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The TED Blog shares interesting news about TED, TED Talks video, the TED Prize and more.



Updated: 2017-11-22T21:50:00Z

 



WordPress.comSpeed of change: The talks of TEDNYC x BMW i

2017-11-21T20:20:40Z

The speed of change is a constant in our lives. Sometimes it’s worth slowing things down, to look at what might be changing without us even considering it. To celebrate the efforts of innovators, change-makers and dreamers who are reimagining the future, TED has partnered with BMW i. In a special session of talks hosted by TED […] The speed of change is a constant in our lives. Sometimes it’s worth slowing things down, to look at what might be changing without us even considering it. To celebrate the efforts of innovators, change-makers and dreamers who are reimagining the future, TED has partnered with BMW i. In a special session of talks hosted by TED design curator Chee Pearlman and TED science curator David Biello at TED HQ in New York City on Thursday night, five speakers (and three remarkable performers) explored how we might shape future through creativity and imagination. Acoustic duo Anielle and Matthew kicked off the evening with a performance of their original song “Dead Romance,” weaving together the sounds of Americana folk music and modern pop. Systems engineer and researcher Danielle Wood shares six ways technologies developed for space exploration can lead to better, more sustainable development on earth. (Photo: Jasmina Tomic/TED) Justice and development through space. Danielle Wood leads the Space Enabled research group at the MIT Media Lab, where she works to break down the idea that space is for the few, the rich or the elite. She identifies six space technologies that can contribute to sustainable development across the world. First, communication satellites can be essential during times of disaster, when regular communication networks malfunction. Likewise, scientists use positioning satellites to study endangered species and track their movements, and they use earth observation satellites to measure features of our environment such as the temperature of the ocean. Next, the diet and exercise regimens used by astronauts living in orbiting laboratories like the International Space Station help us learn more about how to improve health on earth. Space spinoff includes the inventions created for space that can transfer to other fields outside space technology. Finally, adventures in space can serve as inspiration for people across the globe to develop new skills in science and technology. “Space truly is useful for sustainable development for the benefit of all peoples,” Wood says. Shared mobility architect Sandra Phillips details the opportunities of carsharing at TED and BMW i’s Speed of Change salon. (Photo: Jasmina Tomic/TED) The future of shared mobility and public transportation. Shared mobility architect Sandra Phillips has helped launch car-sharing programs in several countries, bridging the gap between homes and distant subway stations while benefiting the environment and community. The idea is simple: “Essentially, you become a member of a club and gain access to different types of shared vehicles. You only use them when you need them, and you pay for what you use,” Phillips says. In practice, this looks like using a shared car or bike to get to the nearest transit station, instead of relying on your own car. In a study conducted at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers found that in the five cities where carsharing service Car2Go was tested, some 28,000 cars were removed from the roads, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and opening up space for parks, libraries and other community hubs. Phillips believes this is possible because car-sharing brings together the inclusive social mandate of public transportation and the innovation behind private mobility companies. While it may not be the solution for congestion in large cities, in places like Vancouver and Sacramento, having access to car-sharing could transform how people get around. The dark side of our beautiful lawns. Americans think of our lawns as lush, green, living carpets that we proudly display in front of our homes. But they’ve become one of the m[...]



It’s Nov. 18. Can we make jokes about Mugabe yet?

2017-11-18T13:55:42Z

Comedian Carl Joshua Ncube writes: If you are about to watch my TED Talk, then you are watching the first one to have an expiry date. You see, when I went onto the red dot I was afraid, I was petrified — and this was not because of an ’80s tune or the fear of [](image)

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Comedian Carl Joshua Ncube writes: If you are about to watch my TED Talk, then you are watching the first one to have an expiry date. You see, when I went onto the red dot I was afraid, I was petrified — and this was not because of an ’80s tune or the fear of speaking in public on such a big stage. My fear was about my President Robert Mugabe. For 37 years of my life I have been filled with the fear of Mugabe, and coming to TED was my opportunity to show off my talent as a comedian, but fear got ahold of me through veiled threats from his agents about the content of my comedy.

So back to the EXPIRY of this talk… Today is the 18th of November and a historic moment for our country. Our army has seized power and as we speak we are all going out to the street to march for our FREEDOM. Today I march to end my FEAR. After you watch this, Mugabe may no longer be our PRESIDENT and I will no longer be afraid. Watch this TALK and see me when I used to be AFRAID to tell jokes! NOT ANYMORE! I am Carl Joshua Ncube and I fear nothing!


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TED’s response to claims of sexual harassment 

2017-11-18T15:42:22Z

We believe in ideas worth spreading. One of those ideas is that all humans are entitled to equal consideration and respect. The Washington Post recently reported that TED has grappled with sexual harassment at its conferences and in the workplace. We would like to address that article here. At the TED2017 conference in Vancouver, we were […]Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED We believe in ideas worth spreading. One of those ideas is that all humans are entitled to equal consideration and respect. The Washington Post recently reported that TED has grappled with sexual harassment at its conferences and in the workplace. We would like to address that article here. At the TED2017 conference in Vancouver, we were informed privately that four women attendees experienced sexual harassment, and another experienced aggressive behavior from male attendees. We were alarmed by what we heard and immediately conducted full investigations to understand the context and impact of what had happened. As a result, one man was asked to leave the conference immediately, and a second barred. These two men were the source of the five complaints, and will not return to TED. The main TED conference attracts some 2,000 attendees, and in recent years we have been successful in increasing the percentage of women attending from about 25% to 40%. By and large, the vast majority of attendees report a wonderful experience. But incidents do happen. Historically, when we’ve heard that an attendee has experienced conduct that made them uncomfortable or worse, we have always investigated and done our best to resolve. But this past year’s experience motivated us to do far more to strengthen our existing procedures. With input from experts, we put even more robust and specific anti-harassment policies and systems in place in summer 2017: Making clear every attendee is aware of our code of conduct, and that violation of it would mean removal from the event. Publicizing the means by which attendees can report problems. We are determined to continue to increase the number of women who come to TED and to ensure that the conference experience is one where all attendees feel safe and respected. The Washington Post article also mentioned two incidents alleged to have taken place at our New York-based office over the past four years. These were fully investigated at the time, and we took the claims very seriously. For the sake of the individuals mentioned, we don’t think it’s appropriate to address them in public. We all have a strong belief in our mission and a deep respect for the perspectives and values our co-workers bring to the organization.  We will use this story as motivation to ensure that inclusion remains at the core of our conference experience and workplace culture. [...]



