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Updated: 2017-09-22T00:00:00+00:00

 



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 206

2017-09-22T00:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 206 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 206Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 206. Question 1 What condition is Ewart on the left, Conner on the right and when those two disappear Bamberger is present? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Pericardial effusion While percussing the posterior chest, dullness at the left lower lung field is Ewart’s sign of pericardial effusion, while right-sided dullness is Conner’s sign. Disappearance of Ewart’s or Conner’s signs when the patient sits up and leans forward is Bamberger’s sign of pericardial effusion. [Reference] Question 2 A young male keeps presenting with low back pain, you suspect they are drug seeking but before you aim to try and manage their chronic pain you take an X-ray. What is the diagnosis? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Bertolotti’s syndrome It is an atypical cause of low back pain or buttock pain caused by a transitional lumbar vertebrae with a large, “spatulated” transverse process that either fuses with the sacrum (sacral ala) or ilium, or forms a pseudo-articulation at that location (Seen on a lumbar spine AP X-ray). This is a congenital abnormality, but doesn’t usually become symptomatic until a patient’s 20’s or 30’s. [Reference] Question 3 Who is patient zero? + Reveal the funtabulous answer! One of the most demonised patients in history – Gaetan Dugas – for spreading HIV to the US Initially, however, the CDC researcher, who was studying cases in Los Angeles, California, referred to Dugas not as “patient zero”, but as “patient O”, the letter “O” standing for “outside California” and subsequently the term “patient zero” was born. In 2016 Nature published a report from Dr. Michael Worobey’s team who conducted a genetic study that looked at blood samples taken from gay and bisexual men in 1978 and 1979 as part of a hepatitis B study, and based on the results of the data, concluded that Dugas was not the source of the virus in the U.S. “On the family tree of the virus, Dugas fell in the middle, not at the beginning.” [Reference] Question 4 What is the medical term for someone who has a severe case of ‘ants in their pants’ after being given a dose of metoclopramide? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Akathisia – a syndrome characterized by an inability to remain seated, with motor restlessness and a feeling of muscular quivering; may appear as a side effect of antipsychotic and neuroleptic medication. Question 5 What hereditary condition is associated with a urinary odour of swimming pools? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Hawkinsinuria, also called 4-Alpha-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase deficiency, is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder affecting the metabolism of tyrosine. Patients present with metabolic acidosis during the first year of life, which should be treated by a phenylalanine- and tyrosine-restricted diet. The tolerance toward these amino acids normalizes as the patients get older. Then only a chlorine-like smell of the urine indicates the presence of the condition, patients have a normal life and do not require treatment or a special diet. [Reference] Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 206Neil Long [...]



Jellybean 77 Paul Middleton chats with RollCageMedic

2017-09-19T00:27:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In Australia alone thousands of people have an out of hospital cardiac arrest each year. Only 10% survive. It’s a very scary and dangerous rollercoaster. No better place to talk about that than under a real roller-coaster under the Sydney Harbour Bridge with Paul Middleton. Jellybean 77 Paul Middleton chats with RollCageMedicDoug LynchLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In Australia alone thousands of people have an out of hospital cardiac arrest each year. Only 10% survive. It’s a very scary and dangerous rollercoaster. No better place to talk about that than under a real roller-coaster under the Sydney Harbour Bridge with Paul Middleton. Matt went to Luna Park in Sydney a few weeks back. Not to ride the roller coaster nor knock coconuts off their stands for a teddy bear, but to attend the Resus@ThePark conference. He took a few minutes to sit down outside in the sunshine with Paul Middleton the conference convenor. Of course there was hammering and drilling as some adjustments were made to the Vivid Sydney Festival set up. Which was quite fitting as Paul Middleton (@Scientosis) is building something too. A future in which anyone who has a cardiac arrest in Australia is likely to get effective bystander CPR and defibrillation. We know this stuff is important. We know that early CPR and defib makes a difference. As a former Australian Resuscitation Council (New South Wales) Chair Paul understands that this is a team sport. A big team. So now he is trying to drive change in the greater community through the charity Take Heart Australia. This means getting almost everyone in the country to realise that cardiac arrest affects everyone and that everyone has a role in helping. Everyone is a responder. We also know that even as nurses, doctors and paramedics it’s just not that easy to ‘shock’ someone, especially the first time you do it. So whats the first thing Paul needs to do to get 24 million Australians over the fear of stepping in, the fear of electrocuting people? Ask for help of course! It is no small thing trying to bring about change on a huge scale. This is a public health initiative with parallels with what Mark Wilson is trying to do with the GoodSam App. (See Jellybean 55 with Mark Wilson from SMACCdub) Mark spoke ‘via satellite’ to the audience at Luna Park. Such imaginative approaches are to be encouraged. Or would you rather sit back and wait for a government funded public health campaign to sort it all out? Nothing wrong with a grass roots movement. Resus@ThePark will be back next year. Check it out. All Jellybeans are available on iTunes, Stitcher and SoundCloud. Check out the links below. Big thank you to David Gedge and the Wedding Present with their 1990 version the Cockney Rebel Classic “Make Me Smile” from their Corduroy EP Further Reading Take Heart Australia Vivid Australia Resus @ The Park Further Listening iTunes JellyBean Podcast link Stitcher JellyBean Podcast link Last update: Sep 19, 2017 @ 8:44 am Jellybean 77 Paul Middleton chats with RollCageMedicDoug Lynch [...]



