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The TED Blog shares interesting news about TED, TED Talks video, the TED Prize and more.



Updated: 2018-02-23T19:25:24Z

 



WordPress.comRemembering pastor Billy Graham, and more news in brief

2018-02-21T20:10:23Z

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Remembering Billy Graham. For more than 60 years, pastor Billy Graham inspired countless people around the world with his sermons. On Wednesday, February 21, he passed away at his home in North Carolina after struggling with numerous illnesses over the past few years. He was 99 years old. Raised […] Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Remembering Billy Graham. For more than 60 years, pastor Billy Graham inspired countless people around the world with his sermons. On Wednesday, February 21, he passed away at his home in North Carolina after struggling with numerous illnesses over the past few years. He was 99 years old. Raised on a dairy farm in N.C., Graham used the power of new technologies, like radio and television, to spread his message of personal salvation to an estimated 215 million people globally, while simultaneously reflecting on technology’s limitations. Reciting the story of King David to audiences at TED1998, “David found that there were many problems that technology could not solve. There were many problems still left. And they’re still with us, and you haven’t solved them, and I haven’t heard anybody here speak to that,” he said, referring to human evil, suffering, and death. To Graham, the answer to these problems was to be found in God. Even after his death, through the work of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, led by his son Franklin, his message of personal salvation will live on. (Watch Graham’s TED Talk) Fashion inspired by Black Panther. TED Fellow and fashion designer Walé Oyéjidé draws on aesthetics from around the globe to create one-of-a-kind pieces that dismantle bias and celebrate often-marginalized groups. For New York Fashion Week, Oyéjidé designed a suit with a coat and scarf for a Black Panther-inspired showcase, sponsored by Marvel Studios. One of Oyéjidé’s scarves is also worn in the movie by its protagonist, King T’Challa. “The film is very much about the joy of seeing cultures represented in roles that they are generally not seen in. There’s villainy and heros, tech genius and romance,” Oyéjidé told the New York Times, “People of color are generally presented as a monolithic image. I’m hoping it smashes the door open to show that people can occupy all these spaces.” (Watch Oyéjidé’s TED Talk) Nuclear energy advocate runs for governor. Environmentalist and nuclear energy advocate Michael Shellenberger has launched his campaign for governor of California as an independent candidate. “I think both parties are corrupt and broken. We need to start fresh with a fresh agenda,” he says. Shellenberger intends to run on an energy and environmental platform, and he hopes to involve student environmental activists in his campaign. California’s gubernatorial election will be held in November 2018. (Watch Shellenberger’s TED Talk) Can UV light help us fight the flu? Radiation scientist David Brenner and his research team at Columbia University’s Irving Medical Center are exploring whether a type of ultraviolet light known as far-UVC could be used to kill the flu virus. To test their theory, they released a strain of the flu virus called H1N1 in an enclosed chamber and exposed it to low doses of UVC. In a paper published in Nature’s Scientific Reports, they report that far-UVC successfully deactivated the virus. Previous research has shown that far-UVC doesn’t penetrate the outer layer of human skin or eyes, unlike conventional UV rays, which means that it appears to be safe to use on humans. Brenner suggests that far-UVC could be used in public spaces to fight the flu. “Think about doctors’ waiting rooms, schools, airports and airplanes—any place where there’s a likelihood for airborne viruses,” Brenner told Time. (Watch Brenner’s TED Talk.) A beautiful sculpture for Madrid. For the 400 anniversary of Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, artist Janet Echelman created a colorful, fibrous sculpture, which she suspended above the historic space. The sculptu[...]



You are here for a reason: 4 questions with Halla Tómasdóttir

2018-02-13T18:08:45Z

Cartier and TED believe in the power of bold ideas to empower local initiatives to have global impact. To celebrate Cartier’s dedication to launching the ideas of female entrepreneurs into concrete change, TED has curated a special session of talks around the theme “Bold Alchemy” for the Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards, featuring a selection of favorite […] Cartier and TED believe in the power of bold ideas to empower local initiatives to have global impact. To celebrate Cartier’s dedication to launching the ideas of female entrepreneurs into concrete change, TED has curated a special session of talks around the theme “Bold Alchemy” for the Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards, featuring a selection of favorite TED speakers. Leading up to the session, TED talked with financier, entrepreneur and onetime candidate for president of Iceland, Halla Tómasdóttir, about what influences, inspires and drives her to be bold. TED: Tell us who you are. Halla Tómasdóttir: I think of myself first and foremost as a change catalyst who is passionate about good leadership and a gender-balanced world. My leadership career started in corporate America with Mars and Pepsi Cola, but since then I have served as an entrepreneur, educator, investor, board director, business leader and presidential candidate. I am married, a proud mother of two teenagers and a dog and am perhaps best described by the title given to me by the New Yorker: “A Living Emoji of Sincerity.” TED: What’s a bold move you’ve made in your career? HT: I left a high-profile position as the first female CEO of the Iceland Chamber of Commerce to become an entrepreneur with the vision to incorporate feminine values into finance. I felt the urge to show a different way in a sector that felt unsustainable to me, and I longed to work in line with my own values. TED: Tell us about a woman who inspires you. HT: The women of Iceland inspired me at an early age, when they showed incredible courage, solidarity and sisterhood and “took the day off” (went on a strike) and literally brought the country to its knees — as nothing worked when women didn’t do any work. Five years later, Iceland was the first country in the world to democratically elect a woman as president. I was 11 years old at the time, and her leadership has inspired me ever since. Her clarity on what she cares about and her humble way of serving those causes is truly remarkable. TED: If you could go back in time, what would you tell your 18-year-old self? HT: I would say: Halla, just be you and know that you are enough. People will frequently tell you things like: “This is the way we do things around here.” Don’t ever take that as a valid answer if it doesn’t feel right to you. We are not here to continue to do more of the same if it doesn’t work or feel right anymore. We are here to grow, ourselves and our society. You are here for a reason: make your life and leadership matter. src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/halla_tomasdottir_it_s_time_for_women_to_run_for_office" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> The private TED session at Cartier takes place April 26 in Singapore. It will feature talks from a diverse range of global leaders, entrepreneurs and change-makers, exploring topics ranging from the changing global workforce to maternal health to data literacy, and it will include a performance from the only female double violinist in the world. [...]



