Subscribe: Double-Tongued Dictionary
http://feeds.feedburner.com/DoubleTonguedWordWresterDictionary
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
air  call  complete episode  complete  episode  listener  man  meaning  new  part complete  part  someone  term  word  words 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Double-Tongued Dictionary

A Way with Words



A radio program and podcast about language.



Last Build Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2018 23:50:30 +0000

 



A Shoo-in

Sat, 13 Jan 2018 12:58:34 +0000

This week it’s butterflies, belly flowers, plot bunnies, foxes, and cuckoos. Also, writing advice from Mark Twain and a wonderful bit of prose from Sara Pennypacker’s book Pax. And are there word origins? Well, does a duck swim? We’ll hear the stories of polka, smarmy, bully pulpit, and the exes and ohs we use to [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~3/YxFKNwZX4Ho/a-shoo-in-10-july-2017.mp3




Noon of Night

Sat, 06 Jan 2018 16:39:01 +0000

As a kid, you may have played that game where you phone someone to say, “Is your refrigerator running? Then you better go catch it!” What’s the term for that kind of practical joke? Is it a crank call or a prank call? There’s a difference. • If someone has a chip on his shoulder, [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/2XBcPc9sDJ8/170626-AWWW-Noon-of-Night.mp3




Hot Dog, Cold Turkey

Sat, 23 Dec 2017 16:22:43 +0000

Why do we call a frankfurter a hot dog? It seems an unsettling 19th-century rumor is to blame. Also, if someone quits something abruptly, why do we say they quit cold turkey? This term’s roots may lie in the history of boxing. Plus, a transgender listener with nieces and nephews is looking for a gender-neutral [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/oo1VMC6N7sA/170529-AWWW-Hot-Dog-Cold-Turkey.mp3




Brand Spanking New

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 18:49:09 +0000

Take a look back at some notable words and phrases from 2017: Remember path of totality? How about milkshake duck? Also, a committee has to choose a new mascot for a school’s sports teams. They want to call them the Knights, as in the fighters in shining armor. But is the word knight gender-neutral? • [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/afERZIX7kUA/171218-AWWW-Brand-Spanking-New.mp3




Joe Moore Mojo

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A listener in Enterprise, Alabama, recalls that when a storm was approaching his grandfather would say “It’s going to come up a Joe Moore.” The slang term Joe Moore comes from the word mojo, meaning a magic spell or magic power. By metathesis, which is what linguists call the transposition of letters or sounds in [...]



Sports Dictionaries for Radio Readers

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

The KPBS Radio Reading Service provides audio recordings of daily newspapers for the visually impaired. A volunteer who reads for the service has trouble understanding some of the jargon from the sports pages. Good references for the language of sports include The Dickson Baseball Dictionary by Paul Dickson, the Dictionary of Sports and Games Technology [...]



“Fidget Spinner” for Word fo the Year?

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

One term that rose to prominence in 2017: fidget spinner. This is part of a complete episode.



Should You Correct People Who Mispronounce Your Name?

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A Corpus Christi, Texas, man named Luis is exasperated when people insist on pronouncing his name LOO-iss rather than loo-EES, which is the way he prefers and which reflects his Spanish-speaking heritage. He’s well within his rights to correct them. This is part of a complete episode.



Suggestions for a Word Meaning “Nervous Anticipation”

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Listeners write in with suggestions for a young caller’s request for a single term to describe someone in a state of nervous anticipation. They propose aflutter, atwitter, nervousited, happrehensive, and a noun form, antrepidation. This is part of a complete episode.



The Spanking in Brand Spanking New

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

The spanking in the phrase brand spanking new has been used as an intensifier since the 16th century and may be related to a Danish word meaning to strut. This is part of a complete episode.



Gas Station Serendipity

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A lexical lagniappe at a gas pump leads to a discussion of the word serendipity, coined by 18th-century writer Horace Walpole. This is part of a complete episode.



What Does “Souge” Mean?

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A North Carolina man moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and encountered puzzlement when he used the word souge to mean plunge into water or immerse abruptly. More often spelled souse, this term is more likely to be heard in the Southern U.S. This is part of a complete episode.



Are There Such Things as Perfect Synonyms?

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Can words ever be perfect synonyms? No. Words can have approximate synonyms, but there are always shades of implicit and explicit meaning. Consider, for example, the terms butt and derrière. Although both refer to the same part of the anatomy, they carry different connotations. This is part of a complete episode.



Band or Short Story? A Word Game

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Great news! You have a 50 percent chance of getting all of the answers to Quiz Guy John Chaneski’s “Band or Short Story?” puzzle. For example, is “My Life with The Thrill Kill Kult” an electronic industrial rock band or the title of a short story? This is part of a complete episode.



