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Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




Blog Pimping, or: Who Do You Want to Delight?

Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:10:58 -0400

Big Contrarian → Tacky. My favorite bloggers are great at articulating something I feel in my gut -- but they regularly present it better, more clearly, and (on days like today), more succinctly than I ever could. Such is the case with Jack Shedd's post, "Tacky," a razor-sharp polemic on the industry of cheese-food manufacturing that "pro blogging" has turned into. Write top ten lists and whore yourself on many other sites as you possibly can. Don’t be thoughtful, long-winded or interesting. Don’t write about you love, unless what you love is popular on Digg. And for god’s sake don’t even think about writing about more than one topic. Whether their strategies work or not is slightly beside the point. It’s cheap. It’s marketing driven, instead of content driven. It’s the type of thinking that leads to a sequel to the movie Garfield. For myself, I think there's nothing wrong with having a blog and wanting to make money with it. Obviously. But I also hold an increasingly old-fashioned view that you ought to start with something you're passionate about sharing with people -- something besides how to make easy money with a blog -- and try to build an audience of people you respect based on producing work you're happy with or even proud of. Consequently, I very much agree with Jack's thoughts on audience-building. Despite the utter-bullshit so much of the Anderson’s long tail has proven to be, the core idea that everything finds an audience should be held up and remembered. Clung to fastidiously; A life raft for the ignored, for the invisible. If you’re worth reading, someone will read you. If you’re worth watching, someone will watch you. If you’re worth hearing, someone will listen. Seconded. If you do not agree with Jack's or my opinion on building your audience -- or if you think this is an unrealistically conservative tactic for simps and losers -- consider this: I learned about Big Contrarian from reading a blogger I trust and respect: John Gruber. Today, the chances are good that at least a few of you might visit Jack's site for the first time because you learned about it from someone you (theoretically) trust and respect: me. If you like Jack's stuff as much as Chairman Gruber and I do, I'll bet you'll tell others about it through your own sites or through emails, IRL conversations, and what have you. And the music goes round. Organically. Jack didn't beg a link, he didn't pretend to be 50,000 peoples' "friend," and he didn't concoct a bunch of tricks, games, and page-padding bullshit in an attempt to increase views and time-on-site. Jack didn't do anything except write a great blog. It's up to his readers to do the rest. If what you're doing is interesting and appeals to someone, that's all you need. Seriously. So, yes, if that wasn't a clear enough recommendation: read Jack's blog, Big Contrarian, and tell your friends about it. Jack gets this stuff, and his combination of links and commentary is, not coincidentally, reminiscent of blogging's salad days. When people were more excited about what they had to say than with figuring out how to make it palatable to readers who'd prefer the entire web be re-formatted as a series of retardate lists. If you watched The Wire, I'll bet you walked away with the same piece of wisdom that I did -- the thread that ran through every episode of every season, and that was articulated by the show's creator, David Simon, in the DVD narration of the very first scene from The Wire: It's about how institutions have an effect on individuals, and how...whether you're a cop, a longshoreman, a drug dealer, a politician, a judge [or] lawyer, you are ultimately compromised and must contend with whatever institution you've committed to. This is one of the most insightful things I've ever heard someone related to the TV business say, and I happen to believe it's true of any industry, institution,[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy

Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:30:59 -0400

As I wrote yesterday, I'm loving the new iPhone apps on the iTunes store. Also, as we mentioned on MacBreak Weekly yesterday, it seems likely that we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg in terms of what people will do with that SDK. But it got me thinking about the stuff I want -- the itches I want to scratch. So, iPhone developer friends. Please make these three apps. Prime This Elevator pitch: Scan barcode to instantly order an item via Amazon Out and about and see something you want to buy? Maybe a book, CD, or DVD that you want, but don't want to buy/carry/pack right now? No problem. Take a photo of the item's barcode, hit one button, and the item is instantly ordered through Amazon 1-Click using your default credit card and shipping preferences. Done. Yeah, I know; I know. You want price comparisons, and wish lists, and an API for tagging and "mashups." Well, suck it up; you're not who this is for. This is for hardcore, mainlining Amazon Prime power users. That's why it has exactly one button: "Prime This." Suggested price: Free (developer will make a killing on affiliate money) iParked Elevator pitch: Location-aware parking reminder Open the app, hit a button, and your location is noted and added to a map. Optionally add an alarm (for the parking meter or street cleaning), notes and photos ("3rd level; Area G"), and other pertinent data ("Closes at 1am; after hours number is...."). When you're ready to go to your car, the app reminds you where you parked (with a walking map), and off you go. Suggested price: $5 That Reminds Me Elevator pitch: Lightweight, location-aware alarm app Tell TRM the really mushy kinds of things that fall somewhere between a todo and a wish and a curiosity. buy a lottery ticket on my birthday pick up a crazy notebook next time I'm in Chinatown grab a takeout menu next time I'm at Andy's Using functionality similar to OmniFocus's flexible, location-aware contexts, add new items to your list with optional alarms and start/end dates. Then forget about it. Next time you're geographically near where you need to be, you get a reminder and a map to get you there. Suggested price: $5 The Question to You What’s the iPhone app you crave? What would take great advantage of Location Services, the camera, SDK features, or what have you? What itch do you want to have scratched? ”iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 17, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Chronic Procrastination and the Cost of the "Ding!"

Mon, 21 Jul 2008 11:05:52 -0400

Guadian UK: Hi-tech is turning us all into time-wasters

(via Rich Siegel)

A few weeks ago, I pointed you to a startling stat in the New York Times stating that 28% of the average worker's day gets blown on unnecessary interruptions -- helping contribute to a crisis that a company like Intel now considers a $1 billion per year problem. From yesterday's Guardian comes more numbers on the growing cost of distraction:

Ferrari says that chronic procrastination is now so serious a condition it needs to be recognised by clinicians. In a study to be published later this year, he estimates that 15 to 20 per cent of people are chronic procrastinators. 'We now have data on 4,000 people, and it doesn't seem to matter what age you are, or your sex or background.'

Of course, as the Inbox Zero guy, I think a real eye-opener sneaks in with this passing note about the cost of all those noisy email notifications you created:

Even the beeps notifying the arrival of email are said to be causing a 0.5 per cent drop in gross domestic product in the United States, costing the economy $70bn a year.