New podcast alert: WorkLife with Adam Grant, a TED original, premieres Feb. 28

2018-02-13T15:42:15Z

Adam Grant to Explore the Psychology of Unconventional Workplaces as Host of Upcoming New TED Original Podcast “WorkLife” Organizational psychologist, professor, bestselling author and TED speaker Adam Grant is set to host a new TED original podcast series titled WorkLife with Adam Grant, which will explore unorthodox work cultures in search of surprising and actionable […] Adam Grant to Explore the Psychology of Unconventional Workplaces as Host of Upcoming New TED Original Podcast “WorkLife” Organizational psychologist, professor, bestselling author and TED speaker Adam Grant is set to host a new TED original podcast series titled WorkLife with Adam Grant, which will explore unorthodox work cultures in search of surprising and actionable lessons for improving listeners’ work lives. Beginning Wednesday, February 28, each weekly episode of WorkLife will center around one extraordinary workplace—from an award-winning TV writing team racing against the clock, to a sports team whose culture of humility propelled it to unexpected heights. In immersive interviews that take place in both the field and the studio, Adam brings his observations to vivid life – and distills useful insights in his friendly, accessible style. “We spend a quarter of our lives in our jobs. This show is about making all that time worth your time,” says Adam, the bestselling author of Originals, Give and Take, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg. “In WorkLife, we’ll take listeners inside the minds of some fascinating people in some truly unusual workplaces, and mix in fresh social science to reveal how we can lead more creative, meaningful, and generous lives at work.” Produced by TED in partnership with Pineapple Street Media and Transmitter Media, WorkLife is TED’s first original podcast created in partnership with a TED speaker. Its immersive, narrative format is designed to offer audiences a new way to explore TED speaker ideas in depth. Adam’s talks “Are you a giver or a taker?” and “The surprising habits of original thinkers” have together been viewed more than 11 million times in the past two years. The show marks TED’s latest effort to test new content formats beyond the nonprofit’s signature first-person TED talk. Other recent TED original content experiments include Sincerely, X, an audio series featuring talks delivered anonymously;  Small Thing Big Idea, a Facebook Watch video series about everyday designs that changed the world; and the Indian prime-time live-audience television series TED Talks India: Nayi Soch, hosted by Bollywood star and TED speaker Shah Rukh Khan. “We’re aggressively developing and testing a number of new audio and video programs that support TED’s mission of ‘Ideas Worth Spreading,’” said TED head of media and WorkLife co-executive producer Colin Helms. “In every case, our speakers and their ideas remain the focus, but with fresh formats, styles and lengths, we can reach and appeal to even more curious audiences, wherever they are.” WorkLife debuts Wednesday, February 28 on Apple Podcasts, the TED Android app, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. Season 1 features eight episodes, roughly 30 minutes each, plus two bonus episodes. It’s sponsored by Accenture, Bonobos, JPMorgan Chase & Co., and Warby Parker. New episodes will be made available every Wednesday. [...]



The Big Idea: How to find and hire the best employees

2018-02-06T21:47:42Z

So, you want to hire the best employee for the job? Or perhaps you’re the employee looking to be hired. Here’s some counterintuitive and hyper-intuitive advice that could get the right foot in the door. Expand your definition of the “right” resume Here’s the hypothetical situation: a position opens up at your company, applications start […]So, you want to hire the best employee for the job? Or perhaps you’re the employee looking to be hired. Here’s some counterintuitive and hyper-intuitive advice that could get the right foot in the door. Expand your definition of the “right” resume Here’s the hypothetical situation: a position opens up at your company, applications start rolling in and qualified candidates are identified. Who do you choose? Person A: Ivy League, flawless resume, great recommendations — or Person B: state school, fair amount of job hopping, with odd jobs like cashier and singing waitress thrown in the mix. Both are qualified — but have you already formed a decision? Well, you might want to take a second look at Person B. Human resources executive Regina Hartley describes these candidates as “The Silver Spoon” (Person A), the one who clearly had advantages and was set up for success, and “The Scrapper” (Person B), who had to fight tremendous odds to get to the same point. “To be clear, I don’t hold anything against the Silver Spoon; getting into and graduating from an elite university takes a lot of hard work and sacrifice,” she says. But if it so happens that someone’s whole life has been engineered toward success, how will that person handle the low times? Do they seem like they’re driven by passion and purpose? Take this resume. This guy never finishes college. He job-hops quite a bit, goes on a sojourn to India for a year, and to top it off, he has dyslexia. Would you hire this guy? His name is Steve Jobs. That’s not to say every person who has a similar story will ultimately become Steve Jobs, but it’s about extending opportunity to those whose lives have resulted in transformation and growth. Companies that are committed to diversity and inclusive practices tend to support Scrappers and outperform their peers. According to DiversityInc, a study of their top 50 companies for diversity outperformed the S&P 500 by 25 percent. (Check out Regina’s TED Talk: Why the best hire might not have the perfect resume for more advice and a fantastic suggested reading list full of helpful resources.) Shake up the face-to-face time Once you choose candidates to meet in-person, scrap that old hand-me-down list of interview questions — or if you can’t simply toss them, think about adding a couple more. Generally, these conversations ping-pong between two basic questions: one of competency or a one of character. To identify the candidates who have substance and not just smarts, business consultant Anthony Tjan recommends that interviewers ask these five questions to illuminate not just skills and abilities, but intrinsic values and personality traits too. What are the one or two traits from your parents that you most want to ensure you and your kids have for the rest of your life? A rehearsal is not the result you want. This question calls for a bit more thought on the applicant’s end and sheds light on the things they most value. After hearing the person’s initial response, Tjan says you should immediately follow up with “Can you tell me more?” This is essential if you want to elicit an answer with real depth and substance. What is 25 times 25? Yes, it sounds ridiculous but trust us — the math adds up. How people react under real-time pressure, and their response can show you how they’ll approach challenging or awkward situations. “It’s about whether they can roll with the embarrassment and discomfort and work with me. When a person is in a job, they’re not always going to be in situations that are in their alley,” he says. Tell m[...]



Lee Cronin’s ongoing quest for print-your-own medicine, and more news from TED speakers

