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Learn how you can live green and sustainably in the midstate.



Last Build Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2010 20:44:13 UTC

Copyright: Copyright 2015
 



Natural remedies to fight hay fever

Sat, 01 May 2010 14:24:28 UTC

2011-04-18T17:24:22Z

If you suffer from hay fever, your torturous symptoms may be starting right about now. My allergies kicked into full gear in the past week, and let me tell you, its driving me absolutely bonkers. I've suffered from environmental allergies my whole life and have been on a whole score of prescription medications. None of them worked completely. Many... Stinging nettles If you suffer from hay fever, your torturous symptoms may be starting right about now. My allergies kicked into full gear in the past week, and let me tell you, its driving me absolutely bonkers. I've suffered from environmental allergies my whole life and have been on a whole score of prescription medications. None of them worked completely. Many of them didn't work at all. (Is Claritin just a placebo?) An allergy test indicated that I am basically allergic to everything the doctor could inject into me. Since traditional medicine failed me in the seasonal allergy arena, I turned to natural remedies. Here's a run down of some of the common ones. You'll have to experiment to find what works best for you, since everyone has different reactions and is allergic to different substances. Most importantly, in addition to any supplement you might try, get a neti pot and cleanse your sinuses regularly. This will flush out any allergens in your nasal cavities. Homeopathic remedies are a popular option. BioAllers, a brand of homeopathic allergy remedies, explains homeopathic medicine: "Homeopathic formulations work with the body's natural response system to strengthen its ability to heal itself. As natural homeopathic formulations there are no side-effects or contra-indications with other medications, and will not make you drowsy." Homeopathic remedies actually contain extremely dilute amounts of the allergens that cause you problems or other ingredients that cause similar reactions. The idea is that the very dilute amount will actually strengthen your immune system, and therefore, not trigger an allergic reaction to the substance, because your body will not view it as foreign (similar to the idea of immunization.) I must admit that I am more of an herbal remedy girl than a homeopathic girl. I personally haven't had strong results with homeopathy, but I have met many people who have, so I still recommend that you try it with an open mind (after all, prescriptions don't seem to work for me either.) One of the most popular herbs for seasonal allergies is stinging nettles. Nettle is used for inflammatory and mucous conditions. If you experience itchy eyes, try eyebright as well. Both herbs are available in whole herb, capsule and tincture forms. Herb Pharm makes an eyebright nettle tincture, which I recommend. Olba's inhaler For congestion I use Olba's eucalyptus and menthol based inhaler. I don't know how I survived before I discovered this product. Not comfortably, I assure you. I don't usually get very severe bronchial problems with my allergies, but if I do, I brew a cup of Breathe Easy Tea by Traditional Medicinals. This tea is a standby for anytime I get an infection also. Another option is a bioflavonoid from citrus called quercetin. According to Prescription for Nutritional Healing, quercetin "stabilizes the membranes of the cells that release histamine." Make sure you purchase a formula with vitamin C in it to help with absorption. Other approaches include strengthening your immune system to help your body more effectively combat the agents it treats as foreign. Fasting, cleansing and eating a whole food diet are recommended for strengthening your immune system. What natural remedies do you use to combat seasonal allergies? Comment below. [...]



Don't miss the 5th Annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair

Thu, 01 Oct 2009 10:14:06 UTC

2010-12-15T20:44:13Z

The Fifth Annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair, held on Spoutwood Farm in York County, PA, will be Sunday, October 4th, 2009 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. The fair will feature traditional arts and crafts, cutting-edge advances in green building and renewable energy and other topics of sustainable living.

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The Fifth Annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair, held on Spoutwood Farm in York County, PA, will be Sunday, October 4th, 2009 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.

The fair will feature traditional arts and crafts, cutting-edge advances in green building and renewable energy and other topics of sustainable living.

There will be a farmers market with produce and products from local farms; a family fun zone with crafts, animals, costumed characters and other fun for families; an artisan marketplace with artists and crafters from many traditions; mule drawn wagon rides for children of all ages; and a speaker tent with experts supplying practical info on topics of sustainable living.

