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Notes and Queries in Anthropology



Last Build Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2017 03:26:57 +0000

 



Othered by Anthropology: Being a Student of Color in Anglo-cized Academia

Sat, 04 Nov 2017 03:26:57 +0000

[Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Savannah Martin.] It is both impressive and depressing how frequently scholars of color are Othered by anthropology. For many, the tales of alienation are too numerous to count; we are made to feel strange so regularly that the process becomes disquieting in its familiarity. Sometimes subtly, sometimes conspicuously, all the time … Continue reading Othered by Anthropology: Being a Student of Color in Anglo-cized Academia



Enchantment as Methodology

Wed, 01 Nov 2017 12:54:42 +0000

An invited post by: Yana Stainova   “The sharing of joy, whether physical, emotional, psychic or intellectual forms a bridge between the sharers, which can be the basis for understanding much of what is not shared between them, and lessens the threat of their differences,” Audre Lorde   We often equate good scholarship with a … Continue reading Enchantment as Methodology



#MeToo: A Crescendo in the Discourse about Sexual Harassment, Fieldwork, and the Academy (Part 2)

Sun, 29 Oct 2017 03:08:14 +0000

UPDATED 10/29/17, 9:50 am: Edited to include links to helpful resources During the first few months of ethnographic research, many cultural anthropologists recognize that the training you received in the classroom seldom prepares you for the spontaneous, erratic, and frequently daunting task of actually completing field research. You are (oftentimes, but not always) away from … Continue reading #MeToo: A Crescendo in the Discourse about Sexual Harassment, Fieldwork, and the Academy (Part 2)



#MeToo: A Crescendo in the Discourse about Sexual Harassment, Fieldwork, and the Academy (Part 1)

Tue, 24 Oct 2017 07:42:10 +0000

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Bianca C. Williams. Sunday night, October 15, I watched women across my social media timeline bravely and vulnerably share their stories of sexual assault and sexual harassment as part of the collective conversation tagged #MeToo. I contributed my own #MeToo post after reading the initial three shares by friends, writing that … Continue reading #MeToo: A Crescendo in the Discourse about Sexual Harassment, Fieldwork, and the Academy (Part 1)



About that takedown notice from the AAA

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:41:33 +0000

Here we go again. If you’re a member of the American Anthropological Association, you should have received an email this past week (10/17) about avoiding copyright infringement. The message was concise and right to the point: A bunch of members are in violation of their author agreements, and the AAA wants you to take your … Continue reading About that takedown notice from the AAA



The Automation and Privatization of Community Knowledge

Sun, 01 Oct 2017 23:08:58 +0000

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about community, who we are as a community, what keeps us connected and together, and how community knowledge is stored and distributed. As an anthropologist, my research focuses in part on automation and algorithmic impact on society, in particular, on our relationships and how we maintain them towards common … Continue reading The Automation and Privatization of Community Knowledge



Explaining Ethnography in the Field: A Conversation between Pasang Yangjee Sherpa and Carole McGranahan

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 16:23:00 +0000

What is ethnography? In anthropology, ethnography is both something to know and a way of knowing. It is an orientation or epistemology, a type of writing, and also a methodology. As a method, ethnography is an embodied, empirical, and experiential field-based way of knowing centered around participant-observation. This is obvious to anthropologists as it has … Continue reading Explaining Ethnography in the Field: A Conversation between Pasang Yangjee Sherpa and Carole McGranahan



Paying with Our Faces: Apple’s FaceID

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 19:17:19 +0000

In early September, Apple Computer, Inc. launched their new iPhone and with it, FaceID, software that uses facial-recognition as an authentication for unlocking the iPhone. The mass global deployment of facial-recognition in society is an issue worthy of public debate. Apple, as a private company,  has now chosen to deploy facial-recognition technology to millions of … Continue reading Paying with Our Faces: Apple’s FaceID



Resources for Understanding Race After Charlottesville

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:26:09 +0000

In this time of fake news and alternative facts coming from the White House as well as some media, what can we as scholars contribute to challenge this? In this time of amplified racist hate and violence, whether it is anti-Black, anti-Muslim, or directed at any group, what can we as scholars contribute to challenge … Continue reading Resources for Understanding Race After Charlottesville



Remembering the Mexican Revolution with Aunt Julia

Sat, 16 Sep 2017 13:41:35 +0000

Growing up in Austin, Texas, Diez y Seis — Mexican Independence Day — always seemed to hold an official, albeit minor, status in the state capitol. This was not a holiday that we observed in my family in any formal capacity. Much like Cinco de Mayo we might find ourselves at a Mexican restaurant that … Continue reading Remembering the Mexican Revolution with Aunt Julia



Peer Review Boycott: Say No to Political Censorship

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 15:44:17 +0000

By: Charlene Makley and Carole McGranahan Would you peer review manuscripts for a journal or press that politically censors its content? If your answer is no, then please join us in making your statement public by signing this petition. Why the need for what seems like such an obvious defense of academic freedom? Several weeks … Continue reading Peer Review Boycott: Say No to Political Censorship



Situating Knowledge

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 13:38:23 +0000

As an anthropologist working at the intersection of anthropology and development studies I sometimes undertake work for development organizations. The kind of work I do does not fall into the category of applied anthropology or  the work of cultural translation. Most often  I’m asked to provide, in written form,  a rapid analytical overview of an … Continue reading Situating Knowledge



What you can REALLY do with an anthropology degree

Sat, 09 Sep 2017 00:39:12 +0000

The Brooking Institute’s Hamilton Project (because after Hamilton everything has to be named after Hamilton) has a new website examining the relationship between career path and college major — in other words, it shows you what people who major in one field do for a living. The site and its accompanying interactive data visualizer and reports affirms … Continue reading What you can REALLY do with an anthropology degree



Artificial Intelligence: Making AI in our Images

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 15:21:41 +0000

Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Sally Applin Hello! I’m Sally Applin. I am a technology anthropologist who examines automation, algorithms and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the context of preserving human agency. My dissertation focused on small independent fringe new technology makers in Silicon Valley, what they are making, and most critically, how the adoption of … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence: Making AI in our Images



The Cyborg Anthropologist (Tools We Use)

Mon, 04 Sep 2017 07:09:18 +0000

For those who don’t know, I live, work, teach, and do research in a predominantly Chinese speaking environment. Although you are probably aware that learning Chinese is hard, you might not realize that even scholars who have studied the language for most of their adult lives still struggle with it. That’s because scholars who work … Continue reading The Cyborg Anthropologist (Tools We Use)