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Comments for Technosailor.com



The Wandering Thoughts of an Inquisitive Software Engineer...



Last Build Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 08:52:00 +0000

 



Comment on Public Enemy Number 1 for A Small Development Shop by amme john

Mon, 13 Apr 2015 08:52:00 +0000

Hello, I also agree with CJ Andrew. And thanks Aaron for sharing this remarkable post.



Comment on New Adventures with 10up by Tris Hussey

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 23:54:00 +0000

Congrats man!



Comment on If I Had to do it All Again by Brandon Eley

Sat, 28 Feb 2015 03:01:00 +0000

I'm not quite there yet (40) but I can still appreciate your perspective. Oh, and according to the Photoshop eyedropper it's blue and (almost) black. ;)



Comment on The Internet is About to Become WAY Faster by CJ Andrew

Fri, 20 Feb 2015 22:19:00 +0000

I think this is a great step forward, and will do a lot for the entire web experience. Given that eCommerce is now on the rise, HTTP/2 is a welcome enhancement. It will be interesting to see how it will affect sites that use SSL (eCommerce sites). Most likely they may not need to do anything special. It will also be interesting to see how WordPress plugin authors take advantage of HTTP/2, as it gets into common usage.






Comment on Public Enemy Number 1 for A Small Development Shop by CJ Andrew

Tue, 10 Feb 2015 16:51:25 +0000

Here, here, Aaron. I agree. Some companies/clients insist on the Net-30, etc. payment schedule. It's a cash flow killer for independents (I think). There have even been situations where change requests have arrived late, and pushed the Net-30 even further down the road. The companies "put their foot down", and stipulate when the contractor gets paid, but expect that they (contractors) keep working till invoice fulfillment, even if the initial scope has been completed. Its funny sometimes to watch clients stomp their feet, when told that payment is by milestone, and immediate. Great post. succinct.



Comment on Weekly Blog Post Challenge by CJ Andrew

Wed, 04 Feb 2015 23:33:53 +0000

A very good intro to your blog, and also to the Weekly Post Challenge (WPC). Challenges are a good way to blend commitment with accountability, and I think I'll be joining in as well. Thanks for "rebooting" your blog



Comment on Depression:What it Means by Bnpositive

Wed, 13 Aug 2014 14:31:49 +0000

Great post Aaron, thanks for sharing.



Comment on Depression:What it Means by Athena

Tue, 12 Aug 2014 22:55:06 +0000

Thank you so much for putting into words something that I struggle with every day. Your description for bi-polar is right on the nose. My family is embarrassed and will change the subject quickly if I bring up being bi-polar. I am not medicated. On my best days I make things, create, clean, can not be stopped and will stay up for days. On my down days I can't even get the energy or motivation to take a shower. Luckily, the down days do not happen as frequently as the up days, but when they do, a sick day from work is taken, I close off to others, not responding to texts or messages. If only I had friends close by that understood this and would just come knock on my door so I can have company or get out of the house for a bit without asking for it, or feeling pathetic.






Comment on Entrepreneurial Priorities if You Don’t Want to Despise Yourself at Age 80 by Brandon Eley

Tue, 03 Jun 2014 13:16:18 +0000

This is something we all have to learn the hard way, I think. I can relate to a lot of what you're saying here... I used to work crazy hours. 8-5 at work, then working on my own business at night. Then writing, speaking, traveling around the country (and world). My poor kids hardly ever saw me for several years. For what? Not knocking the people who love that life, but I can't say it was worth it. Though I enjoyed spending time with all my friends and colleagues at "tech" conferences like SxSW and BlogWorld, at the end of the day it was just a bunch of people practicing the "fake it till you make it" routine trying to get the book deal or big consulting client. Woke up one day and realized, it's not worth it. I still work a lot... occasionally on nights after the kids are in bed or weekends. But I'm at home every night cooking dinner and we sit down and eat as a family. I go to soccer games, karate testings, and cub scout activities. We go to the pool on Saturday and just chill. I am still wildly ambitious, and will probably start another company or get involved in a startup. But now I realize you don't have to work 90 hours a week or neglect your friends and family to be successful. Success isn't about money, titles, or your VC-funded startup getting acquired. At least, when we're all laying on our death beds, that's not what we'll care about.



