Subscribe: TED Blog
http://feeds.feedburner.com/TEDBlog
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
idea search  idea  media  new  people  photo  san francisco  talk  ted talk  ted  tedwomen  time  video  women  world   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: TED Blog

TED Blog



The TED Blog shares interesting news about TED, TED Talks video, the TED Prize and more.



Updated: 2016-12-07T02:15:50Z

 



WordPress.comAnnouncing our 2017 TED Prize winner: Healthcare warrior Raj Panjabi

2016-12-01T13:06:36Z

It sounds simple enough: If you’re sick, you make an appointment with a doctor, and if it’s an emergency, you head to the nearest hospital. But for more than a billion people around the world, it’s a real challenge — because they live too far from a medical facility. Where Raj Panjabi’s nonprofit, Last Mile […]Raj Panjabi was born in Liberia, but his family fled civil war when he was nine. He returned as a medical student — and went on to found Last Mile Health. Photo: Courtesy of Last Mile Health It sounds simple enough: If you’re sick, you make an appointment with a doctor, and if it’s an emergency, you head to the nearest hospital. But for more than a billion people around the world, it’s a real challenge — because they live too far from a medical facility. Where Raj Panjabi’s nonprofit, Last Mile Health, operates in Liberia, people in remote communities hike for hours or even days — sometimes canoeing through the jungle or motorbiking over rough terrain — to get medical care. Many will go their entire lives without visiting a doctor, which puts them at high risk of dying from diseases that are easily treated. Last Mile Health has created a model for expanding healthcare access to remote regions by training, employing and equipping community health workers. The organization’s work has shown impressive results in Liberia, and could be replicated elsewhere. That’s why TED is thrilled to announce Raj Panjabi as the winner of the 2017 TED Prize. On April 25, 2017, at the annual TED Conference, Panjabi will reveal a $1 million wish for the world, related to this work. “I’m shocked and humbled, because I feel in many ways our work is only just beginning,” he said. “But it feels very right to me that this cause is worthy of the TED community’s efforts. Illness has been universal for the entire length of human history — but universal access to care has not been. Now, because of the advances in modern medical science and technology over the past 50 to 100 years, we have the chance to end that inequality.” Reaching remote communities in Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, often involves long hikes or traveling by motorbike. Last Mile Health trains community health workers to serve these remote areas. Photo: Courtesy of Last Mile Health Since 2007, Last Mile Health has partnered with the government of Liberia to train, equip, employ and support community health workers. These community health workers are nominated by local leaders, and trained, with support from nurses, to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical problems. In the past year, these health workers have conducted more than 42,000 patient visits in their regions, and treated nearly 22,000 cases of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea in children. They’ve also proven themselves to be a powerful line of defense against pandemics. During the Ebola outbreak, Last Mile Health assisted the government of Liberia in its response, helping to train 1,300 health workers and community members to prevent the spread of the disease in the southeastern region of the country. This year, Panjabi, who’s also a physician in the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School, was named to TIME’s list of the “100 Most Influential People in the World” for Last Mile Health’s part in helping contain the Ebola epidemic. And it feels especially fitting to announce him as the next TED Prize winner on World AIDS Day, since Last Mile Health began as Liberia’s first rural public HIV program, helping patients in the war-torn area of Zwedru who could not make the trek to the capital, Monrovia, for care. “I want to see a health worker for everyone, everywhere, every day,” says Panjabi. “I’m honored and excited by the opportunity to amplify the work of these inspiring community health workers.” Sign up to receive updates as Panjabi readies to reveal his wish at TED2017. And learn more about the TED Prize, a $1 million grant given annually to a bold [...]



Have a TED Talk idea? Apply to our Idea Search events in Africa

2016-11-29T21:51:41Z

Do you have a TED Talk you’ve always wanted to try out in front of an audience? We’re thrilled to announce that applications are open for two new events in Africa: TEDLagos and TEDNairobi 2017 Idea Search! Anyone with an idea worth spreading is invited to apply to either of those two events; around 25 […]Saki Mafundikwa prepares to speak at the TED@Nairobi auditions in 2013, aiming for a slot on the TED mainstage. (Spoiler: He made it.) Photo: whattookyousolong.org Do you have a TED Talk you’ve always wanted to try out in front of an audience? We’re thrilled to announce that applications are open for two new events in Africa: TEDLagos and TEDNairobi 2017 Idea Search! Anyone with an idea worth spreading is invited to apply to either of those two events; around 25 finalists at each event will share their risky, quirky, fascinating ideas in under 6 minutes, in early February, onstage at beautiful venues in Lagos, Nigeria, and Nairobi, Kenya. The TED Idea Search is a chance for us to find fresh voices to ring out on the TEDGlobal stage. Some of these talks will be posted on the online TED platform; other speakers will be invited to expand on their talks on the TEDGlobal 2017 main stage in Arusha, Tanzania, in the summer of 2017, themed Builders. Truth-tellers. Catalysts. We are looking for speakers whose talks fit well within that theme. Saki Mafundikwa, Richard Turere, Zak Ebrahim, Sally Kohn, Hyeonseo Lee — all these speakers are fantastic finds from previous TED talent searches. The deadline to apply is December 13, 2016, at 6pm Lagos time / 8pm Nairobi time. To apply, you’ll need to fill out a form and make a 1-minute video describing your talk idea. Quick notes: We can’t cover travel for finalists who live far from the cities where these events are taking place; we encourage local applicants to Lagos and Nairobi. Please choose only one event to apply to — applying to both events will not increase your chances of being selected to speak. Apply to speak at the TED Africa Idea Search 2017 [...]