Although the headline wants to point the blame squarely at "hi-tech," the last graf talks about your brain's own role in how that nasty new technology is allowed to be abused:

It appears that the brain is divided into two parts. One triggers 'automatic responses' which take precedence over everything else - such as fleeing sabre-toothed tigers. The other governs 'deliberate responses' - writing that report due next week or booking a visit to the optician.

Do yourself (and your company) a favor this morning: try just briefly shutting off the "Ding!" and give yourself authority to schedule your next email dash.

Just for one morning, see if you can't get a bit more actual work done if you're not mentally scanning for sabre-tooths.

(image)

(image) Chronic Procrastination and the Cost of the "Ding!"” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 21, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




Blog Pimping, or: Who Do You Want to Delight?

Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:10:58 -0400

Big Contrarian → Tacky. My favorite bloggers are great at articulating something I feel in my gut -- but they regularly present it better, more clearly, and (on days like today), more succinctly than I ever could. Such is the case with Jack Shedd's post, "Tacky," a razor-sharp polemic on the industry of cheese-food manufacturing that "pro blogging" has turned into. Write top ten lists and whore yourself on many other sites as you possibly can. Don’t be thoughtful, long-winded or interesting. Don’t write about you love, unless what you love is popular on Digg. And for god’s sake don’t even think about writing about more than one topic. Whether their strategies work or not is slightly beside the point. It’s cheap. It’s marketing driven, instead of content driven. It’s the type of thinking that leads to a sequel to the movie Garfield. For myself, I think there's nothing wrong with having a blog and wanting to make money with it. Obviously. But I also hold an increasingly old-fashioned view that you ought to start with something you're passionate about sharing with people -- something besides how to make easy money with a blog -- and try to build an audience of people you respect based on producing work you're happy with or even proud of. Consequently, I very much agree with Jack's thoughts on audience-building. Despite the utter-bullshit so much of the Anderson’s long tail has proven to be, the core idea that everything finds an audience should be held up and remembered. Clung to fastidiously; A life raft for the ignored, for the invisible. If you’re worth reading, someone will read you. If you’re worth watching, someone will watch you. If you’re worth hearing, someone will listen. Seconded. If you do not agree with Jack's or my opinion on building your audience -- or if you think this is an unrealistically conservative tactic for simps and losers -- consider this: I learned about Big Contrarian from reading a blogger I trust and respect: John Gruber. Today, the chances are good that at least a few of you might visit Jack's site for the first time because you learned about it from someone you (theoretically) trust and respect: me. If you like Jack's stuff as much as Chairman Gruber and I do, I'll bet you'll tell others about it through your own sites or through emails, IRL conversations, and what have you. And the music goes round. Organically. Jack didn't beg a link, he didn't pretend to be 50,000 peoples' "friend," and he didn't concoct a bunch of tricks, games, and page-padding bullshit in an attempt to increase views and time-on-site. Jack didn't do anything except write a great blog. It's up to his readers to do the rest. If what you're doing is interesting and appeals to someone, that's all you need. Seriously. So, yes, if that wasn't a clear enough recommendation: read Jack's blog, Big Contrarian, and tell your friends about it. Jack gets this stuff, and his combination of links and commentary is, not coincidentally, reminiscent of blogging's salad days. When people were more excited about what they had to say than with figuring out how to make it palatable to readers who'd prefer the entire web be re-formatted as a series of retardate lists. If you watched The Wire, I'll bet you walked away with the same piece of wisdom that I did -- the thread that ran through every episode of every season, and that was articulated by the show's creator, David Simon, in the DVD narration of the very first scene from The Wire: It's about how institutions have an effect on individuals, and how...whether you're a cop, a longshoreman, a drug dealer, a politician, a judge [or] lawyer, you are ultimately compromised and must [...]



Apple Device Security: Big Temptation to Dumb-Down

Tue, 22 Jul 2008 13:42:33 -0400

Chairman Gruber recently discovered (via his sharp-eyed reader, Earl Misquitta), that the aforementioned iPhone Remote application can also be used as a virtual keyboard for entering search text, login information, and what have you on your AppleTV. Seeing the typed characters appear on the TV screen as you type them is simply magical. So, if, like me, you’re in the amazingly tiny sliver of the Venn diagram for people who own both these products, this is hugely convenient, and what a welcome trick it is. As I’ve alluded to before, the AppleTV’s torturous keyboard entry (via the hardware Apple Remote’s 4-way joystick) is abysmal. In 21 uninterrupted years of using Apple products, it’s probably the most consistently frustrating and poorly-designed interface I’ve encountered. I literally hate using it. The ability to enter text via the superior (but far from perfect) iPhone keyboard is wonderful but it doesn’t and can’t address a deeper problem with the keyboard-challenged devices Apple are focused on vending right now: assy and annoying text entry encourages the use of crap passwords. This is bad, and here’s why. Sliding backward We’ve all heard the lectures about not using your ferret’s name as The Single Password™ for everything you do, and my sense is that, over the years, a lot of us have tried to get better about password hygiene — especially as more of our stuff moves into an online cloud. But my entirely anecdotal opinion is that the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the AppleTV each tempts their users to slide back to dumbing-down their passwords in exchange for better ease-of-use. The most annoying device in your chain ends up driving the passwords you use for everything. Right now, it’s such a pain to enter a secure password on a device like the iPhone or the AppleTV, that I’m betting a few of you have already fallen back on your ferret. Or “pencil.” Or your ATM PIN. This is an unbelievably bad idea, but what are the options if this is a device you need to use a lot? A real-world problem I’m a fervent 1Password user and (unpaid) evangelist, so I don’t suffer from this conundrum quite as badly when using Safari on the iPhone. 1Password generates and remembers secure passwords for me, then lets me enter them on my phone in a few seconds via a password-protected bookmarklet. Imperfect, but a big step up over nothing. Of course, I’m still SOL when the iTunes App Store wants me to (again again again) manually re-enter my password in order to download apps on my iPhone. I’m not made of stone. This sucks. I’ll even be the first to admit — solely on the basis of how vexing the AppleTV (and non-Safari on iPhone) password entry is — that I’ve been sorely tempted to move to a more trivial password. But I’ve held out. If you’re using MobileMe, or Google’s apps like Gmail, or any of the other myriad cloud functionalities that store a lot of personal information, it’s just not worth assuming the risk in return for a bit of convenience. ”Four digits? What a pain.” To make this nuttiness even more frustrating, every day I watch friends entering 4 or 5 character passwords over an iPhone that they don’t even bother to auto-lock (“Meh, I use it too much. It’d be a pain.”). Understand: this is a portable device on which all their email, contact information, and logged-in web accounts live. They’re one drunken taxi ride away from a potentially significant privacy crisis. While leaving a phone unlocked in public does blow my mind, I think I understand how we got here. For 30 years now, banking customers have tolerated four-digit ATM PINs because [...]



Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy

Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:30:59 -0400

As I wrote yesterday, I'm loving the new iPhone apps on the iTunes store. Also, as we mentioned on MacBreak Weekly yesterday, it seems likely that we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg in terms of what people will do with that SDK. But it got me thinking about the stuff I want -- the itches I want to scratch. So, iPhone developer friends. Please make these three apps. Prime This Elevator pitch: Scan barcode to instantly order an item via Amazon Out and about and see something you want to buy? Maybe a book, CD, or DVD that you want, but don't want to buy/carry/pack right now? No problem. Take a photo of the item's barcode, hit one button, and the item is instantly ordered through Amazon 1-Click using your default credit card and shipping preferences. Done. Yeah, I know; I know. You want price comparisons, and wish lists, and an API for tagging and "mashups." Well, suck it up; you're not who this is for. This is for hardcore, mainlining Amazon Prime power users. That's why it has exactly one button: "Prime This." Suggested price: Free (developer will make a killing on affiliate money) iParked Elevator pitch: Location-aware parking reminder Open the app, hit a button, and your location is noted and added to a map. Optionally add an alarm (for the parking meter or street cleaning), notes and photos ("3rd level; Area G"), and other pertinent data ("Closes at 1am; after hours number is...."). When you're ready to go to your car, the app reminds you where you parked (with a walking map), and off you go. Suggested price: $5 That Reminds Me Elevator pitch: Lightweight, location-aware alarm app Tell TRM the really mushy kinds of things that fall somewhere between a todo and a wish and a curiosity. buy a lottery ticket on my birthday pick up a crazy notebook next time I'm in Chinatown grab a takeout menu next time I'm at Andy's Using functionality similar to OmniFocus's flexible, location-aware contexts, add new items to your list with optional alarms and start/end dates. Then forget about it. Next time you're geographically near where you need to be, you get a reminder and a map to get you there. Suggested price: $5 The Question to You What’s the iPhone app you crave? What would take great advantage of Location Services, the camera, SDK features, or what have you? What itch do you want to have scratched? ”iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 17, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



First Look: Evernote for the iPhone

Thu, 10 Jul 2008 13:31:14 -0400

(Oh, man. I’ve got a crazy busy day today, but it just got a lot busier thanks to an intoxicating morning with the iPhone 2.0 update and the iTunes App Store. I’ll try and sneak in a few little posts today on the amazing new apps as time permits)

Evernote (iTunes App Store Link)

  • Free
  • works with Evernote web and desktop apps

I need to do a full post on [Evernote](Evernote](http://www.evernote.com/) here some time soon, because it really is a nifty little application for collecting, storing, and organizing practically any kind of information you can throw at it. The iPhone version is a stripped-down, all-business version of the app that will scratch an itch for Evernote fans who are fatigued by having to email everything to the mothership.

(image)

More after the jump, including how to take screengrabs like this on your iPhone 2.0...

The Evernote iPhone app is crazy-simple to use, and rightfully focuses on mobile capture. Photos, voice, and text can be sent directly into your Big Evernote Database -- including the handy inclusion of location data which will show up in Evernote as Lat/Long, all thanks to iPhone's 2.0 location magic (and yes: the location stuff works fine without GPS; I do wonder how that will affect sales of what's starting to look like a costly 3G iPhone I can personally do without).

(image)

You can also access your existing stuff in browsable list form, or by searching, And, yes, once the photo you take in Evernote has synced with the EN site, the OCR makes any readable text in the image searchable from the iPhone app. Very nicely done.

(image)


Cool New iPhone Feature: Built-in Screen Capture

Nota frickin' bene: How did I get screengrabs on an uncracked 2.0 iPhone? Easy. Click the Home button and the top (Power) button at the same time to capture a PNG of the current screen to the Photo Viewer (grabbable later via iPhoto). Hat tip to Jason Snell for this awesome little bit of magic.

(image) First Look: Evernote for the iPhone” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 10, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Apple Device Security: Big Temptation to Dumb-Down

