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IT, mobility, wireless and handheld news



 



Push notifications: A productivity killer

Mon, 24 Jul 2017 19:15:00 PDT

At Wired David Pierce writes: Kill your notifications. Yes, really. Turn them all off. (You can leave on phone calls and text messages, if you must, but nothing else.) You'll discover that you don't miss the stream of cards filling your lockscreen, because they never existed for your benefit. They're for brands and developers, methods [...]

Push notifications: A productivity killer

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Intergen takes SKYCITY to the cloud

Mon, 24 Jul 2017 19:04:00 PDT

Intergen has announced a deal with SKYCITY Entertainment Group (SKYCITY) to deliver Microsoft Dynamics 365 to 6,000 users across Australia and New Zealand.(image)



Nothing nebulous about Microsoft�s cloud-transition

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:34:00 PDT

Four years ago Microsoft lost its mojo. The software giant had failed to compete in web search. People questioned whether Microsoft was on an IBM-style path to irrelevance. When the phone business flopped, it looked like Microsoft’s time in the sun was over. Today it is back. The 2017 Microsoft is a different beast, the […] Nothing nebulous about Microsoft’s cloud-transition(image)



We�re spending more on tech, but not as much as Australians

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 16:43:00 PDT

Gartner says New Zealand technology spending will be $11.8 billion in 2017. That’s up 2.7 percent from 2016. It’s also a lot higher than last year’s forward looking forecast from Gartner. The total spend is forecast to pass $12 billion in 2018. Communications services is the top technology category in New Zealand. Customers will spend a total […] We’re spending more on tech, but not as much as Australians(image)



Endace announces EndaceFabric for network-wide packet recording

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 01:49:00 PDT

Scalable, centrally-managed fabric of Network Recorders gives NOC and SOC teams quick access to network history, and accelerates network security and performance investigations.(image)



Acorn 6: MacOS image editing for the rest of us

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 22:04:00 PDT

For years Adobe Photoshop was my image editor. I used it on a Windows PC. Then switched to the Mac version. Now my first choice image editor is Flying Meat’s Acorn 6. Acorn only runs on a Mac. Last week the software updated from version 5 to 6. The upgrade brings a raft of new […] Acorn 6: MacOS image editing for the rest of us(image)



HTC faces backlash over keyboard pop-up ads

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 20:53:00 PDT

The phone maker says the pop-ups have been seen because of an "error" to the annoyance of users. Source: HTC backlash over pop-up ads on keyboard – BBC News HTC has responded to the fuss over the pop-up ads on its Android keyboard by saying the move was "an error". From the outside it looks [...]

HTC faces backlash over keyboard pop-up ads

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BNZ adds Visa credit cards to Android Pay wallet

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 00:44:00 PDT

From today, BNZ customers can load their BNZ Visa credit card into their Android Pay wallet, allowing even greater flexibility when it comes to payment choice.(image)



Still living in a Notification hell � Om Malik

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 18:00:00 PDT

It doesn’t matter what app it is — they are all trying to get me to turn on notifications, again and again, so that I can come back to their service. Facebook and Instagram are the most aggressive, b Source: Still living in a Notification hell – Om Malik There comes a point where this […] Still living in a Notification hell – Om Malik(image)



Duet Display uses iPad to extend Mac, PC

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 15:58:00 PDT

Duet Display started life as an iOS app to turn an iPad into a second screen for a Mac or Windows PC. It has since moved on. The latest version adds a Touch Bar interface. There’s also an optional upgrade that turns an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil into an advanced drawing tablet. I’ve been […] Duet Display uses iPad to extend Mac, PC(image)



PC sales could be worse

Sun, 16 Jul 2017 12:34:00 PDT

~650,000 machines still ship every day, but that’s the lowest total since 2007 Source: PC sales still slumping, but more slowly than feared • The Register Simon Sharwood writes: Both analyst firms suggest that rising component prices have led to rising PC prices which has led to falling enthusiasm from buyers, especially consumers. DRAM, LCD […] PC sales could be worse(image)



Crypto-currencies, tulips, market bubbles

Sun, 16 Jul 2017 11:38:00 PDT

Source: Crypto-tulips Frances Coppola writes about financial bubbles. She says the cryptocurrency market shares characteristics with earlier bubbles like Dutch tulips and dotcom stocks. Which means a crash is underway. That’s not just Bitcoin, but all of the cryptocurrencies. The remarkable aspect of this is that everyone couldn’t see it coming. As Coppola points out some […] Crypto-currencies, tulips, market bubbles(image)



