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Christian Science Monitor | World



Global Issues



 



Brexit: Could Britain change its mind?

In a show of what the press has dubbed 'Bregret,' more British voters now think it was the wrong choice to leave the EU than still think it was the right decision.

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Russian Olympic Committee pledges support for athletes

While it denies state-sponsored doping, Russia's Olympic Committee announced its support for the athletes who choose to participate in the 2018 Winter Games under a neutral flag. The ROC urged them to 'achieve victory for the glory of Russia.'

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Jerusalem: Exhausted and adrift, Palestinians offer muted response to Trump

When Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital, analysts warned it could bring a wave of violence. But the response of outraged and distrustful Palestinians has been muted, and some are ready to abandon the two-state solution for peace.

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French rock star played on American persona

For three generations of French people, rock 'n' roll star Johnny Hallyday was a window on America and a chance to dream. A million people attended his funeral cortege in Paris this weekend.

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Putin declares victory against 'terrorists' in Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced a partial pullout of Russian troops. The visit marked the first visit by a foreign head of state to Syria since its civil war began in 2011.

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Netanyahu visits EU to win support following Trump's embassy move announcement

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu visited Brussels to ask EU leaders to join President Trump in recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Many EU foreign ministers continue to criticize Mr. Trump's decision and its ramifications for the peace process. 

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After 35-year ban, movie theaters allowed once again in Saudi Arabia

The arrival of movie theaters in Saudi Arabia will mark the latest cultural change as a result of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's efforts to liberalize the conservative country.

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Russian athletes hope to compete at Olympics despite ban

Though they will not be able to compete under the Russian flag, a majority of Russian athletes still want to compete at the upcoming Olympic Games in Pyeongchang.

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Poland breaks norms and grants greater power to ruling party

Polish lawmakers approved two bills that give the ruling party more power over the courts, despite warnings from EU officials that the laws is not common democratic practice. 

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Girl with albinism wins top school prize in Kenya

Earning the top score on exams in Kenya earns students national recognition and a spot on national television. This year the honor went to a young girl with albinism who has overcome prejudice and threats to her life, breaking down cultural stereotypes along the way.

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Second day of protests after Trump's announcement continue in West Bank and Gaza

Muslims and Arabs around the world continue to protest President Trump's decision to move the US Embassy to Jerusalem, officially recognizing the Holy City as Israel's capital. 

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Brexit negotiations poised to move forward after major roadblocks cleared

A breakthrough in Brexit negotiations was announced by Prime Minister Theresa May and EU leaders after a long night of negotiations. Issues such as the border with Ireland, money paid to the EU, and citizens rights have been resolved, paving the way for the next round of talks.

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Yemen: Why death of ex-dictator makes ending war harder, and more urgent

Just before his death, ex-dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh seemed to offer the Saudis a face-saving way out of their war in Yemen, where a humanitarian crisis is already in full swing. For now, they are vowing to press the attack against the Shiite Houthis.

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In Trump era, US-UK 'special relationship' faces – and causes – new trials

President Trump is deeply unpopular in Britain, and the multiple diplomatic flareups on his watch have put a unique strain on relations with Britain and Prime Minister Theresa May. But the 'special relationship' also limits how May can respond.

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Beijing gives migrant workers their marching orders

For decades, low-paid migrant workers from the Chinese countryside have been building the shiny new Beijing and keeping it running. Now the government is demolishing their homes and forcing them out of the city. How will the capital function without them?

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One woman’s journey from CEO to minister to puppeteer

As a pastor in Detroit, Lottie Hood created the Underground Railroad Living Museum Flight to Freedom Tour. Then she brought all her experiences together to help at-risk children.

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Arab world responds to Trump’s Jerusalem decision with protests and warnings

After President Trump recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, Palestinian protesters burned posters of President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, as well as Israeli and United States flags across the West Bank.

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Australia legalizes same-sex marriage

After a nationwide postal survey showed the majority of Australians favor legalizing same-sex marriage, Australia's Parliament followed through with legislation, which allows same-sex unions to take place starting in January.

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Russia's doping plot: Symptom of a deeper Olympic malaise?

While the extent of Russia's doping efforts was unique, it may indicate a greater issue for the Games than cheating athletes. Rather, it may show a loss of the Olympic ideals themselves – and a need to reset the Olympic project accordingly.

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Berlusconi's improbable return to politics: Why Italy is giving him another look

The bombastic billionaire's reentry into the political arena – despite his history of corruption charges and tawdry parties – says much about the current state of Italian politics, and where the public's mores lie.

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