Tue, 22 Jul 2008 13:42:33 -0400

Chairman Gruber recently discovered (via his sharp-eyed reader, Earl Misquitta), that the aforementioned iPhone Remote application can also be used as a virtual keyboard for entering search text, login information, and what have you on your AppleTV. Seeing the typed characters appear on the TV screen as you type them is simply magical. So, if, like me, you’re in the amazingly tiny sliver of the Venn diagram for people who own both these products, this is hugely convenient, and what a welcome trick it is. As I’ve alluded to before, the AppleTV’s torturous keyboard entry (via the hardware Apple Remote’s 4-way joystick) is abysmal. In 21 uninterrupted years of using Apple products, it’s probably the most consistently frustrating and poorly-designed interface I’ve encountered. I literally hate using it. The ability to enter text via the superior (but far from perfect) iPhone keyboard is wonderful but it doesn’t and can’t address a deeper problem with the keyboard-challenged devices Apple are focused on vending right now: assy and annoying text entry encourages the use of crap passwords. This is bad, and here’s why. Sliding backward We’ve all heard the lectures about not using your ferret’s name as The Single Password™ for everything you do, and my sense is that, over the years, a lot of us have tried to get better about password hygiene — especially as more of our stuff moves into an online cloud. But my entirely anecdotal opinion is that the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the AppleTV each tempts their users to slide back to dumbing-down their passwords in exchange for better ease-of-use. The most annoying device in your chain ends up driving the passwords you use for everything. Right now, it’s such a pain to enter a secure password on a device like the iPhone or the AppleTV, that I’m betting a few of you have already fallen back on your ferret. Or “pencil.” Or your ATM PIN. This is an unbelievably bad idea, but what are the options if this is a device you need to use a lot? A real-world problem I’m a fervent 1Password user and (unpaid) evangelist, so I don’t suffer from this conundrum quite as badly when using Safari on the iPhone. 1Password generates and remembers secure passwords for me, then lets me enter them on my phone in a few seconds via a password-protected bookmarklet. Imperfect, but a big step up over nothing. Of course, I’m still SOL when the iTunes App Store wants me to (again again again) manually re-enter my password in order to download apps on my iPhone. I’m not made of stone. This sucks. I’ll even be the first to admit — solely on the basis of how vexing the AppleTV (and non-Safari on iPhone) password entry is — that I’ve been sorely tempted to move to a more trivial password. But I’ve held out. If you’re using MobileMe, or Google’s apps like Gmail, or any of the other myriad cloud functionalities that store a lot of personal information, it’s just not worth assuming the risk in return for a bit of convenience. ”Four digits? What a pain.” To make this nuttiness even more frustrating, every day I watch friends entering 4 or 5 character passwords over an iPhone that they don’t even bother to auto-lock (“Meh, I use it too much. It’d be a pain.”). Understand: this is a portable device on which all their email, contact information, and logged-in web accounts live. They’re one drunken taxi ride away from a po[...]



Merlin's Review of "It's All Too Much" on Kevin Kelly's Cool Tools

Mon, 07 Jul 2008 13:49:11 -0400

Cool Tool: It's All Too Much

As my battle with clutter continues, one of my favorite people (and one of the smartest guys writing for the web, period), Kevin Kelly, noticed my efforts and took note of my affection for Peter Walsh's wonderful book, It's All Too Much.

My review for Cool Tools is indeed adapted from a few posts that originated here, but I think it's worth pointing to because, a) that book has had a huge influence on how I think about my relationship to "stuff," b) I'm honored that KK liked what I'd had to say about it, and c) if you aren't already reading Kevin's sites -- particularly his consistently insightful The Technium column -- you'd do yourself a favor to get acquainted fast. Kevin's the real deal.

I also like what Kevin had to add to the review, regarding the need for an "anti-stuff tool":

Merlin Mann's review turned me onto this fantastic book. We've rethought our household because of it. We were reminded that life is not about stuff; it's about possibilities, which the right tools can enable. For a world of expanding stuff, this book is the necessary anti-stuff tool.

(image) Merlin's Review of "It's All Too Much" on Kevin Kelly's Cool Tools” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 07, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 16:52:28 -0400

iPhone 2.0: The glory wore off in wash - (37signals) [via DF] While acknowledging the complexity of Apple's ambitious launch, David Heinemeier Hansson says iPhone 2.0 wasn't ready for prime time on a number of levels. Combined, it’s a rather big disappointment. I’m surprised just how much impact the small griefs have when they add up to a lack of confidence in the system. It’s a great example of the cumulative effects of problems. They have an exponential damage on the experience. [...] It feels a little like Apple got swept up in knocking down every single detraction point from 1.0 that they lost sight of what everyone loved about the first version. Yes, it got cheaper (not really), faster (some times), installable apps, and GPS, but it lost a bit of Apple soul in the process. David also has a laundry list of complaints on stability and performance. I went through his items and ticked off each of the ones I've also noticed (with a 01-10 for how big a problem it's been for me): [ 0^ ] "Annoying delays all over the place." [MDM: Kinda. I guess that's how I'd describe it.] [ -- ] "Changing to the SMS view can take more than 10 seconds at times." [MDM: Mmm. I haven't seen this. But then I hate SMS and avoid it like the plague.] [ -- ] "Transitions between apps are being dropped entirely or cut short (the latter looks like a UI stutter)." [MDM: Nope.] [ -- ] "It some times requires 3 clicks on the fast-forward button in iTunes to get a response." [MDM: Nope.] [ 07 ] "The screen will freeze for 4-5 seconds not accepting any input, then replay ALL your feverous tapping when it finally returns." [MDM: Oh yeah. Feels like a page out.] [ 09 ] "Some times the keyboard will not keep up with your input (and I’m not that fast of a typer)." [MDM: I'm a *really* slow typer and I get this almost nonstop] [ 07 ] "I’ve had applications crash numerous times." [MDM: Poof. Multiples a day.] [ 10 ] "The entire phone has crashed twice." [MDM: Closer to a half-dozen times for me.] [ 02 ] "Restarting the phone kinda helps some of these problems, but not for long and it feels so dirty and Windows-like to do." [MDM: I guess. More opinion than observation.] I'll also add a few of my own: Wildly-varying response errors. Similar to the screen freeze I guess, I'm getting substantial lag time -- especially between ending a drag gesture and having the thing I was trying to change register the movement. I'm constantly selecting the "wrong" thing for example. Over and over. The crazy-long Backup time in iTunes. Wow. Can I request a lot fewer of those? Apps I've removed from the phone mysteriously reappear after the next sync Hangs. Huge, old-school, everything freezes, hold all the buttons and wait til restart hangs. Hm. I hadn't really thought about all these at once, but, yeah. That's a big bunch of broken. Let's hope an update is out soon that addresses some of these. ”DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Apple Device Security: Big Temptation to Dumb-Down