8 insider tips: Make an audition video for TED’s Idea Search 2017

2016-11-27T20:22:06Z

Here are 8 insider tips to creating a great audition video for the TEDNYC Idea Search 2017. (Remember, the deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 28, at 6pm Eastern.) 1. Distill your idea. In a 1-minute video, you have about 150 words to describe your proposed TED Talk. So you can’t — and you don’t […]Tania Luna auditions for the TED stage. (Spoiler: She got there.) Photo: James Duncan Davidson Here are 8 insider tips to creating a great audition video for the TEDNYC Idea Search 2017. (Remember, the deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 28, at 6pm Eastern.) 1. Distill your idea. In a 1-minute video, you have about 150 words to describe your proposed TED Talk. So you can’t — and you don’t have to — give every single detail of your idea. Instead, focus on the basics of what you will want to say. As a tip, try writing your script around a big question that your talk will answer, such as: “How can teachers learn to connect with Generation Z?” Think about what you’d want the audience to take away from your talk — the main insight — and be sure to communicate that in your video. 2. Watch our TED Talk about … well … giving a TED Talk. Our curator, Chris Anderson, distills 4 points you’ll want to think about as you write your script. 3. Think about how your idea will be relevant right now. Some of our finalists will win spots onstage at TED2017, our major conference of the year, happening in April 2017. So think on this question: why does your idea have special meaning right now, as 2017 kicks off? The theme of TED2017 is “The Future You,” and we’ll be thinking about the big picture of how our world is evolving, as well as how we humans are changing. 4. Use incisive, clear language — not jargon. Consider that the audience, for the most part, will not be as familiar with your idea, or your industry, as you are. So try to describe your concepts in a way that most people would understand, without compromising the quality of your thoughts and ideas. 5. When you practice your script, record your practice. And then watch your practice recordings — you’ll likely see some ways you can get to the point faster. Listen for places where you lose your own interest, and cut cut cut. 6. Consider asking someone else to film you. This way, you can focus on delivering your talk, not on your tech. If you’re filming yourself on your laptop or phone, remember to look directly at the camera, not at your own face on the screen. 7. Keep your video simple. You don’t need to edit or produce your video in any way — no need for onscreen graphics or fancy cuts. We’re looking for your raw talent here. 8. Be your own fabulous self. Don’t feel you need to play-act the “TED speaker” — here at TED HQ, we’re as sick of this stereotype as you are. We’re looking for people who are authentic, who have something to say and their own honest way to say it. Use your real accent, your real gestures, your everyday words — be you! Looking for a couple of examples of great audition videos? Watch Zak Ebrahim’s short audition video, which turned into a blockbuster TED Talk and a TED Book, and helped share his message of peace to millions of people. Watch Sally Kohn’s short audition video, which turned into a TED Talk … after which she was invited back to give another TED Talk. And finally, 2 pro tips: 1. Try to turn in your video and application a few hours before the deadline. Here at TED HQ, we’re going to be watching hundreds of videos the day after the deadline closes … but you can get our attention by submitting earlier in the day. 2. If the audition format just doesn’t work for you, but you still want to speak, use our form to apply to speak at a TED event, or look for a nearby TEDx event and apply to speak there! The TED Idea Search is only one of many, many ways we are looking for great ideas. Here̵[...]



Wireless advances in treating spinal cord damage, morphing wings for aircraft, and the world’s tallest tropical trees

2016-11-22T23:29:38Z

Just a few of the intriguing headlines involving members of the TED community this week: Advances in treating spinal cord damage. In Nature, Grégoire Courtine and a team of scientists announced that they had successfully used a wireless brain-spine interface to help monkeys with spinal cord damage paralyzing one leg regain the ability to walk. […] Just a few of the intriguing headlines involving members of the TED community this week: Advances in treating spinal cord damage. In Nature, Grégoire Courtine and a team of scientists announced that they had successfully used a wireless brain-spine interface to help monkeys with spinal cord damage paralyzing one leg regain the ability to walk. Compared to other similar systems, the wireless component is unique, allowing the monkeys to move around freely without being tethered to electronics. Speaking with The New York Times, Courtine emphasized that the goal of the system is not to fix paralysis, but rather to have better rehabilitation for patients. (Watch Grégoire’s TED Talk) A new instrument to shed light on distant planets. A team of scientists and engineers, including TEDster Jeremy Kasdin, have used a new instrument to isolate and analyze the light emitted by planets orbiting nearby stars. The instrument, CHARIS, was designed and built by Kasdin’s team. By analyzing the light emitted by the planets, researchers are able to determine more details about their age, size and atmospheric composition. This operation was a test run, and is part of a larger scientific effort to find and analyze exoplanets. (Watch Jeremy’s TED Talk) Bendable, morphing wings for aircraft. In Soft Robotics, Neil Gershenfeld and a team of researchers describe a new bendable, morphing wing that could create more agile, fuel-efficient aircraft — as well as simplify the manufacturing process. A long time goal of researchers, previous attempts used mechanical control structures within the wing to deform it, but these structures were heavy, canceling out any fuel-efficiency gains, and they added complexity. The new method makes the entire wing the mechanism and its shape can be changed along its entire length by activating two small motors that apply a twisting pressure to each wingtip. (Watch Neil’s TED Talk) A deadly Ebola mutation. New research suggests that a mutation in the Ebola virus may be responsible for the scale of the epidemic that began in 2013 in West Africa. The research, conducted by a team of researchers that included TEDster Pardis Sabeti, showed that roughly 3 months after the initial outbreak, and about the time the epidemic was detected, the virus had mutated. The mutation made the virus better suited for humans than its natural host, the fruit bat, which may have allowed the virus to spread more aggressively. Working independently, another team of researchers came to a similar conclusion, but the role of the mutation in Ebola’s virulence and transmissibility still needs to be clarified. (Watch Pardis’ TED Talk) The future of transportation. Bjarke Ingels’ firm (BIG) released its design plans for a hyperloop system that would connect Dubai and Abu Dhabi in just a 12 minutes, a journey that now takes more than two hours by car. With a system of autonomous pods, the group hopes to eliminate waiting time; their design reveal includes conceptual images and video showing from start to finish what the passenger experience would be like. BIG made the designs for Hyperloop  One, one of the companies racing to make Elon Musk’s concept a reality. (Watch Bjarke’s TED Talk) The world’s tallest tropical trees. Greg Asner has identified the world’s tallest tropical tree using laser scanning, along with 50 other record-breakers. The tree, located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, stands at 94.1 meters tall or, as Asner said for comparison, about the height of five sperm whales stacked snout-to-fluke. He measured the tree using a laser scanning technology called LIDAR (for Light Detection[...]