Comment on NSA And Chaos Theory by Sean

Sat, 15 Jun 2013 21:05:55 +0000

I don't quite see it that way. Not getting the linkage to chaos theory, but that aside, I don't see it as being much different than what the likes of Google/Yahoo do with their huge datasets and related problems. It's impressive to be sure, but by no means unique. If you have some time, there are lots of data science courses on Coursera.org. Taking one peels back at least one layer of the mystery behind all this. It's a fascinating world with a lot of ongoing research.



Comment on 9 Years of Blogging: Lessons from the Trenches by Jesus Nieto

Tue, 28 May 2013 11:05:32 +0000

First of all congratulations Aaron for your 9th Birthady working with Wordpress , it´s practically all life of Wordpress Project. In my opinion it's true that in this 9 years the way to get information has changed a lot but, I think every type of media have their audience (usually shared), but sure can live all together. Nice post for commemorate your 9th year of Wordpress Blogging!



Comment on 9 Years of Blogging: Lessons from the Trenches by Mark

Wed, 22 May 2013 04:48:14 +0000

Wow! 9 years, that's a long time. I just started blogging this past months. I really liked what you said at the last part, writing drunk and editing sober. I think there would be a lot of ideas going in your head at that time of writing, right?



Comment on 9 Years of Blogging: Lessons from the Trenches by Gary grant

Mon, 20 May 2013 19:06:30 +0000

My oldest WP blog has been live and more or less regularly updated since August, 2005. My first foray into blogging was on the Blogger platform. I just looked and I first dabbled in September, 2004. I have taken blogging and turned it into my second career, but it took years to become an overnight success. Many of the things that were said during the early days of pro-blogging are true. Write about your passions. Be an expert. As you point out, do not expect to get rich quick. Can someone who did not go to journo school become one? Sure they can, and blogging can help you get there, but it will never be easy.



Comment on I hate social networking by Matt

Wed, 08 May 2013 12:30:51 +0000

You make a good point Aaron. Social networking is simply a tool to achieve a particular goal, not a lifestyle. When the road towards that goal gets long and involved, it's easy for people to lose focus on where they're heading and get caught up in where they're at.



Comment on I hate social networking by Tara

Thu, 02 May 2013 06:30:28 +0000

Enjoyed your blog and the surprising twist of religion. Just the late night entertaining read I was looking for. Peace.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by j2k2

Mon, 29 Apr 2013 23:07:34 +0000

Very interesting post, two factor authentication is cumbersome but sometimes necessary. I really hope we will see more technologies to increase security without all the overhead. For example, something like a personal RFID device that can be read by computers and mobile devices to grant access in addition to a username and password (with two/three factor authentication in case of loss).



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Jay Van Ryssel

Mon, 29 Apr 2013 15:29:01 +0000

Tanks for mentioning this plugin. Though I'm becoming more, and more concerned with how much information I'm willing to share with Google.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Jonni

Mon, 29 Apr 2013 01:57:20 +0000

It's unsettling how easy it is to socially engineer Amazon and Apple support staff with just a few phone calls. Yes the masses need to be educated on how to protect themselves, but in Mat Honan's case (those who haven't read the story on Wired should do so), Amazon and Apple were arguably the weak link in the whole security chain. Mat could've used the hardest password to remember and it would not have made any difference at all, because the hackers simply called up Amazon and Apple to extract highly personal information. This is scary!



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by MATT SCHNEIDER

Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:40:59 +0000

Correction to my post: "Another issue I have with 2FA is that I normally DO NOT need the “thing you have” to reset a password."



