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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



2018: The year the European Union stands and delivers?

After a year of challenges from the populist far right, Europe looks set for an opportunity to reform. French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel – if she can assemble a coalition – may not get a better chance.

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A new form for the CS Perspective in the Daily

In the spirit of evolving the Monitor Daily toward the clearest statement of the Monitor’s mission, changes are coming to the Christian Science Perspective starting on Jan. 22.

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Will Europe speak up for cooperation?

President Trump is expected to make his case for 'America First' at this month’s World Economic Forum. French President Macron and German Chancellor Merkel could offer an opposing view that values working together over self-interest.

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On policy, Trump favors one side of red-blue divide

From tax reform to offshore drilling, the Trump administration has made major policy moves that appear to favor red states and penalize blue ones, reflecting the GOP's control of government – and the degree to which the president is focused on his base.

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Bangladesh agrees with Myanmar on Rohingya return

Myanmar will begin the repatriation process of refugees currently in Bangladesh next week, but refugees fear mistreatment and that the temporary camps in Myanmar could become permanent.

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A joint women's hockey team could be the first unified Korean Olympics team ever

The two Koreas took a great stride toward unity when they agreed to consider fielding a joint women's Olympic hockey team. If successful, the unified Korean Olympics team would be monumental in reconciling the alienated sister countries and reducing frontline hostilities. 

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As US tightens stance on migrants and refugees, is Mexico prepared to take more?

Over the past year, some US politicians have talked up the idea of returning foreigners without legal documentation to the 'territory from which they came,' whether or not that's their home. Mexico could bear the brunt, but assessments of its asylum system vary.

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US and Canada hold summit on North Korean nuclear threat

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson meets with US allies to discuss cooperation in heightening pressure on North Korea to discontinue weapons development. Russia and China, though closest diplomatically with North Korea, were not invited to the talks.

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New directive by Pakistani Muslim clerics bans suicide bombings

Pakistani Muslim clerics have banded together to issue a fatwa, or religious ruling, against suicide bombing. The ruling, contained in a book published by a state-run university, opposes extremist action and supports moderate Islam within the country.

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False missile alert raises questions about preparedness

A false missile alert sent Hawaii into a panic on Saturday with many people unsure of how to respond. The incident fueled skepticism of the government's ability to alert residents during a real emergency.

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Pope Francis asks for forgiveness for Chilean priests

Pope Francis apologized during a visit to Chile for the sexual abuse committed by Chilean pastors. The pope's visit has met with protests and skepticism over the church's credibility. 

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'Fools and Mortals' finds Shakespeare's brother taking center stage

As in all the best historical fiction, readers will come away with a seminar's-worth of historical knowledge without feeling like they did any heavy lifting.

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The joy that's ours

A Christian Science perspective: Allowing our hearts to feel God’s joy opens our eyes to more of the infinite good God has for everyone.

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For Senegal island's residents, famed slavery heritage site incurs a cost

Visitors have flocked to Gorée Island, with its memorial to the transatlantic slave trade, since UNESCO designated it a place of 'outstanding universal value.' But locals say the benefits haven't trickled down, echoing a common claim at World Heritage Sites.

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Keeping the American experiment alive

As president, Donald Trump clearly wields huge power. What he does matters, in many cases enormously. But it’s also fair to say that, according to the vision of the Founders, a fixation on Trump – pro or con – is a backward way of addressing America’s challenges.

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Readers write: Birds and their plans, billionaire fights poverty, using proven methods

Letters to the editor for the Jan. 15, 2018 weekly magazine.

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Why presidential language matters

When presidents sort groups of voters – and groups of nations – into categories they like and dislike, the results aren’t always pretty. It’s a tactic that can be wrong, and ineffective, say historians.

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In wake of Fujimori pardon, divided Peru debates meaning of reconciliation

Former President Fujimori received a Christmas Eve pardon on his 25-year sentence for human rights abuses. The government calls it the first step in reconciliation for a still deeply divided country. Protestors took to the streets this week, saying reconciliation looks different to them. 

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Florida races to accommodate influx of Puerto Rican migrants

Hundreds of thousands of migrants from Puerto Rico continue to arrive in Florida in the aftermath of hurricane Maria. The state is working to resettle these new arrivals, many of whom plan on staying permanently. 

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Israel's BDS dilemma: Is it wise to blacklist the boycotters?

Israel intensified its battle with the BDS movement this week, listing 20 groups whose members could not enter the country. Critics say such moves corrode Israeli democracy, doing more harm than the pro-Palestinian boycotters themselves.