Ingenuity starts with a spark: The talks of TED@IBM

2016-11-28T19:01:59Z

From artists to scientists, mothers, mathematicians and business visionaries, people in every corner of the world are dreaming up solutions to our most pressing problems. Whether tackling war and peace or the principles of machine learning, ingenuity starts with one thing: a spark. And regardless of where the spark takes hold, inspiration demands action to […]IBM’s editorial director, Michela Stribling, kicks off Session 1 at TED@IBM: Spark, November 16, 2016 in San Francisco. (Photo: Russell Edwards/TED) From artists to scientists, mothers, mathematicians and business visionaries, people in every corner of the world are dreaming up solutions to our most pressing problems. Whether tackling war and peace or the principles of machine learning, ingenuity starts with one thing: a spark. And regardless of where the spark takes hold, inspiration demands action to reach its greatest potential. At the third installment of TED@IBM — part of the TED Institute, held on November 15, 2016, at the SFJAZZ Center in San Francisco — a diverse and brilliant collection of speakers and performers dared to ask: What if we used our collective expertise and insights to provide a spark that could change the world for good? After opening remarks from Michela Stribling, IBM’s editorial director, the talks in Session 1 challenged us to think about how we can work together to solve problems and, maybe, leave the planet better than we found it. Where light meets sound. In a performance that blurs the boundaries of light and sound, Ryan and Hays Holladay create a visual experience of beats and tones shaped around reverberations of color. With multicolored projections and an assortment of carefully placed lamps, the brothers transcribe their music across the illuminated bursts of surfaces suddenly made visible. Here, music becomes the performer, rather than the performance, directing us not toward itself but toward the tempo and rhythm that orchestrates its narration. It’s a melody as much seen as it is heard: a series of intonations whose colorful pattern of sound eventually collapses into the nearly faded spotlight of a solitary lamp. The answer to fighting cybercrime. Cybercrime netted $450 billion in profits last year, with 2 billion records lost or stolen. As the vice president at IBM Security, Caleb Barlow recognizes the insufficiency of our current strategies to protect our data from the ultra-sophisticated criminal gangs that are responsible for 80 percent of all cyber attacks. His solution? When a cyber attack occurs, we should respond to it with the same collective effort and openness as a health care crisis — we need to know who is infected and how the disease is spreading. Last year, Barlow and his team started publishing all of IBM’s threat data in an effort to encourage the same sharing from other major corporations, governments and private security firms. If we’re not sharing, he says, then we’re part of the problem. According to Adam Grant, there are three basic kinds of employees: givers, takers, and matchers (who’ll match the prevailing behavior of the group). The key to a happy workplace is to balance that mix. Grant speaks at TED@IBM: Spark. (Photo: Russell Edwards/TED) One bad apple spoils the bunch. The success of any company is defined by the quality of people who work there. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant has spent a lot of time analyzing business structures, and he’s concluded that there are three different types of employees: givers, takers and matchers. To achieve a balanced workplace with equal opportunity for and distribution of work, power and play, companies must endeavor to hire givers and matchers, whose personalities allow employees to feel supported, heard and acknowledged. The challenge is to stop takers from getting a seat at the table, because they so often undercut the spirit of collaboration workplaces need to thrive. The bus[...]



Have a TED Talk idea? Apply to the TEDNYC Idea Search 2017

2016-11-21T14:22:16Z

Do you have a TED Talk you’ve always wanted to try out in front of an audience? We’re thrilled to announce that applications are open for our TEDNYC Idea Search 2017 in New York City. Anyone with an idea worth spreading is invited to apply; 10 finalists will share their risky, quirky, fascinating ideas in […]Do you have a TED Talk you’ve always wanted to try out in front of an audience? We’re thrilled to announce that applications are open for our TEDNYC Idea Search 2017 in New York City. Anyone with an idea worth spreading is invited to apply; 10 finalists will share their risky, quirky, fascinating ideas in under 6 minutes, in late January, onstage at the TED theater in Manhattan. The TEDNYC Idea Search is a chance for us to find fresh voices to ring out on the TED stage. Some of these talks will be posted on the online TED platform; other speakers will be invited to expand on their talks on the TED2017 main stage in Vancouver in the spring of 2017. Joshua Prager, Hannah Brencher, Richard Turere and Hyeonseo Lee — all these speakers are fantastic finds from previous TED talent searches. The deadline to apply is November 28 at 6pm Eastern time. To apply, you’ll need to fill out this form and make a 1-minute video describing your talk idea. One note: We can’t cover travel to New York City for finalists from out of town; we encourage applicants from the tri-state area surrounding New York. Apply to speak at the TEDNYC Idea Search 2017 >>   [...]



Meet our new Head of Media: Colin Helms

2016-11-13T20:39:20Z

This fall, TED welcomes Colin Helms as its Head of Media. In this leadership team role, Colin will oversee strategy and operations of TED’s core media business, including video production, new format development, distribution, social media, mobile and design. Colin brings more than 20 years of experience in both digital and traditional media content strategy […]Colin Helms comes to TED from MTV, where he was the SVP of connected content. He says, “My team’s challenge is to make TED available and relevant to audiences we haven’t reached yet.” Credit: Dian Lofton / TED This fall, TED welcomes Colin Helms as its Head of Media. In this leadership team role, Colin will oversee strategy and operations of TED’s core media business, including video production, new format development, distribution, social media, mobile and design. Colin brings more than 20 years of experience in both digital and traditional media content strategy and platform development. Prior to joining TED’s New York office, he was the SVP of Connected Content at MTV, where he oversaw the brand’s digital evolution from broadband video and social media to its pioneering multi-screen programming and original digital content studio. Before that, he served as a founding editor of Complex magazine as well as the editor-in-chief of the music magazine and festival CMJ. “It’s more important than ever to give ‘ideas worth spreading’ their greatest potential audience,” said TED curator Chris Anderson. “Colin’s expertise navigating today’s media landscape—at once vast and unpredictable—will help us expand that mission into an exciting new future.” “My team’s challenge is to make TED available and relevant to audiences we haven’t reached yet,” Colin says. “Media behaviors and habits vary depending on so many factors — geography, economics, cultural norms, you name it — and our job is to meet these audiences where they already are. That means online, yes, but it could also mean TV, radio, and a very broad variety of other content platforms. I’m excited to help TED become a part of millions more people’s media habits.” Credit: Dian Lofton / TED [...]



