael Baka, his company commander. "He knew everyone had their doors combat-locked and they wouldn't be able to get out."

Instead of jumping out of the truck to save his own life, like he had been trained to do, McGinnis threw his back against the radio mount, smothering the explosive with his body. The grenade exploded just as Pfc. McGinnis covered it. The blast filled the vehicle with black smoke and debris and blew the driver's door and right passenger's door wide open and blew the machine gun off its mount. The explosion hit McGinnis on his sides and his lower back, under his vest. He was killed instantly.

The other four soldiers in the Humvee suffered relatively minor injuries.

On the morning of December 4, 2006, before his convoy had left, Cpt. Baka has signed a waver promoting Pfc. McGinnis to Specialist and he was posthumously promoted to E-4.

For his heroic actions on that day, McGinnis was awarded the Silver Star and was nominated for a Medal of Honor which he received on June 2, 2008.


All Information Was Found On And Copied From MilitaryCity.com

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 11 Feb 2009 08:09:00 +0000

Oops, I've missed a few!This Weeks Post Was Suggested And Written By BratSgt. Patrick Tainsh33 years old from Oceanside, CaliforniaTroop E, 2nd Squadron, 2nd Armored Cavalry RegimentFebruary 11, 2004Five years ago today, Sgt. Patrick Tainsh sacrificed all as the mounted unit he was part of was hit by an IED in Baghdad. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze and Sliver Stars saving the lives of his commanding officer and other soldiers before succumbing to his own wounds. Also killed in the attack was Pfc. William C. Ramirez from Portland, Oregon.On Veteran’s Day, 2007, Deborah Tainsh, Sgt. Tainsh's mother, attended a school in Columbia, Georgia, and shared a story she had written called "A Boy Named Patrick."Here is part of the story :…a little boy named Patrick who loved football, beaches, surfing, and skateboarding, and especially reading. Patrick watched his dad be a Marine for over twenty years. During this time Patrick kept reading not only surfing and skateboarding magazines, but history books, too. One day when Patrick was a man, he told his dad and best friend, “I want to do something that will make a difference in the world, I’m going to be a soldier.” And so he did. And in 1999 he went to Fort Knox, Kentucky for boot camp and then went to Fort Polk, Louisiana where he worked and trained hard to become a United States Army Cavalry Scout. Then in 2003 Patrick had to say good bye to his mom and dad because he had to go fight a war in Iraq to protect his country, friends, and family from terrorists and to help fight for the freedoms of the boys and girls in that country where they and their families were treated very badly by theircountry’s leader. Patrick once wrote a letter to his mom and dad telling them that he cried for the children because they were hungry and he didn’t have food to give them. He said he couldn’t understand how a country’s leader could treat the people so badly and make them live in such dirty conditions with trash and wild dogs everywhere. And so Patrick's mom and dad keep a photo in their living room of Patrick surrounded by Iraqi children.You can read the story in it's entirety here.Sgt Tainsh came to the military later than some, but rose through the ranks fast. In his last letter to his parents, Sgt Tainsh shared his thoughts about his mission. And in 2006, Sgt. Tainsh's mother wrote a book called Heart Of A Hawk about her son's life and her and her husband's struggles since their son was killed.These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People LivedThis post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.[...]



Happy New Year!

Thu, 01 Jan 2009 08:00:00 +0000

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Auld Lang Syne
Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll take a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne
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Last Post of 2008!

Thu, 01 Jan 2009 07:55:00 +0000

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Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

---William Shakespeare, the Tempest,
Act IV, Scene i, Lines 148-157

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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 31 Dec 2008 19:44:00 +0000

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Kathi

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2nd Lt. Christopher E. Loudon
22 years old from Brockport, Pennsylvania
1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division
October 17, 2006
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2nd Lt. Christopher Loudon graduated from Slippery Rock University with a Baccalaureate Degree in Environmental Health in 2005. Upon graduation, he entered the United States Army on September 9, 2005. He received his commission as an Infantry officer and was assigned to 2nd Platoon, Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry, 4th Infantry Division at Ft. Hood, Texas. He deployed to Iraq in July 2006 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

2nd Lt. Loudon�s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Iraq Campaign Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Ranger Tab.