NZ Tech Podcast: Big batteries, solar cars, cold war, IoT

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 21:53:00 PDT

You can hear me with Paul Spain and Ed McKnight on the NZ Tech Podcast episode 345. We talk about the world's largest lithium-ion battery which is heading to South Australia. Also: Russia vs US; solar car, electric autonomous trucks, UFB 2 moving, New Zealand IoT networks, Bitcoin exchange hacked, audio tickets, Alibaba vs Amazon Echo and the NZ Young Professionals Podcast.      NZ Tech Podcast: Big batteries, solar cars, cold war, IoT(image)



Vodafone Australia mulls Wisp alliance, NZ implications

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 21:49:00 PDT

CommsDay reports that Vodafone Australia is considering an alliance with regional wireless ISPs. Wireless ISPs or wisps provide local wireless broadband. Most operate in areas the big carriers find uneconomic to service. They might connect a handful of properties further up a valley, or behind a range of hills. You can take it as read one […] Vodafone Australia mulls Wisp alliance, NZ implications(image)



Rural health professionals see fibre pay-off

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 16:52:00 PDT

Health is one area where rural broadband can change lives, even save lives. Broadband gives health professionals and patients fast access to resources and expertise. In rural areas this would often be difficult, expensive or time-consuming to get any other way. Broadband helps move patient records and test results. It’s fast and can be secure. […] Rural health professionals see fibre pay-off(image)



NZ Tech Podcast 340: E3 Highlights incl Xbox One X, UFB 1 rollout 75% complete, Magpie GPS tracker, Elanation kids wearable

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 19:29:00 PDT

This week we discuss from E3 in Los Angeles, NZs Ultra-Fast Broadband rollout progress, highlights Magpie GPS tracker, ETurbo kids smartwatch from Elanation, Kin2Kin startup shares monetisation plans, Fuji Xero NZ financial dramas. Hosted by Paul Sp... (more in the full post)(image)



NZ Tech Podcast 339: Intel Compute Card, New Macs, Apple HomePod, iPad Pro grows up, SpaceX recycles

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 18:42:00 PDT

This week on NZ Tech Podcast we discuss Intel Compute Card, Apple Worldwide Developers Conference highlights incl new Macs, Apple HomePod, iPad Pro comes of age. SpaceX recycling rockets and capsules, 25% of Australians support a cashless society, D... (more in the full post)(image)



NZ Tech Podcast 338: Glenn Gore - Chief Architect, Amazon Web Services (AWS)

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 18:37:00 PDT

Paul Spain joined Glenn Gore following his keynote at Amazon's AWS Summit in Auckland. Glenn is an Australian based in London,and he shares his own story and discusses what he's learnt working with AWS client organisations around the world. Get the ... (more in the full post)(image)



Google crawling Geekzone HTTPS

Sun, 21 May 2017 21:00:00 PDT

Last week (May 2017) I made the changes to start serving Geekzone over HTTPS (and this blog too). This included removing extra lines of code that dealt with HTTP to HTTPS redirection for some pages (the ones that were always served as HTTPS before the switchover) as well as setting HST header and other changes on the server side.

Immediately after the changes I used Google Webmaster and Bing Webmaster tools to let search engine crawlers know about this change. Pretty happy on how things are going:

Googlebot crawling the new HTTPS domain:

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Search results showing the old HTTP URLs:

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Search results now showing the new HTTPS URLs (the line before the big uptick is the content pages already served over HTTPS, before the whole site changed):