How small lies turn into big lies, what everyday objects tell us about inequality, and robots that lend a helping hand during disasters

2016-11-04T15:48:52Z

Just a few of the intriguing headlines involving members of the TED community this week: The cascading effect of small lies. Tali Sharot is the senior author on a paper published in Nature Neuroscience that sheds light on the possible slippery-slope effect of telling small, self-serving lies. Using an fMRI scanning device to monitor the […] Just a few of the intriguing headlines involving members of the TED community this week: The cascading effect of small lies. Tali Sharot is the senior author on a paper published in Nature Neuroscience that sheds light on the possible slippery-slope effect of telling small, self-serving lies. Using an fMRI scanning device to monitor the amygdala, an area of the brain associated with emotional response, the researchers found that when participants believed lying was to their benefit, “they were more inclined to dishonesty and their lies escalated over time,” reports The New York Times.  What’s more, as their lying progressed, the response in their amygdalas decreased — and the bigger the decrease, the bigger their next lie would be. The findings suggest that the brain becomes desensitized over time to the negative emotional effects of lying, but Sharot cautions that, while we know the decreased activity is related to lying, whether or not it’s related to a negative emotional reaction is still speculation. Fellow TEDster Dan Ariely is a co-author on the paper. (Watch Tali’s TED Talk and Dan’s TED Talk, and stay tuned for Ariely’s upcoming TED Book.) What everyday objects tell us about inequality. An initiative of the nonprofit Gapminder, Dollar Street collects photographs of everyday objects from the richest to the poorest households around the world as a way to explore inequality. For the project, a team of photographers photographed up to 155 objects, everything from toothbrushes to toys, in 200 homes in nearly 50 countries, a list that continues to grow. The completely fascinating website, where you can  explore the collection of photographs, launched on October 18. The project is the brainchild of Anna Rosling Rönnlund, who co-founded Gapminder along with TEDsters Hans Rosling and Ola Rosling. (Watch Hans’ and Ola’s TED Talk or read the Ideas article about Dollar Street.) Robots to the rescue. A joint training exercise between members of the Italian Coast Guard and a team led by TEDster Robin Murphy from Texas A&M’s Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) tested a robot-assisted search and rescue to help safeguard migrants crossing the Mediterranean from Africa to Italy. Lasting 3 days, the exercise tested EMILY, an unmanned surface vehicle that can drive to a group of people in distress and position itself so that the greatest number of people can grab on. The EMILY system was tested in January 2016 to help migrants crossing from Turkey to Greece, and two EMILYs are currently in use by the Hellenic Coast Guard and Hellenic Red Cross; the Hellenic Coast Guard credited CRASAR with recently saving over two dozen refugees trapped in high seas. This new exercise pinpointed differences between migration routes, as well as new ways for robots and humans to interact in the water. (Watch Robin’s TED Talk) Better diagnostics for pathogens. Richard Baraniuk is the lead author on a study detailing a new diagnostic method that could help slow the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and mitigate infectious disease outbreaks by allowing faster detection of microbes. Typically, bacterial detection requires the use of DNA probes that are target-specific, which means detection can be costly and slow when dealing with new or mutating species. Instead, the new method uses a small number of DNA probes randomly generated that are not target-specific, greatly reducing the cost and time of detection. (Watch Richard’s TED Talk) Open-source, autonomous vehicle[...]



The other side isn’t your enemy: Jonathan Haidt speaks at TEDNYC

2016-11-08T18:02:58Z

With less than a week until America casts ballots in what has become one of the most controversial US presidential elections in history, TED invited the social psychologist and expert on the psychology of morality Jonathan Haidt to talk about our divisions — and how we might heal. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson at […] src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/jonathan_haidt_can_a_divided_america_heal" width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen> With less than a week until America casts ballots in what has become one of the most controversial US presidential elections in history, TED invited the social psychologist and expert on the psychology of morality Jonathan Haidt to talk about our divisions — and how we might heal. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson at TED HQ in New York, Haidt draws on a social science perspective to explain why people on the left and right don’t just disagree with each other these days, they actually think the other side is a threat to the nation. “We’re tribal — we evolved for tribalism,” Haidt explains. “It’s how we created society. We’re not doomed to always be fighting each other, but we’ll never have world peace.” On the left, that tribalism has manifested itself with people who want to define their tribe more globally. On the right, the definition stops at local communities and nations. Haidt quotes the UK pollster Stephan Shakespeare, who put it this way: “We are either ‘drawbridge up’ people or ‘drawbridge down’ people.” Another principle of social science explains why political arguments feel so unreasonable lately: As humans, our intuition comes first, while reason comes second. “Our intelligence actually may have evolved to help us manipulate each other and defend our reputations,” Haidt says. “That’s why you can’t win a political argument with reasoning and evidence.” Add in the internet, he says, and our post-hoc reasoning is ramped up on speed. There’s also a historical explanation for the current division, Haidt says. The influence of World War II can’t be overstated, because the generation of people who fought and endured it had to learn to come together to endure hardships, making them more cooperative and willing to compromise even years later. The next generation, the Baby Boomers, grew up without the same kind of unifying national event, and never had to confront the fatal consequences of divisiveness the way their parents did. So, he says, it makes sense that they wouldn’t be able to compromise in politics. So is there a salve for a divided America? Haidt provides an interesting vision for how we might move forward. America was built on federalism and local control, he reminds us, and conservatives continue to value small government. World War II and then the Baby Boomers put more and more control in the hands of the federal government — in part, Haidt says, as a political maneuver to get Civil Rights legislation passed. But now, he points out, young people today are watching the government, specifically Congress, accomplish nothing at all. “What if young people find ways outside of government to make change?” he asks. “If we can take an awful lot off the federal plate, then people won’t feel the government is dominating their life as much.” “Both sides are right about something,” Haidt says. “There are a lot of problems in the country, but neither side is capable of seeing them all.” He suggests turning to the ancient wisdom of Buddha, Jesus and Marcus Aurelius for advice on how to drop fear, reframe our differences and stop seeing other people as your enemy. “Be more humble; you don’t know as much as you think,” he says. “Make an[...]



Rachel Dolezal’s TEDx Talk

2016-11-02T14:05:25Z

In April 2016, Rachel Dolezal spoke at an independently organized TEDx event held at a university. This particular talk has sparked much debate, including internally on our own staff. For some, sharing the talk risks causing deep offense, and runs counter to TED’s mission of ideas worth spreading. But for others, now that the talk has been recorded, not posting it would unduly limit an important conversation about identity(image)

In April 2016, Rachel Dolezal spoke at an independently organized TEDx event held at a university. As you may know, Ms. Dolezal is a former president of the NAACP’s Spokane chapter who sparked a national debate and resigned after the public discovered that she was a white woman identifying herself as a black woman.

Recently she announced on TV that she had recorded “a TED Talk.” Some of you were upset by this. Indeed, the news surprised us too, because we knew she hadn’t spoken at a TED event. But it turned out she had spoken at one of the thousands of TEDx events that are held around the world.

TEDx organizers host events independent of TED, and they have the freedom to invite speakers they feel are relevant to their communities. These volunteers find thousands of new voices all over the world — many of which would not otherwise be heard — including some of our most beloved, well-known speakers, people like Brene Brown and Simon Sinek.

What TEDx organizers have achieved collectively is remarkable. But, yes, some of them occasionally share ideas we don’t stand behind.