2018-01-29T18:55:19Z

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Print your own pharmaceutical factory. As part of an ongoing quest to make pharmaceuticals easier to manufacture, chemist Lee Cronin and his team at the University of Glasgow have designed a way to 3D-print a portable “factory” for the complicated and multi-step chemical reactions needed to create useful drugs. […] Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Print your own pharmaceutical factory. As part of an ongoing quest to make pharmaceuticals easier to manufacture, chemist Lee Cronin and his team at the University of Glasgow have designed a way to 3D-print a portable “factory” for the complicated and multi-step chemical reactions needed to create useful drugs. It’s a grouping of vessels about the size of water bottles; each vessel houses a different type of chemical reaction. Pharmacists or doctors could create specific drugs by adding the right ingredients to each vessel from pre-measured cartridges, following a simple step-by-step recipe. The process could help replace or supplement large chemical factories, and bring helpful drugs to new markets. (Watch Cronin’s TED Talk) How Amit Sood’s TED Talk spawned the Google Art selfie craze. While Amit Sood was preparing for his 2016 TED Talk about Google’s Cultural Institute and Art Project, his co-presenter Cyril Diagne, a digital interaction artist, suggested that he include a prototype of a project they’d been playing with, one that matched selfies to famous pieces of art. Amit added the prototype to his talk, in which he matched live video of Cyril’s face to classic artworks — and when the TED audience saw it, they broke out in spontaneous applause. Inspired, Amit decided to develop the feature and add it to the Google Arts & Culture app. The new feature launched in December 2017, and it went viral in January 2018. Just like the live TED audience before it, online users loved it so much that the app shot to the number one spot in both the Android and iOS app stores. (Watch Sood’s TED Talk) A lyrical film about the very real danger of climate change. Funded by a Kickstarter campaign by director and producer Matthieu Rytz, the documentary Anote’s Ark focuses on the clear and present danger of global warming to the Pacific Island nation of Kiribati (population: 100,000). As sea levels rise, the small, low-lying islands that make up Kiribati will soon be entirely covered by the ocean, displacing the population and their culture. Former president Anote Tong, who’s long been fighting global warming to save his country and his constituents, provides one of two central stories within the documentary. The film (here’s the trailer) premiered at the 2018 Sundance Festival in late January, and will be available more widely soon; follow on Facebook for news. (Watch Tong’s TED Talk) An animated series about global challenges. Sometimes the best way to understand a big idea is on a whiteboard. Throughout 2018, Rabbi Jonathan Sacks and his team are producing a six-part whiteboard-animation series that explains key themes in his theology and philosophy around contemporary global issues. The first video, called “The Politics of Hope,” examines political strife in the West, and ways to change the culture from the politics of anger to the politics of hope. Future whiteboard videos will delve into integrated diversity, the relationship between religion and science, the dignity of difference, confronting religious violence, and the ethics of responsibility. (Watch Rabbi Sacks’ TED Talk) Nobody wins the Google Lunar X Prize competition :( Launched in 2007, the Google Lunar X Prize competition challenged entrepreneurs and engineers to design low-cost ways to explore space. The premise, if not the work itself, was simple — the first privately funded team to get a robotic spacecraft to the moon, send high-resolution photos and video back to Earth, and move the spacecraft 500 meters would win[...]



Talks from TEDNYC Idea Search 2018

2018-01-29T00:16:16Z

TED is always looking for new voices with fresh ideas — and earlier this winter, we opened a challenge to the world: make a one-minute audition video that makes the case for your TED Talk. More than 1,200 people applied to be a part of the Idea Search program this year, and on Wednesday night at […]Cloe Shasha and Kelly Stoetzel hosted the fast-paced TED Idea Search 2018 program on January 24, 2018 at TED HQ in New York, NY. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED) TED is always looking for new voices with fresh ideas — and earlier this winter, we opened a challenge to the world: make a one-minute audition video that makes the case for your TED Talk. More than 1,200 people applied to be a part of the Idea Search program this year, and on Wednesday night at our New York headquarters, 13 audition finalists shared their ideas in a fast-paced program. Here are voices you may not have heard before — but that you’ll want to hear more from soon. Ruth Morgan shares her work preventing the misinterpretation of forensic evidence. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED) Forensic evidence isn’t as clear-cut as you think. For years, forensic science research has focused on making it easier and more accurate to figure out what a trace — such as DNA or a jacket fiber — is and who it came from, but that doesn’t help us interpret what the evidence means. “What we need to know if we find your DNA on a weapon or gunshot residue on you is how did it get there and when did it get there,” says forensic scientist Ruth Morgan. These gaps in understanding have real consequences: forensic evidence is often misinterpreted and used to convict people of crimes they didn’t commit. Morgan and her team are committed to finding ways to answer the why and how, such as determining whether it’s possible to get trace evidence on you during normal daily activities (it is) and how trace DNA can be transferred. “We need to dramatically reduce the chance of forensic evidence being misinterpreted,” she says. “We need that to happen so that you never have to be that innocent person in the dock.” The intersection of our senses. An experienced composer and filmmaker, Philip Clemo has been on a quest to determine if people can experience imagery with the same depth that they experience music. Research has shown that sound can impact how we perceive visuals, but can visuals have a similarly profound impact? In his live performances, Clemo and his band use abstract imagery in addition to abstract music to create a visual experience for the audience. He hopes that people can have these same experiences in their everyday lives by quieting their minds to fully experience the “visual music” of our surrounding environment — and improve our connection to our world. Reading the Bible … without omission. At a time when he was a recovering fundamentalist and longtime atheist, David Ellis Dickerson received a job offer as a quiz question writer and Bible fact-checker for the game show The American Bible Challenge. Among his responsibilities: coming up with questions that conveniently ignored the sections of the Bible that mention slavery, concubines and incest. The omission expectations he was faced with made him realize that evangelicals read the Bible in the same way they watch reality television: “with a willing, even loving, suspension of disbelief.” Now, he invites devout Christians to read the Bible in its most unedited form, to recognize its internal contradictions and to grapple with its imperfections. Danielle Bilot Bilot suggests three simple but productive actions we can take to help bees: plant flowers that bloom year-round, leave bare areas of soil for bees to nest in, and plant flower patches so that bees can more easily locate food. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED) To bee or not to bee? The most famous bee species of recent memory has[...]



New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe, and more news from TED speakers

2018-01-18T17:20:11Z

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe. KIC 8462852 (often called “Tabby’s star,” after the astronomer Tabetha Boyajian, who led the first study of the star) intermittently dims as much as 22% and then brightens again, […] As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe. KIC 8462852 (often called “Tabby’s star,” after the astronomer Tabetha Boyajian, who led the first study of the star) intermittently dims as much as 22% and then brightens again, for a reason no one has yet quite figured out. This bizarre occurrence led astronomers to propose over a dozen theories for why the star might be dimming, including the fringe theory that it was caused by an alien civilization using the planet’s energy. Now, new data shows that the dimming isn’t fully opaque; certain colors of light are blocked more than others. This suggests that what’s causing the star to dim is dust. After all, if an opaque object — like a planet or alien megastructure — was passing in front of the star, all of the light would be blocked equally. Tabby’s star is due to become visible again in late February or early March of 2018. (Watch Boyajian’s TED Talk) TED’s new video series celebrates the genius design of everyday objects. What do the hoodie, the London Tube Map, the hyperlink, and the button have in common? They’re everyday objects, often overlooked, that have profoundly influenced the world around us. Each 3- to 4- minute episode of TED’s original video series Small Thing Big Idea celebrates one of these objects, with a well-known name in design explaining what exactly makes it so great. First up is Michael Bierut on the London Tube Map. (Watch the first episode here and tune in weekly on Tuesday for more.) The science of black holes. In the new PBS special Black Hole Apocalypse, astrophysicist Janna Levin explores the science of black holes, what they are, why they are so powerful and destructive, and what they might tell us about the very origin of our existence. Dubbing them the world’s greatest mystery, Levin and her fellow scientists, including astronomer Andrea Ghez and experimental physicist Rainer Weiss, embark on a journey to portray the magnitude and importance of these voids that were long left unexplored and unexplained. (Watch Levin’s TED Talk, Ghez’s TED Talk, and read Weiss’ Ideas piece.) An organized crime thriller with non-fiction roots. McMafia, a television show starring James Norton, premiered in the UK in early January. The show is a fictionalized account of Misha Glenny’s 2008 non-fiction book of the same name. The show focuses on Alex Goldman, the son of an exiled Mafia boss who wants to put his family’s history behind him. Unfortunately, a murder foils his plans and to protect his family, he must face up to various international crime syndicates. (Watch Glenny’s TED Talk) Inside the African-American anti-abortion movement. In her new documentary for PBS’ Frontline, Yoruba Richen examines the complexities of the abortion debate as it relates to US’ racial history. Richen speaks with African-American members of both the pro-life and the anti-abortion movements, as her short doc follows a group of anti-abortion activists as they work in the black community. (Watch Richen’s TED Talk.) Have a news item to share? Write us at contact@ted.com and you may see it included in this weekly round-up. [...]