He was KIA in Baghdad, Iraq when an IED detonated near his vehicle. Also killed with him were; Corporal David M. Unger, 21, of Leavenworth, Kansas ;Corporal Russell G. Culbertson III, 22, of Amity, Pennsylvania and Specialist Joseph C. Dumas Jr., 25, of New Orleans, Louisiana.

He leaves behind his parents, Randy and Susan Loudon ; his wife, Jacey Loudon ; a daughter, Isabel Loudon ; two brothers, First Lieutenant Nicholas Loudon ,and Jonathan Loudon ; his paternal grandmother, Florence Loudon and his maternal grandfather, Everett William Campbell.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Happy Christmas!

Thu, 25 Dec 2008 21:09:00 +0000

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"For today in the city of David a savior has been born for you who is Messiah and Lord."
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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 19 Nov 2008 16:29:00 +0000

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Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody
55 years old from Fort Belvoir, Virginia
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Call it breaking the brass ceiling. Ann E. Dunwoody, after 33 years in the Army, ascended Friday to a peak never before reached by a woman in the U.S. military: four-star general.

At an emotional promotion ceremony, Dunwoody looked back on her years in uniform, said it was a credit to the Army—and a great surprise to her—that she would make history in a male-dominated military.

"Thirty-three years after I took the oath as a second lieutenant, I have to tell you this is not exactly how I envisioned my life unfolding," she told a standing-room-only auditorium. "Even as a young kid, all I ever wanted to do was teach physical education and raise a family.

"It was clear to me that my Army experience was just going to be a two-year detour en route to my fitness profession," she added. "So when asked, `Ann, did you ever think you were going to be a general officer, to say nothing about a four-star?' I say, `Not in my wildest dreams.'

"There is no one more surprised than I—except, of course, my husband. You know what they say, `Behind every successful woman there is an astonished man.'"

You can read the rest of Gen. Dunwoody's story here.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Happy Veterans Day!

Wed, 12 Nov 2008 04:38:00 +0000

Today we honor the countless brave and noble men and women who have served and fought to preserve our beloved country.

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We would not be here or free today, if it were not for them. Every single American (and, frankly most of the people of the world who are free) owes thanks to the Men and Women of the United States Military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. May God bless you and keep you. And, may you always know that your are remembered. (And don't forget to pin your medals on and wear them proudly!)

You can read about the history of Veterans Day here.

And President Bush's remarks at the Rededication Ceremony of the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. God bless him for his courageous service to our country in a time of war.(image)



Happy 233rd!

Tue, 11 Nov 2008 04:48:00 +0000

Happy Birthday to the United States Marine Corps!

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Semper Fi! Thank you for all you have done for our country in your 233 years of service. God bless you!


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Learn about the Marines here and here. (image)



Wednesday Hero

Thu, 06 Nov 2008 00:20:00 +0000

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Cpt. Gussie M. Jones
41 years old from Raleigh, Arkansas
31st Combat Support Hospital
March 07, 2004
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Cpt. Gussie Jones was born in Arkansas and was one of eight children. She began her Army career by enlisting in 1988 as a personnel clerk and climbed to the rank of a sergeant.

In 1986, Jones earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Arkansas Central University. She was selected to attend the Army Enlisted Commissioning Program and earned her second bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University in 1998. It was in nursing.

Her career as a registered nurse and a commissioned officer began in September 1998 at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio. In 2002, after completing a course in critical-care nursing, she was assigned to Beaumont Army Medical Center, where she became a mentor.

"She was a very dedicated person and was always smiling, said a co-worker and friend, Capt. Susan Gilbert. If anyone asked her to do something, she would do it. And she was very kind and gentle and patient with the patients."

Cpt. Jones died of a heart attack while on duty in Baghdad, Iraq. During her 15 years of military services, Jones received a Joint Service Commendation medal, four Army Commendation medals and three Army Achievement medals.