Tue, 22 Jul 2008 13:42:33 -0400

Chairman Gruber recently discovered (via his sharp-eyed reader, Earl Misquitta), that the aforementioned iPhone Remote application can also be used as a virtual keyboard for entering search text, login information, and what have you on your AppleTV. Seeing the typed characters appear on the TV screen as you type them is simply magical. So, if, like me, you’re in the amazingly tiny sliver of the Venn diagram for people who own both these products, this is hugely convenient, and what a welcome trick it is. As I’ve alluded to before, the AppleTV’s torturous keyboard entry (via the hardware Apple Remote’s 4-way joystick) is abysmal. In 21 uninterrupted years of using Apple products, it’s probably the most consistently frustrating and poorly-designed interface I’ve encountered. I literally hate using it. The ability to enter text via the superior (but far from perfect) iPhone keyboard is wonderful but it doesn’t and can’t address a deeper problem with the keyboard-challenged devices Apple are focused on vending right now: assy and annoying text entry encourages the use of crap passwords. This is bad, and here’s why. Sliding backward We’ve all heard the lectures about not using your ferret’s name as The Single Password™ for everything you do, and my sense is that, over the years, a lot of us have tried to get better about password hygiene — especially as more of our stuff moves into an online cloud. But my entirely anecdotal opinion is that the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the AppleTV each tempts their users to slide back to dumbing-down their passwords in exchange for better ease-of-use. The most annoying device in your chain ends up driving the passwords you use for everything. Right now, it’s such a pain to enter a secure password on a device like the iPhone or the AppleTV, that I’m betting a few of you have already fallen back on your ferret. Or “pencil.” Or your ATM PIN. This is an unbelievably bad idea, but what are the options if this is a device you need to use a lot? A real-world problem I’m a fervent 1Password user and (unpaid) evangelist, so I don’t suffer from this conundrum quite as badly when using Safari on the iPhone. 1Password generates and remembers secure passwords for me, then lets me enter them on my phone in a few seconds via a password-protected bookmarklet. Imperfect, but a big step up over nothing. Of course, I’m still SOL when the iTunes App Store wants me to (again again again) manually re-enter my password in order to download apps on my iPhone. I’m not made of stone. This sucks. I’ll even be the first to admit — solely on the basis of how vexing the AppleTV (and non-Safari on iPhone) password entry is — that I’ve been sorely tempted to move to a more trivial password. But I’ve held out. If you’re using MobileMe, or Google’s apps like Gmail, or any of the other myriad cloud functionalities that store a lot of personal information, it’s just not worth assuming the risk in return for a bit of convenience. ”Four digits? What a pain.” To make this nuttiness even more frustrating, every day I watch friends entering 4 or 5 character passwords over an iPhone that they don’t even bother to auto-lock (“Meh, I use it too much. It’d be a pain.”). [...]



Google Docs Adds Over 300 New Templates

Thu, 17 Jul 2008 13:57:46 -0400

Google Docs Templates

(image) Google Docs recently added over 300 templates for a variety of business documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. Need templates for a calendar, a letter, a resume, or even Avery-compatible labels? You're good to go.

My favorites are in the eclectic "Miscellaneous" section, where you'll find templates for athletes, parents, wedding or event planners, wine nerds, screenwriters -- even "animal guardians".

Cool new resource and a neat idea. Yet another reason for MS Office to keep an eye on its dwindling lunch.

I'm looking forward to spending some time with these, because I'm a huge GDocs nerd. Can't wait until you can edit Google Documents via your iPhone. That's when the game really changes.

(image) Google Docs Adds Over 300 New Templates” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 17, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




How Hard is MobileMe Really "Pushing"?

Wed, 16 Jul 2008 10:43:26 -0400

Apple's MobileMe Lacks True Push Syncing - InformationWeek According to many users, and as reported by numerous news outlets, Apple MobileMe's implied promise of instantaneous sync between between multiple devices (including, it had been implied, your desktop Mac) is not accurate. Since it appears that syncing from the desktop to anywhere else in "the cloud" can actually take as long as 15 minutes, many are questioning Apple's referring to this functionality as "Push" (as opposed to simply sped-up, automated "syncing"). Marin Perez of InformationWeek writes: The gripe comes because data entered on their Macintosh or PC address books and calendars isn't immediately pushed to MobileMe's servers. "Selecting Automatic in Mac OS X allows your computer to immediately sync and update when there are any changes on the MobileMe servers," read a support note on Apple's Web site. "Those changes come from your iPhone, iPod Touch, the MobileMe Web site, or another computer. Changes made on your computer will be synced to the MobileMe 'cloud' every 15 minutes." You may have shared my slack-jawed gape and consequent fistbump when Phil Schiller's WWDC demo of MobileMe [free iTunes link] implied magically fast, truly instantaneous syncing. Because that's really hard to do well -- and implying MobileMe would enable such a thing suggested mighty technological leaps over the previous .Mac service, whose sync skills and reliability were famously uneven at best. While most of us won't see our lives fall apart if true Push is not happening on MobileMe, it's still disappointing that Apple implied they were solving a complicated and thorny problem vs. simply speeding up the frequency of syncing via an existing method. FWIW, this weekend I informally tested MobileMe's syncing skillz on two Macs, "the old iPhone," and via apps on the MobileMe site. Mostly this consisted of creating calendar items with unique date and time stamps and seeing how long it took for them to show up on the different devices. Let's just say the two Macs were, far and away, the pokiest syncers for both incoming and outgoing events. Mostly I guess I'm just bummed that this wasn't the sufficiently advanced technology that it seemed. I'm sure there's room for improvements and enhancements to MobileMe -- and God know what it took to get that thing out the door in the midst of last week's shitstorm -- but I'm disappointed in Apple. I don't mind the RDF -- a lot of times, it's a fun place to hang out for an hour or two -- but playing fast and loose with terms that mean something in the market they're trying to penetrate is not cricket. Elsewhere on this issue: holgr.com » Blog Archive » Apple’s MobileMe - Push or in sync? Looks like Apple has removed all mentions about push mail from their MobileMe site. It has been removed from the MobileMe Mail features list too. Now your mail is “in sync”. But they forgot the mentioning at their enterprise site, where they are talking about Exchange push mail. MobileMe not so pushy - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) That, to me, doesn't sound like "push," it sounds like "sync." The term "push" still applies, however, to me.com email, as that shows up immediately (in my experience, at leas[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 16:52:28 -0400

