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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



To confront a rising China, what is Trump offering Asian allies?

White House visits this week from India’s Modi and South Korea’s Moon highlight the still unanswered question of whether Trump will have a policy to replace Obama’s Asia pivot.

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Can we restore civility to Washington policy debates?

In many policy debates, the discussion has shifted from criticizing ideas to questioning motives. Can policymakers find their way back to civility?

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10 best books of June: the Monitor's picks

June books are summer books, but that doesn't mean they're not intelligent. Here are 10 new titles that the Monitor's book critics found to be good blends of entertainment and smarts.

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Cardinal leaves Vatican to face sexual abuse charges in Australia

Cardinal Pell is the highest-ranking Vatican official to face charges of sexual assault, adding to the church's long-running sexual abuse scandal and complicating Pope Francis's efforts toward reform amid 'zero tolerance' for sex crimes against children.

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Germany considers law to enforce free speech restrictions on social media

While a proposed German law may have noble intentions – enforcing existing limits on free speech, such as Holocaust denial – critics object that it would pressure online giants such as Facebook and Twitter to delete questionable content before it’s deemed illegal.

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Study shows lack of malaria funding in sub-Saharan Africa

Chad, Congo, and the Central African Republic are among the 'neglected' countries where there is little to no malaria research or funding despite high death rates related to the disease, according to a study released by University of Southampton in England.

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Trump administration releases new limits on US travel

To be eligible, US visa applicants from six mainly Muslim countries must prove a relationship with a ‘close’ family member or business tie. The new criteria follows Monday’s Supreme Court ruling.

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Iraq reclaims Mosul mosque, declares end of ISIS caliphate

The Iraqi military announced Thursday that it has regained control of the historic Grand al-Nuri Mosque from ISIS, claiming its 'fictitious state has fallen.'

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'Toscanini: Musician of Conscience' is a feast of music, culture, politics

Toscanini's life intersected with the lives of a range of fascinating figures, including Puccini, Verdi, Mahler, Horowitz, the relatives of Richard Wagner, and  diabolical characters like Mussolini and Hitler.

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'Giant of the Senate' author Al Franken is back to 'The Funny'

Al Franken's humor is back at full strength in his new book, which is a memoir of the former 'Saturday Night Live' writer's journey to the NBC institution and his more recent time in politics.

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Water for all

A Christian Science perspective: Prayer that acknowledges God’s intelligence and love as here to guide us all brings a change in thought that supports immediate, practical solutions to the world’s needs.

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Emoluments: grinding out or softening up?

A high-flown term for ‘salary’ seems to be rooted in a metaphor of ground grain, but the word’s sound symbolism suggests something else. 

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China spent $100 billion on reforestation. So why does it have 'green deserts'?

Beijing's Grain-for-Green program has helped blanket the country's hillsides with trees, undoing damage from decades of blistering development. But fostering biodiversity remains a challenge, conservationists say.

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How Russia and others use cybercriminals as proxies

US adversaries are offering cyber criminals a bargain: Use your talents for spy agencies, in exchange for legal immunity. One such cybercriminal was involved in the 2016 US election interference.

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How Supreme Court may redefine 'wall of separation' on religion

The clash over differing conceptions of religious liberty and the idea of ‘a wall of separation’ was on full display in Monday’s Trinity Lutheran decision, and more cases are on the docket for next term.

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Cyberwar's new front: What we know about latest global attacks

With two major 'ransomware' outbreaks in as many months, WannaCry and Petya represent a new breed of attacks: malware drawing on NSA-developed cyber weapons let loose by an antagonistic and formidable hacking group. 

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Famine must receive more of the world’s attention

Americans shouldn’t be distracted from addressing one of the world’s great crises: starvation affecting millions.

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After 20 years of Chinese rule, Hong Kong hype marred by pro-democracy tensions

What was once described as ‘one country, two systems’ is now being called ‘one country, 1.5 systems’ as Hong Kong citizens feel increasingly stifled under a tightening Communist grip. 

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Three Chicago officers accused of covering up teen shooting

Appointed special prosecutor Patricia Brown Holmes announced accusations against one current and two former police officers suspected of covering up evidence to protect each other and other officers after the shooting of Laquan McDonald.

