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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



Why origami machines may unlock secrets of Mars and the universe

More than a mere pastime, the tools of origami are leaping off the page and into the realms of engineering and manufacturing. 

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Tim Allen, conservatives in Hollywood, and Nazi Germany (+video)

The comedian is one of a number of conservatives in Hollywood to attest to a climate that oppresses and punishes their views. The comparison to the Third Reich is anything but apt, historians say – but the industry's relationship with politics is a complicated one.

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Could conservation provide ground for peace in conflict zones?

Some things, like birds, transcend political boundaries. That's why some scientists say conservation of the natural world could promote peace among humans.

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Can you tally up world progress?

The UN’s latest index on human development reveals ‘impressive’ results in well-being. But it also suggests that immeasurable qualities are necessary for progress.

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After ISIS: For Iraqis, reconciliation in Mosul will be challenging, and vital

The goal of post-ISIS reconciliation in multi-ethnic Mosul is to avoid the sectarian fighting and Sunni disenfranchisement that helped spawn the jihadist movement and spread its reach in the first place.

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‘Dare to be tender’: One year after attack, Belgian king urges kindness

Belgians gathered on Wednesday in solace and remembrance of the 32 people who lost their lives during a series of suicide bombing attacks on March 22, 2016.

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What we know about Trump team Russia links – and why that matters

The White House moves to disassociate itself from four Trump associates linked to Russia. A new report suggests that one of them, former campaign chair Paul Manafort, secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to help Vladimir Putin.   

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Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort received millions to promote Putin (+video)

An Associated Press investigation finds ties between Manafort and Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Putin's, stretching back to at least 2005.

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In unanimous decision, Supreme Court raises bar for special education (+video)

The ruling could bring major benefits to students with disabilities – especially those with 'individualized education programs,' or IEPs.

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'Zootopia' lawsuit says basis for film was stolen from 'Total Recall' writer

Gary Goldman says he initially pitched ideas and character designs that wound up in the Disney hit 'Zootopia,' which grossed more than $341 million at the domestic box office.

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Calif. class action suit alleges 'unfair competition' with Ivanka Trump brand

Ivanka Trump's fashion brand is facing a class action lawsuit brought by a California boutique, claiming that the first daughter's close relationship to the president and role in the administration gives her business an unfair advantage. 

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Data didn't change tech's frat-boy culture. Will storytelling?

Some high-tech firms are finding that storytelling and empathy create far more buy-in for diversity than reams of data about its boost to innovation and profits.

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Supreme Court tightens restrictions on presidential appointments

This ruling could narrow the president’s nominating authority, say experts. But it's not clear what effect it will have on the slow progress filling vacant spots in the executive branch.

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What is known so far about terrorist attack outside London's Parliament (+video)

A counterterrorism investigation into the incident is already under way.

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Germany set to deport native-born potential terrorists

Germany will deport German-born children of immigrants, following concerns that they may have been considering terrorist activity, a court ruled Tuesday. 

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US infant mortality rate declines, but disparities remain

After hitting a record high in 2005, the rate of infant mortality in the United States has steadily declined.

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Wiser from his past, a former gang member in Nicaragua helps at-risk kids

Jairo Blanchard has organized a soccer league and other activities through his nonprofit, Recreación Sana. An estimated 800 children in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, take part.

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Mother Ganges: Can human rights save India's sacred river?

An Indian court granted the Ganges River and one of its main tributaries the status of legal personhood, granting environmentalists a key tool to clean up the sacred waters. But advocates worry the new legal status may not be enough.

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Fossilized shrimp joins band of species named for naturalist David Attenborough

Cascolus ravitis, a Latinized reference to the famed naturalist and BBC presenter David Attenborough, is the name given to a newly discovered ancient crustacean that was a precursor to modern shrimp, lobsters, and crabs.

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Finally – giving women artists their due

In 'Broad Strokes,' historian Bridget Quinn remembers forgotten female painters and sculptors.

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New Fox show 'Shots Fired' delves into the justice system and race

'Shots,' which premieres on March 22, depicts two deaths likely linked to a sheriff's department – one of which receives far more attention from the government. Sanaa Lathan and Stephan James star in the 10-episode series.

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Gorsuch hearings: Should agencies – or courts – decide the law?

Judge Neil Gorsuch is one of the most prominent critics of a legal doctrine that gives the power to federal agencies to interpret regulations. Scaling it back could also have significant repercussions for President Donald Trump.

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Bestselling books the week of 3/23/17, according to IndieBound

What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

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What is Facebook's responsibility when people broadcast crimes? (+video)

The apparent assault of a Chicago teenager was broadcast on Facebook Live, but no one reported it through the Facebook system designed to review inappropriate content. 

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How technology tramples on freedom

Rapid advances in biometric technology mean the public is surveilled – and their movements recorded – more than ever before. If this technology spreads without limits, it could soon impinge on basic rights.

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Could this be the end of Sears and Kmart? Parent company raises red flag.

Once a hallmark of the post-World War II consumer boom, Sears hasn't turned a profit since 2011.

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A hacker's guide to fixing automotive cybersecurity

The security researcher known for hacking a 2014 Jeep Cherokee, leading to a 1.4 million-vehicle recall, outlines how automakers can keep connected cars safe from cyberattacks.

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Rusty-patched bee finally gets its endangered listing

After many delays, the bumblebee has finally become the first in the continental US to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

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With budget boost, Trump shifts NASA's gaze from Earth to Mars

For the most part, NASA has avoided the deep cuts that the Trump administration has proposed for other research agencies. This authorization bill continues that trend, but doesn’t yet have scientists breathing a sigh of relief.

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North Korea's latest missile launch failed. How often does that happen? (+video)

The results of North Korea's missile tests have been mixed. According to a recent investigation, the United States is partially responsible for the comparatively high failure rate.

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How Washington evaluates software vulnerabilities

The US government keeps some security flaws for itself. We take a look inside the secretive process to decide which ones to keep - and which ones to reveal to tech companies.

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How millennials can learn from boomers' retirement planning mistakes

On average, the baby boomer generation is significantly under-saved for retirement. It’s not too late for millennials to change way we think about retirement so we can avoid making the same mistakes that our parents’ generation did.

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Passcode signs off

The Monitor’s cybersecurity and privacy project ends March 31.

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'No One Cares About Crazy People' cries for more attention for the mentally ill

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Ron Powers draws on heart-wrenching personal experience in writing about the way society treats the mentally ill.

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The fruitage of prayer

A Christian Science perspective: Putting the understanding of God being Spirit into practice.

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Butterscotch and chocolate chip cookies

A surprising discovery: leaving the dough in the refrigerator overnight yielded delicious results.

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A freight train sings me an iron lullaby

The screech of the rails, the blast of the horn say all is well.

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How Galápagos giant tortoises have made a comeback

As many as 300,000 giant tortoises once roamed the Galápagos Islands, but that number went down by about 90 percent. Here's a rundown of innovative conservation strategies that are enabling the restoration of tortoise populations.

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Why the airline 'electronics ban' may not be discrimination (+video)

The policy's timing and targeted locations have prompted concerns that the ban was motivated by anti-Muslim rhetoric. But security experts aren't so quick to denounce the move.

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Are you a speed shopper or browser? New Target stores to accommodate both (+video)

Years after the start of the e-commerce revolution, American shoppers don't just want web options – they want it all online and in stores, and all at the same time. Retail giants are racing to keep up.

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