This particular talk has sparked much internal debate. For many on our staff, sharing the talk risks causing deep offense, and runs counter to TED’s mission of ideas worth spreading. But for others, now that the talk has been recorded, refusing to post it would unduly limit an important conversation about identity, and the social underpinning of race — and would be counter to TED’s guiding philosophy of radical openness. There’s no easy middle ground here.

So, in a doubtless flawed attempt to do the right thing by all of our constituencies, we have decided to make the talk available to you here, while highlighting the context in which the talk was created and the deeply felt concerns it has raised.

We are lucky to have a thoughtful audience, and we hope the conversation you engage in here will transcend the material that sparks it.

Sincerely,
The TED Editors

src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/189852349" width="586" height="330" frameborder="0" title="Race and Identity- Being Black in America - Rachel Dolezal - TEDxUIdaho" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen>


(image) (image) (image)



How to react to a bully in a comment thread

2016-11-02T19:54:10Z

Bullies never win -- not even in the comments section. TED’s community manager, Katie Pierce, shares these tips on how to react to a comment-thread bully.Bullies never win — not even in the comments section. TED’s community manager, Katie Pierce, shares these tips on how to react to a comment-thread bully. I grew up with a dad who was a baseball-loving criminal investigator, so in my house, dinner conversation was about two things: Yankees batting averages and criminal psychology. At the table, I was introduced to the science of lying and the secrets of writing analysis — and I learned how to remove fear from the equation when dealing with bad guys. And believe me, this comes in handy as a comment moderator.  TED’s website comments are a place where civility is important, and I’ve had to take on some big bullies while steering our community. I used to see these bullies as completely opposed to TED’s mission to create meaningful interaction in the comment threads on every TED Talk. But after much time spent trying to eradicate them, I’ve realized how valuable bullies can be to listen to and learn from.  For example, listening for changes in word choice and tone helps me identify potential bullies even before they’ve begun actively bullying their next target. So I take notice when someone starts using more combative language, expressing their superiority or posting with an abnormal frequency.  While I’ve got your back on TED.com, bullies will certainly try to sneak into other areas of your life too. Here are my tricks to dealing with a bully that work online, offline … anytime. The first three are the most important: Remain calm Remain calm Remain calm That moment when bullying hits you — it really, really hurts. Your emotions are billowing out like a mushroom cloud in your brain and you can’t think straight through all the smoke. Just remember: you are not under siege. You are still the person you were before you encountered the bully. They’ve only stated an opinion, not wished the awful thing into being. If you can tough it out until the emotional plume settles, you’ll be in a great place to respond effectively. Determine the severity of the bullying It can be difficult to look beyond yourself when you’ve just been emotionally provoked, which is why steps 1–3 are so important. Make sure your heartbeat has slowed back down and you’re taking full, deep breaths. Then, ask yourself, “Am I angry because this speaker is being aggressively wrong and rude in a general way — or is this a personal attack on me?” Sometimes a comment is pointed enough for you to be in danger: Does it make a specific threat? Does it contain information about you that you don’t want shared? If this happens on the TED.com comment threads, flag the comment so our mods see it right away, and write to me. Ask for the help you need … and be the help you need No matter what else you do, make sure to address this reality: Being bullied sucks. Bullying is not a normal stressor, and denying that you feel bad after an incident does not make it easier to work through. Maintaining your mental health while dealing with a bully is absolutely essential. Bullies do their real damage if you skip this step. So: Ask a friend to have a decompression session to discuss the interaction; do your favorite form of exercise; or employ another form of self-care that works for you. And in online spaces that have a moderator, don’t hesitate to reach out if you need backup! As a moderator myself, I hate that a bully hurt you, and I really do want to help! Bonus: Involving a moderator helps protect your fellow community members, and it also helps the mods do their jobs better. Leave no one [...]



TED Fellows in the Field: How Juliana Rotich is connecting Africans with rugged technology

2016-10-31T17:34:28Z

Meet Kenyan technologist, entrepreneur and TED Fellow Juliana Rotich in the latest installment of the Fellows in the Field video series. Visit the iHub, an incubator for Nairobi’s young technology entrepreneurs, and learn about BRCK, a rugged mobile WiFi device with huge potential to bring connectivity to areas of the world with limited infrastructure. “It’s [](image)

class='youtube-player' type='text/html' width='586' height='360' src='http://www.youtube.com/embed/2NIuOrsIQcc?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent' allowfullscreen='true' style='border:0;'>

Meet Kenyan technologist, entrepreneur and TED Fellow Juliana Rotich in the latest installment of the Fellows in the Field video series. Visit the iHub, an incubator for Nairobi’s young technology entrepreneurs, and learn about BRCK, a rugged mobile WiFi device with huge potential to bring connectivity to areas of the world with limited infrastructure.

“It’s been incredible to see how the technology sector has changed in Kenya and in Africa,” Rotich says. “There is more work to do to provide opportunity and to create companies that not only solve problems here, but can also solve problems around the world.

Interested in becoming a TED Fellow yourself? The search is on for the next class. Learn more about becoming a TEDGlobal 2017 Fellow in Arusha, Tanzania. We encourage all talented innovators in their fields — science, art, technology, entrepreneurship, film and beyond — to apply to become a TED Fellow, especially those working across the African continent.

Apply now to become a TEDGlobal 2017 Fellow in Arusha, Tanzania.


(image) (image) (image)



On babies and TED

2016-10-31T21:25:32Z

At this year’s TEDWomen conference, we tried out some new ideas for accommodating attendees with small children. Beyond a lactation room, for instance, we offered a list of local, vetted caregiver services to call upon, a free livestream pass for caregivers, a free breast-milk shipping service, and a suite at a nearby hotel where attendees [](image)

At this year’s TEDWomen conference, we tried out some new ideas for accommodating attendees with small children. Beyond a lactation room, for instance, we offered a list of local, vetted caregiver services to call upon, a free livestream pass for caregivers, a free breast-milk shipping service, and a suite at a nearby hotel where attendees and caregivers with small children could gather and watch the livestream together.

We did not, however, reverse our grownups-only policy. That’s because, simply put, our attendees have been vocal about us maintaining it.

But in our attempt to accommodate all our audiences, we fell short: A newborn was turned away from TEDWomen last week, and the disappointed mother wondered how an organization like TED could leave her with so few options.

That disappointment touches a nerve here at TED. Many of us are parents, and there’s no denying that many of the moving ideas shared on stage last week — ones that demanded a healthier world for babies and their parents — prompt us to ask: How can TED do its part to set a new standard?

