Subscribe: Kent Pool
http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/groups_pool.gne?id=73919431@N00
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
added photo  added  area  beach  bird  dungeness  harbour  john  kent  lawrence added  photo pool  photo  pool  pstone added   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Kent Pool

Kent Pool



Kent (in South-East England). Photos and discussions of Kent. Other Kent groups include: East Kent Geotagged: Kent Dungeness University of Kent Folkestone and Shepway Canterbury Geotagged: Canterbury Maidstone Kent Institute of Art and Design



Updated: 2017-02-28T16:59:43Z

 



Mummy digger & baby digger

2016-11-16T11:11:10Z

Rupert Spencer has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




PERFUGIUM MISERIS

2017-02-28T16:32:32Z

John Lawrence 438 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

PERFUGIUM MISERIS is an overlooked part of Ramsgate’s history. It is the Latin motto which is carved into the beautiful lighthouse, at the end of the western harbour arm. This lighthouse was designed by Georgian master engineer, John Smeaton (1724 – 1792), though built nearly 100 years later, who is widely regarded as the “father of civil engineering”. PERFUGIUM MISERIS translates as “refuge for those in need”.

These two words are a message from the town to the world beyond and stand as a memorial to those who lost their lives beneath the waves, beyond the safety of the harbour walls. Many of those lives were lost in the Great Storm of 1703 which, through tragedy, brought about significant change to Ramsgate. Widely believed to be the only true hurricane to hit British shores at full force, the storm caused the deaths of roughly 1500 sailors from the Royal Navy on the Goodwin Sands alone. That is without the countless lives lost in other vessels out at sea, as the storm raged across the country. The need for a more effective refuge in the area resulted in a new harbour design for Ramsgate, the reconstruction of the harbour commenced from 1749 and took a century to complete with the lighthouse marking the harbour mouth
Facts
Established: 1783, Current Lighthouse Built: 1842, Height: 11 Metres (36.09 Feet), Operator: Ramsgate New Port, Designer: John Smeaton


MY THANKS TO ALL WHO VISIT AND COMMENT IT IS APPRECIATED




Ant (3)-02526

2015-06-01T16:23:37Z

G.K.Jnr. has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Shot using an APS-C camera with a 105mm Macro Lens together with a full set of Extension Tubes. Lighting was via a modified Ring Flash.




Calystegia sepium

2017-02-28T16:00:59Z

John Lawrence 438 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Also known as larger bindweed, hedge bindweed, Rutland beauty, bugle vine, heavenly trumpets, bellbind, granny-pop-out-of-bed) (Formerly Convolvulus sepium) is a species of bindweed, with a sub cosmopolitan distribution throughout the temperate Northern and Southern hemispheres.
It is an herbaceous perennial that twines around other plants, in a counter-clockwise direction, to a height of up to 2–4 m, rarely 5 m. The pale matte green leaves are arranged spirally, simple, pointed at the tip and arrowhead shaped 5–10 cm long and 3–7 cm broad.
The flowers are produced from late spring to the end of summer. In the bud, they are covered by large bracts which remain and continue to cover sepals. The open flowers are trumpet-shaped, 3–7 cm diameter, white, or pale pink with white stripes.
It can be very invasive.


MY THANKS TO ALL WHO VISIT AND COMMENT IT IS APPRECIATED




Frosty sunrise landscape.

2017-02-28T12:17:39Z

pstone646 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




Time for a swim.

2017-02-28T12:17:39Z

pstone646 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




The bird and the sunrise storm.

2017-02-28T12:17:41Z

pstone646 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




Margate Beach

2017-02-28T08:22:08Z

only lines has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




Christ Church Clock Tower, Folkestone, Kent.

2017-02-28T08:15:52Z

saxonessex has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

A direct hit by a German bomb destroyed Christ Church in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, Kent on the 17th May 1942. There were fatalities and the tower that somehow survived the direct hit now serves as a memorial. The area around the tower contains memorial plaques with dedications for other local people who lost their lives in conflict.