Albannach, the internationally renowned Scottish pipe and drum tribal band will be the featured headline in an excellent roster of performers meant to appeal to all ages.

Tony Geraci, Food Service Director for Baltimore City, will be the afternoon keynote speaker. Tony, who started in New Orleans as a chef and lives on his boat in Baltimore harbor, will discuss how he is transforming the way food is sourced and prepared for all Baltimore City school children. Not tolerating skinless peaches in corn syrup, he started his tenure by ordering peaches from Westminster, MD fruitgrower Baugher's. Many kids in Baltimore had never eaten a fresh peach. Tony is revolutionizing food in Baltimore schools by emphasizing local fresh food, a student-centered farm and menu preparation spearheaded by the students themselves.

Spoutwood Farm is a family owned farm with a Community Supported Agriculture program, supporting more than 100 families with naturally grown vegetables. Spoutwood Farm supports sustainable living practices and offers educational workshops, classes and other sustainable events for the community.




Living Sustainably classes

Wed, 04 Mar 2009 20:12:59 UTC

2009-03-04T20:19:27Z

The Unitarian Church of Harrisburg will be hosting a series of classes on Living Sustainably. This five part series is free and will be held at 1280 Clover Lane, Harrisburg, PA 17113. Classes will be held from 7-9 p.m.

The Unitarian Church of Harrisburg will be hosting a series of classes on Living Sustainably. This five part series is free and will be held at 1280 Clover Lane, Harrisburg, PA 17113. Classes will be held from 7-9 p.m.

The schedule is as follows:

Week l (March 18, 2009):
Environmentally, where are we now......without the sugar coating!

Week 2 (March 25, 2009):
Economic models and measurements used: How they work against the environment

No class - April 1, 2009:

Week 3 (April 8, 2009):
"Reduce Reuse Recycle" and "Think Globally. Act Locally" Do we really know what these mean in our everyday actions?

Week 4 (April 15, 2009):
Green Living, Pattern Language, Permaculture, Intentional Communities, Alternative Lifestyles

Week 5 (April 22, 2009 - EARTH DAY):
Where do we go from here?

To register, email Cassa Von Kundra. You may also call Cass at 717-421-2335.




Baltimore Boat Show offers green boating section

Mon, 12 Jan 2009 10:35:52 UTC

2009-01-12T23:49:35Z

The Baltimore Boat Show kicks off January 21 and will feature a special Green Boating section this year. The section will showcase the latest eco-friendly technologies and efficient boats, including boats made from recycled materials, hybrid boats that run off off of electric and solar power and manufacturer incentives to recycle old boat parts. The show will run through... The Baltimore Boat Show kicks off January 21 and will feature a special Green Boating section this year. The section will showcase the latest eco-friendly technologies and efficient boats, including boats made from recycled materials, hybrid boats that run off off of electric and solar power and manufacturer incentives to recycle old boat parts. The show will run through January 25. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 13-15 and free for children 12 and younger. Below are ten ideas from the Baltimore Boat Show that will help minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the performance of your boat: 1. Choose green products: Use the cleanest maintenance products that do the job. Look for the EPA-certified "Design for the Environment" DfE label, which assures you that the product has minimal environmental impact and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution. 2. Use the right prop: Use a prop with the right pitch so your engine reaches its designed wide-open-throttle RPM. An adjustable-pitch ProPulse propeller allows you to dial in the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. Modular props, like the Quicksilver Flo-Torq II series, let you swap props while keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption, improve performance. 3. Don't push water: Install and use trim tabs or hydrofoils such as those offered by Bennett, Nauticus and StingRay. Most planing powerboats can improve hole-shot acceleration or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performance and save gas. 4. Keep the bilge clean: Avoid the accidental discharge of oily water by using a sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product like BIO-SOK to convert hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution 5. Retire that 2-stroke outboard: It may be possible to get a few more years out of your old-technology outboard, but you'll be much happier with the reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, and pollution of a modern injected four-stroke outboard such as those by Mercury. For an even quieter ride, try Torqeedo's electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution. 6. Recycle your lead-acid batteries: 12V batteries are among the most recycled products in the world. Get up to a $10.00 credit on a new battery, when you return your core to any West Marine store. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. 7. Prevent fuel spills: Use or install a device to prevent overboard discharges from your tank vent. The Davis No Spill and the Racor Lifeguard Separator are two methods. The Fuel Whistle by Green Marine makes a whistling sound that stops when your tank is full to prevent spills. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution 8 Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots such as those by Raymarine can steer better than most helmspersons, and they don't have a limited attention span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption 9. Recycle your monofilament fishing line at shore side recycling locations. If your harbor doesn't have a recycling location, see fishinglinerecycling.org. 10. Eat responsibly harvested seafood: Protect fish stocks by using the Seafood MiniGuide and chose sustainable seafood at a restaurant or grocery store. Ensure that the fish stocks are plentiful for your children and for generations to come. For your free MiniGuide, visit http://www.westmarine.com/pdf/MiniGuideSea[...]