TED debuts “Small Thing Big Idea” original video series on Facebook Watch

2018-01-16T18:43:04Z

Today we’re debuting a new original video series on Facebook Watch called Small Thing Big Idea: Designs That Changed the World. Each 3- to 4-minute weekly episode takes a brief but delightful look at the lasting genius of one everyday object – a pencil, for example, or a hoodie – and explains how it is so perfectly []

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Today we’re debuting a new original video series on Facebook Watch called Small Thing Big Idea: Designs That Changed the World.

Each 3- to 4-minute weekly episode takes a brief but delightful look at the lasting genius of one everyday object – a pencil, for example, or a hoodie – and explains how it is so perfectly designed that it’s actually changed the world around it.

The series features some of design’s biggest names, including fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi, museum curator Paola Antonelli, and graphic designer Michael Bierut sharing their infectious obsession with good design.

To watch the first episode of Small Thing Big Idea (about the little-celebrated brilliance of subway maps!), tune in here, and check back every Tuesday for new episodes.

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Why Oprah’s talk works: Insight from a TED speaker coach

2018-01-10T19:26:43Z

By Abigail Tenembaum and Michael Weitz of Virtuozo When Oprah Winfrey spoke at the Golden Globes last Sunday night, her speech lit up social media within minutes. It was powerful, memorable and somehow exactly what the world wanted to hear. It inspired multiple standing O’s — and even a semi-serious Twitter campaign to elect her […] By Abigail Tenembaum and Michael Weitz of Virtuozo When Oprah Winfrey spoke at the Golden Globes last Sunday night, her speech lit up social media within minutes. It was powerful, memorable and somehow exactly what the world wanted to hear. It inspired multiple standing O’s — and even a semi-serious Twitter campaign to elect her president #oprah2020 All this in 9 short minutes. What made this short talk so impactful? My colleagues and I were curious. We are professional speaker coaches who’ve worked with many, many TED speakers, analyzing their scripts and their presentation styles to help each person make the greatest impact with their idea. And when we sat down and looked at Oprah’s talk, we saw a lot of commonality with great TED Talks. Among the elements that made this talk so effective: A strong opening that transports us. Oprah got on stage to give a “thank you” speech for a lifetime achievement award. But she chose not to start with the “thank you.” Instead she starts with a story. Her first words? “In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee.” Just like a great story should, this first sentence transports us to a different time and place, and introduces the protagonist. As TED speaker Uri Hasson says: Our brain loves stories. Oprah’s style of opening signals to the audience that it’s story time, by using the opening similar to any fairy tale: “Once upon a time” (In 1964) “There was a princess” (I was a little girl) “In a land far far away” (…my mother’s house in Milwaukee.” Alternating between ideas and anecdotes. A great TED Talk illustrates an idea. And, just like Oprah does in her talk, the idea is illustrated through a mix of stories, examples and facts. Oprah tells a few anecdotes, none longer than a minute. But they are masterfully crafted, to give us, the audience, just enough detail to invite us to imagine it. When TED speaker Stefan Larsson tells us an anecdote about his time at medical school, he says: “I wore the white coat” — one concrete detail that allows us, the audience, to imagine a whole scene. Oprah describes Sidney Poitier with similar specificity – down to the detail that “his tie was white.” Recy Taylor was “walking home from a church service.” Oprah the child wasn’t sitting on the floor but on the “linoleum floor.” Like a great sketch artist, a great storyteller draws a few defined lines and lets the audience’s imagination fill in the rest to create the full story. A real conversation with the audience. At TED, we all know it’s called a TED talk — not “speech,” not “lecture.” We feel it when Sir Ken Robinson looks at the audience and waits for their reaction. But it’s mostly not in the words. It’s in the tone, in the fact that the speaker’s attention is on the audience, focusing on one person at a time, and having a mini conversation with us. Oprah is no different. She speaks to the people in the room, and this intimacy translates beautifully on camera. It’s Oprah’s talk — and only Oprah’s. A great TED talk, just like any great talk or speech, is deeply connected to the person delivering it. We like to ask speakers, “What makes this a talk that only you can give?” Esther Perel shares anecdotes from her unique experience as a couples therapist, intimate stories that helped her develop a personal perspective on love and fide[...]



Meet the 2018 class of TED Fellows and Senior Fellows

2018-01-10T22:26:43Z

The TED Fellows program is excited to announce the new group of TED2018 Fellows and Senior Fellows. Representing a wide range of disciplines and countries — including, for the first time in the program, Syria, Thailand and Ukraine — this year’s TED Fellows are rising stars in their fields, each with a bold, original approach […] The TED Fellows program is excited to announce the new group of TED2018 Fellows and Senior Fellows. Representing a wide range of disciplines and countries — including, for the first time in the program, Syria, Thailand and Ukraine — this year’s TED Fellows are rising stars in their fields, each with a bold, original approach to addressing today’s most complex challenges and capturing the truth of our humanity. Members of the new Fellows class include a journalist fighting fake news in her native Ukraine; a Thai landscape architect designing public spaces to protect vulnerable communities from climate change; an American attorney using legal assistance and policy advocacy to bring justice to survivors of campus sexual violence; a regenerative tissue engineer harnessing the body’s immune system to more quickly heal wounds; a multidisciplinary artist probing the legacy of slavery in the US; and many more. The TED Fellows program supports extraordinary, iconoclastic individuals at work on world-changing projects, providing them with access to the global TED platform and community, as well as new tools and resources to amplify their remarkable vision. The TED Fellows program now includes 453 Fellows who work across 96 countries, forming a powerful, far-reaching network of artists, scientists, doctors, activists, entrepreneurs, inventors, journalists and beyond, each dedicated to making our world better and more equitable. Read more about their visionary work on the TED Fellows blog. Below, meet the group of Fellows and Senior Fellows who will join us at TED2018, April 10–14, in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Antionette Carroll (USA) Social entrepreneur + designer Designer and founder of Creative Reaction Lab, a nonprofit using design to foster racially equitable communities through education and training programs, community engagement consulting and open-source tools and resources. Psychiatrist Essam Daod comforts a Syrian refugee as she arrives ashore at the Greek island of Lesvos. His organization Humanity Crew provides psychological aid to refugees and recently displaced populations. (Photo: Laurence Geai) Essam Daod (Palestine | Israel) Mental health specialist Psychiatrist and co-founder of Humanity Crew, an NGO providing psychological aid and first-response mental health interventions to refugees and displaced populations. Laura L. Dunn (USA) Victims’ rights attorney Attorney and Founder of SurvJustice, a national nonprofit increasing the prospect of justice for survivors of campus sexual violence through legal assistance, policy advocacy and institutional training. Rola Hallam (Syria | UK) Humanitarian aid entrepreneur  Medical doctor and founder of CanDo, a social enterprise and crowdfunding platform that enables local humanitarians to provide healthcare to their own war-devastated communities. Olga Iurkova (Ukraine) Journalist + editor Journalist and co-founder of StopFake.org, an independent Ukrainian organization that trains an international cohort of fact-checkers in an effort to curb propaganda and misinformation in the media. Glaciologist M Jackson studies glaciers like this one — the glacier Svínafellsjökull in southeastern Iceland. The high-water mark visible on the mountainside indicates how thick the glacier once was, before climate change caused its rapid recession. (Photo: M Jackson) M Jackson (USA) Geographer + glaciologist Glaciologist researching the cultural a[...]