“The courage to …” The talks of TED@Tommy

2017-11-16T14:49:43Z

Courage comes in many forms. In the face of fear, it’s the conviction to dream, dare, innovate, create and transform. It’s the ability to try and try again, to admit when we’re wrong and stand up for what’s right. TED and Tommy Hilfiger both believe in the power of courageous ideas to break conventions and […]At TED@Tommy — held November 14, 2017, at Mediahaven in Amsterdam — fifteen creators, leaders and innovators invited us to dream, to dare and to do. (Photo: Richard Hadley / TED) Courage comes in many forms. In the face of fear, it’s the conviction to dream, dare, innovate, create and transform. It’s the ability to try and try again, to admit when we’re wrong and stand up for what’s right. TED and Tommy Hilfiger both believe in the power of courageous ideas to break conventions and celebrate individuality — it’s the driving force behind why the two organizations have partnered to bring experts in fashion, sustainability, design and more to the stage to share their ideas. More than 300 Tommy associates from around the world submitted their ideas to take part in TED@Tommy, with more than 20 internal events taking place at local and regional levels, and the top 15 ideas were selected for the red circle on the TED@Tommy stage. At this inaugural event — held on November 14, 2017, at Mediahaven in Amsterdam — creators, leaders and innovators invited us to dream, to dare and to do. After opening remarks from Daniel Grieder, CEO, Tommy Hilfiger Global and PVH Europe, and Avery Baker, Chief Brand Officer, Tommy Hilfiger Global, the talks of Session 1 kicked off. Fashion is “about self-expression, a physical embodiment of what we portray ourselves as,” says Mahir Can Isik, speaking at TED@Tommy in Amsterdam. (Photo: Richard Hadley / TED) Let fashion express your individuality. The stylish clothes you’re wearing right now were predicted to be popular up to two years before you ever bought them. This is thanks to trend forecasting agencies, which sell predictions of the “next big thing” to designers.  And according to Tommy Hilfiger retail buyer Mahir Can Isik, trend forecasting is, for lack of a better term, “absolutely bull.” Here’s a fun fact: More than 12,000 fashion brands all get their predictions from the same single agency — and this, Isik suggests, is the beginning of the end of true individuality. “Fashion is an art form — it’s about excitement, human interaction, touching our hearts and desires,” he says. “It’s about self-expression, a physical embodiment of what we portray ourselves as.” He calls on us to break this hold of forecasters and cherish self-expression and individuality. Stylish clothing for the differently abled fashionista. Mindy Scheier believes that what you wear matters. “The clothes you choose can affect your mood, your health and your confidence,” she says. But when Scheier’s son Oliver was born with muscular dystrophy, a degenerative disorder that makes it hard for him to dress himself or wear clothing with buttons or zippers, she and her husband resorted to dressing him in what was easiest: sweatpants and a T-shirt. One afternoon when Oliver was eight, he came home from school and declared that he wanted to wear blue jeans like everyone else. Determined to help her son, Mindy spent the entire night MacGyvering a pair of jeans, opening up the legs to give them enough room to accommodate his braces and replacing the zipper and button with a rubber band. Oliver went to school beaming in his jeans the next day — and with that first foray into adaptive clothing, Scheier founded Runway of Dreams to educate the fashion industry about the needs of differently abled people. She explains how she designs for people who have a hard time getting dressed, and how she partnered with Tommy Hilfiger to make fashion history by producing the first mainstream adaptive clothing line, Tommy A[...]



Open now: Audition for TED2018!

2017-11-15T17:50:23Z

Do you have an idea idea worth spreading? Do you want to speak on the TED2018 stage in Vancouver in April? To find more new voices, TED is hosting an Idea Search at our office theater in New York City on January 24, 2018. Speakers who audition at this event might be chosen for the […]At last year’s TEDNYC Idea Search, artist Olalekan Jeyifous showed off his hyper-detailed and gloriously complex imaginary cities. See more of his work in this TED Gallery. Photo: Anyssa Samari / TED Do you have an idea idea worth spreading? Do you want to speak on the TED2018 stage in Vancouver in April? To find more new voices, TED is hosting an Idea Search at our office theater in New York City on January 24, 2018. Speakers who audition at this event might be chosen for the TED2018 stage or to become part of our digital archive on TED.com. You’re invited to pitch your amazing idea to try out on the Idea Search stage in January. The theme of TED2018 is The Age of Amazement, so we are looking for ideas that connect to that theme — from all angles. Are you working on cutting-edge technology that the world needs to hear about? Are you making waves with your art or research? Are you a scientist with a new discovery or an inventor with a new vision? A performer with something spectacular to share? An incredible storyteller? Please apply to audition at our Idea Search. Important dates: The deadline to apply to the Idea Search is Tuesday, December 5, 2017, at noon Eastern. The Idea Search event happens in New York City from the morning of January 23 through the morning of January 25, 2018. Rehearsals will take place on January 23, and the event happens in the evening of January 24. TED2018 happens April 10–14, 2018, in Vancouver. Don’t live in the New York City area? Don’t let that stop you from applying — we may be able to help get you here. Here’s how to apply! Sit down and think about what kind of talk you’d like to give, then script a one-minute preview of the talk. Film yourself delivering the one-minute preview (here are some insider tips for making a great audition video). Upload the film to Vimeo or YouTube, titled: “[Your name] TED2018 audition video: [name of your talk]” — so, for example: “Jane Smith TED2018 audition video: Why you should pay attention to roadside wildflowers” Then complete the entry form, paste your URL in, and hit Submit! Curious to learn more? Read about a few past Idea Search events: TEDNYC auditions in 2017, in 2014 and in 2013. Watch talks from past Idea Search events that went viral on our digital archive on TED.com: Christopher Emdin: Teach teachers how to create magic (more than 2 million views) Sally Kohn: Let’s try emotional correctness (more than 2 million views) Lux Narayan: What I learned from 2,000 obituaries (currently at 1.4 million views!) Lara Setrakian: 3 ways to fix a broken news industry (just shy of a million views) Todd Scott: An intergalactic guide to using a defibrillator (also juuust south of a million) And here are just a few speakers who were discovered during past talent searches: Ashton Applewhite: Let’s end ageism (1m views) OluTimehin Adegbeye: Who belongs in a city? (a huge hit at TEDGlobal 2017) Richard Turere: My invention that made peace with the lions (2m views) Zak Ebrahim: I am the son of a terrorist. Here’s how I chose peace (4.7m views and a TED Book) [...]