If you're hesitant to use a natural toothpaste, try Natural Dentist

Mon, 22 Dec 2008 19:18:36 UTC

2008-12-22T20:25:10Z

The Natural Dentist produces a line of toothpaste and mouthwash that is made without alcohol, dye, harsh chemicals, detergents and artificial preservatives. Their products are made with a patent-pending blend of herbs that is effective at reducing plaque and gingivitis. They contain xylitol, a natural sweetener; are free of sodium laurel sulfate, which irritates many people's mouths and are... The Natural Dentist produces a line of toothpaste and mouthwash that is made without alcohol, dye, harsh chemicals, detergents and artificial preservatives. Their products are made with a patent-pending blend of herbs that is effective at reducing plaque and gingivitis. They contain xylitol, a natural sweetener; are free of sodium laurel sulfate, which irritates many people's mouths and are packaged without the cardboard box to reduce waste. Their paste and mouthwashes are available with and without fluoride. Several of my co-workers and I were recently lucky enough to try some of Natural Dentist's products. I am happy to present you these varied reviews because they come from a mixture of both people who are very familiar with natural products and people who have never tried a natural body car product before. We tried the Healthy Gums Mouth Rinse in Peppermint Twist and the Healthy Teeth & Gums Original Toothpaste in Peppermint Twist. Our reviews follow: "When I was given Natural Dentist products to try, I was expecting bad-tasting mouthwash and runny toothpaste. I was surprised to find neither. The mouthwash, red in color, might have been a touch sweeter and less edgy than my normal faux generic brand Listerine, but other than that it felt like a normal mouthwash. I was also surprised to discover that my breath was refreshed as well. If the mouthwash had a small noticeable difference from "regular" mouthwashes, the toothpaste did not have any at all. In fact, if the Natural Dentist were to sneak into Colgate's toothpaste-making plant and fill the tubes with their product instead, I would probably have no idea. The white paste looked and tasted like any other toothpaste. Like the mouthwash, it left my mouth feeling clean and refreshed. In short, the Natural Dentist's peppermint twist toothpaste and mouthwash make no convenience sacrifices while taking steps to a healthier and greener alternative, making them convenient to try and maybe even switch to." - Ryan Cohick "I was a little hesitant but actually liked the smell and consistency. This is a great toothpaste for those who are all-organic all-the way. My regular toothpaste is Sensodyne - and what I felt that the natural toothpaste was missing was a bit of the foaming sensation and the after-brushing fresh feeling/scent/all around clean feeling that regular toothpaste offers. I enjoy the mouthwash-kick a lot of toothpastes have these days, so if they could somehow mimic that, I'd be a fan." - Lisa B. I've tried many natural types of toothpaste, so when I tried Natural Dentist I was prepared for a watery, gritty or otherwise strange consistency. I'm really picky about toothpaste and have bestowed former a co-worker Nicole with a whole collection of rejects that I couldn't muster the courage to taste again (she's a bit gutsier than I am, apparently). She didn't get a tube of this one, though. While I would have liked it to be slightly thicker, the texture of this toothpaste is great. The taste is even greater. The mint flavor rivaled that of the super-strong Jason PowerSmile, my toothpaste of choice. I was happy to keep using this toothpaste until the whole tube was gone. The mouthwash is where I really got hooked, though. I liked the strength and flavor of it. When I saw the red color, I was worried that the flavor was going to be some sort of cherry, but it delivered in minty freshness. And don't worry, that red color is from vegetable juices, not an artificial color. I would definitely re[...]