What’s the definition of feminism? 12 talks that explain it to you

2017-12-24T15:52:21Z

Earlier this month, Merriam-Webster announced that 2017’s word of the year is feminism. Searches for the word on the dictionary website spiked throughout the year, beginning in January around the Women’s March, again after Kellyanne Conway said in an interview that she didn’t consider herself a feminist, and during some of feminism’s many pop culture […]Image courtesy Backbone Campaign. License CC BY 2.0 Earlier this month, Merriam-Webster announced that 2017’s word of the year is feminism. Searches for the word on the dictionary website spiked throughout the year, beginning in January around the Women’s March, again after Kellyanne Conway said in an interview that she didn’t consider herself a feminist, and during some of feminism’s many pop culture moments this year. And the steady stream of #MeToo news stories have kept the word active in search over the past few weeks and months. It’s not surprising, really. Think of it as one of the outcomes of the current moral crisis in the US and around the world — along with a growing awareness of the scope of the global epidemic of sexual harassment and acts of violence against women, the continuing challenges of underrepresentation in all decision-making positions and the misrepresentation of women and girls in media. I believe this moment presents an opportunity to enlist more women and men to step forward as feminists, to join the drive toward a world in which women feel safe at work and home and enjoy freedom to pursue their dreams and their potential for themselves, their families, communities and countries. Still, I hear every day the question: “What does feminism actually mean?” According to Merriam-Webster, it’s “the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes” and “organized activity on behalf of women’s rights and interests.” That’s a good elevator pitch, but it could use more perspective, more context. Over my seven years as curator and host of the TEDWomen conference, we’ve seen more than a few TED Talks take up the subject of feminism from many angles. Here are a dozen, chosen from the more than 150 TEDWomen talks published on TED.com and the TED Archive YouTube channels so far — including a bonus talk from the TEDx archive that kicked off a global conversation. Looking ahead to 2018, I hope these talks can inform how we channel the new awareness and activism of 2017 into strategic decisions for women’s rights. Could we eliminate the gender gap in leadership? Could we eliminate economic, racial, cultural and gender inequities? Imagine these as goals for a newly energized and focused global feminist community. 1. Courtney Martin: Reinventing feminism src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/courtney_martin_reinventing_feminism" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> What does it mean to be a millennial and a feminist in the 21st century? In her first TEDWomen talk, Courtney Martin admits that when she was younger, she didn’t claim the feminist label because it reminded her too much of her hippie mom and outdated notions of what it means to be a feminist. But in college, she changed her mind. Her feminism, she says, looks and sounds different from her mom’s version, but it’s not all that different underneath: feminist activism is on a continuum. While her mother talks about the patriarchy, Courtney talks about intersectionality and the ways that many other issues, such as racism and immigration, are part of the feminist equation. Blogging at Feministing.com, she says, is the 21st-century version of consciousness-raising. 2. Hanna Rosin: New data on the rise of women src="https://embed[...]



Free report: Bright ideas in business from TEDWomen 2017

2017-12-22T15:13:04Z

The Brightline Initiative helps leaders from all types of organizations build bridges between ideas and results. So they felt strong thematic resonance with TEDWomen 2017, which took place in New Orleans from November 1-3, and the conference theme of “Bridges.” In listening to the 50+ speakers who shared ideas, Brightline noted many that felt especially […]At a workshop at TEDWomen 2017, the Brightline Initiative helped attendees parse the topic, “Why great ideas fail and how to make sure they don’t.” Photo: Stacie McChesney/TED The Brightline Initiative helps leaders from all types of organizations build bridges between ideas and results. So they felt strong thematic resonance with TEDWomen 2017, which took place in New Orleans from November 1-3, and the conference theme of “Bridges.” In listening to the 50+ speakers who shared ideas, Brightline noted many that felt especially helpful for anyone who wants to work more boldly, more efficiently or more collaboratively. We’re pleased to share Brightline’s just-released report on business ideas from the talks of TEDWomen 2017. Give it a read to find out how thinking about language can help you shake off a rut, and why a better benchmark for success might just be your capacity to form meaningful partnerships. Get the report here >> [...]



The Big Idea: TED’s 4 step guide to the holiday season

2017-12-21T20:55:31Z

More charmingly referred to as a garbage fire that just keeps burning, 2017 has been a tough, relentless year of tragedy and strife. As we approach the holiday season, it’s important to connect and reconnect with those you love and want in your life. So, in these last few weeks of the year, here are […]More charmingly referred to as a garbage fire that just keeps burning, 2017 has been a tough, relentless year of tragedy and strife. As we approach the holiday season, it’s important to connect and reconnect with those you love and want in your life. So, in these last few weeks of the year, here are a few ways to focus on building and honoring the meaningful relationships in your life. 1. Do some emotional housekeeping Before you get into the emotional trenches with anyone (or walk into a house full of people you don’t agree with), check in with yourself. How you engage with your inner world drives everything from your ability to lead and moderate your mood, to your quality of sleep. Be compassionate and understanding of where you are in your life, internally and externally. Psychologist Guy Winch makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies. src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/guy_winch_the_case_for_emotional_hygiene" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> “We sustain psychological injuries even more often than we do physical ones, injuries like failure or rejection or loneliness. And they can also get worse if we ignore them, and they can impact our lives in dramatic ways,” he says. “And yet, even though there are scientifically proven techniques we could use to treat these kinds of psychological injuries, we don’t. It doesn’t even occur to us that we should. ‘Oh, you’re feeling depressed? Just shake it off; it’s all in your head. Can you imagine saying that to somebody with a broken leg: ‘Oh, just walk it off; it’s all in your leg.’” In his article, 7 ways to practice emotional first aid, Winch lays out useful ways to reboot and fortify your emotional health: Pay attention to emotional pain — recognize it when it happens and work to treat it before it feels all-encompassing. The body evolved the sensation of physical pain to alert us that something is wrong and we need to address it. The same is true for emotional pain. If a rejection, failure or bad mood is not getting better, it means you’ve sustained a psychological wound and you need to treat it. For example, loneliness can be devastatingly damaging to your psychological and physical health, so when you or your friend or loved one is feeling socially or emotionally isolated, you need to take action. Monitor and protect your self-esteem. When you feel like putting yourself down, take a moment to be compassionate to yourself.Self-esteem is like an emotional immune system that buffers you from emotional pain and strengthens your emotional resilience. As such, it is very important to monitor it and avoid putting yourself down, particularly when you are already hurting. One way to “heal” damaged self-esteem is to practice self-compassion. When you’re feeling critical of yourself, do the following exercise: imagine a dear friend is feeling bad about him or herself for similar reasons and write an email expressing compassion and support. Then read the email. Those are the messages you should be giving yourself. Find meaning in loss. Loss is a part of life, but it can scar us and keep us from moving forward if we don’t treat the emotional wounds it creates — and the holidays are normally a time when these[...]