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Geekzone gone full HTTPS

Thu, 18 May 2017 15:38:00 PDT

Last night I switched Geekzone (www.geekzone.co.nz) to full HTTPS support. And slowly traffic over SSL is going up (comparing last six hours overnight vs last month). Up until now we only used SSL for login, registration, private messages and profile pages plus assets (images, CSS and scripts). Now everything is covered. I started using SSL many years ago and wanted to have the site fully served over HTTPS for quite a while. Started by enforcing HTTPS on some content-sensitive pages and moving assets to HTTPS domains, including redirects to ensure clients used the correct schema. Last week I deployed an update for Geekzone mobile to make sure it worked on HTTPS and yesterday I did the same on the full desktop version of the site. Also included in this change is the addition of a "Secure" flag to cookies used on these domains. This ensures cookies only move between the client browser and server when there's a secure connection. If anyone requests http://www.geekzone.co.nz instead of https://www.geekzone.co.nz the server will instruct the browser to redirect to the correct location while the browser knows not to disclose the cookies until the secure connection is established. This is essential to avoid session hijacking (unless of course we talk MITM attacks, of course). Why have all this trouble for a forum? Because we have lots of industry (telcos mainly but other companies around too) people using the site. Account numbers, PIN and passwords are sometimes sent via our private message system (which has been served using the HTTPS schema for quite a while) so it makes sense to extend this to the whole site. In addition to this, for the last few months I have been using ThisData to collect, analyse and understand user behaviour around the site, in real-time, to quickly determine if an account could've been compromised. Up until now we were using it in "read mode" and tracking notifications. Last week I changed the webhook/API to actually start closing sessions and blocking IP addresses if a user confirms a breach occurred. ThisData receives millions of transactions reports (login, logout, forum post, message sent, message read, password change, new registration, avatar change, invalid password, etc) from us every month and uses machine learning to observe and assign a "risk" to each transaction. Based on this risk result our forum software can take different actions to protect our users - like the ones I described in the previous paragraph. I have also added a Geekzone ruleset to the HTTPS Everywhere project. This ensures that browsers using the HTTPS Everywhere add-ons will know to use the HTTPS schema instead of HTTP even if the source explicitly refer to the HTTP version (including references to any Geekzone resource served in non-Geekzone pages). This is important because Cloudflare also uses the same ruleset when doing the automatic HTTPS upgrade for some of their millions of clients around the Internet. We also use other platforms to prevent spammers and scammers joining the site. One or another can sometimes get past all this protection but our moderator team is pretty quick to act and our community is really good at reporting suspicious behaviour. There are lots more to be done, for sure. But it feels good when all this falls into place. Update 20 May: Added HSTS headers now, site listing update on HTTPSWatch NZ.[...]



Television, (re)enhanced: the Samsung QLED range

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 15:11:00 PDT

Television. Been around since the 1930’s, with an evolution that has been interesting and non stop. It wasn’t that long ago we had a Philips K9 TV in the house (no remote – that was an extra $600 in 1984), and in recent years we’ve had the rapid shift towards flat panels and high definition viewing, supported by the content industry. And yet the concept is still remarkably similar: a screen 1 or more gather around for knowledge, entertainment and disconnection with reality. I often wonder if ‘TV’ will actually become more a personal viewing exercise, with viewers opting for a tablet or similar and the comfort of their own environment, rather than the shared experience of many people watching (and the inevitable commentary…. “what is this cr*p”?) I had the privilege of being introduced to Samsung’s new QLED range of Televisions a few days ago. These are due in the NZ market in May 2017 and continue the evolution of LED-LCD display technology, with colours and pictures that are strong, vibrant, bright and a joy to view. The current technology buzz in the TV display world is OLED, which is an early lifecycle technology that emits light (to assemble a display pictures) in a different fashion to the more mainstream LCD TV's. While it’s fascinating to see the evolution of technology and the promises these improvements bring, I tend to focus on how these compare to the here and now. Television is a well penetrated product into most people’s lives, and you’ll find one in most homes and places of work around NZ and the world, and they continue to function day in and out without too much fuss. The switch from the older tube technology to Plasma and subsequently LCD came with the usual hallmarks of new methods; the old technology had better colours, was more fluid and better saturation (so pictures looked more natural and so on), while manufacturing quality of early technology often meant the lifespan of a TV was adjusted from 25 years down to 10, and even 5 for some types until common sense (and sales trends) kicked in. In the range below, the Samsung panels are an evolution of LED technology and not OLED. While that’s interesting, how these panels perform and what they offer is more valuable than what's under the metal/plastic. Declaration: I have 3 Samsung TV’s, acquired between 2007-10. A 27” that had it’s screen die 1 day before the end of the warranty (on boxing day no less), but which Noel Leeming had repaired and is still going strong 10 years later (disappointingly, when you see so many flash new models these days). A 37” with a bezel (the plastic edging around the screen) that has cracked from several house moves), and a little 22” doing duty in the bedroom. All the TV's operate fine, and for me (and I expect a great many people) they will only be replaced when they stop working… meaning the market for Samsung’s new models as always is somebody seeking a replacement for various reasons. The highpoint of features and functions for me is equipment that’s 7-10 years old, meaning anything new will certainly be appealing. I am a researcher and make considered purchases, meaning features, form, function and most importantly for such a major appliance, ability to elegantly mount and position in the house.                 65” glory – Q8C $7,999         &[...]