We haven’t figured this out yet, but we are trying — and listening. We’ve been in touch with parents from this event and others to help us take a hard look at how we can better support parents of babies and small children. We recognize the importance of getting this right. Stay tuned.


(image) (image) (image)



It’s time to lead: The talks of Session 6 of TEDWomen 2016

2016-10-29T00:54:04Z

When Hillary Clinton became the first female nominee of a major political party in the United States this summer, she reflected that this achievement “belongs to generations of women and men who struggled, sacrificed and made this moment possible.” Women have been leaders throughout history, making positive changes in their communities. But in so many places around […]When Hillary Clinton became the first female nominee of a major political party in the United States this summer, she reflected that this achievement “belongs to generations of women and men who struggled, sacrificed and made this moment possible.” Women have been leaders throughout history, making positive changes in their communities. But in so many places around the world, women are held back from leadership on the largest stages by social, cultural and religious barriers. In the final session of TEDWomen 2016 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, eight speakers and one performer tackled one of the most fundamental issues facing women today: leadership. Halla Tómasdóttir ran for president of Iceland this year — and came in a strong second from a wide field, against strong odds. She analyzes her campaign onstage at TEDWomen 2016. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED A living emoji of sincerity. “Are you going to quit?” That was the first question the media asked Halla Tómasdóttir, who ran for president of Iceland in 2016, at her first televised debate. Polling at 1 percent at the time, it didn’t look like Tómasdóttir had a chance at winning the election — or making an impact at all on the political debate. Sharing her journey from watching Iceland’s first female president, Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, assume leadership, to deciding to run for Iceland’s highest office herself, Tómasdóttir narrates her motivations, struggles and achievements with wit and warmth. “It’s possible to run a different type of campaign,” she says, explaining how she insisted that her campaign take the high road and stay positive throughout the election, eventually earning her the description of “a living emoji of sincerity” in a New Yorker article. Despite a lack of resources and media attention, and against overwhelming odds, Tómasdóttir finished second in the election. “What we see, we can be. So screw fear and challenges. It matters that women run. And it’s time for women to run — whether it’s for CEO or president.” Know your own power. US Representative Nancy Pelosi has represented San Francisco’s 12th district for 29 years, is currently the Democratic leader of the House of Representatives, and made history by becoming the first woman Speaker of the House. But she never felt that she was on a course for public office. In a revealing interview with TEDWomen co-founder Pat Mitchell, Pelosi reflects on her career and offers advice to other women seeking leadership positions, urging them to know their power and be their authentic selves. “Nothing is more wholesome to a government than the increased participation of women in leadership,” she says. Read more about the interview here. Religious life, reinvented. “Religion today has failed to capture the imagination of a generation that is repelled by the viciousness of extremism and alienated by the dullness of routine-ism,” says Rabbi Sharon Brous. As a Jewish leader at the forefront of a movement for multi-faith justice work — which includes women’s mosques, Jewish indie startups, black churches in North Carolina, and a holy bus loaded with nuns — Brous wants to rethink and reinven[...]



Know your power, be sure of your convictions, and act upon them: Nancy Pelosi speaks at TEDWomen 2016

2016-11-01T17:21:41Z

Nancy Pelosi has represented San Francisco’s 12th district for 29 years, is currently the Democratic leader of the House of Representatives, and made history by becoming the first woman Speaker of the House. But before all that happened, she never felt that she was on a course for public office. When the opportunity to run […]Nancy Pelosi at TEDWomen 2016 – It’s About Time, October 26-28, 2016, Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts, San Francisco, California. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED Nancy Pelosi has represented San Francisco’s 12th district for 29 years, is currently the Democratic leader of the House of Representatives, and made history by becoming the first woman Speaker of the House. But before all that happened, she never felt that she was on a course for public office. When the opportunity to run came along, she was a young mom; while she was heavily involved in the community, the thought of running for office had never crossed her mind. Pelosi’s predecessor, Sala Burton, encouraged her to run when she became ill. Pelosi, feeling confident that she had a clear purpose, decided to go for it. “I knew my purpose and my call to service was to children,” she says. She wanted to make sure that all children had the same opportunities that her own children had. She won the election and the rest is history. Asked by interviewer and TEDWomen co-founder Pat Mitchell what makes women’s leadership different and beneficial, Pelosi reflects how, when she ran meetings as Speaker of the House, people sometimes remarked on how different the meeting would have been if it was led by a man. Women are intuitive and respectful of other views, she says. They listen, learn and are ready to use their time well — and those differences make a difference. In fact, Pelosi believes that nothing is more wholesome to government than the increased participation of women. Reflecting back on her long career, Pelosi offers advice to other women seeking leadership positions. When setting out on a course, she urges women to know their purpose, know their subject, act strategically and use their intuition. “When people know that you are going to act, your leadership will be very, very respected, and people will not try to destroy your options while you take your time,” she says. Most important, she encourages women to be sincere. “It’s wonderful to have mentors and to have role models, but you must be your authentic self,” she urges, remarking that people want to see sincere and authentic candidates. Nancy Pelosi with host Pat Mitchell at TEDWomen 2016 – It’s About Time, October 26-28, 2016, Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts, San Francisco, California. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED When she attended her first meeting at the White House, Pelosi was aware that this was unlike any White House meeting that any other woman had attended. As she sat down at the table with President Bush and the other leaders, she suddenly felt that the chair she was sitting on was very crowded. “It was weird, it was so tight, and I realized that on that chair were Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth,” she says. “I could hear them say, ‘At last we have a seat at the table.'” In that moment, she was standing on the shoulders of all the women who had come before her. “Women fought for the right to vote — it was not given,” she says, correcting the headlines that came after women’s suffrage in 1920. She realizes that one day, other women will stand on her shoulders, too. Pelosi believes that the issues that face the United States are part of so[...]