Breathe and push: Notes from Session 6: Rebuild

2017-11-13T15:05:24Z

We’ve spent the past few days together thinking on big ideas, hard problems and new visions for what the world might be. What will tie it all together? This session on rebuilding — on facing tough questions and finding the inner (and exterior) resources we need to move forward. Embrace your emotional truth. How we deal […]Leah Chase is 94 years old and she spent the morning, as she always does, cooking at her restaurant. She brings lessons from a life of activism and speaking up (and cooking) to the stage at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED We’ve spent the past few days together thinking on big ideas, hard problems and new visions for what the world might be. What will tie it all together? This session on rebuilding — on facing tough questions and finding the inner (and exterior) resources we need to move forward. Embrace your emotional truth. How we deal with our inner world drives everything, says psychologist Susan David. Every aspect of how we love, how we live, parent and lead is influenced by our emotional agility, how well we approach our emotions with curiosity, courage and compassion. But we need to strip away the toxic rigidity of categorizing emotions as overwhelmingly good or bad,  pushing away the “bad” ones or pretending they don’t exist. And in our society, we’ve adopted a damaging mentality of forcing positivity as a new form of moral correctness. “It’s tyranny of positivity, and it’s cruel, unkind and ineffective,” says David. “We do it to ourselves and we do it to others.” This systematic avoidance and invalidation of our true feelings doesn’t equip us to deal with the world as it is. Yet, how do we conquer something so daunting and painful? David suggests when you feel a strong feeling, to not immediately run for the emotional exists. When she was struggling, journaling provided a way to work through feelings in a healthy and ultimately life-changing way. Tough emotions are a part of our contract with life, she says. It’s up to us to handle them and ourselves with mercy and grace. It starts with talking — and eating — together. By the time she took the stage by storm, the Queen of Creole Cuisine, Leah Chase, had already started cooking the lunch at her famous restaurant Dooky Chase. Though 94 years old, the activist and restaurateur radiates more life than an eager child, talking about the incredible group of people she has met throughout her life. She laughs at her children for asking her not to be political and proudly states, “You have to be political today. You have to be involved. You have to be part of the system. Look how it was when we couldn’t be a part of the system.” Chase knows too well the progress that has been made for women just in her lifetime — and how much more there is to do. In the midst of the civil rights movement, Dooky Chase served as a space where white and black people came together, where activists planned protests, and where the police entered but did not disturb. To her, it begins with talking, with sitting next to each other and discussing differences and commonalities. Still bustling today, Dooky Chase represents more than a place where people eat: It is symbolic of political transformation as it has “changed the course of America over gumbo and some fried chicken.” And, just in case anyone is concerned that she will retire anytime soon, Chase assures us that so long as she’s living, she will also be doing. Musimbi Kanyoro is head of the Global Fund for Women, funneling money worldwide into making lives better. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Promoting equal generosity. Like so many of the speakers who’ve stood on the TED Women stage this week, Musimbi Kanyoro is the child of a dynamo. Says Kanyoro of her mother, who lived in a farming village in western Kenya: “she was a little bit like Melinda Gates, but with a lot less mone[...]



When two take the stage: Images from TEDWomen 2017 duets

2017-11-04T03:41:04Z

If you think a TED Talk is always a solo star turn, think again. Every year at TEDWomen, we feature a whole session devoted to talks given by two partners.  Whether they’re couples, collaborators, parent and kid, or best friends, the onstage chemistry is always fun to watch. In this photo gallery you may get […]If you think a TED Talk is always a solo star turn, think again. Every year at TEDWomen, we feature a whole session devoted to talks given by two partners.  Whether they’re couples, collaborators, parent and kid, or best friends, the onstage chemistry is always fun to watch. In this photo gallery you may get the idea: Friends and collaborators Tiffany Mugo and Siphumeze Khundayi are talking here about open-minded, joyful sexuality, inspired by African traditions with a modern twist. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Ples Felix, left, and Azim Khamisa, center, share their heartfelt thank-yous with the audience as they close their talk. Behind them on the screen is their third partner, Ples’ grandson Tony, who’ll join their work fighting youth violence as soon as he leaves prison next year. They speak at TEDWomen 2017. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Best friends Felice Belle and Jennifer Murphy crack each other up onstage at TEDWomen. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Joan Blades and John Gable seem to be putting into practice the idea they came to share: that we should all try to listen to one another better and honor each other’s perspectives. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED After Jess Search, left, hosted a sparkling Session 5, she passed the baton to our conference co-host Pat Mitchell, who stepped in to handle some housekeeping notes to the audience. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED During our Facebook Live chat with Justin Baldoni, host Manoush Zomorodi has a moment. We may all have had that same moment. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED [...]