Harrisburg Green Drinks

Wed, 10 Dec 2008 14:34:15 UTC

2008-12-10T14:51:51Z

Are you interested in networking with other local people who are interested in "green" topics? Green Drinks International is an organization that gets people who work or are interested in environmental fields together for informal gatherings over drinks. There are Green Drinks groups active in 438 cities around the world, and one is coming to Harrisburg soon!

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Are you interested in networking with other local people who are interested in "green" topics?

Green Drinks International is an organization that gets people who work or are interested in environmental fields together for informal gatherings over drinks. There are Green Drinks groups active in 438 cities around the world, and one is coming to Harrisburg soon!

The first Harrisburg Green Drinks meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 14th, 2009 at 5:30 p.m. at Appalachian Brewing Company in Harrisburg. The meeting will feature the first produced organic beer in Pennsylvania.

Some cities have held amazingly large Green Drink gatherings. A Melbourne event on Friday, February 15, 2008 was attended by over 1,800 people. Over 900 people came out for a 2007 holiday gathering in New York City.

If you're interested in this group, there is a Harrisburg Green Drinks discussion board on Facebook where you can let others know that you'd like to be a part of this group.

If you'd like more information, send an email to hbggreendrinks@gmail.com.




Wheatland Custom Homes builds green home in the midstate

Thu, 13 Nov 2008 15:28:47 UTC

2008-11-13T20:25:19Z

A home certified by the Green Communities Alliance was recently built in Enola, Pa. Green Communities Alliance is a not-for-profit organization, which certifies green homes using the guidelines and standards developed by the National Association of Home Builders. The home, located at 8 Redwood Drive, Enola, Pa. 17025, received both Living Green and Energy Star certification.

(image) The green home in Enola is 50% more energy efficient than a standard code-built home.

A home certified by the Green Communities Alliance was recently built in Enola, Pa. Green Communities Alliance is a not-for-profit organization, which certifies green homes using the guidelines and standards developed by the National Association of Home Builders. The home, located at 8 Redwood Drive, Enola, Pa. 17025, received both Living Green and Energy Star certification.

The builder, Wheatland Custom Homes, avoided environmentally sensitive areas, minimized soil erosion and conserved onsite vegetation. They used building materials that minimized waste, installed energy efficient heating and cooling systems, Energy Star appliances, low-flow showers, faucets and toilets and used low VOC paints throughout the home.

Wheatland Custom Homes has won numerous awards from the Home Builders Association of Metro Harrisburg. In 2008 they won the Pennsylvania Parade of Homes, where they won 5 of 6 awards for their first Energy Star home certified green by the Green Communities Alliance.

Rick Martin, president of Wheatland Custom Homes, recently earned the Certified Green Professional (CGP) designation from the National Association of Home Builders, identifying him as someone with knowledge of the best strategies for incorporating green building principles into homes. Martin is one of only nine in the Central Pennsylvania region to earn this designation.

Martin is hopeful that the market for green homes will grow "as people start to see the value inherent in energy efficient, sustainable homes." He believes the market in Central Pennsylvania will start to take hold when "people realize that we can do responsible construction without the dramatic cost increases."

The homes aren't perfectly sustainable, but the fact that they are 50% more energy efficient than a standard code-built home is a giant leap forward. I hope features such as photovoltaic panels and recycled materials, such as stone, metal and reclaimed wood or lumber from forests certified to be sustainably managed, will be added in the future. At this point, Martin says there is not a good local source for recycled materials or reclaimed wood. "It still costs more to remove the nails and stuff from the old ones than it costs to just buy new," he explains.