A photograph by Paul Nicklen shows the tragedy of extinction, and more news from TED speakers

2018-01-10T17:59:54Z

The past few weeks have brimmed over with TED-related news. Here, some highlights: This is what extinction looks like. Photographer Paul Nicklen shocked the world with footage of a starving polar bear that he and members of his conservation group SeaLegacy captured in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. “It rips your heart out of your chest,” […] The past few weeks have brimmed over with TED-related news. Here, some highlights: This is what extinction looks like. Photographer Paul Nicklen shocked the world with footage of a starving polar bear that he and members of his conservation group SeaLegacy captured in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. “It rips your heart out of your chest,” Nicklen told The New York Times. Published in National Geographic, on Nicklen’s Instagram channel, and via SeaLegacy in early December, the footage and a photograph taken by Cristina Mittermeier spread rapidly across the Internet, to horrified reaction. Polar bears are hugely threatened by climate change, in part because of their dependence on ice cover, and their numbers are projected to drop precipitously in coming years. By publishing the photos, Nicklen said to the Times, he hoped to make a scientific data point feel real to people. (Watch Nicklen’s TED Talk) Faster 3D printing with liquids. Attendees at Design Miami witnessed the first public demonstration of MIT’s 3D liquid printing process. In a matter of minutes, a robotic arm printed lamps and handbags inside a glass tank filled with gel, showing that 3D printing doesn’t have to be painfully slow. The technique upends the size constraints and poor material quality that have plagued 3D printing, say the creators, and could be used down the line to print larger objects like furniture, reports Dezeen. Steelcase and the Self-Assembly lab at MIT, co-directed by TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits and Jared Laucks, developed the revolutionary technique. (Watch Tibbits’ TED Talk) The crazy mathematics of swarming and synchronization. Studies on swarming often focus on animal movement (think schools of fish) but ignore their internal framework, while studies on synchronization tend to focus solely on internal dynamics (think coupled lasers). The two phenomena, however, have rarely been studied together. In new research published in Nature Communications, mathematician Steven Strogatz and his former postdoctoral student Kevin O’Keefe studied systems where both synchronization and swarming occur simultaneously. Male tree frogs were one source of inspiration for the research by virtue of the patterns that they form in both space and time, mainly related to reproduction. The findings open the door to future research of unexplored behaviors and systems that may also exhibit these two behaviors concurrently. (Watch Strogatz’s TED Talk) A filmmaker’s quest to understand white nationalism. Documentary filmmaker and human rights activist Deeyah Khan’s new documentary, White Right: Meeting the Enemy, seeks to understand neo-Nazis and white nationalists beyond their sociopolitical beliefs. All too familiar with racism and hate related threats in her own life, her goal is not to sympathize or rationalize their beliefs or behaviors. She instead intends to discover the evolution of their ideology as individuals, which can provide insights into how they became attracted to and involved in these movements. Deeyah uses this film to answer the question: “Is it possible for me to sit with my enemy and for them to sit with theirs?” (Watch Khan’s TED Talk) The end of an era at the San Francisco Symphony. Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas announced that he will be stepping down from his role as music director of the San Francisco Symphony [...]



Ben Saunders’ solo crossing of Antarctica, and more news from TED speakers

2017-12-15T20:06:21Z

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A solo crossing of Antarctica. With chilling detail, Ben Saunders documents his journey across Antarctica as he attempts to complete the first successful solo, unsupported and unassisted crossing. The journey is a way of honoring his friend Henry Worsley, […] As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A solo crossing of Antarctica. With chilling detail, Ben Saunders documents his journey across Antarctica as he attempts to complete the first successful solo, unsupported and unassisted crossing. The journey is a way of honoring his friend Henry Worsley, who died attempting a similar crossing last year. While being attacked by intense winds, Saunders writes of his experiences trekking through the hills, the cold, and the ice, the weight he carries, and even the moments he’s missing, as he wishes his dear friends a jolly and fun wedding day back home. (Watch Saunders’ TED Talk) The dark side of AI. A chilling new video, “Slaughterbots,” gives viewers a glimpse into a dystopian future where people can be targeted and killed by strangers using autonomous weapons simply for having dissenting opinions. This viral video was the brainchild of TED speaker Stuart Russell and a coalition of AI researchers and advocacy organizations. The video warns viewers that while AI has the potential to solve many of our problems, the dangers of AI weapons must be addressed first. “We have an opportunity to prevent the future you just saw,” Stuart states at the end of the video, “but the window to act is closing fast.” (Watch Russell’s TED Talk) Corruption investigators in paradise. Charmian Gooch and her colleagues at Global Witness have been poring over the Paradise Papers, a cache of 13.4 million files released by the the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists that detail the secret world of offshore financial deals. With the 2014 TED Prize, Gooch wished to end anonymously owned companies, and the Paradise Papers show how this business structure can be used to nefarious end. Check out Global Witness’ report on how the commodities company Glencore appears to have funneled $45 million to a notorious billionaire middleman in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to help them negotiate mining rights. And their look at how a US-based bank helped one of Russia’s richest oligarchs register a private jet, despite his company being on US sanctions lists. (Watch Gooch’s TED Talk) A metric for measuring corporate vitality. Martin Reeves, director of the Henderson Institute at BCG, and his colleagues have taken his idea that strategies need strategies and expanded it into the creation of the Fortune Future 50, a categorization of companies based on more than financial data. Companies are divided into “leaders” and “challengers,” with the former having a market capitalization over $20 billion as of fiscal year 2016 and the latter including startups with a market capitalization below $20 billion. However, instead of focusing on rear-view analytics, BCG’s assessment uses artificial intelligence and natural language processing to review a company’s vitality, or their “capacity to explore new options, renew strategy, and grow sustainably,” according to a publication by Reeves and his collaborators. Since only 7% of companies that are market-share leaders are also profit leaders, the analysis can provide companies with a new metric to judge progress. (Watch Reeves’ TED Talk) The boy who harnessed the wind — and the silver screen. William Kamkwamba’s story will soon reach [...]