Be fierce, claim power: Notes from Session 5 of TEDWomen: Burn

2017-11-09T15:54:49Z

There’s a theme of Bridges that plays through this conference — and one of the things we sometimes need to do with bridges is burn them, to move forward with no option of going backward in time or space. In this session, hosted by documentary film aficionado Jess Search, we listen to hard truths about […]Singer/songwriter Judith Hill performs “Strange Fruit” to begin Session 5 of TEDWomen 2017, a hard look at hard things. Photo: Stacie McChesney / TED There’s a theme of Bridges that plays through this conference — and one of the things we sometimes need to do with bridges is burn them, to move forward with no option of going backward in time or space. In this session, hosted by documentary film aficionado Jess Search, we listen to hard truths about taking the steps we need to take — without looking back. In her day job, Jess Search supports documentary filmmakers as head of the Doc Society. She brings that same curious eye to her job this week: hosting Thursday evening’s session of TEDWomen 2017. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED A strange and bitter crop. The session begins with Judith Hill’s richly textured performance of “Strange Fruit,” a protest song made famous by Billie Holliday. Contrasting traditional Deep South imagery of magnolia blossoms and gentle breezes with the brutal legacy of lynching, the lyrics drive home the still-unexamined history of racial terrorism in the 20th-century American South: “Southern trees bear strange fruit / Blood on the leaves and blood at the root / Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze / Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.” When Gretchen Carlson reported her own sexual harassment at work, it sparked an outpouring of thousands of women’s stories — and inspired her to speak up even more to create safer places to work. She speaks at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Stacie McChesney / TED We have to be fierce. Gretchen Carlson is a veteran TV journalist and host who won the title of Miss America in the late ’80s, representing her home state with a smile and a plan to land a dream job in media. But again and again in her year wearing the crown, this young woman encountered men who pushed unwanted sexual advances on her: the TV executive who stuck his tongue down her throat; the LA publicist who grabbed her by the neck in a car backseat. “Only recently did I realize these incidents weren’t just harassment – they were assault,” she says now. “But like so many survivors, I thought: ‘I’ve got this. I’m okay. Just move on, Gretchen.'” Fast-forward to 2016, when her story of workplace harassment at Fox News broke. It was one of the scariest days of her life — but it also brought an outpouring of women’s stories, a flood of honesty that inspired her to do more and has led to her new book. Onstage, she lays out three things we can all do to create safer places to work — from acting as allies to fighting against binding arbitration clauses in workplace contracts. Because here’s the breaking news, “the untold, shocking truth about women and sexual harassment: Women want to work in a safe, welcoming and harassment-free environment,” she says. A pause. “That’s it.” Tribal attorney Tara Houska holds a piece of her cultural history — a rattle used in sacred ceremonies — while talking about the kids in the slide behind her, the Native American kids who are one of the fastest-growing new demographics in the US. Can we make life better for these kids? She speaks at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED We are resilient. We are fierce. We are still here. “When you aren’t viewed as real people, it’s a lot easier to run over your rights,” says tribal attorney Tara Houska. As part of the [...]



Fearless risk-taking: Notes from Session 4 of TEDWomen 2017: Suspend

2017-11-09T17:15:40Z

Acumen founder Jacqueline Novogratz hosts this session of TEDWomen 2017, "Suspension," featuring speakers including cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky, cellist Helen Gillet and psychiatrist (and former Zimbabwean rockstar) Dixon Chibanda. Jacqueline Novogratz hosts this session of TEDWomen 2017 — about the risks we take to create the world we want. . Photo: Stacie McChesney / TED The suspension bridge, says Acumen founder and session host Jacqueline Novogratz, provides the perfect metaphor for the leadership we need to see in this “fractured, divided, too often cynical world.” Why? Because its structure balances a strong, deep, unwavering foundation with its ability to stretch across vast distances to connect and bring close. That’s precisely what we need to see in today’s moral leaders, says Novogratz. And that’s what we’re set to hear in this TEDWomen session, “Suspend.” Shameem Akhtar is an education activist in her home of Pakistan, where she advocates for the education of women and girls. She speaks at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED To learn is to be free. Shameem Akhtar lived as a boy for most of her childhood, due to her uncle’s savvy thinking around the oppressive restrictions often placed on girls in their native Pakistani culture. She experienced the privileges and freedoms of being a boy — playing outside and, most important, going to school. An immutable passion was lit to study and learn, and be free, and she fought both to attend university and to take a job, in a culture where most women are expected to stay home. And then a funny thing happened; people noticed she was sending money home. “Over time, other parents begin sending their daughters to school,” she says. “Today, not a single girl from my village is out of school.” Change is slow and there is still much work to be done, but Akhtar is now a passionate advocate for girls’ rights and education. “The road is not easy, the destination is not close, but I have dreams in my eyes and I am not going to look back now,” she concludes, to great applause from an appreciative audience. (Note: this is Akhtar’s first visit to the United States. She arrived in New Orleans on Halloween. Talk about culture shock.) Lera Boroditsky studies how our language habits shape how we think and see the world, sharing amazing examples from many cultures. She speaks at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash Does language shape how we think? Globally, there are about 7,000 languages spoken, all with different sounds, vocabularies and structures. “It begs the question, does the language we speak shape the way we think?” asks cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky. It’s a long-standing (like, thousands of years), ongoing debate, but Boroditsky shares five examples from new research suggesting that the answer is … yes. For example, the Pormpuraaw, an Aboriginal tribe in Australia, use cardinal directions instead of words like left or right, helping them to stay better oriented than we used to think humans ever could be. “The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is,” says Boroditsky. “Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000.” Turning prison into a bridge to a better life. Six years ago, Teresa Njoroge was convicted of a financial crime — the end of a long string of false accusations against her, increasing attempts to bribe her, and a corrupt justice system in her home in Kenya. As the gates of Langata Women Maximum Prison closed behind her, she knew she was in for the toughest year of her life. But what she did not expect, she says, was the women, and their stories, she encountered there. “I reali[...]



The power of partnership: Notes from Session 3 of TEDWomen … Connect

2017-11-09T15:54:57Z

Our hosts for this session, Jean Oelwang and Chris Waddell, are life partners who’ve both had to overcome their inclination to be a solo superhero — to be the best at business, school, sports. Jean spent her career climbing the corporate ladder, being tough, making her way to the top alone. Meanwhile, Chris was a […]Life partners Chris Waddell and Jean Oelwang are hosts of Session 3, an exploration of partnerships. They kick off the session at TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Our hosts for this session, Jean Oelwang and Chris Waddell, are life partners who’ve both had to overcome their inclination to be a solo superhero — to be the best at business, school, sports. Jean spent her career climbing the corporate ladder, being tough, making her way to the top alone. Meanwhile, Chris was a skiier who, early in his own career, faced what could be a devastating setback when his ski popped off during a turn, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down. He went on to become a world-champion monoskier, setting Paralympic history. He kicks off this session with his story of a quest to summit Mt. Kilimanjaro solo on his handcycle. On the way, he found that, maybe, going solo wasn’t the real goal at all. Building from this story, Session 3 unfolds … Historian of photography Deborah Willis and artist Hank Willis Thomas, sometime collaborators, always mother and son, speak about their intertwined work and lives at TEDWomen 2017. Photo: Stacie McChesney / TED Love overrules: Deborah Willis and Hank Willis Thomas are photographers. They are also mother and son. Deborah, told by her photography professor that she was intended for motherhood and not the art world, responded by giving birth to Hank, working the pregnancy into her pictures, and launching into a storied career as a photographer, curator and writer. Growing up in a house full of pictures, Hank also picked up a camera early in life. Their subsequent work has always drawn from what they characterize as a symbiotic relationship defined by abiding love. “Through her actions,” Hanks says of his mother, “she has shown me that love is an action, not a feeling … a way of listening and a way of seeing.” Love–as it relates to family, community, race, identity, notions of truth–has remained a throughline that pierces their efforts to highlight stories that diverge from mainstream narratives about black life. Pondering the reason behind her decision to make photography and love the twin foundations of her professional life, Deborah comes to a conclusion: “Because of the lack of images that circulate in the public about black love and black joy.” Watching this duo onstage provides both. A textbook for racial literacy. Growing up, Winona Guo and Priya Vulchi thought they understood racism. “We had experienced and heard stories about race, about prejudice, discrimination and stereotyping, and we were like, ‘we get it, racism!’” says Vulchi. “But we weren’t even close,” says Guo. The two friends, then seniors in high school, decided they needed to learn more — so they took a trip to collect hundreds of personal stories about race. Using those stories, Guo and Vulchi highlight the two fundamental gaps they discovered in our racial literacy: the heart gap and the mind gap. One, an inability to understand each of our experiences and be compassionate beyond lip service, and the other, an inability to understand the larger systemic ways racism operates. To bridge those gaps, Guo and Vulchi co-created a textbook, The Classroom Index, that pairs personal stories with statistics. “We need to raise the bar, elevate our standards for racial literacy, because without investing in an education that values both the sto[...]