Wheatland Custom Homes plans on building around four green homes in the midstate in 2009. If you are worried that a green home won't be as attractive or will look like something better fitted for a commune, Martin explains that "I was talking to someone about what a green house looks like, and realized that there is really not a difference. So I suggested that the proper picture of a green house is a picture of the monthly utility bill."





Green Urban Initiative to develop community gardens in Harrisburg

Fri, 07 Nov 2008 17:41:49 UTC

2008-11-10T13:06:51Z

I'm really excited about the development of a new Harrisburg nonprofit called Green Urban Initiative. Green Urban Initiative is working to development a local Community Vegetable Gardening Program.

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I'm really excited about the development of a new Harrisburg nonprofit called Green Urban Initiative.

Green Urban Initiative is working to development a local Community Vegetable Gardening Program.

One of the biggest hindrances to vegetable gardening in a city like Harrisburg is the lack of space. Yards are small; many people rent and surrounding buildings block the sunlight. With that in mind, the group will work with gardeners to secure land, acquire tools and materials and develop a garden infrastructure that will include the election of a garden leader, drafting guidelines and rules of the garden, etc. The majority of the decision making and work will be left up to the gardeners. The gardener's will be able to utilize the organization's resources, such as materials, educational workshops and assistance with securing land. Ultimately, the group wants to establish a garden within walking distance of every resident in the city.

Organizer Jason Zubler explains that

"while growing your own produce may not eliminate the need to purchase groceries, it can significantly reduce costs and promote healthier eating habits and a healthier lifestyle. This is why we are really going to push education through workshops and whatever other means we can identify. Even if you've never lifted a shovel or seen a tomato on a vine, we will help you become a successful gardener!"

The group has yet to determine where their first plot will be this spring, so if you are interested, be sure to get in contact with them and let them know. Annual membership is $10. Membership entitles the donor to a subscription of the e-newsletter, annual event invitations, participation in educational workshops and participation in the group's programs. Anyone interested in joining one of the gardens must be a member and the availability of plots will be limited to members in neighborhoods where the organization has established a garden.

As the group grows, they have plans to work on reducing waste at city festivals, developing an energy reduction campaign, creating a land trust to preserve urban gardens and developing a city wide composting program.

For more information on this group, please email Jason Zubler at zubes25@yahoo.com.




The Holistic Option: MySpace meets WebMD for the holistically-minded

Fri, 17 Oct 2008 13:44:31 UTC

2008-10-17T14:21:26Z

I recently learned about a great new resource on the Web called The Holistic Option. This site is like WebMD but covers holistic, alternative and integrative medicine.

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I recently learned about a great new resource on the Web called The Holistic Option. This site is like WebMD but covers holistic, alternative and integrative medicine.

An abundance of free information is available on this site. You can start by learning more about alternative treatments that you may be curious about like acupuncture, aromatherapy, biofeedback and more. The content is provided in collaboration with professional associations, licensed practitioners and experts in the field of holistic medicine.

You can also search for natural remedies for medical conditions. Simply select the condition you are interested in, and you will be given a list of natural herbal and nutritional supplements suggestions, as well as preventative tips.

It's been my experience, especially in the midstate, that holistic practitioner are hard to find. So the "find a practitioner" tool is very useful. Simply choose the modality that you want and enter your location. Every practitioner listed on the site must submit an application that is screened by the site's advisory board.

If you are actually hoping to become practitioner yourself, there is also a directory where you can find schools near you.

My favorite parts of the site, though, are the podcast and featured articles, videos and blogs. There is a wealth of information here ranging from pumpkin seeds' nutritional value to hormones in our milk to whether or not you should give your child a flu shot.

If you like the sense of community on social networking sites, you can also become a member for free, create a profile and discuss holistic remedies on the forums. You also have the opportunity to write about your personal experience with any of the natural remedies that are recommended.