Whitstable

2017-02-26T05:22:43Z

NovemberAlex has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




375712

2012-01-12T22:12:19Z

Photography By Ryan Webb has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

1P37 1205 Ramsgate - Victoria




Mind the boat

2016-04-15T21:44:04Z

Andrewsteeleuk has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Mixed flock of Dunlins (Calidris alpina), Sanderling (Calidris alba) and Ringed Plovers (Charadrius hiaticula) in flight over Barton's Point Coastal Park at Sheernees on the Isle of Sheppy. More of the waders in flight below




Taking A Break

2017-02-27T22:09:19Z

Nobbinumnut has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Botany Bay in Kent, England.

A typical British seaside view with typical British seaside weather.

I thought some added contrast would make the scene a little more interesting and now look forward to going back when the tide is a little higher.




465249 (18-2-17) Gravesend

2017-02-27T21:27:20Z

FGW43021 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




465194 (18-2-17) Gravesend

2017-02-27T21:27:19Z

FGW43021 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




465033

2012-01-11T18:47:43Z

Photography By Ryan Webb has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

2A44 1354 Gillingham - Charing Cross




Orlestone Forest

2017-02-26T19:03:52Z

richwat2011 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Orlestone is three hundred and eighty eight hectares in size. It is predominantly mixed native broadleaves and a small percentage of conifer.

The area is a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest), managed principally for birds and butterflies.

There is a medium sized car park and picnic area, with a height barrier at the main entrance. . All roads are unsurfaced. As it is very low lying, it has a tendency to flood in winter.




Topiary

2017-02-27T20:08:51Z

John Lawrence 438 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

Tis the Lesser spotted Hedge Man of Kent!!!!

Seen in the Village of Woodnesborough.

Thanks for all visits and comments.




Summer Scene

2017-02-27T20:03:23Z

Trm-photography.com has added a photo to the pool:

(image)




Dungeness

2017-02-26T19:03:51Z

richwat2011 has added a photo to the pool:

(image)

A Foggy Morning at Dungeness.

Dungeness is a headland on the coast of Kent, England, formed largely of a shingle beach in the form of a cuspate foreland. It shelters a large area of low-lying land, Romney Marsh. Dungeness is also the name of the power station and a few other nearby buildings near the beach, and of an important ecological site at the same location.

Dungeness is one of the largest expanses of shingle in the world. It is of international conservation importance for its geomorphology, plant and invertebrate communities and birdlife. This is recognised and protected mostly through its conservation designations as a National Nature Reserve (NNR), a Special Protection Area (SPA), a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and part of the Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) of Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay.

There is a remarkable variety of wildlife living at Dungeness, with over 600 different types of plant: a third of all those found in Britain. It is one of the best places in Britain to find insects such as moths, bees and beetles, and spiders; many of these are very rare, some found nowhere else in Britain.

The short-haired bumblebee, Bombus subterraneus, was last found in the UK in 1988, but has survived in New Zealand after being shipped there more than 100 years ago. It is to be reintroduced at Dungeness. It is planned that the first bees will be introduced in the spring of 2010.

The flooded gravel pits on Denge Beach, both brackish and fresh water, provide an important refuge for many migratory and coastal bird species. The RSPB has a bird sanctuary there and every year thousands of bird watchers descend on the peninsula to catch a glimpse of a rare bird from the bird observatory.

One of the most remarkable features of the site is an area known as 'the patch' or, by anglers, as 'the boil'. The waste hot water and sewage from the Dungeness nuclear power stations are pumped into the sea through two outfall pipes, enriching the biological productivity of the sea bed and attracting seabirds from miles around.

Beach fishing is popular at Dungeness, with the area being a nationally recognised cod fishing venue in the winter.

The name Dungeness derives from Old Norse nes: "headland", with the first part probably connected with the nearby Denge Marsh. Popular etymology ascribes a French origin to the toponym, giving an interpretation as "dangerous nose".