A glimpse of a bold new future: Notes from Session 2 of TEDWomen 2017: Design

2017-11-09T15:41:02Z

Physician and UN High Commissioner Alaa Murabit hosts the second session of TEDWomen 2017, featuring all things design and a rousing performance from writer and activist Asali DeVan Ecclesiastes.Host Alaa Murabit, a physician and activist, spoke at TEDWomen in 2015; she returns now in 2017 to host a bold session about design of all kinds, from medical breakthroughs to the simple dignity of bring true to yourself. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Up bright and early in the Big Easy, and right back into the TEDWomen program, with a session hosted by physician and UN High Commissioner (and a past TEDWomen speaker herself) Alaa Murabit, who confesses that she was pleasantly confused to find herself helming a session featuring all things design. “I always thought design was about externally pleasing aesthetics,” she said, confessing that her own design skills are … limited. “But what you’ll learn from speakers in this session is that design isn’t just about how great something looks — but how well it works.” Ready? Ready: How do you design for the wonders of science? Growing up, neuroscientist-turned-designer Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya watched how her father would encourage diners in his Thai restaurant to embrace the unfamiliar. Now, she applies this same spirit to science activism, attempting to “introduce the wonder and humanity of science to the world, just like my dad introduced Thai food to our neighbors.” Her own experiments so far have resulted in creating Beyond Curie, a series of illustrations highlighting historical badass women in STEM and a scientifically rigorous, yet visually compelling pop-up science museum for adults. Most recently, she started a fashion line and community for women and girls to express their love of science — and find each other in the process. Giving new meaning to remote work. “We’re just getting inside the joint now,” says Nadine Hachach-Haram as she peers into her laptop. She’s not kidding — she’s helping a surgeon based in Minnesota to drill into a patient’s knee, using her webcam to provide direction and feedback on what he should do next. Remote, collaborative surgeries like this, she says, can provide the next wave of surgical innovation, likely to have as dramatic an impact on humanity as the discovery of antiseptic or the use of robotics in the operating room. With her system, called Proxima, an experienced surgeon can advise another surgeon on a procedure, live, using AR and a laptop camera. It’s early days, but the hope is to provide a lifeline for the 5 billion people who lack access to safe surgical care. Says one mother whose child received cleft palette surgery in her Peruvian village, directed by a surgeon in California, “this technology gave my daughter her smile.” Born to invent. In 2016 Anushka Naiknaware of Portland, Oregon, became the youngest winner — at age 13 — of the Google Science Fair when she designed a sensor that tracks wound healing. Driven by a fascination about how the world worked, she learned about  wounds that don’t heal normally due to preexisting conditions such as diabetes — and was shocked by their prevalence and cost ($50 billion worldwide in 2010). Since there’s a correlation between the moisture level of a wound and its stage of healing, Naiknaware worked in her garage to combine materials science, fractal math and biology to create a sensor that wirelessly delivers wound information to both patient and doctor. Did we mention she was 13 when she did this? But Anushka says she’d rather people be inspired by her story to make their own difference. Young iventor Anushka Naiknaware has a passion to solve problems and to learn as much as she can about ever[...]



The power of showing up: Notes from Session 1 of TEDWomen 2017: Build

2017-11-09T15:55:04Z

In this first session of TEDWomen, themed "Build," we find ideas of power, empathy, ingenuity and radical humanity, to name just a few.Vocalist Deborah Cox and the Lake Area Girls Choir blow the roof off to kick-start TEDWomen 2017: Bridges, November 1-3, 2017, Orpheum Theatre, New Orleans. Photo: Stacie McChesney / TED “We build them, we cross them, sometimes we burn them.” TED Content Director Kelly Stoetzel kicks off TEDWomen 2017 with an explanation of how she and conference curator Pat Mitchell developed this year’s rich conference theme, Bridges. “Over the next three days we’ll hear talks from artists and architects, entrepreneurs, scientists and activists,” she continues — the usual TED fare, in other words, given a special TEDWomen twist. In this session, “Build,” we find ideas of power, empathy, ingenuity and radical humanity, to name a few. So let’s get cracking. Hosts Pat Mitchell and Kelly Stoetzel kick off TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED I’m every woman. This fall, the powerhouse vocalist Deborah Cox is starring in the national tour of The Bodyguard, a musical based on a movie starring the late great Whitney Houston, who sings a song first popularized by the great Chaka Khan that was co-written by the songwriting legend Valerie Simpson (of Ashford & Simpson)  … That chain of strong women’s voices just got 50 voices stronger, as Cox opens with a stunning take on “I’m Every Woman,” joined by the young women of the Lake Area Girls Choir. Their combined voices rock the audience right out of their seats, echoing up through the balconies of the historic Orpheum Theater. Be the first domino. Self-proclaimed professional troublemaker Luvvie Ajayi tamed her fears by conquering them in the boldest ways possible — deep-sea diving, skydiving and ziplining across forests. In this, the first full talk of the conference, she encourages others to do the same, to be the first domino causing a chain reaction. “Being the first domino is doing or saying what is difficult, because that is usually when it’s needed,” she says. However, she adds, we can’t simply rely on those who have traditionally spoken up and out to ignite social change. Instead, she call for us all to fearlessly embrace who we are as a revolutionary act, to become fellow troublemakers and speak truth to power despite trepidation. Why did Luvvie Ajayi jump out of a “perfectly good plane,” she asks? To face her fear in the boldest way possible. She speaks at TEDWomen 2017: Bridges, November 1-3, 2017, Orpheum Theatre, New Orleans, Louisiana. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Footbridges that connect people with opportunity. Avery Louise Bang found her calling when she traveled in Fiji as a college student and saw communities mired in isolation because of the rivers, canyons or peaks separating them from the rest of the world. Without an easy way to cross these expanses, people struggled to send their kids to school or reach medical care. Bang resolved to help, and studied engineering before joining the Denver-based nonprofit Bridges to Prosperity, which has now built 270 bridges in more than 20 countries, connecting nearly a million people. But their work, she emphasizes, is less about constructing spans of steel, stone and mortar and more about transforming lives by giving them access to a larger world. She calls on countries and philanthropists to prioritize connecting the estimated one billion people on the planet still stranded due to geography. As she says: “Poverty due to rural isolation is a crisis we can solve in our lifetime.” Avery Bang builds bridges — literal ones, that link isolated villages to s[...]