"She was so much a part of their team, and so her death must really affect their morale," Gilbert said. "I'm very worried about the other soldiers because they've lost their battle buddy."


All Information Was Found On And Copied From MilitaryCity.com

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Happy Halloween!

Sat, 01 Nov 2008 02:00:00 +0000

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Happy Halloween!
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Wednesday Hero

Wed, 29 Oct 2008 19:35:00 +0000

Wednesday Hero was started to put a spotlight on the men and women of the United States military and the bravery their show day in and day out. But on a few occasions a service members of an allied nation has been profiled. Such is the case this week.

Despite being shot twice during an ambush in Afghanistan, an SAS (Special Air Service) soldier from Australia lashed himself to the front of his patrol vehicle so he wouldn't be left behind if he passed out from loss of blood and kept on fighting.

The Digger is expected to be recommended for a high level bravery award.

Suffering from serious upper body wounds, the soldier struggled on to the front of his SAS long range patrol vehicle (LRPV) and, under heavy fire, used a rope to attach himself firmly between the vehicle's bull bar and radiator.

Once he was secured, and there was no chance that he would fall off if he fainted, he picked up his rifle and resumed firing at the enemy during a two-hour fighting withdrawal.

SAS troops and their special forces comrades from the Commando Regiment are well aware of the slow and painful death that awaits them if they are captured by the Taliban.

The Digger, who cannot be identified, faded in and out of consciousness, emptying several magazines as volleys of enemy rounds and rocket propelled grenades, rained down around him.

He was finally evacuated from the battle field at high speed still lashed to the front of the LRPV.

A source told The Courier-Mail the Digger was now "up and about" and would recover fully from his serious gunshot wounds. His heroic deeds will be recognised when he is recommended for a high level bravery award.

Several others engaged in the do-or-die battle on September 2 are also in line for top honours.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Thu, 23 Oct 2008 04:31:00 +0000

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Sgt. Carlton A. Clark
22 years old from South Royalton, Vermont
2nd Brigade Troop Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)
August 06, 2006
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Sgt. Carlton Clark graduated from South Royalton High School in 2002. While in high school, he was co-captain of his soccer team and a member of the track and field and basketball teams. He graduated from basic combat training and advanced individual training in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. in 2002 and was stationed at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. as a combat engineer. He was air assault qualified and deployed during the initial wave of Operation Iraqi Freedom for one year. He was subsequently assigned to West Point to train cadets. He re-enlisted and was deployed for a second tour of duty in Iraq. He earned a Purple Heart, an Army Commendation Medal with Valor, a Bronze Star Medal and was posthumously awarded a second Purple Heart.

Sgt. Clark was killed in action when an IED detonated near his Humvee while conducting combat operations in Baghdad. Also killed in the attack were Staff Sgt. Stephen A. Seale and Cpl. Jose Zamora.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Pull out of Iraq?

Wed, 22 Oct 2008 15:13:00 +0000

This is from an e-mail that has made the rounds.

Pull out of Iraq?

Perhaps the U.S. should pull out of Chicago?


Body Count In the last six months:
292 Americans killed (murdered) in Chicago;
221 Americans killed in Iraq .


Who Runs Chicago?
Senators: Barack Obama & Dick Durbin
Rep: Jesse Jackson Jr.
Illinois Gov: Rod Blogojevich,
Illinois House leader: Mike Madigan,
Illinois Atty. Gen: Lisa Madigan (daughter of Mike),
Chicago Mayor: Richard M. Daley (son of Mayor Richard J.Daley)
....our leadership in Illinois .....all Democrats!!

Can't blame Republicans; because there aren't any!!!

State pension fund $44 Billion in debt, worst in country.

Although, Cook County (Chicago) sales tax is 10.25% (highest in country).
(Look it up if you want)

Chicago school system is rated one of the worst in the country.

Summary:
This is the political culture that Obama comes from in Illinois .

And he's gonna 'fix' Washington politics for us?

Wake Up America!
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