Cyber attacks on NZ small business

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 17:30:00 PST

In August 2016, Symantec sampled 525 NZ business owners and operators about their perception of cyber security issues; all the businesses employed less than 20 people, and some of the discoveries show that we are woefully behind the eight ball.

Most companies are using some sort of Windows device, half of them using Windows 10 as their main operating system. Only 1 in 5 laptops and mobile devices don�t have some form of logon security, and just a quarter of staff have access to financial data outside their work computer.

The biggest threats � email/phishing scams (70%) and hacking attempts (47%). Interestingly, the threats where staff are consciously being devious are small � 2% internal threats, and a tiny 1% of employees posting stuff they shouldn�t on social media.

As Kiwis, we value our time � the biggest impact from cyber-attacks was down-time and inconvenience.

The two figures that scared me the most were that 70% don�t know if they have any sort of internet security running, and only 57% of businesses are doing automatic or daily backups. Crazy that 4% of responses are doing backups annually (seriously, why bother?) or none.

So how to mitigate the risks? Symantec have five tips:

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More info here.

My thanks to Symantec and Mark Gorrie, the Director of the Norton Business Unit for Symantec, Pacific, for hosting me at lunch yesterday.

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Webstock 2017: think of others

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 02:07:00 PST

I had the good fortune to be allowed to attend Webstock 2017 this year, held in Wellington New Zealand from 13-17 February. This quirky event is growing in popularity and attendance, and this year featured a whole host of presenters covering many topics, from the origin of Emoji�s to empathetic design for the elderly. Nearly all the presenters were from the US, and there were two overwhelming themes that kept repeating and being referenced throughout the event: 1. �We are sorry about what is happening is US Politics. This isn�t who we are�2. �We need to think of everyone � old, young, able bodied, disabled, sight and mobility impaired, rich and poor � when creating for people Resonating in the back of my mind was the phrase �He Tangata, He Tangata, He Tangata�. It is the people, It is the people, It is the people. I may not be using the phrase in it�s correct setting, but it speaks to what I heard repeatedly throughout the days � by the people, about the people, and for the people. I observed an audience of old and young, multiple races and all genders, and was enthused by the sheer size and participation. This thing is big. REALLY BIG. And it continues to get bigger, which is great for Wellington and great for the design sector in New Zealand. So what were my takeaways from the time? Knowing your audience and being present to what they want to here is crucially important. I heard a few jokes fall flat, and some that were absolutely wrong to be used � a quick websearch if you are interested will reveal my abstract reference. A highlight was Marcin Wichary, a polish chap from Google, who covered topics from charles babbage to the work he did creating the Google Doodle that was Pacman in 2010, and the journey of discovery he went on to recreate this classic game. Warm, enthusiastic about his topic and a genuinely engaging fellow, he touched on a couple of rueful points about never assuming and not bothering to question �why� � as well as not being satisfied until he was, and not giving up until the task was done. It�s a small item, but seeing through any commitment to completion in the modern world takes focus, and I often see failure because people just gave up or lost interest� because they just did. Significant reference was made to Apple�s design aesthetics and their efforts in designing for humans, by many of the presenters. Love or loathe that company, they have made their mark on the western world and continue to set a tone for modern digital experiences that we all live with and don�t appreciate we are. I met with Janine Gianfredi on Thursday night after the show, and caught her presentation on the Friday, about designing US Government services from a startup with the Executive (The White House under President Obama), and taking things to market. Born out of the chaos that was the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (�Obamacare�), Janine referred to the �mission� of getting healthcare for people who historically could�nt. The Federal government set up the national exchange, but required insurance companies in every state to cooperate in creating products and offering to customers � not trivial, and a service that was born from a big government project (many contractors, little focus on end to end experience, and a desire to just ship software even if it sucked) had to be refactored by a smaller team who thought about the users, what they had to do, and how they could impr[...]