Gallery: Just about to open doors at TEDWomen 2017 at the Orpheum Theater

2017-11-02T00:06:20Z

We’re about to open the doors for the audience to join TEDWomen in New Orleans — three days of powerful talks from women and men that take on the issues breaking now and share soul-deep ideas for creating better lives going forward. TEDWomen is happening in an astonishing theater, new to us and freshly renovated […]Rehearsal days involve a lot of laptop time as our video and stage teams fine-tune the details to create the amazing experience that will be TEDWomen 2017 in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED We’re about to open the doors for the audience to join TEDWomen in New Orleans — three days of powerful talks from women and men that take on the issues breaking now and share soul-deep ideas for creating better lives going forward. TEDWomen is happening in an astonishing theater, new to us and freshly renovated but nearly a century old. In itself it’s a story of renewal and rejuvenation: Flooded during Katrina, the theater was meticulously restored and reopened in 2015. During our rehearsal and setup says, we’re pretty unabashedly taking hundreds of pictures of this glorious interior — which is about to rock with the sounds of the Lake Area Girls Choir backing the Broadway star Deborah Cox. Photographer Ryan Lash captures this amazing theater from three angles — from the top of the house, from the first balcony, and a reverse shot from backstage capturing yet another impromptu crew meeting on the red circle. The speaker’s-eye view from the red circle, looking out at the audience seating at the Orpheum Theater in New Orleans. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Follow news from TEDWomen in a bunch of ways — here on the TED Blog, on @TEDTalks, on the hashtag #tedwomen. Tune in for some amazing Facebook Live interviews with four speakers throughout Thursday and Friday. And of course, look for talks from TEDWomen that will post on TED.com throughout the year to come! [...]



Watch Facebook Live sessions, live from TEDWomen in New Orleans

2017-11-06T14:06:05Z

Join us for four in-depth conversations over two days, live from the Blue Room at TEDWomen, hosted by podcaster Manoush Zomorodi. Guests include TEDWomen speakers Gretchen Carlson, Sally Kohn, Cleo Wade and Justin Baldoni. Find them all on Facebook at facebook.com/TED — or get direct links below to each super-worthwhile conversation Facebook Live with Gretchen Carlson Broadcast journalist Gretchen […] Join us for four in-depth conversations over two days, live from the Blue Room at TEDWomen, hosted by podcaster Manoush Zomorodi. Guests include TEDWomen speakers Gretchen Carlson, Sally Kohn, Cleo Wade and Justin Baldoni. Find them all on Facebook at facebook.com/TED — or get direct links below to each super-worthwhile conversation Facebook Live with Gretchen Carlson Broadcast journalist Gretchen Carlson joins us for a newsworthy interview about sexual harassment and assault in the workplace and what we can do to end it. Facebook Live with Sally Kohn Political pundit Sally Kohn talks with Manoush about media bias and the challenge of reporting news that speaks to both sides. Facebook Live with Cleo Wade Artist and poet Cleo Wade joins Manoush in the Blue Room for an interview about finding your voice and using your power to create change. Facebook Live with Justin Baldoni Actor Justin Baldoni from CW’s Jane the Virgin talks with Manoush about challenging gender stereotypes, redefining masculinity, and working together to end sexism. [...]



Free report: Bright ideas in business, distilled from TEDGlobal 2017

2017-10-31T16:02:53Z

Th Brightline Initiative helps executives implement ambitious ideas from business strategies, so it’s only fitting that the nonprofit group was onsite taking notes and holding brainstorms at TEDGlobal 2017 in Arusha, Tanzania. With the theme “Builders. Truth-Tellers. Catalysts.,” TEDGlobal was a celebration of doers and thinkers, including more than 70 speakers who’ve started companies, nonprofits, education […]What’s a good way to remember an idea in the middle of a conference — so you can turn it into action? Take notes and brainstorm with others. At TEDGlobal 2017 in Tanzania, the Brightline Initiative inspired people to brainstorm ideas around talks they’d just watched, including Pierre Thiam’s celebration of the ancient grain fonio (watch this talk). (Photo: Ryan Lash/TED) Th Brightline Initiative helps executives implement ambitious ideas from business strategies, so it’s only fitting that the nonprofit group was onsite taking notes and holding brainstorms at TEDGlobal 2017 in Arusha, Tanzania. With the theme “Builders. Truth-Tellers. Catalysts.,” TEDGlobal was a celebration of doers and thinkers, including more than 70 speakers who’ve started companies, nonprofits, education initiatives and even movements. We’re excited to share the Brightline Initiative’s just-released report on business ideas pulled from the talks of TEDGlobal 2017. These aren’t your typical business ideas — one speaker suggests a way to find brand-new markets by thinking beyond the physical address, while several others share how ancient traditions can spawn fresh ideas and even cutting-edge businesses. Whether you run a startup, sit in the C-suite or are known as a star employee, the ideas from these talks can spark new thinking and renew your inspiration. Get the report here >> PS: Look for more great ideas from the Brightline Initiative soon; this week at TED’s New York office, TED and Brightline partnered to produce an evening-length event of speakers who are creating change through smart, nuanced business thinking. Read about the event now, and watch for talks to appear on TED.com in the coming months. [...]