The site currently has 50 practitioners in their director, recognition from 18 professional associations, new advisory board members being added each month and 65+ new subscribers to the podcast daily. They've accomplished all of this since their launch in April 2008. Clearly it's a growing community that I look forward to being a part of.




Hundredfold Farm hosts open house

Tue, 07 Oct 2008 18:53:10 UTC

2008-10-07T19:17:07Z

Hundredfold Farm, an eco-community of solar/passive solar homes near Gettysburg, is holding an open house this Saturday, October 11 from noon to 5 p.m. This collaborative housing project is focused on sustainable living. Hundredfold Farm offers a sense of community that is not often found in today's neighborhoods, yet the houses are still private dwellings. The community practices tolerance...

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Hundredfold Farm, an eco-community of solar/passive solar homes near Gettysburg, is holding an open house this Saturday, October 11 from noon to 5 p.m. This collaborative housing project is focused on sustainable living.

Hundredfold Farm offers a sense of community that is not often found in today's neighborhoods, yet the houses are still private dwellings. The community practices tolerance toward everyone regardless of age, income, ethnicity, sexuality or family situation.

The community features native woodland, a pond, walking paths, barns and outbuildings that are available for community use, a member-owned organic Christmas tree farm onsite, a greenhouse and community vegetable and flower gardens.

During the open house you can take a tour of the homes, get an overview of how they conserve and generate energy and treat wastewater, speak with current residents and enjoy refreshments. You'll learn about retrofitting your home or building your dream green home.

This event is free and open to the public, but please RSVP to Lenny, so they know to expect you.

For directions, visit Hundredfold Farm's Web site or use this map:

width="425" height="350" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" src="http://www.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&time=&date=&ttype=&q=1668+old+route+30,+orrtanna,+pa+17353&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=48.287373,104.326172&ie=UTF8&om=1&ll=39.962386,-77.340317&spn=0.343508,0.617981&z=11&iwloc=addr&output=embed&s=AARTsJooHyu2bQRzpvzEl8lhTYcvGBRSaA">
View Larger Map




Sweetsurprise's High Fructose Corn Syrup commercials

Tue, 23 Sep 2008 15:06:49 UTC

2008-09-23T19:45:54Z

Are you kidding me? Have you seen those high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) commercials from sweetsurprise.com, which is run by the Corn Refiners Association?

Are you kidding me? Have you seen those high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) commercials from sweetsurprise.com, which is run by the Corn Refiners Association?

The commercials claim that corn syrup doesn't have artificial ingredients and, like sugar, is fine in moderation.

While HSCF is made from corn, I wouldn't consider it natural (which it implies it is by saying it doesn't contain artificial ingredients). It is processed in a lab with ingredients that are frequently genetically modified. Even the FDA has said that products containing high fructose corn syrup should not be labeled as natural. The FDA determined that it is produced using synthetic fixing agents. (After all, if the FDA actually says it's not natural, it must have serious issues.)

High fructose corn syrup also has a whole host of problems associated with it. It is suspected of stimulating insulin resistance, raising the risk of heart disease, accelerating bone loss and more.

Watch the two commercials below.

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Whiskey is made from corn or grains like barley and wheat. I guess we should be feeding that to children too.

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Below is a video response to why the commercials are ridiculous and misleading.

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This video is a spoof based on the commercials. I think it does a great job of illustrating the faulty logic in the ads. Just because you can't explain why something is bad doesn't make it good.

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Have you seen these commercials? What is your response?




Determine your roof's solar potential with RoofRay

Wed, 17 Sep 2008 18:21:33 UTC

2008-09-17T18:39:09Z

Thinking about installing solar panels on your home? There's a neat new site called RoofRay that helps you calculate your homes solar potential. The site aims to help consumers make informed decisions on solar purchases, since solar installation is a fairly technical process.

Thinking about installing solar panels on your home? There's a neat new site called RoofRay that helps you calculate your homes solar potential. The site aims to help consumers make informed decisions on solar purchases, since solar installation is a fairly technical process.