Britney Spears Anagram

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

The name Britney Spears anagrams to the name a certain Protestant denomination. This is part of a complete episode.



Bullseye Origin

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

An eight-year-old from San Diego wonders about the origin of the term bullseye. This is part of a complete episode.



Daylighting Rivers

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Daylighting refers to uncovering built-over rivers and streams and reintegrating them into the urban landscape. This is part of a complete episode.



Is “Knight” Gender-Neutral?

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, woman serves on a committee that is choosing a new school. Some members propose calling their sports teams the Steel Knights. But is the term knight gender-neutral? This is part of a complete episode.



2017 Words of the Year

Sat, 16 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Grant reviews notable words and phrases from 2017. One is path of totality, meaning the part of the earth completely covered in shadow when the moon blocks the sun. Another is milkshake duck, which arose from a tweet by Australian cartoonist Ben Ward. Milkshake duck encapsulates the idea that in the age of social media, [...]



The Last Straw

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 21:21:39 +0000

In this episode, books for word lovers, from a collection of curious words to some fun with Farsi. • Some people yell “Geronimo!” when they jump out of an airplane, but why? • We call something that heats air a heater, so why do we call something that cools the air an air conditioner? The [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~3/HOFTNazKCgc/171211-AWWW-The-Last-Straw.mp3




Gregarious Laughter

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A Burlington, Vermont, listener wants to settle a dispute: Can laughter be described as gregarious? This is part of a complete episode.



See A Man About a Horse

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A listener in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, recalls that his grandfather used to announce he was headed to the restroom by saying, “I have to go see a man about a horse.” An earlier version of the phrase is, “I have to go see a man about a dog.” These phrase are among many euphemisms [...]



Describing What It’s Like to Be Sick but Not Look Sick

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

If you’re living with a chronic illness or disability, you often have to ration your physical and mental energy. And if that illness isn’t readily apparent to others, it can be hard to explain how debilitating that process can be. On her website But You don’t Look Sick, writer Christine Miserandino, who has lupus, illustrates [...]



Leather Britches Beans

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A woman in Virginia Beach, Virginia, says her Appalachia-born grandmother would occasionally say that it was time to string the leather britches or to hang up the leather britches. She was referring to preserving green beans. So why the leather and britches? This is part of a complete episode.



Book Recommendations for 2017

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

For the book lover on your gift list, Grant recommends the mix of magic in science in All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders. He also likes the work of Firoozeh Dumas: It Ain’t So Awful Falafel, about an Iranian teenage girl living in California, as well as Dumas’s books for adults, [...]



Now What Gesture Should We use to Suggest Rolling Down a Car Window?

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A listener in Plaza, North Dakota, says he tried to signal some teenagers to lower their car window by moving his fist in a circle, but since they grew up with push-button window controls, they didn’t understand the gesture. What’s the best gesture now for communicating that you want someone to roll down their car [...]



Falling to Staves

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Someone who’s really hungry might say I’m falling to staves, meaning they’re famished. It’s a reference to the way a barrel falls apart if the metal hoops that hold them together are removed. This is part of a complete episode.



BANANA Acronym

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

The acronym NIMBY stands for “Not In My Back Yard.” A more emphatic version used among urban planners is BANANA, which stands for Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anyone. This is part of a complete episode.



Yelling Geronimo

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A man in Surprise, Arizona, wonders why people jumping into a pool sometimes yell “Geronimo!” The history of this exclamation goes back to an eponymous 1939 movie about the famed Apache warrior Geronimo. The film was popular on U.S. military bases, where the warrior’s name became a rallying cry. A widely circulated story goes that [...]



Inside Out Word Puzzle

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Quiz Guy John Chaneski has an inside-out puzzle that’s clued by a short sequence of letters inside a longer one. For example, what holiday contains the letters KSGI? This is part of a complete episode.



Kids Misunderstand Things and Make Us Laugh

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

We’ve talked before about kids’ funny misunderstandings of words. Martha shares another story from a Dallas, Texas, listener. This is part of a complete episode.



Last Straw vs. Last Draw

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

What do you call that last small irritation, burden, or annoyance that finally makes a situation untenable? Is it the last straw or the last draw? Hint: it has nothing to do with a shootout at the OK corral. This is part of a complete episode.



Snuba

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Snuba is a portmanteau — a combination of snorkel and scuba — and refers to snorkeling several feet underwater while breathing through a long hose that’s attached to an air supply float on a raft. This is part of a complete episode.



Why Do We Call it Air Conditioning?