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by MATT SCHNEIDER

Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:38:19 +0000

It is my experience (as owner of a secure messaging website that offers 2FA) that 2FA will not be accepted and utilized by the masses. There are few users that understand it and fewer that are willing to accept the inconvenience to get the extra protection. Any implementation of 2FA that does not "remember" trusted locations is doomed. No one wants to be forced to retrieve their mobile device (assuming that is the "thing you have") to get the single-use pin every time they log in. Besides that, if their mobile device is not charged, they cannot log in. If a site does "remember" trusted locations, they must be storing every IP address you access the site from. Some people may not like that tracking, but it is what provides "some" convenience in the 2FA model. Another problem with using IP address for "trusting" locations is that anyone who is truly mobile will connect from many different IP addresses. The building I work in has an Intranet with a big range of IP addresses and I get a different IP address every other time I log in. I am constantly being challenged to prove who I am when accessing sites where I have opted for 2FA. As you move around with your mobile device and connect to sites from various wireless sources, the same thing happens because you are constantly changing IP addresses. Eventually users say "enough is enough" and they shut off 2FA. Another issue I have with 2FA is that I normally need the "thing you have" to reset a password. That is usually controlled by answering challenge questions. There are stories in the news every day about how this account or that account was hacked. 2FA will challenge someone who attempts to log in from an "untrusted" location with the correct password, but it usually won't stop someone with the correct answers to the account reset challenge questions. So, if I can determine the "secret" answer to one of your challenge questions and I am in control of the email account associated with that web account (e.g. your bank, Twitter, Facebook, etc.) I can make your life very difficult. That will probably not happen to most of us. Unethical hackers usually go after high-value targets.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Peter Jackson

Fri, 26 Apr 2013 16:56:44 +0000

Yep: everyone should be using the strongest security possible, and two factor auth is a great step in the right direction. A couple other things to think about: Don't register your computer with your bank when you log in unless your computer is secure. Make them email you an access code each time you connect. Especially on laptops. If Google Authenticator is an app on your phone, and your phone also runs your email (probably), then you better lock your homescreen. Make your phone erase itself after 10 failed attempts to unlock it. Restoring your erased phone because your kid tried to unlock it is way better than losing your phone at a bar and having to reset all your passwords and such.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Bill Erickson

Fri, 26 Apr 2013 16:03:05 +0000

Another great plugin is Google Authenticator. I use it on all my sites to enable 2 factor authentification.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Aaron

Fri, 26 Apr 2013 16:02:16 +0000

I still take issue that what the banks are employing is “Two Factor Authentication” – it isn’t – it’s just another set of “something you know” – i.e. some image, some phrase, and some more data (make of your first car, city/town you were born in, etc.) that can easily be harvested. No second factor there – just more data.
Yeah, I thought about calling out banks on their implementation of 2FA. Also, the promise of NFC is a pretty big reduction of friction thanks to technology.



Comment on Two-Factor Authentication: What it is and Why You Should be Using it Now by Mike

Fri, 26 Apr 2013 15:59:23 +0000

Nice summary, Aaron. The subject of "two factor" authentication has been in my wheelhouse for over a decade. The company (companies, actually) have been all about it. I still take issue that what the banks are employing is "Two Factor Authentication" - it isn't - it's just another set of "something you know" - i.e. some image, some phrase, and some more data (make of your first car, city/town you were born in, etc.) that can easily be harvested. No second factor there - just more data. True 2FA comes from what you say, correctly; "something I have". The most common frustration/push-back from customers (potential and real) is that it works. Yes, that's right. People are frustrated that it works. Why? Because, it IS inconvenient. You need to have your hands on that device in order to authenticate. I share your hope that the tech will bring along some silver bullet that will "make 2FA easier", but honestly, I don't think we want that. Making things easier usually means some sort of centralization which usually leads to a nice Honey Pot. I'm somewhat encouraged by the progress of "Secure Element"-based standards that could provide a convenient, secure, location for keys to secure our authentication protocols. We'll get there.



Comment on WordPress Hacking and Cleanup by Brandon Eley

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 02:10:07 +0000

I should just hire you to audit all our WP installs before one gets compromised... you have a per-site price? $10 sounds fair... ;)



Comment on Abusing Twitter Direct Messages, Spam and Classlessness by baltimore fan

Thu, 11 Apr 2013 16:01:50 +0000

That's funny. Pretty sure Phil Gentile is the only person who tweets for I Hate JJ Redick.



Comment on Abusing Twitter Direct Messages, Spam and Classlessness by Aaron

Thu, 11 Apr 2013 15:30:09 +0000

Cheers, Phil. No harm, no foul. Love the blog!



Comment on Abusing Twitter Direct Messages, Spam and Classlessness by Phil

Thu, 11 Apr 2013 15:29:00 +0000

Aaron, Apologize for the spat on twitter. One of my writers thought he was being funny. Needless to say I took away his access to our twitter account. Agree with you 100%. Only negative can come from bashing folks on social media. Cheers. -Phil Editor-In-Chief I Hate JJ Redick