Conservation through poetry: Ian McCallum speaks at TEDWomen 2016

2016-10-30T18:31:44Z

In December 1968, the crew of the Apollo 8 space mission captured a historic photo: “Earthrise,” an image of our home planet as seen from lunar orbit. Astronaut Jim Lovell was on that mission, and here’s what he said: “Everything that you’ve ever known, your loved ones, your business, the problems of the Earth itself … is all behind your thumb.” It […]Ian McCallum speaks onstage at TEDWomen 2016. Behind him is an image of the historic photo “Earthrise,” a view of our home planet from space. As astronaut Jim Lovell said: “Everything that you’ve ever known, your loved ones, your business, the problems of the Earth itself … is all behind your thumb.” Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED In December 1968, the crew of the Apollo 8 space mission captured a historic photo: “Earthrise,” an image of our home planet as seen from lunar orbit. Astronaut Jim Lovell was on that mission, and here’s what he said: “Everything that you’ve ever known, your loved ones, your business, the problems of the Earth itself … is all behind your thumb.” It was a poetic reflection on the frailty of life contained within that planet, and it echoed the observations of poets past and present that nature exists as an interconnected web of experiences between people and their environments. Ian McCallum, a poet and psychiatrist, counts himself as just one of many voices who highlight this relationship, suggesting that so much of what makes up the natural world is also shared by living mammals like us. His message is, in part, one of warning, of human development that’s created devastating effects on elephants, rhinoceroses, forests, and other keystone species vital to the Earth’s ecosystem. In the nearly 50 years since James Lovell and the other members of Apollo 8 gazed at our planet from the shelter of space, Earth has seen its ecological balance become more and more precarious through the actions of poachers and other human agents. Ironically, while humans create so much environmental change, we are ourselves not a keystone species, McCallum says, not essential to any larger ecosystem. “Were we to disappear tomorrow,” he says, “nothing would miss us.” But despite the best efforts of scientists to call us humans to account, people still exhibit apathy toward “the ecological warning calls of science.” In the absence of such reactions, he says, “the only voice left that can awaken us belongs to the poets.” Poetry is as much “a language of protest” as it is “a language of hope,” and it pushes us to be bold in how we address problems and ideas. It challenges us to be “keystone individuals” even if we aren’t a keystone species: to be “someone who can make a difference to the lives of others, to the animals, and to the Earth; someone who is willing to be disturbed” and willing “to stand firm in the knowledge that there are some things that are simply not for sale.” It is, at its core, a process of self-examination, as poetry reminds us to consider what McCallum stresses we seem to have forgotten: “that wilderness is not a place, but a pattern of soul where every tree, every bird and beast is a soul maker[.]”                               — Wilderness, Ian McCallum, 1998 [...]



It’s about time to reimagine: The talks of Session 5 of TEDWomen 2016

2016-10-28T19:58:56Z

“TED is about challenging convention and deepening our understanding of the world around us by considering, even for just a few moments, a radically different way to look at things,” says Dalia Mogahed, host of Session 5 of TEDWomen 2016 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. In the conference’s penultimate […]Dalia Mogahed hosts a powerful, challenging Session 5 of TEDWomen 2016: It’s About Time. (Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED) “TED is about challenging convention and deepening our understanding of the world around us by considering, even for just a few moments, a radically different way to look at things,” says Dalia Mogahed, host of Session 5 of TEDWomen 2016 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. In the conference’s penultimate session, thought leaders, activists and scientists challenge us to reimagine how we learn, work and build. Through explorations of some topics we’d rather not discuss — and discussions of innovative ways to solve old problems — each of the session’s seven speakers leave us with a sense of hope for a better way to engage in our global community. “The act of making is a social activity,” says architect Jeanne Gang. She spoke at TEDWomen 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED) Architecture 101: think about humans before construction. “People think architects design buildings — and cities — but what we really design are relationships,” says Jeanne Gang, a renowned architect and MacArthur fellow. When relationships are at the core of structural design, the lighting and the distribution of space can help instill trust, communication and harmony in communities. Gang describes design choices for projects she led to reinvigorate a student population, bring together a racially segregated city and foster community in a high-rise apartment in the heart of Chicago. She’s adamant about the role of architecture in solving social problems, like climate change, and the responsibility of designers to create timeless and impactful spaces. “The act of making,” she says “is a social activity.” “None of us are just what you can see — we’re all dealing with things you can’t see,” says Michele L. Sullivan. She spoke at TEDWomen 2016 in San Francisco. (Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED) Asking for help is a strength, not a weakness. Caterpillar Foundation president Michele L. Sullivan started learning difficult, eye-opening lessons on her very first day of kindergarten, when her classmates asked her: “Why do you look different?” Her confidence shattered, Sullivan hated being in public for years after, feeling every stare and pointed finger. “As a child, you can’t understand another child’s curiosity — or adult’s ignorance,” she says. Sullivan excelled in the classroom, and she made school a priority, eventually going on to earn an MBA. There were difficulties along the way. At her first job interview, Sullivan says, the biggest challenge of the day wasn’t the interview — it was finding a way to get into the building, which wasn’t handicap accessible. (She got the job anyway.) In her life, she chooses to focus on her experiences with gracious strangers who help her with small acts of kindness each day. “The only shoes you truly can walk in are your own,” she says. “But with compassion, courage and understanding, we can walk together, side by side.” Pediatric psychologist Kathy Hull shared moving stories of pediat[...]



It’s time for a new story: The talks of Session 4 of TEDWomen 2016

2016-11-14T03:07:17Z

In all of its formats, in all the ways we listen and watch, the media is extremely powerful in how it represents — or underrepresents or misrepresents — women. Unless we’re prepared to change the way women are portrayed in the stories we tell, we’re not prepared for real change. In Session 4 of TEDWomen […]Ashley Judd speaks boldly about online gender violance — and what we can start doing to end it. She’s onstage at TEDWomen 2016 in San Francisco. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED In all of its formats, in all the ways we listen and watch, the media is extremely powerful in how it represents — or underrepresents or misrepresents — women. Unless we’re prepared to change the way women are portrayed in the stories we tell, we’re not prepared for real change. In Session 4 of TEDWomen 2016 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, seven speakers (and a ballet company!) asked us to rethink how we tell each other stories, to empower us all. Stacy Smith studies how women are represented in film … starting with a simple headcount. She spoke onstage at TEDWomen 2016: It’s About Time, in San Francisco. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED The epidemic of invisibility. Filmmaking has the powerful capacity to transform and transport ideas. It shows us about the world — and ourselves. But the reality is that many of us are grossly underrepresented, if represented at all, in film. Media researcher and activist Stacy Smith studies inequality in film. Each year, Smith and her team study 100 popular Hollywood films, and they’ve found that women are largely invisible — on and off camera — to the point that women represent less than a third of speaking parts. Why is this? Perhaps thanks to this fact: Only 4.1 percent of films are directed by women. The numbers get smaller when factoring in race, age, sexuality and disability. Smith describes this situation as an “epidemic of invisibility.” Even in these grim circumstances, she offers practical solutions, like “just add five”: If, starting today, each filmmaker was to add five female speaking characters to their film, we would fill the gender gap in a mere three years. Ultimately, viewers have the power to address these problems by supporting women filmmakers and insisting that more women voices are heard. Teach girls to be brave: Writer Caroline Paul has lived a high-risk life. She has paddled unexplored rivers in Borneo, sea kayaked the dangerous waters of Alaska, and flown experimental planes around the California coast; adventure and danger are part of her DNA. So it came as a surprise to her that both men and womenwere baffled by her exploits. And then she realized: they were operating under the misconception that women weren’t brave. Where does this frame of thinking come from? It begins in infanthood, she says. Parents spend so much time protecting young girls from falling down and making mistakes that they grow up to be women who see and use fear as a barrier instead of a propeller to power our most courageous and ambitious endeavors. The message of this talk is simple: encourage young girls to get outside of their comfort zones, to build confidence by letting them try and fail for themselves, and shape their destinies based on their capabilities and not their limitations. “I’m not against fear,” Paul says. “I’m just pro-bravery.” Nanfu Wang speaks about her career as a documentary filmmaker at TEDWomen 2016: It’s About Time. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED The power of story to contr[...]