Exploring the boundaries of legacy at TED@Westpac

2018-01-11T20:25:07Z

Legacy is a delightfully complex concept, and it's one that the TED@Westpac curators took on with gusto for the daylong event held in Sydney, Australia, on Monday December 11th. Themed around the idea of "The Future Legacy," the day was packed with speakers who took on topics ranging from education to work-health balance to designer babies.Cyndi Stivers and Adam Spencer host TED@Westpac — a day of talks and performances themed around “The Future Legacy” — in Sydney, Australia, on Monday, December 11th. (Photo: Jean-Jacques Halans / TED) Legacy is a delightfully complex concept, and it’s one that the TED@Westpac curators took on with gusto for the daylong event held in Sydney, Australia, on Monday December 11th. Themed around the idea of “The Future Legacy,” the day was packed with 15 speakers and two performers and hosted by TED’s Cyndi Stivers and TED speaker and monster prime number aficionado Adam Spencer. Topics ranged from education to work-health balance to designer babies to the importance of smart conversations around death. For Westpac managing director and CEO Brian Hartzer, the day was an opportunity both to think back over the bank’s own 200-year-legacy — and a chance for all gathered to imagine a bold new future that might suit everyone. He welcomed talks that explored ideas and stories that may shape a more positive global future. “We are so excited to see the ripple effect of your ideas from today,” he told the collected speakers before introducing Aboriginal elder Uncle Ray Davison to offer the audience a traditional “welcome to country.” And with that, the speakers were up and running. “Being an entrepreneur is about creating change,” says Linda Zhang. She suggests we need to encourage the entrepreneurial mindset in high-schoolers. (Photo: Jean-Jacques Halans / TED) Ask questions, challenge the status quo, build solutions. Who do you think of when you hear the word “entrepreneur?” Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk and Bill Gates might come to mind. What about a high school student? Linda Zhang might just have graduated herself but she’s been taking entrepreneurial cues from her parents, who started New Zealand’s second-largest thread company. Zhang now runs a program to pair students with industry mentors and get them to work for 48 hours on problems they actually want to solve. The results: a change in mindset that could help prepare them for a tumultuous but opportunity-filled job market. “Being an entrepreneur is about creating change,” Zhang says. “This is what high school should be about … finding things you care about, having the curiosity to learn about those things and having the drive to take that knowledge and implement it into problems you care about solving.” Should we bribe kids to study math? In this sparky talk, Mohamad Jebara shares a favorite quote from fellow mathematician Francis Su: “We study mathematics for play, for beauty, for truth, for justice, and for love.” Only problem: kids today, he says, often don’t tend to agree, instead finding math “difficult and boring.” Jebara has a counterintuitive potential solution: he wants to bribe kids to study math. His financial incentive plan works like this: his company charges parents a monthly subscription fee; if students complete their weekly math goal then the program refunds that amount of the fee directly into the student’s bank account; if not, the company pockets the profit. Ultimately, Jebara wants kids to discover math’s intrins[...]



Why not? Pushing and prodding the possible, at TED@IBM

2017-12-09T15:54:23Z

We know that our world — our data, our lives, our countries — are becoming more and more connected. But what should we do with that? In two sessions of TED@IBM, the answer shaped up to be: Dream as big as you can. Speakers took the stage to pitch their ideas for using connected data […]The stage at TED@IBM bubbles with possibilities … at the SFJAZZ Center, December 6, 2017, San Francisco, California. Photo: Russell Edwards / TED We know that our world — our data, our lives, our countries — are becoming more and more connected. But what should we do with that? In two sessions of TED@IBM, the answer shaped up to be: Dream as big as you can. Speakers took the stage to pitch their ideas for using connected data and new forms of machine intelligence to make material changes in the way we live our lives — and also challenged us to flip the focus back to ourselves, to think about what we still need to learn about being human in order to make better tech. From the stage of TED@IBM’s longtime home at the SFJAZZ Center, executive Ann Rubin welcomes us and introduces our two onstage hosts, TED’s own Bryn Freedman and her cohost Michaela Stribling, a longtime IBMer who’s been a great champion of new ideas. And with that, we begin. Giving plastic a new sense of value. A garbage truck full of plastic enters the ocean every minute of every hour of every day. Plastic is now in the food chain (and your bloodstream), and scientists think it’s contributing to the fastest rate of extinction ever. But we shouldn’t be thinking about cleaning up all that ocean plastic, suggests plastics alchemist David Katz — we should be working to stop plastic from getting there in the first place. And the place to start is in extremely poor countries — the origin of 80 percent of plastic pollution — where recycling just isn’t a priority. Katz has created The Plastic Bank, a worldwide chain of stores where everything from school tuition and medical insurance to Wi-Fi and high-efficiency stoves is available to be purchased in exchange for plastic garbage. Once collected, the plastic is sorted, shredded and sold to brands like Marks & Spencer and Henkel, who have commissioned the use of “Social Plastic” in their products. “Buy shampoo or detergent that has Social Plastic packaging, and you’re indirectly contributing to the extraction of plastic from ocean-bound waterways and alleviating poverty at the same time,” Katz says. It’s a step towards closing the loop on the circular economy, it’s completely replicable, and it’s gamifying recycling. As Katz puts it: “Be a part of the solution, not the pollution.” How can we stop plastic from piling up in the oceans? David Katz has one way: He runs an international chain of stores that trade plastic recyclables for money. Photo: Russell Edwards / TED How do we help teens in distress? AI is great at looking for patterns. Could we leverage that skill, asks 14-year-old cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, to spot behavior issues lurking under the surface? “Humans aren’t very good at detecting patterns like changes in someone’s sleep, exercise levels, and public interaction,” he says. “If some of the patterns from these suicidal teens go unrecognized and unnoticed by the human eye,” he suggests we could let technology help us out. For the last 3 years, Bakshi and his team have been working with artificial neural networks (ANNs, for short) to develop an app that can pick up on irregularities in a person’s online behavior and build an early warning systems for at-risk teens[...]