NZ Tech Podcast 321: $3000+ Free Gadgets, One Million Podcast Downloads, US Homeland Security vs Travellers, Banks vs Apple

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 20:37:00 PST

On NZ Tech Podcast's 6th anniversary we celebrate over a million downloads of the podcast. Topics included Homeland Security vs Travellers, Australian Banks vs Apple, PayPal account risks, Logitech's 4K webcam, Intel Coffee Lake, near Invisible Ma... (more in the full post)(image)



NZ Tech Podcast 314: Meet Quickflix new Hollywood owner, a temptation to share Ransomware, Homes.co.nz update

Wed, 14 Dec 2016 21:40:00 PST

This week on NZ Tech Podcast, Hollywood's Erik Pence discusses Quickflix v2 and Jeremy O'Hanlon shares an update on Homes.co.nz. Also featured - new Ransomware which rewards you for sharing it, Netflix Virtual Reality on Google Daydream, Sky TV/Du... (more in the full post)(image)



NZ Tech Podcast 313: Amazon Go, John Key’s legacy, Goodnest, Media Design School, Network 4 Learning, Uber Eats NZ

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 15:37:00 PST

This week on NZ Tech Podcast we discussed Amazon Go – the new bricks & mortar supermarket with checkouts. In studio guest James MacAvoy shared about NZ startup Goodnest and how it provides discount access to cleaners, electricians and ... (more in the full post)(image)



Microsoft Ignite New Zealand, Microsoft Surface Studio

Sat, 29 Oct 2016 22:25:00 PDT

Earlier this week I had the chance to attend this year's Microsoft Ignite New Zealand. This was the ninth year I attended the event, previously known as Microsoft TechEd.

Many, many things changed over the years and while Microsoft Ignite is still a technology event at heart, things changed, just the same as Microsoft did over the years.

If you were one of the couple of thousands of attendees you had the chance to learn not only from technical sessions but also from personal development sessions, ones created to let people progress in their careers not only by their geeky prowess but by being better at how these are used in the context of relating to yourself, other people in your job and your life.

If you attended the keynote session you'd have heard from local Microsoft people and international guests who showed how to use technology to "empower every person and every organisation on the planet to achieve more."

The message was powerful and easy to understand: technology for technology sake was hot. Today's technology is used to make lives better. From using Internet of Things and Big Data to make better, intelligent wheelchairs to solving global water challenges with cloud technology.

I had the chance to talk to Microsoft experts from different areas, from Donna Sarkar (MIcrosoft Windows 10 and Windows Insider) to Donovan Brown (on how Microsoft is making DevOps an integral part of its stack) and all of these had the passion make this mission come to life.

During the same week Microsoft announced its new Surface device. A long term project, which goes back to the first Surface concept (remember the Surface table?) this all-in-one computer integrates design and functionality, plus extra accessories that can help developers create new interfaces and experiences, making it a dream - one that will be here in early 2017.

Watch the video below and tell me it's not a work of art?

src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BzMLA8YIgG0" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0">(image)




How one database query can fix HOP cards

Wed, 12 Oct 2016 16:33:00 PDT

From Stuff this morning:

Auckland train commuters were over-charged due to a fault with HOP card machines, but Auckland Transport says it won't issue refunds unless passengers complain.

Commuters at Takanini train station on Wednesday found both tag-on machines on the platform were out of order.

Everyone who caught a train during the outage was charged a penalty fee when they hopped off because they hadn't tagged on.

My mind really boggles with this.

Firstly, why are both tag-on machines down in one location?  They should be independent of each other (different network circuits, power feeds etc), so if one goes down, the other can still operate happily? Also, surely someone is notified when both go down, so a contingency plan can be put in place?

Secondly, why isn�t AT crediting penalties for passengers who didn�t do anything wrong?  The fact that you have to contact them to get a refund is pretty poor customer service. Not the best way to build any confidence in their systems.

I have no idea how their internal database is structured, but to help them out, something along this line should get them started:

SELECT * FROM RailTrip
WHERE TagOffLocation = �Newmarket� AND TaggedOn = False
AND TaggedOffDate BETWEEN �2016-10-13 7:00:00� AND �2016-10-13 9:00:00�

Grab all the rows from the above, loop through em and credit back anyone who is within that criteria.

You�re welcome AT.

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The secret life of mobile batteries - UPDATED 6.10.2016

