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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | World

Christian Science Monitor | World



Global Issues



 



Thirty-two slain in Philippine president's war on drugs

Killings mark the single deadliest day since President Rodrigo Duterte launched his relentless war on his nation's drug trade.

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Zambian political opposition leader released from prison

Hakainde Hichilema, president of the opposition party United Party for National Development, was freed after spending 100 days in prison. 

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UK government voices opposition to Irish border posts

Britain said there must be no border posts or electronic checks between Northern Ireland and the Irish republic after Brexit, and it committed itself to maintaining the longstanding, border-free Common Travel Area covering the UK and Ireland.

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In call to cancel debt, Cambodia asks: When war is over, who cleans up the mess?

About 130 square miles of Cambodia are thought to be contaminated with unexploded ordnance dropped by US forces during the Vietnam War – one reason the prime minister says the country should not have to repay a wartime debt of $500 million.

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After Thatcher, New Labour, and austerity, has Britain decided to turn left again?

Not long ago, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s calls for economic redistribution were seen by many within his own party as a liability. But today a decisive shift to the left seems possible, even probable in a bastion of Anglo-Saxon capitalism.

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Korean leaders, US signal tentative shift toward diplomacy

Early signs of deescalation follow rising combative rhetoric between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump over the Hermit Kingdom's threats to launch missiles into the waters near Guam.

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In Charlottesville aftermath, Europe sees widening divide with US

The lack of a quick, clear response to the weekend events in Charlottesville from the White House left Europe – which has had a long struggle with racism and white supremacy – deeply concerned about Trump's values.

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Syrian rebels, refugees leave enclave in Lebanon

The departure of rebels from a group called Saraya Ahl al-Sham will leave an Islamic State enclave as the last militant stronghold straddling the border near the Lebanese town of Arsal, which is home to tens of thousands of refugees.

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In 'liberated' Mosul, ISIS still imperils the path to city's revival

Sweeping western Mosul of ISIS booby-traps, weapons factories, and hold-out snipers is dangerous work for Iraqi police whose goal, after a nine-month siege, is to tell returning residents 'Your house is good.'

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Retirement? No thanks. In 'graying' Japan, these women are just getting started

Women in Japan often feel forced to choose between motherhood and a career, keeping many out of the full-time workforce for decades. For these entrepreneurs, though, 'retirement age' presented an opportunity to start a business venture.

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Olympic refugee team looks to 2020 games with ambitious mindset

One year after Rio, members of the Athlete Refugee Team (ART) have their sights on the Tokyo Games, aiming to deliver more than just 'warm-hearted moments of participation.'

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How a couple's gift to a university benefits more than just college students

The McVay Youth Partnership at Hamline University offers paid leadership opportunities for students, who mentor middle- and high-schoolers. The program was endowed by Pete and Mary McVay.

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Why Poland's crisis may come down to a president and a puppet master

Last month, President Duda unexpectedly vetoed two controversial government bills, setting up a possible power struggle with Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the party's passionate leader. The result could help solve Poland's roiling constitutional crisis where opposition protests and EU criticism have not.

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An iconic Tibetan horse festival – with politics in the wings

The Yushu festival is one of the most famous events on the Tibetan Plateau – an impressive sight for those who can get tickets, handed out by officials. But critics say the event serves Beijing's political interests in a sensitive region. 

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International observers say Kenyan election was fair and free from hackers

The EU's election observer mission reported Thursday no apparent election fraud, and John Kerry, the head of the observer mission, called the Kenyan election 'a remarkable statement to Africa and the world about its democracy.'

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Afghan boy shows his art in Serbia to help another in need

Known as 'Little Picasso,' Farhad Nouri is a migrant from Afghanistan with remarkable artistic talent. He wants to show how important it is to be good to other people.

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Why South Korea's offer for talks with the North continues unrequited

Seoul's collaborative offerings to North Korea were ridiculed but President Moon still thinks the South should take the lead when it comes to solving the North Korean nuclear problem.

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What Carla Del Ponte's resignation means for search for justice in Syria

The veteran prosecutor decried Russian obstruction at the UN and a lack of political will in her decision to quit the war crimes probe into Syria. But others cite progress and note justice often does not come until the conflict is over.

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A onetime prison warden shares her first love with youths: the arts

Alexandreena Dixon founded an organization that uses African storytelling traditions to teach long-forgotten African values and rituals. The aim is to broaden horizons for black children.

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Across the Arab world, a 'Women’s Spring' comes into view

Legislative advances for women in Tunisia and Jordan may soon be followed by measures in Lebanon and Iraq. A quiet revolution has drawn on women’s increased participation in politics and the improved flow of ideas across borders.

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