To fond your potential, enter your address in the Google Maps mashup and then draw your solar arrays on the satellite image of the building. After entering a roof tilt angle an estimate of potential power, power per square foot, and total peak power are estimated. You can then enter your current energy use and bills to calculate whether using solar energy would save you money.

Watch the video below for a demo on how the site works.

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What I find interesting is that some enthusiasts are mapping large commercial buildings like Wal-Mart and Costco, just to see how must energy they could save if they utilized the space for solar panels.




This weekend: Pennsylvania Renewable Energy and Sustainable Living Festival

Tue, 16 Sep 2008 13:26:16 UTC

2008-09-16T13:42:07Z

Head to Kempton, Pa. this weekend to attend the Pennsylvania Renewable Energy and Sustainable Living Festival. This three-day festival features exhibits, lectures, workshops, vendors and more about renewable energy, natural building construction, sustainable agriculture, land-use planning, forestry and healthy living practices in general.

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Head to Kempton, Pa. this weekend to attend the Pennsylvania Renewable Energy and Sustainable Living Festival. This three-day festival features exhibits, lectures, workshops, vendors and more about renewable energy, natural building construction, sustainable agriculture, land-use planning, forestry and healthy living practices in general.

The show runs from Friday, September 19 to Sunday, September 21. Friday and Saturday's hours are 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday's are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Adult tickets are $12, ages 13 to 21 are $6 and children under 12 are free. Some workshops will have sign-up requirements and fees.

Music will be performed by Livingston Taylor, Eddie Bluestone Band and more.

A variety of food vendors will be on hand with plenty of vegetarian options. All food will be served on biodegradable products. Some of the vendors will feature locally-produced option.

Workshops and lectures include an introduction to wind power, vegetable oil for fuel, alternative farming techniques, solar site selection and solar panel installation, biofuel auto conversions, alternative heat sources, and many other topics. There will be an entire section dedicated to transportation, showcasing some of the most efficient vehicles on the market today.




Don't miss the 4th annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair

Tue, 02 Sep 2008 17:22:32 UTC

2008-09-02T17:41:07Z

Mark Sunday, October 5 on your calendars, because you won't want to miss out on Spoutwood Farm's 4th Annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair. The fair features exhibits on local farming, renewable energy and green living. There will be a farmer's market, children's village, artists and plenty of food and drink as well. It will be held from 10 a.m. -...

Mark Sunday, October 5 on your calendars, because you won't want to miss out on Spoutwood Farm's 4th Annual Mother Earth Harvest Fair.

The fair features exhibits on local farming, renewable energy and green living. There will be a farmer's market, children's village, artists and plenty of food and drink as well. It will be held from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m, rain or shine.

Live music will be provided by the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Adrienne Young and her band, Little Sadie.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 3-11 and $5 per car for parking.

Visit the fair's Web site for directions and more information.




Better World Club: An environmentally friendly auto club

Fri, 22 Aug 2008 21:41:36 UTC

2008-08-22T21:56:27Z

Have you heard about the Better World Club? It's like AAA for the environmentally-minded. Membership includes eco-travel services, discounts on hybrid car rental, insurance services, free maps, auto maintenance discounts and bicycle roadside assistance. They also donate 1% of their annual revenues toward environmental cleanup and advocacy.

Have you heard about the Better World Club? It's like AAA for the environmentally-minded. Membership includes eco-travel services, discounts on hybrid car rental, insurance services, free maps, auto maintenance discounts and bicycle roadside assistance. They also donate 1% of their annual revenues toward environmental cleanup and advocacy.

For the free maps you receive, you can choose from the most energy-efficient route or the scenic byways.

They are also one of the few carbon offsetting services that allow you to compensate the amount of CO2 used just on your trip. I'm still leery about carbon offsetting, but if it is something you like to do, this may work for you.

The Better World Club has a number of issues with AAA, which you can read about on their AAA Watch page.

Check out their Web site and see if it sounds like a fit for you. Share your thoughts on them below.