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Californian rescue workers 'searching for a miracle'

Rescue workers continue to search for victims after mudslides crashed into homes early Tuesday morning, as the likelihood of finding victims drops.

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Q&A: In St. Louis, the Rev. Darryl Gray is 'praying with my feet'

'If we can be successful in St. Louis as Dr. King and the civil rights leaders were in Selma, it could change this country, as Selma did.' – The Rev. Darryl Gray, civil rights activist

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Acclaimed screenwriter Aaron Sorkin is in the director's chair for 'Molly's Game'

Idris Elba as Molly Bloom's lawyer, Charlie Jaffey, is a highlight of the film. At 140 minutes, “Molly’s Game” is a long sit, made to seem even longer because of Sorkin’s flashback structure.

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Congress raises concerns over Florida drilling exemption

Secretary Zinke's decision to remove Florida from a list of states being considered for offshore drilling has led some lawmakers to question whether the administration has violated federal law. Florida has not opposed the drilling measure, unlike several other states.

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Speaking of America: 'I'm not where I want to be'

After a tumultuous year, a reporter took a cross-country journey to sample Americans' views of their country. Today, a Trump voter in Kentucky finds reason for more hope, but still wants her children to move away. Part 5 of 5.

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Ripple effect of #MeToo in China: Beijing professor dismissed over sexual allegations

Inspired by the #MeToo movement in the United States, a former student of Beihang University in Beijing spoke out against her professor. Her actions, in turn, inspired students from more than 50 universities around the country to do the same.

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Greece's new restrictions on the right to strike leads thousands to protest

Greece's implementation of a series of new reforms has galvanized thousands of Greeks to protest and shut down the city's ability to function. Hospitals, shipping grounds, and transportation systems have been abandoned in the turmoil.

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Africa responds to Trump's vulgar comment

African governments, the African Union, the United Nations, political activists, and others all criticized President Trump's statement about immigrants, with many characterizing it as racist. 

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Now, even some tech firms acknowledge tech's downside

The request by influential shareholders for Apple to help curb excessive digital media use among teens and Mark Zuckerberg's decision to revamp Facebook's newsfeed comes amid a growing discontent over the ways that technology platforms foster habit-forming behavior. Some companies, including Facebook, appear to be listening.

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Tunisia’s revolution, Act 2

Days of protests against austerity in the North African country serve as yet another model for the Arab world on how to tolerate dissent and define the common good in a spirit of equality.

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Building a just society through God’s love

A Christian Science perspective: Holding to everyone’s real identity as the reflection of divine Love is the basis for overcoming social injustice.

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Top Picks: Ryuichi Sakamoto’s 'Async,' the Pod Wrangler app, and more

'Loving Vincent' required more than 100 artists to hand-paint frames of film, a masseuse/healer and a billionaire encounter one another unexpectedly in the film 'Beatriz at Dinner,' and more top picks.

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Cliven Bundy case: How big a problem is prosecutorial misconduct?

Beyond high-profile examples, such as the dismissal 'with prejudice' this week of the Bundy case, the question of how often prosecutorial misconduct occurs now is open to debate – with a former state attorney calling it a “rare event” and a former federal judge calling it an “epidemic.”

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A pang of conscience in Myanmar

The military’s admission of a mass atrocity perpetrated against the minority Rohingya may hint at a desire to end one of the world’s worst cases of human rights abuse.

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The rabbi and the rapper: what they see in old Ladino love songs

The musical duo 'Los Serenos Sefarad' sing and rap in Ladino, an old Spanish dialect. The centuries-old love songs in their repertoire, they say, tell more about Jews' painful expulsion from Spain than they do about romantic love.

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In Namibia's abortion debate, echoes of a repressive history

Opponents argue the restrictions represent a troubled legacy of apartheid rule, echoing debates around Africa about what to do with laws left over from colonial days. Others say they reflect contemporary views in a deeply religious country.

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California mudslides highlight evacuation complexities

Officials faced the difficult task of determining evacuation zones during this week's California mudslides. The mudslides, many in places with voluntary evacuations or no alert at all, killed at least 17 people and destroyed dozens of homes in Santa Barbara County.

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In Venezuelan crisis, gourmet chocolate creates a new hope for some

In a country stunted by recession and a Byzantine bureaucracy, small businesses suffer. Despite this, some Venezuelans have found a way to stay afloat: gourmet chocolate. The country's richness in cacao reserves has created a new economic lifeline for its people.

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Trump opens path for states to require employment for Medicaid recipients

The Trump administration announced a policy shift that would allow states to enforce work requirements for Medicaid recipients. Ten states have already applied for waivers to require work or community involvement.

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