The urgency of intersectionality: Kimberlé Crenshaw speaks at TEDWomen 2016

2016-11-13T16:13:20Z

Michelle Cusseaux. Aura Rosser. Tanisha Anderson. Mya Hall. Natasha McKenna. These are the names of but a few African-American women who were victims of police brutality in the past two years. Why are most people unfamiliar with these names? Activist and law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw urges us to ask this question. Through her theory of […]“When there’s no name for a problem, you can’t solve it,” says Kimberlé Crenshaw. She spoke at TEDWomen 2016 on October 27 in San Francisco. (Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED) Michelle Cusseaux. Aura Rosser. Tanisha Anderson. Mya Hall. Natasha McKenna. These are the names of but a few African-American women who were victims of police brutality in the past two years. Why are most people unfamiliar with these names? Activist and law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw urges us to ask this question. Through her theory of intersectionality, she explains the overwhelming underrepresentation of violence against African-American women in activism, politics and media. “The problem is, in part, a framing problem,” Crenshaw says. “Without frames that are capacious enough to address all the ways that disadvantages and burdens play out for all members of a particular group, the efforts to mobilize resources to address a social problem will be  partial and exclusionary.” For Crenshaw, this meant developing a language as a method of understanding this problem, she says: “When there’s no name for a problem, you can’t see a problem. When you can’t see a problem, you can’t solve it.” Inspiration struck as a law student, when she came across the case of Emma DeGraffenreid, an African-American woman who sued a manufacturing company for not hiring her on the basis of race and gender. The judge dismissed her claim, noting that the company had hired people of her color, and hired people of her gender. It just didn’t happen to hire people who were both. Crenshaw seeing this obvious injustice (or “injustice squared,” as she puts it) imagined DeGraffenreid standing at the intersection of being both a woman and an African-American. This intersection is at the heart of the theory of intersectionality, a theory Crenshaw has developed to describe how our overlapping social identities relate to structures of racism and oppression. The reality is that African-American women face discrimination through both their race and gender. Spheres of social identities — from race to gender to sexuality to disability — operate on multiple levels, creating multidimensional experiences. This casts a shadow on the African-American women who have lost their lives to systemic racism in the past few years. “Why don’t we know these stories? Why is it that their lost lives don’t generate the same amount of media attention and communal outcry of the lost lives of their fallen brothers?” she demands. Frustrated by this situation, Crenshaw launched the #SayHerName campaign, a social media movement that seeks to shed light on forgotten women. “Let’s create a cacophony of sound to represent our intention. To hold these women up. To bring them into the light,” Crenshaw proclaims. Accompanied onstage by singer Abby Dobson to close out this powerful talk, she encourages us to bring these women to light and finally say their names: Michelle Cusseaux. Aura Rosser. Tanisha Anderson. Mya Hall. Natasha McKenna. [...]



The time for equality is now: The talks of Session 3 of TEDWomen 2016

2016-10-30T04:29:17Z

When it comes to equality across race, class and gender: “None of us has time to sleep — we need to be woke as hell,” says Mia Birdsong, host of Session 3 of TEDWomen 2016. In an emotional, pointed session, seven speakers and one performer explored the painful realities of the present and offered hopeful […]When it comes to equality across race, class and gender: “None of us has time to sleep — we need to be woke as hell,” says Mia Birdsong, host of Session 3 of TEDWomen 2016. In an emotional, pointed session, seven speakers and one performer explored the painful realities of the present and offered hopeful views of the future. Founders of the Black Lives Matter movement — from left, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, interviewed onstage by TEDWomen cohost Mia Birdsong at TEDWomen 2016 in San Francisco. Photo: Marla Aufmuth / TED “I’m not passing a torch; I’m helping you light the fire.” Kicking off session 3, Mia Birdsong sat down with the three founders of the Black Lives Matter movement, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi, for an in-depth conversation about the movement, how it’s rocked public consciousness across the world and where the future lies for Black lives. Sharing personal experiences of being Black in America and statistics about the abhorrent state of racism worldwide, Garza, Cullors and Tometi made it clear that this systemic problem must be addressed at the root for the progress of all. “Our work is not just about our own visibility, but how we make the whole visible,” they say. Their advice on how to participate? Lead, join something and “sharpen each other so we can rise.” Attacking discrimination through prenatal care. When activists discuss the effects of racism on marginalized populations, they tend to focus on the challenges that occur during one’s lifetime. But what about before you’re even born? According to stats shared by birthing rights activist and doula Miriam Zoila Pérez, pregnant women of color experience far poorer health outcomes than their white counterparts. Though poverty and access-to-care are partially responsible for this statistic, Pérez identifies discrimination as the root cause of this disparity. Pregnant women of color who receive the recommended prenatal care still suffer from higher rates of illness and death during pregnancy and childbirth, and immigrants of color actually have worse health outcomes the longer that they stay in the United States. “Racism is actually making us sick,” Pérez says. She illustrates a new way to counteract these effects, known as “the JJ Way.” This model of unconditional support from healthcare providers emphasizes a compassionate rather than punitive environment for all women. “While we can’t eradicate racism and the stress that results from it overnight, we might be able to create environments that provide a buffer to what people of color experience on a daily basis. And during pregnancy, that buffer can be an incredible tool towards shifting the impact of racism on generations to come.” The urgency of intersectionality. As a law student, professor Kimberlé Crenshaw came across the case of Emma DeGraffenreid, an African-American woman who had sued a manufacturing company for not hiring her on the basis of her race and gender. The judge dismissed her claim, noting that the company had hired people of her color, and hired people of her gender. It just d[...]