The making of TED-Ed’s first 360° animation

2017-10-26T20:42:04Z

  Virtual reality is an emerging medium for artists and educators. Painting is an ancient art form; some cave paintings were made up to 40,000 years ago. In TED-Ed’s first 360° animated video, you can examine the intersection of these two ideas by exploring an ancient cave and its surroundings as educator Iseult Gillespie shares a […]  Virtual reality is an emerging medium for artists and educators. Painting is an ancient art form; some cave paintings were made up to 40,000 years ago. In TED-Ed’s first 360° animated video, you can examine the intersection of these two ideas by exploring an ancient cave and its surroundings as educator Iseult Gillespie shares a brief history of cave paintings. Below, animation director Michael “Lippy” Lipman shares a few tips, sketches and stories from the making of this special animation. As director of the very first TED-Ed VR animated short, you worked with an ace team to bring hand-drawn animation and educational content to life in a new genre: the emerging medium of 360° 2D stereoscopic VR animation. How difficult was it to pull that rabbit out of the hat? Generally I can say that pulling together all of the various technologies and production artists to make this happen was probably THE most daunting production challenge I’ve ever encountered in my 25 years of working in animation. There is simply no “one product solution” at this point in VR’s production adolescence. Happily, we were pretty ruthless and focused in our desire to create a VR cartoon. I’m glad we persevered. To get from the original concept idea to a working final product required cobbling together a “tech salad” of software solutions. And to make it even more challenging, the final presentation platform — Google Cardboard video presented on YouTube — kept iterating throughout our production process. So that in itself was a moving target which made our ability to cross the finish line more precarious by the month! Happily, we were pretty ruthless and focused in our desire to create a VR cartoon. I’m glad we persevered. When did you start working on this particular animation project with TED-Ed? I received my first Cardboard player in my New York Times Sunday delivery in the fall of 2015. I’d been reading about the platform, but when the viewer just showed up in my living room I immediately realized that millions of NYT readers now had access to Cardboard-based content. I made a decision that morning to create cartoons for the platform! I thought long and hard about what kinds of content would work well in the 360° VR world and pretty quickly came to the idea that a narrator-driven vehicle could work very well in a medium where the viewer can be looking at any point in the 360° sphere at any time. This is a massive challenge for traditional narrative cinema because the director is not fully in charge of choosing the audience’s focus. And though I certainly had to deal with many of the same challenges as an animation director, I knew that the inclusion of a voiceover narrator would make my job easier by directing the viewer to look for specific visuals within the world I would create. Early concept art included this flat, panoramic painting of the inside of the cave. Art credit: Lippy/TED-Ed Why did you suggest the topic of prehistoric cave paintings for this video? Well, once I’d gotten the Cardboard viewer I began to gorge myself on any and all of the 360° VR content I could find. I knew that I wanted to make the piece as a hand-drawn 2D animated short. Having set that criteria, it then dawned on me that I’d be required to design, paint, and [...]



8 ways TEDxers gave back on TEDxGlobalDay

2017-10-26T14:19:23Z

The spirit of the TEDx community shone brightly during the first TEDxGlobalDay in September. In this dynamic one-day initiative, more than 5,000 TEDxers from 230 cities in 76 countries set out to prove that local action can spark global conversations. The day was broken up into three parts, organized by local hosts who managed teams […]The spirit of the TEDx community shone brightly during the first TEDxGlobalDay in September. In this dynamic one-day initiative, more than 5,000 TEDxers from 230 cities in 76 countries set out to prove that local action can spark global conversations. The day was broken up into three parts, organized by local hosts who managed teams of around 20 people each. Each team watched the talks from TEDGlobal>NYC, talked about ways to foster change in their communities, and then went out into the field to volunteer: Teams cleaned up public spaces, helped with hurricane relief, visited local schools and orphanages to deliver necessary supplies and visit with the children, and helped spread awareness about mental health issues. Take a look at what some of the teams did — and check out the TEDxGlobalDay Facebook page for more examples. Beirut, Lebanon The team from TEDxLAU joined up with FoodBlessed, a volunteer organization that fights food poverty in Lebanon. Together, they helped to serve a weekly meal for those in need. Lagos, Nigeria In Nigeria, TEDx teams talked with a local recycling company about the importance of proper waste disposal. They then went out to tidy up the streets of Lagos and interact with locals to share what they learned. Jakarta, Indonesia TEDxJakarta went to an urban garden to learn more about the benefits of composting. They learned about how using their leftover food as fertilizer helps reduce waste, and got their hands dirty as they practiced how to grow their own food with it. Santa Clara, California The team from TEDxLosGatosHighSchool made blankets and pet beds, then delivered them to a local animal shelter. Bangalore, India TEDxers kicked things off with a welcoming dance, followed by rose milk and samosas. After the talks, the team went to visit an orphanage for differently abled kids, where they put on a song-and-dance performance and helped plant tree saplings on the grounds. Chiang Mai, Thailand The TEDxChiangMai team went out into the streets for a two-part activity. They took a walk around the center of town to clean up the streets, and also kicked off a “no straw” campaign that encourages people to switch from disposable plastic straws to those made from stainless steel, bamboo or papaya fibers. Tehran, Iran The TEDxTehran team spent the day discussing Iran’s economy, specifically how to find solutions to the current recession. They broke up into small groups, and each created a mini model of Iran’s economy to test their ideas. In this activity, each group built their own “paper airplane factory” and received an order for 18 paper airplanes. Their goal: produce beautiful high-quality paper airplanes based on some of the solutions they had brainstormed. Shamāl Kurdufān, Sudan The TEDXALUbayyid team spent the day working with orphaned children. At a local school for orphans, they helped to build new classrooms and spent time picking up garbage around the grounds, to create a clean, happy space for the kids. [...]