Get ready for TED Talks India: Nayi Soch, premiering Dec. 10 on Star Plus

2018-01-10T18:54:15Z

TED is a global organization with a broad global audience. With our TED Translators program working in more than 100 languages, TEDx events happening every day around the world and so much more, we work hard to present the latest ideas for everyone, regardless of language, location or platform. Now we’ve embarked on a journey […]This billboard is showing up in streets around India, and it’s made out of pollution fumes that have been collected and made into ink — ink that’s, in turn, made into an image of TED Talks India: Nayi Soch host Shah Rukh Khan. Tune in on Sunday night, Dec. 10, at 7pm on Star Plus to see what it’s all about. TED is a global organization with a broad global audience. With our TED Translators program working in more than 100 languages, TEDx events happening every day around the world and so much more, we work hard to present the latest ideas for everyone, regardless of language, location or platform. Now we’ve embarked on a journey with one of the largest TV networks in the world — and one of the biggest movie stars in the world — to create a Hindi-language TV series and digital series that’s focused on a country at the peak of innovation and technology: India. Hosted and curated by Shah Rukh Khan, the TV series TED Talks India: Nayi Soch will premiere in India on Star Plus on December 10. The name of the show, Nayi Soch, literally means ‘new ideas’ — and this kick-off episode seeks to inspire the nation to embrace and cultivate ideas and curiosity. Watch it and discover a program of speakers from India and the world whose ideas might inspire you to some new thinking of your own! For instance — the image on this billboard above is made from the fumes of your car … a very new and surprising idea! If you’re in India, tune in at 7pm IST on Sunday night, Dec. 10, to watch the premiere episode on Star Plus and five other channels. Then tune in to Star Plus on the next seven Sundays, at the same time, to hear even more great talks on ideas, grouped into themes that will certainly inspire conversations. You can also explore the show on the HotStar app. On TED.com/india and for TED mobile app users in India, each episode will be conveniently turned into five to seven individual TED Talks, one talk for each speaker on the program. You can watch and share them on their own, or download them as playlists to watch one after another. The talks are given in Hindi, with professional subtitles in Hindi and in English. Almost every talk will feature a short Q&A between the speaker and the host, Shah Rukh Khan, that dives deeper into the ideas shared onstage. Want to learn more about TED Talks? Check out this playlist that SRK curated just for you. [...]



Brand-new TED Talks from TEDWomen 2017: A note from the curator

2017-12-01T20:06:41Z

This year’s TEDWomen in New Orleans was a truly special conference, at a vital moment, and I’m sure the ripples will be felt for a long time to come. The theme this year was bridges: we build them, we cross them, sometimes we even burn them. Our speakers talked about the physical bridges we need […]This year’s TEDWomen in New Orleans was a truly special conference, at a vital moment, and I’m sure the ripples will be felt for a long time to come. The theme this year was bridges: we build them, we cross them, sometimes we even burn them. Our speakers talked about the physical bridges we need for access and connection as well as the metaphoric ones we need to bridge the differences that increasingly divide us. Along with the inspiring TED Talks and often game-changing ideas that were shared in the TEDWomen stage, my biggest take-away from this year’s conference was once again the importance of community and the opportunity this conference offers for women and a few good men from different countries, cultures, religions, backgrounds, from so many different sectors of work and experience, to come to together to listen, to learn, to connect with each other, to build their own bridges. Take a look at all the presentations with our detailed speaker-by-speaker coverage on the TED Blog. Between sessions, we hosted four great Facebook Live conversations in the Blue Room, diving deeper into ideas from talks with WNYC’s Manoush Zomorodi. Catch up on them right here. And we’re starting to post TED Talks from our event to share freely with the world. First up: Gretchen Carlson, whose timely talk about sexual harassment is relevant and resonant for so many women and men at this #MeToo moment. It’s already been viewed by over 800,000 people! src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/gretchen_carlson_how_we_can_end_sexual_harassment_at_work" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> Gretchen calls on women who have experienced sexual harassment to “Be Fierce!” (also the title of her recent book). Luvvie Ajayi, in another TEDWomen Talk being released today, encourages not just women, but all of us to be courageous and to Speak Up when we have something to say, even if it makes others uncomfortable — especially if it makes the speaker uncomfortable. “I want us to leave this world better than we found it,” she told the audience in her hopeful and uplifting talk, “And how I choose to effect change is by speaking up, by being the first and by being the domino.” src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/luvvie_ajayi_get_comfortable_with_being_uncomfortable" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> And don’t miss Teresa Njoroge’s powerful talk on women in prison. At Clean Start Kenya, Njoroge builds bridges connecting the formerly imprisoned to the outside world and vice versa. src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/teresa_njoroge_what_i_learned_serving_time_for_a_crime_i_didn_t_commit" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> And one of the highlights of the conference for me, my conversation with Leah Chase, the Queen of Creole Cuisine. Chase’s New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase changed the course of American history over gumbo and fried chicken. During the civil rights movement, it was a place where white and black people came together, where activist[...]



Breakthroughs: The talks of TED@Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

2017-12-09T15:54:29Z

Humanity is defined by its immense body of knowledge. Most times it inches forward, shedding light onto the mysteries of the universe and easing life’s endeavors in small increments. But in some special moments, knowledge and understanding leap forward, when one concentrated mind or one crucial discovery redirects the course of things and changes the […]TED and Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, have partnered to help surface and share brilliant ideas, innovations — and breakthroughs. (Photo: Paul Clarke / TED) Humanity is defined by its immense body of knowledge. Most times it inches forward, shedding light onto the mysteries of the universe and easing life’s endeavors in small increments. But in some special moments, knowledge and understanding leap forward, when one concentrated mind or one crucial discovery redirects the course of things and changes the space of possibilities. TED and Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, have partnered to help surface and share brilliant ideas, innovations — and breakthroughs. At the inaugural TED@Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany event, hosted by TED International Curator Bruno Giussani at Here East in London on November 28, 16 brilliant minds in healthcare, technology, art, psychology and other fields shared stories of human imagination and discovery. After opening remarks from Belén Garijo, CEO, Healthcare for Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, the talks of Session 1 kicked off. Biochemist Bijan Zakeri explains the mechanism behind a molecular superglue that could allows us to assemble new protein shapes. (Photo: Paul Clarke / TED) A molecular superglue made from flesh-eating bacteria. The bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes — responsible for diseases including strep throat, scarlet fever and necrotizing fasciitis (colloquially, flesh-eating disease) — has long, hair-like appendages made of proteins with a unique property: the ends of these proteins are linked by an incredibly strong chemical bond. “You can boil them, try to cut them with enzymes or throw them in strong acids and bases. Nothing happens to them,” says biochemist Bijan Zakeri. Along with his adviser Mark Howarth, Zakeri figured out a way to engineer these proteins to create what he describes as a molecular superglue. The superglue allows us to assemble new protein shapes, and “you can chemically link the glue components to other organic and inorganic molecules, like medicines, DNA, metals and more, to build new nano-scale objects that address important scientific and medical needs,” Zakeri says. What if we could print electronics? “We must manufacture devices in a whole new way, with the electronics integrated inside the object, not just bolted in afterwards,” says advanced technologist Dan Walker. He introduces us to his vision of the fast approaching future of technology, which could take two potential paths: “The first is hyper-scale production, producing electrically functional parts along the standard centralized model of manufacturing. Think of how we print newspapers, ink on paper, repeating for thousands of copies. Electronics can be printed in this way, too.” he says. Walker designs inks that conduct electricity and can be used to print functional electronics, like wires. This ink can be used in inkjet printers, the sort that can be found in most offices and homes. But these inkjet printers are still 2D printers — they can print the electronics onto the object, but they can’t print the object itself. “The second way the manufacturing world will go [...]