iPhone 2.0: The glory wore off in wash - (37signals) [via DF] While acknowledging the complexity of Apple's ambitious launch, David Heinemeier Hansson says iPhone 2.0 wasn't ready for prime time on a number of levels. Combined, it’s a rather big disappointment. I’m surprised just how much impact the small griefs have when they add up to a lack of confidence in the system. It’s a great example of the cumulative effects of problems. They have an exponential damage on the experience. [...] It feels a little like Apple got swept up in knocking down every single detraction point from 1.0 that they lost sight of what everyone loved about the first version. Yes, it got cheaper (not really), faster (some times), installable apps, and GPS, but it lost a bit of Apple soul in the process. David also has a laundry list of complaints on stability and performance. I went through his items and ticked off each of the ones I've also noticed (with a 01-10 for how big a problem it's been for me): [ 0^ ] "Annoying delays all over the place." [MDM: Kinda. I guess that's how I'd describe it.] [ -- ] "Changing to the SMS view can take more than 10 seconds at times." [MDM: Mmm. I haven't seen this. But then I hate SMS and avoid it like the plague.] [ -- ] "Transitions between apps are being dropped entirely or cut short (the latter looks like a UI stutter)." [MDM: Nope.] [ -- ] "It some times requires 3 clicks on the fast-forward button in iTunes to get a response." [MDM: Nope.] [ 07 ] "The screen will freeze for 4-5 seconds not accepting any input, then replay ALL your feverous tapping when it finally returns." [MDM: Oh yeah. Feels like a page out.] [ 09 ] "Some times the keyboard will not keep up with your input (and I’m not that fast of a typer)." [MDM: I'm a *really* slow typer and I get this almost nonstop] [ 07 ] "I’ve had applications crash numerous times." [MDM: Poof. Multiples a day.] [ 10 ] "The entire phone has crashed twice." [MDM: Closer to a half-dozen times for me.] [ 02 ] "Restarting the phone kinda helps some of these problems, but not for long and it feels so dirty and Windows-like to do." [MDM: I guess. More opinion than observation.] I'll also add a few of my own: Wildly-varying response errors. Similar to the screen freeze I guess, I'm getting substantial lag time -- especially between ending a drag gesture and having the thing I was trying to change register the movement. I'm constantly selecting the "wrong" thing for example. Over and over. The crazy-long Backup time in iTunes. Wow. Can I request a lot fewer of those? Apps I've removed from the phone mysteriously reappear after the next sync Hangs. Huge, old-school, everything freezes, hold all the buttons and wait til restart hangs. Hm. I hadn't really thought about all these at once, but, yeah. That's a big bunch of broken. Let's hope an update is out soon that addresses some of these. ”DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC B[...]



Apple Device Security: Big Temptation to Dumb-Down

Tue, 22 Jul 2008 13:42:33 -0400

Chairman Gruber recently discovered (via his sharp-eyed reader, Earl Misquitta), that the aforementioned iPhone Remote application can also be used as a virtual keyboard for entering search text, login information, and what have you on your AppleTV. Seeing the typed characters appear on the TV screen as you type them is simply magical. So, if, like me, you’re in the amazingly tiny sliver of the Venn diagram for people who own both these products, this is hugely convenient, and what a welcome trick it is. As I’ve alluded to before, the AppleTV’s torturous keyboard entry (via the hardware Apple Remote’s 4-way joystick) is abysmal. In 21 uninterrupted years of using Apple products, it’s probably the most consistently frustrating and poorly-designed interface I’ve encountered. I literally hate using it. The ability to enter text via the superior (but far from perfect) iPhone keyboard is wonderful but it doesn’t and can’t address a deeper problem with the keyboard-challenged devices Apple are focused on vending right now: assy and annoying text entry encourages the use of crap passwords. This is bad, and here’s why. Sliding backward We’ve all heard the lectures about not using your ferret’s name as The Single Password™ for everything you do, and my sense is that, over the years, a lot of us have tried to get better about password hygiene — especially as more of our stuff moves into an online cloud. But my entirely anecdotal opinion is that the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the AppleTV each tempts their users to slide back to dumbing-down their passwords in exchange for better ease-of-use. The most annoying device in your chain ends up driving the passwords you use for everything. Right now, it’s such a pain to enter a secure password on a device like the iPhone or the AppleTV, that I’m betting a few of you have already fallen back on your ferret. Or “pencil.” Or your ATM PIN. This is an unbelievably bad idea, but what are the options if this is a device you need to use a lot? A real-world problem I’m a fervent 1Password user and (unpaid) evangelist, so I don’t suffer from this conundrum quite as badly when using Safari on the iPhone. 1Password generates and remembers secure passwords for me, then lets me enter them on my phone in a few seconds via a password-protected bookmarklet. Imperfect, but a big step up over nothing. Of course, I’m still SOL when the iTunes App Store wants me to (again again again) manually re-enter my password in order to download apps on my iPhone. I’m not made of stone. This sucks. I’ll even be the first to admit — solely on the basis of how vexing the AppleTV (and non-Safari on iPhone) password entry is — that I’ve been sorely tempted to move to a more trivial password. But I’ve held out. If you’re using MobileMe, or Google’s apps like Gmail, or any of the other myriad cloud functionalities that store a lot of personal information, it’s just not worth assuming the risk in return for a bit of convenience. ”Fou[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, 2008. Except as noted, it's[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 25, [...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was or[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” was written by Merlin Mann f[...]



aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support

Fri, 25 Jul 2008 12:59:20 -0400

aTV Flash - Ver. 3.2 - Apple Core, LLC The 3.2 version of Apple Core's patchstick for the AppleTV is out. And it's pretty amazing. If you've never heard of the aTV, I'll point you to the product page for all the feature details that turn your AppleTV into a tricked-out media center that runs an assload of codecs without PitA transcoding. And, yes, you will need to read the detailed instructions on how to make this work -- there's a lot of them and it's not for the impatient or the faint of heart. For now, I just want to highlight why this particular release of this particular product has scratched such an itch for me. New GUI installer - UNIX doofuses like me no longer have to fling their key drives against a wall in frustration; the product now ships with a relatively simple wizard for installing the aTV software on your 1GB or smaller USB drive. Much easier now. If you're even wimpier than me they also offer several options that get you the software pre-installed on an AppleTV. Vanilla FTP access - I'm with stevenf in general on SFTP, but this latest release of aTV removes the requirement to force SSH1 (and, consequently use of the shell or [ugh] Fugu) in order to SFTP onto the AppleTV. With the introduction of old-school FTP I can use Trasmit for file transfer (yay!). Plus this has enabled me to create basic Automator folder actions for uploading files to the AppleTV automatically (here's what my Movie uploader looks like). Love this -- Transmit is such a nice friend. USB Drive suport - Using the included NitoTV (and after a quick update with the 10.4.9 Combo Installer and a restart) your AppleTV can now see and access attached USB devices [howto]. Like, say, a Drobo. Yep. Just point Sapphire at your collection, and you suddenly have a pretty rich way to enjoy your legal backups of movies and TV shows. "Boom," as the introducer of the AppleTV might say. The usual warnings and admonitions apply with this stuff. Apple Core says installing this product won't void your AppleTV's warranty; I have no opinion about that. I will say anything you do here is at your own risk. Don't blame me if your TV blows up. Also, don't "steal" anything; always pay retail...preferably at a really big store you have to drive to. For a while, I was on the fence about whether to use my Mac Mini as a media center (and basically pitch the AppleTV). The power is obviously there with a Mini, but I also didn't want to deal with a keyboard and the other annoyances of using a proper computer as a TV device. I've been very satisfied with the aTV over the past few weeks I've had it, and this new version just takes it to another level. Even if the AppleTV ends up tanking as hard as everybody seems to claim it will, I'm grateful for the hobbyists and hackers who have made it easy for civilians like me to use this amazing device to its fuller potential. ”aTV Update Gives AppleTV FTP and USB Drive Support” w[...]



iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy

Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:30:59 -0400

As I wrote yesterday, I'm loving the new iPhone apps on the iTunes store. Also, as we mentioned on MacBreak Weekly yesterday, it seems likely that we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg in terms of what people will do with that SDK. But it got me thinking about the stuff I want -- the itches I want to scratch. So, iPhone developer friends. Please make these three apps. Prime This Elevator pitch: Scan barcode to instantly order an item via Amazon Out and about and see something you want to buy? Maybe a book, CD, or DVD that you want, but don't want to buy/carry/pack right now? No problem. Take a photo of the item's barcode, hit one button, and the item is instantly ordered through Amazon 1-Click using your default credit card and shipping preferences. Done. Yeah, I know; I know. You want price comparisons, and wish lists, and an API for tagging and "mashups." Well, suck it up; you're not who this is for. This is for hardcore, mainlining Amazon Prime power users. That's why it has exactly one button: "Prime This." Suggested price: Free (developer will make a killing on affiliate money) iParked Elevator pitch: Location-aware parking reminder Open the app, hit a button, and your location is noted and added to a map. Optionally add an alarm (for the parking meter or street cleaning), notes and photos ("3rd level; Area G"), and other pertinent data ("Closes at 1am; after hours number is...."). When you're ready to go to your car, the app reminds you where you parked (with a walking map), and off you go. Suggested price: $5 That Reminds Me Elevator pitch: Lightweight, location-aware alarm app Tell TRM the really mushy kinds of things that fall somewhere between a todo and a wish and a curiosity. buy a lottery ticket on my birthday pick up a crazy notebook next time I'm in Chinatown grab a takeout menu next time I'm at Andy's Using functionality similar to OmniFocus's flexible, location-aware contexts, add new items to your list with optional alarms and start/end dates. Then forget about it. Next time you're geographically near where you need to be, you get a reminder and a map to get you there. Suggested price: $5 The Question to You What’s the iPhone app you crave? What would take great advantage of Location Services, the camera, SDK features, or what have you? What itch do you want to have scratched? ”iPhone Apps I'd Totally Buy” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 17, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"[...]



Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"




Apple Device Security: Big Temptation to Dumb-Down

Tue, 22 Jul 2008 13:42:33 -0400

Chairman Gruber recently discovered (via his sharp-eyed reader, Earl Misquitta), that the aforementioned iPhone Remote application can also be used as a virtual keyboard for entering search text, login information, and what have you on your AppleTV. Seeing the typed characters appear on the TV screen as you type them is simply magical. So, if, like me, you’re in the amazingly tiny sliver of the Venn diagram for people who own both these products, this is hugely convenient, and what a welcome trick it is. As I’ve alluded to before, the AppleTV’s torturous keyboard entry (via the hardware Apple Remote’s 4-way joystick) is abysmal. In 21 uninterrupted years of using Apple products, it’s probably the most consistently frustrating and poorly-designed interface I’ve encountered. I literally hate using it. The ability to enter text via the superior (but far from perfect) iPhone keyboard is wonderful but it doesn’t and can’t address a deeper problem with the keyboard-challenged devices Apple are focused on vending right now: assy and annoying text entry encourages the use of crap passwords. This is bad, and here’s why. Sliding backward We’ve all heard the lectures about not using your ferret’s name as The Single Password™ for everything you do, and my sense is that, over the years, a lot of us have tried to get better about password hygiene — especially as more of our stuff moves into an online cloud. But my entirely anecdotal opinion is that the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the AppleTV each tempts their users to slide back to dumbing-down their passwords in exchange for better ease-of-use. The most annoying device in your chain ends up driving the passwords you use for everything. Right now, it’s such a pain to enter a secure password on a device like the iPhone or the AppleTV, that I’m betting a few of you have already fallen back on your ferret. Or “pencil.” Or your ATM PIN. This is an unbelievably bad idea, but what are the options if this is a device you need to use a lot? A real-world problem I’m a fervent 1Password user and (unpaid) evangelist, so I don’t suffer from this conundrum quite as badly when using Safari on the iPhone. 1Password generates and remembers secure passwords for me, then lets me enter them on my phone in a few seconds via a password-protected bookmarklet. Imperfect, but a big step up over nothing. Of course, I’m still SOL when the iTunes App Store wants me to (again again again) manually re-enter my password in order to download apps on my iPhone. I’m not made of stone. This sucks. I’ll even be the first to admit — solely on the basis of how vexing the AppleTV (and non-Safari on iPhone) password entry is — that I’ve been sorely tempted to move to a more trivial password. But I’ve held [...]



DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 16:52:28 -0400

iPhone 2.0: The glory wore off in wash - (37signals) [via DF] While acknowledging the complexity of Apple's ambitious launch, David Heinemeier Hansson says iPhone 2.0 wasn't ready for prime time on a number of levels. Combined, it’s a rather big disappointment. I’m surprised just how much impact the small griefs have when they add up to a lack of confidence in the system. It’s a great example of the cumulative effects of problems. They have an exponential damage on the experience. [...] It feels a little like Apple got swept up in knocking down every single detraction point from 1.0 that they lost sight of what everyone loved about the first version. Yes, it got cheaper (not really), faster (some times), installable apps, and GPS, but it lost a bit of Apple soul in the process. David also has a laundry list of complaints on stability and performance. I went through his items and ticked off each of the ones I've also noticed (with a 01-10 for how big a problem it's been for me): [ 0^ ] "Annoying delays all over the place." [MDM: Kinda. I guess that's how I'd describe it.] [ -- ] "Changing to the SMS view can take more than 10 seconds at times." [MDM: Mmm. I haven't seen this. But then I hate SMS and avoid it like the plague.] [ -- ] "Transitions between apps are being dropped entirely or cut short (the latter looks like a UI stutter)." [MDM: Nope.] [ -- ] "It some times requires 3 clicks on the fast-forward button in iTunes to get a response." [MDM: Nope.] [ 07 ] "The screen will freeze for 4-5 seconds not accepting any input, then replay ALL your feverous tapping when it finally returns." [MDM: Oh yeah. Feels like a page out.] [ 09 ] "Some times the keyboard will not keep up with your input (and I’m not that fast of a typer)." [MDM: I'm a *really* slow typer and I get this almost nonstop] [ 07 ] "I’ve had applications crash numerous times." [MDM: Poof. Multiples a day.] [ 10 ] "The entire phone has crashed twice." [MDM: Closer to a half-dozen times for me.] [ 02 ] "Restarting the phone kinda helps some of these problems, but not for long and it feels so dirty and Windows-like to do." [MDM: I guess. More opinion than observation.] I'll also add a few of my own: Wildly-varying response errors. Similar to the screen freeze I guess, I'm getting substantial lag time -- especially between ending a drag gesture and having the thing I was trying to change register the movement. I'm constantly selecting the "wrong" thing for example. Over and over. The crazy-long Backup time in iTunes. Wow. Can I request a lot fewer of those? Apps I've removed from the phone mysteriously reappear after the next sync Hangs. Huge, old-school, everything freezes, hold all the buttons and wait til restart hangs. Hm. I hadn't[...]



DHH on iPhone 2.0's Glitches

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 16:52:28 -0400

iPhone 2.0: The glory wore off in wash - (37signals) [via DF] While acknowledging the complexity of Apple's ambitious launch, David Heinemeier Hansson says iPhone 2.0 wasn't ready for prime time on a number of levels. Combined, it’s a rather big disappointment. I’m surprised just how much impact the small griefs have when they add up to a lack of confidence in the system. It’s a great example of the cumulative effects of problems. They have an exponential damage on the experience. [...] It feels a little like Apple got swept up in knocking down every single detraction point from 1.0 that they lost sight of what everyone loved about the first version. Yes, it got cheaper (not really), faster (some times), installable apps, and GPS, but it lost a bit of Apple soul in the process. David also has a laundry list of complaints on stability and performance. I went through his items and ticked off each of the ones I've also noticed (with a 01-10 for how big a problem it's been for me): [ 0^ ] "Annoying delays all over the place." [MDM: Kinda. I guess that's how I'd describe it.] [ -- ] "Changing to the SMS view can take more than 10 seconds at times." [MDM: Mmm. I haven't seen this. But then I hate SMS and avoid it like the plague.] [ -- ] "Transitions between apps are being dropped entirely or cut short (the latter looks like a UI stutter)." [MDM: Nope.] [ -- ] "It some times requires 3 clicks on the fast-forward button in iTunes to get a response." [MDM: Nope.] [ 07 ] "The screen will freeze for 4-5 seconds not accepting any input, then replay ALL your feverous tapping when it finally returns." [MDM: Oh yeah. Feels like a page out.] [ 09 ] "Some times the keyboard will not keep up with your input (and I’m not that fast of a typer)." [MDM: I'm a *really* slow typer and I get this almost nonstop] [ 07 ] "I’ve had applications crash numerous times." [MDM: Poof. Multiples a day.] [ 10 ] "The entire phone has crashed twice." [MDM: Closer to a half-dozen times for me.] [ 02 ] "Restarting the phone kinda helps some of these problems, but not for long and it feels so dirty and Windows-like to do." [MDM: I guess. More opinion than observation.] I'll also add a few of my own: Wildly-varying response errors. Similar to the screen freeze I guess, I'm getting substantial lag time -- especially between ending a drag gesture and having the thing I was trying to change register the movement. I'm constantly selecting the "wrong" thing for example. Over and over. The crazy-long Backup time in iTunes. Wow. Can I request a lot fewer of those? Apps I've removed from the phone mysteriously reappear after the next sync Hangs. Huge, old-school, everything freezes, hold all the buttons and wait til re[...]



Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise

Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:44:18 -0400

Compelled to Blurt... | Ask Metafilter

Like a lot of people in this Ask Metafilter thread, I thought I was the only person in the universe who made an unconscious little noise when remembering something stupid I did or said.

It's not especially loud, in fact it's often under my breath. The sound is usually just a quiet grunt, or a word/syllable or two. If I remember an embarrassing conversation, I tend to blurt out a random word of the conversation (as in, I'm replaying the dialogue in my head but then all the sudden one of the words pops out of my mouth). If it happens while I'm reading, I tend to blurt out one or two of the words that happen to be under my eyes at the moment.

For context, my tic (which can also be heard when someone near me does something dumb) sounds a little like the noise Leo Bloom makes after he falls on his keys (00:34). "Ooooooom...."

(object) (embed)

The Question to You

Anyone else do this? Anybody out there qualified to talk about the psychology or neuroscience behind this apparent phenomenon? I’ll bet there’s a cool, scientific name for it.

(image) Tracking Down the "Embarrassing Memory" Noise” was written by Merlin Mann for 43Folders.com and was originally posted on July 23, 2008. Except as noted, it's ©2010 Merlin Mann and licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. "Why a footer?"