Rhiannon Giddens and Kate Orff win MacArthur “genius” grants, and more TED news

2017-10-21T17:01:09Z

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A MacArthur for Rhiannon Giddens and Kate Orff. On October 11, the MacArthur Foundation released their list of 2017 Fellows. Among them are musician Rhiannon Giddens and landscape architect Kate Orff. Giddens, known for her rich reinterpretations of American […]As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A MacArthur for Rhiannon Giddens and Kate Orff. On October 11, the MacArthur Foundation released their list of 2017 Fellows. Among them are musician Rhiannon Giddens and landscape architect Kate Orff. Giddens, known for her rich reinterpretations of American folk music, performed for lucky audiences at TED2016. Kate Orff spoke at TEDWomen 2010 about her efforts to revitalize New York’s rivers using oysters. Along with the 20 other fellows, Giddens and Orff will each receive $625,000 with no strings attached to pursue their work. (Watch Giddens’ TED Talk and Orff’s TED Talk) src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/rhiannon_giddens_3_songs_that_bring_history_to_life" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> Dare to drive. After recording herself driving a car in Saudi Arabia and posting the footage on YouTube, Saudi Arabian activist Manal al-Sharif became the face of the Dare2Drive campaign. Though cultural traditions excluded women from driving, this campaign called for women to post pictures of themselves on-the-wheel and on-the-go on social media, strategically working against the government’s ban on public demonstrations and protests. Albeit motivated by its potential impact on the economy and the desire to soften the world’s perception of Saudi Arabia, the Saudi Arabian government recently announced that women will be allowed to drive starting in June of 2018. (Watch al-Sharif’s TED Talk) The internet of flying things. Awaiting medical test results can be nerve-wracking and potentially deadly. That’s why Andreas Raptopoulos’ Matternet has coupled medicine with drone technology. By partnering with Swiss hospitals to deliver blood samples to and from testing centers, Raptopoulos’ drone technology is saving hours in diagnostics and treatment. In addition, through a partnership with Mercedes-Benz, Matternet has launched a drone delivery pilot program in Zurich that carries packages up to 4.4 lbs at 43 mph for over 12 miles — a delivery system they hope to one day deploy globally. (Watch Raptopoulos’ TED Talk) A new geological era. The Anthropocene Working Group (an international group of scientists) developed a proposal to name the current and official geological era the Anthropocene — an era where humans have notably and markedly altered the course of Earth’s timeline and ecosystems. Publishing their summary of evidence and recommendations in the journal Anthropocene in early October, the authors, including TED speaker Naomi Oreskes, suggest that the start date for this suggested era should be the mid-20th century, when momentous chemical changes, species invasions and global climate shifts began to occur (Watch Oreskes’ TED Talk) A new way to fund digital journalism. Once purely a form of affirmation, likes and shares might have kindled a new approach to keep digital journalism alive by inspiring digital activists Bruno Torturra, Ariel Kogan, and Thiago Rondon to found Libre. With the ultimate goal of revolutionizing journalism, the founders wanted to engineer a solution to the financial instability that plagues digital jour[...]



Achievement unlocked: TEDx celebrates 100,000 talks!

2017-10-19T20:33:42Z

Ideas never sleep — and neither does the TEDx archive.  Since going online in 2009, the archive has amassed thousands of perspective-shifting talks from across the world — and we’ve just reached 100,000! So, to celebrate TEDx and its rich library of incredible ideas (honestly, where else but on the TEDx archive will you hear […]Ideas never sleep — and neither does the TEDx archive.  Since going online in 2009, the archive has amassed thousands of perspective-shifting talks from across the world — and we’ve just reached 100,000! So, to celebrate TEDx and its rich library of incredible ideas (honestly, where else but on the TEDx archive will you hear from your city’s leading fly expert, a neuroscientist and a farm activist all in one place?), we’re highlighting this moment with some of our favorite milestones to date. [...]



Monica Lewinsky’s favorite TED Talks to help prevent bullying

2017-10-25T19:30:22Z

October is National Bullying Prevention Month in the US, and chances are you know someone who’s been bullied — or you’ve been bullied yourself. Here, I’ve curated a list of TED and TEDx Talks that I feel unpack different aspects of the problems, solutions and experiences we’re facing in our modern world of bullying – […]Share this playlist of talks selected by Monica Lewinsky in honor of National Bullying Prevention Month. October is National Bullying Prevention Month in the US, and chances are you know someone who’s been bullied — or you’ve been bullied yourself. Here, I’ve curated a list of TED and TEDx Talks that I feel unpack different aspects of the problems, solutions and experiences we’re facing in our modern world of bullying – both on and offline. I hope you’ll not only watch these talks, but also consider ways you might help to move the conversation on these issues forward. As you do, be an upstander: Show support to a target of bullying behavior or online harassment; report a bullying situation; or intervene on behalf of someone if it feels safe for you. Together, we can hopefully make it harder for bullies to thrive. Shane Koyczan: To This Day … for the bullied and beautiful Shane Koyczan’s spoken-word poem speaks to young people suffering from bullying in such a profoundly moving, empathic way that lifts the spirit and validates our humanity. He says, “If you can’t see anything beautiful about yourself, get a better mirror, look a little closer.” src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/shane_koyczan_to_this_day_for_the_bullied_and_beautiful" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> Andrew Solomon: How the worst moments in our lives make us who we are Rather than a search for meaning in the adversity in our lives, we need to forge meaning and build identity. “Forging meaning is about changing yourself,” says Andrew Solomon. “Building identity is about changing the world.” And in a sentence that speaks especially to me, he says, “When we’re ashamed, we can’t tell our stories, and stories are the foundation of identity.” src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/andrew_solomon_how_the_worst_moments_in_our_lives_make_us_who_we_are" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> Nancy Lublin: How data from a crisis text line is saving lives Sometimes it’s not enough to try to help. Sometimes you need to be so creative, so savvy, so plain smart that you realize to reach today’s young people you need to use their megaphone – texting. Nancy Lublin had that vision. She says of her Crisis Text Line, “If you text us, ‘I want to die,’ or ‘I want to kill myself,’ the algorithm reads that, you’re code orange, and you become number one in the queue. So we can handle severity, not chronological.” src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/nancy_lublin_the_heartbreaking_text_that_inspired_a_crisis_help_line" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> Jon Ronson: When online shaming goes too far Jon Ronson paints such a vivid, unforgettable portrait of how a human being’s entire existence can be brutally and cruelly destroyed in an instant by an Internet mob. He uses humor and intelligence to call us out on our public shaming – and it works. src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/jon_ronson_what_happens_when_online_shaming_spiral[...]