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More 'girl heroes' on screen reflect progressive gender attitudes

Young girls are now starring in mainstream action films and TV shows, filling the roles of star characters and heroes traditionally occupied by boys. 

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Helicopter open fires on Venezuelan Supreme Court, but was it staged?

President Maduro classified an assault on Venezuela’s Supreme Court, strafed by a helicopter on Tuesday but injured no one, as a ‘terrorist attack,’ while social media users accused the president of staging the incident as a ruse to crack down on rebellious citizens. 

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Utah representative claims logging could have lessened forest fire damage

Representative Noel attacked 'tree huggers' and poor federal management for the fire at Brian Head, sparking controversy among forestry experts and conservation groups.

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Serbia looks toward modernization with its likely first female prime minister

Ana Brnabic wants to 'move boundaries' as future prime minister of Serbia if confirmed this week, which could include bringing the nation out from the shadow of Russia's influence. 

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'Okja' is a muddled parable that mashes together many genres

The latest from South Korean director Bong Joon-ho is a fable and an action movie, centering on teenager Mija (An Seo-hyun) who is a caretaker for a 'superpig' that is destined for the slaughterhouse.

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'Golden Hill' is a terrific debut historical novel, set in 1746 Manhattan

A stranger bearing a large bill arrives in the small muddy town of colonial New York, and high jinks ensue.

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Loving our neighbor, or just 'walking by'?

A Christian Science perspective: A deeper understanding of what it means to be a ‘neighbor’ inspires courage and love to care for others in need.

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We waited, and it was worth it

Today we can get almost anything, anytime. So why do we need it faster? 

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Supreme Court on Trump's travel ban: Why its tone sounds a bit different

The high court's ruling, which partially allowed the travel ban to take effect, is not a hint of the justices' ultimate decision, so much as it is an expression of the court's adherence to formality.

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Health care: vote delayed, but calls to address costs keep growing

In eight states where insurers have already formalized their proposed rates for 2018, premiums are headed upward by an average of 18 percent next year, according to analysis by health consulting firm Avalere.

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Test Drive: New Hampshire teachers build new ways to measure deeper learning

Schools across the country are watching as some New Hampshire schools start relying less on standardized testing and more on performance-based assessments.

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Bestselling books the week of 6/22/17, according to IndieBound

What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

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When auto insurance becomes a social-justice question

Car insurance costs notably more in predominantly African-American neighborhoods, studies conclude. In Detroit, the mayor and citizens seek a fix for sky-high premiums.

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Saudi youth move? Why crown prince may struggle to win over young subjects.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, more an economic reformer than a social one, is charged with helping ensure the House of Saud’s hold on power.

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A cold shoulder to Cuba

President Trump’s dramatic announcement of a new policy looks more like another tweak in a long line of efforts to get the Castro regime to reform or step down.

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How information overload helps spread fake news

Mathematical modeling of social networks reveals how misinformation finds its way to the top – and offers clues for how to dampen the spread of false information.

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Senate leaders work to unite GOP to approve health care bill

The Congressional Budget Office report released Monday has wavered GOP support for the health care bill. Just three 'no' votes from 'rebellious Republicans' could kill the bill.

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US mayors unite to lead cities in the fight against climate change

After President Trump's withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, US mayors gather at annual conference to pledge their cities' efforts in combating global warming.

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China passes new intelligence law to 'ensure nation's security interests are met'

A Chinese intelligence law quickly passed on Tuesday is part of a raft of legislation in the country that will expand government powers to monitor, raid, and seize property. 

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Five weeks after ISIS captured town, residents forced to serve, marry, and fight for militants

In a report Tuesday, the Army cited seven accounts of escaped or rescued hostages detailing the conditions of Marawi, Philippines, where civilians are being forced to convert to Islam.

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Would France's counter-terrorism bill violate public freedoms or protect its citizens?

In an attempt to end the nation's state of emergency in effect since the 2015 terror attack, a proposed bill wants to expand police power. But Human Rights Watch says the law will lead to anti-Muslim rhetoric and fan societal prejudices.

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