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 00:29:00 PDT

Smartphone batteries have been in the news recently, in case you haven't been keeping up. On this mornings Jetstar flight the attendant took extra care to call out that Galaxy Note7 users would have to keep their device off - personally if I had one of these mobiles I would be utterly livid. Just not acceptable in 2016. I've used iPhones in my line of work for the last few years as my primary device, and androids only as secondary units. The battery life on Apple phones is enough to drive you to despair at times, and as these things get bigger and pack more in, I can't the situation improving much. I'm not a fan of the bigger screen devices like the 6 and 7 - I think Apple hit the mark perfectly with the iPhone 5 screen size - but you have to use what is reasonably available, and for me that is an iPhone 6. Over the last year or so, the battery life on this device has become steadily more atrocious, but when I asked ServicePlus to have a look (Apple's agent in NZ), the diagnostics were that things were.... ok.... but perhaps remove the facebook app, which is a notorious hog. I did but that didn't really help..... and my experience continued to reflect that my battery must be munted. In the weekend I read an article in Forbes, and the author opined that users should skip the iPhone 7 and just replace the battery in their existing iPhones, waiting for 2018 when the iPhone 8 is released (2017 will bring the iPhone 7S). Forbes article The application Battery Life was mentioned... so I downloaded it and what an interesting app to use. Even though IOS9/10 locked out many of the statistics about the battery that could be read, some elements are still discoverable. Here's what says about my phone tonight: When new, the phone had a battery capacity of 1750Mah. All rechargeable batteries degrade over time, but what is interesting is where mine is at - maximum capacity is now 1100Mah, 37% less than as new. Of course, the iPhone battery meter tells me how much charge is remaining - OF THE DECREASED CAPACITY - meaning the more I use this phone, the faster it appears my battery is draining, when in fact it has degraded seriously to the point of being nearly unusable.  I double checked these readings using a Mac app called CoconutBattery, and it's reports are consistent with the above display. The battery has lost a lot of capacity. So, tricky.  Technically the iPhone battery reading is correct - 396/1100 = 36% charge. But without an app on the iPhone telling me "your battery is screwed bro", I am left wondering. I don't think it should have degraded this rapidly - I used my other devices which are older, and they havent got anywhere near this level of degradation, some of them are 6 years old and constantly being used. I don't know if it's better to be told I only have 396/1750, given I can never recharge the battery back up to 1750.... but it would have been nice to know. The device is 2 years old. Arguing over reasonable life of a battery under CGA feels quite the uphill battle. I do wish Apple did make better tools available that acknowledge the limits of technology and help better manage - although if they did, I expect they would a truckload coming back at the 12 month mark as 'not fit'. Battery Life. CoconutBattery. You wouldn't think batteries are that interesting..[...]



Review: Navman MiVUE680

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 05:07:00 PDT

There’s a competition on Geekzone to win this review unit. Click here to enter. Dashcams are not normally a product that I’d review, however when the opportunity came up to do some stunt driving, including a ridiculously tight parallel park, an attempt to jump the car over a ramp, then the actual jump (footage here from outside the car as another perspective), the inner boy-racer in me couldn’t resist. I think dashcams are going to become more standard in cars as the technology matures.  If you’ve ever been involved in an accident, having the actual video footage to help with the police investigation and inevitable insurance claim is gold.  Witness evidence can be debated and argued with; you can’t really dispute the facts when you have the video. The MiVUE680 is a small unit with a 2.7 inch screen on the back (not touch screen) and a wide angle lens capable of 2K full HD video (the MiVUE698 Dual Cam comes with a rear camera as well).  Anyone who’s had a Navman GPS unit will already be familiar with the suction cup mount; the stiff design makes for a secure mount, and not for regular removal of the unit.  It is small enough to mount up behind the rear view mirror, and is supplied with a very long cable for charging via the car’s 12V supply (aka cigarette lighter).  Recordings are saved to a microSD card (not supplied). The most important thing is how do the recordings look?  Below are samples from both day and night driving in Auckland. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/x2cBdaJDOdA" width="580" height="326" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uj1N7He-brg" width="580" height="326" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> As you drive, the dashcam is constantly recording.  Each file lasts around 3 minutes and is 320MB – with the 8GB microSD card I was provided, that’s around an hour and 15 minutes worth of continuous recording time in total. Event recording is triggered when there’s a sudden impact, or you’re driving at high speed, make an aggressive turn or something else that triggers the G sensor.  While the constant recording can be overwritten as you keep driving, the event recording is moved to it’s own separate folder on the SD card.  You can also trigger this manually by pushing a button on the side. The dashcam has lots of other safety features other than video recording which include: Warns you when you are near a fixed speed camera Lane detection warnings Reminders to turn your headlights on if you haven’t Reminders to take regular breaks when driving for long periods of time Warning if you get too close to the car ahead Warning if the car in front of you has moved off and you are still stopped It’s a great little unit which you could easily install then forget about it.  My two issues with it are minor: it should be touch screen, and I felt the buttons down the right hand side were too far away from the indications on the screen, making them hard to match up. My thanks again to Navman for hosting me and providing a unit for review.[...]