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Why do we use the term air conditioner to refer a machine for cooling air, when we use the word heater to describe a mechanism for heating air? The term air conditioning was borrowed from the textile industry, where it referred to filtering and dehumidifying. The first use of this term is in a 1909 [...]



Qaaltagh

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 16:51:47 +0000

There’s a word for the first person to walk through your door on New Year’s Day. The word is quaaltagh, and it’s used on the Isle of Man. This Manx term is one of many linguistic delights in a book Martha recommends for word lovers: The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities: A Yearbook of Forgotten Words, [...]



Skedaddle

Sat, 02 Dec 2017 16:03:53 +0000

The months of September, October, November, and December take their names from Latin words meaning “seven,” “eight,” “nine,” and “ten.” So why don’t their names correspond to where they fall in the year? The answer lies in an earlier version of the Roman calendar. • The sweltering period called the “dog days” takes its name [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/UH2ZFd_e3h0/170508-AWWW-Skedaddle.mp3




Coast is Clear

Sat, 25 Nov 2017 16:00:59 +0000

In the military, if you’ve lost the bubble, then you can’t find your bearings. The term first referred to calibrating the position of aircraft and submarines. • The phrase the coast is clear may originate in watching for invaders arriving by sea. • A dispute over how to pronounce the name of a savory avocado [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/tu_osZ-g8UI/170424-AWWW-Coast-is-Clear.mp3




Hidden Treasures

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 18:03:06 +0000

A new online archive of Civil War letters offers a vivid portrait of the everyday lives of enlisted men. These soldiers lacked formal education so they wrote and spelled by ear. The letters show us how ordinary people spoke then. • Is there a single word that means the opposite of prejudice? Unhate? Or maybe [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~5/braVKVMXIEs/171120-AWWW-Hidden-Treasures.mp3




Go to Grass

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Go to grass is In the 1600s, go to grass meant to be knocked down. In the 1800s, the phrase was the equivalent of telling someone to die and go to hell. Go to grass has also been used to refer to a racehorse or working horse that’s been retired from service. A variant is [...]



Raise Your Words

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A saying attributed to the 13th-century poet Rumi goes, “Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.” This is part of a complete episode.



Six of One, Half Dozen of the Other

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A woman in Council Bluffs, Iowa, says that when her mother was indicating that two things were roughly equal, she’s say they were six and one half dozen of the other. The more common version is six of one and half a dozen of the other or six of one, half a dozen of the [...]



Salisbury Steak

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Salisbury steak is named for Dr. James H. Salisbury, who prescribed what he referred to as “muscle pulp of beef” for Civil War soldiers suffering from so-called camp diarrhea. This is part of a complete episode.



Onus

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A woman in Suffolk, Virginia, is curious about the origin of the word onus, as in responsibility. The word onus is borrowed directly from Latin where it means burden. This Latin word is also the root of the words onerous, which describes something burdensome, and exonerate, meaning to free from a burden. This is part [...]



The Southern Stress on the First Syllable in Words like Cement and Police

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A man from Fort Smith, Arkansas, says his Canadian wife is baffled by his pronouncing the word cement as CEE-ment. Stressing the first syllable of such words as police, insurance, umbrella, and vehicle is an occasional feature of Southerners’ speech. This is part of a complete episode.



A Particular Civil War Letter

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Martha reads a special letter from the U.S. Civil War soldier who wrote this letter. This is part of a complete episode.



Bungalow Belt

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

An Indianapolis, Indiana, woman offers a followup to our discussions about various geographic belts around the country. The Bungalow Belt in Chicago refers to a strip of small brick bungalows just inside the city limits originally occupied by Catholic European immigrants. This is part of a complete episode.



Take the Devil Out of It

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A San Antonio, Texas, woman wonders about a tradition she grew up with. Before drinking an alcoholic beverage, you hand the drink to someone else to have a sip in order to take the devil out of it. This is part of a complete episode.



The Opposite of Prejudice

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

A researcher in Port Jefferson, New York, wonders if there’s a single word that means the opposite of prejudice. Unhate? He suggests the word allophilia, a combination of Greek words that mean love or like of the other. This is part of a complete episode.



Hidden Treasure Word Game

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

Quiz Guy John Chaneski has us looking for Hidden Treasures, specifically terms for valuable items you might find in adjacent sounds in a sentence. For example, the name of a precious metal is hidden in the following sentence: “If you don’t reach your goal, don’t get discouraged.” This is part of a complete episode.



Bobbery

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:51:47 +0000

The term bobbery means a noisy disturbance or hubub. The word’s origin is disputed, although one explanation is that it comes from the Hindi exclamation “Bap re!” or literally, “Oh father!” This is part of a complete episode.