Mastering Intensive Care 016 with Charles Gomersall

2017-09-18T06:28:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Andrew Davies talks to Charles Gomersall -about mastering intensive care while training junior doctors in the BASIC practice of intensive care medicine Mastering Intensive Care 016 with Charles GomersallChris NicksonLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Charles Gomersall – Training junior doctors in the BASIC practice of intensive care How did you feel the first day you worked in ICU? Was it like walking on the moon? So foreign, because you didn’t understand much about the machines, the techniques, or even the words that were being used. That’s what it felt like for me, all those years ago. Thanks to one of my consultants who really “held my hand” on that first day, I was OK, but I wish I could have completed a BASIC course like most resident doctors in Australia (and many other countries) do today when they start their term in intensive care. The BASIC course that those resident doctors now complete is mostly due to the efforts of Charles Gomersall. Over a decade ago, he realised the difficulties these junior doctors had in understanding what the Intensive Care consultants were both talking about and doing, so with a bunch of friends he set up BASIC (The Basic Assessment & Support in Intensive Care) course with the aim to teach participants, over 2 days, to rapidly assess seriously ill patients and provide initial treatment and organ support. Topics like airway management, acute respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation, haemodynamic monitoring, management of shock, interpretation of arterial blood gases, transport of critically ill patients, severe trauma, neurological emergencies, oliguria & acute renal failure, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, arrhythmias, nutrition, sedation and analgesia, etc. This week my guest is Charles who is Professor in the Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. In his words, his minor claims to fame are persuading some friends to write the BASIC course and denying a British prime minister entry to a London Intensive Care Unit, and his remaining ambition is to become a professional chef. That’s all he wanted me to say about his background but let me say that having resident doctors rapidly brought up to speed on basic intensive care skills and practice, mostly so that they can feel comfortable at the ICU bedside in their first few weeks, is something I think is hugely valuable, not only to them, but also to me as a consultant and especially our patients. So that makes Charles a hero in my eyes. Of course, BASIC has gone on to now consist of many other courses, which now help up-skill nurses, medical students, advanced trainees, consultants (by providing refresher courses) in many countries, including in the developing world. So I think Charles is a legendary educator, an inspiring leader and an outstanding clinician. He is softly spoken, humble, unassuming but incredibly well considered. He powerfully helps the patients in his own ICU and dramatically helps patients all around the world by providing BASIC. What a master. In this week’s episode you will hear all about the BASIC course, how it came to be, and where it is right now in amongst the other work of the BASIC Collaborative. You’ll also hear Charles speak about: How he became both a doctor and an intensivist by accident How difficult it is to objectively judge the value of education The prime importance of putting the patient first in clinical, academic and educational practice Understanding the good and bad that surrounds us in our Intensive Care department culture How ICU specialists are like the hotel concierge of the hospital How paying back the support we received as trainees to our upcoming trainees [...]



LITFL Review 298

2017-09-17T20:51:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 298th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 298Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 298th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The UK Intensive Care Society recently had a meeting focusing on burnout. All the podcasts have been made #foamed- start with this one by LJ Mottram on the evidence for workplace stress in ICU, and read her accompanying blog post. [SO]  The first podcast from The Don’t forget the bubbles conference is up- listen to Mary Freer talk about compassionate healthcare. [SO]  The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Dr Smith has a wide complex tachycardia case that may surprise you. [MG] Emergency Medicine Cases has a great introduction to disaster medicine. [MG] How on earth should you repair a tongue laceration? Find out, from another EM:RAP FOAM segment  The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care Phemcast explore the utility of end tidal CO2 in the prehospital and critical care realms. [MG] Scott Weingart discusses intubating the Neurocritical care patient– an excellent compilation of points. [SO] I reviewed the recent paper on Time to treatment and mortality during emergency care in Sepsis along with my team mates at The Bottom Line. [SO] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation The Resus Room podcasts explores recent literature on the role of bicarb in cardiac arrest. [MG] This blog on the simple topic of cannula extension sets is thought provoking.  Marginal gains in the resus room can mean the big difference to outcome.  [CC] The Best of #FOAMtox Toxicology EM:RAP has a FOAM segment this month, exploring dextromethorphan overdose. [MG] Josh Farkas talks us through a case of ketamine tolerance and looks through the evidence behind it.  I’m yet to experience it in my practice.  Are you? [CC] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound What’s the evidence for the 60/60 sign in acute PE? David Slessor discusses the original 2002 paper for The Bottom Line. [SO] The Best of Medical Education and Social Media The EM Clerkship podcast has an overview of tachycardia geared toward medical students. [MG] This Week’s Roshcast has boards review questions on VF, WPW, TBI and more [MG] News from the Fast Lane Check out what’s new amongst the 1,650+ pages of the Critical Care Compendium in CCC Update 014 [CN] Reference Sources and Reading List Emergency Medicine and Critical Care blog/podcast list LITFL Global Blogroll FOAMEM RSS feed syndication for global FOAM #FOAMed – #FOAMcc – #FOAMres #FOAMped – #FOAMtox – #FOAMus – #FOAMim – #FOANed Brought to you by: Anand Swaminathan [AS] (EM:RAP, Core EM,REBEL EM and The Teaching Institute) Chris Connolly [CC] (RCEMFOAMed, FOAMShED) Chris Nickson [CN] ( iTeachEM, RAGE, INTENSIVE and SMACC) Jesse Spurr [JS] (Injectable Orange, Simulcast, The Teaching Institute) Marjorie Lazoff [ML] (TandemHealth) Mat Goebel [MG] Salim Rezaie [SR] (REBEL EM, The Teaching Institute) Segun Olusanya [SO] (JICSCast, The Bottom Line) Last update: Sep 19, 2017 @ 8:45 am LITFL Review 298Marjorie Lazoff, MD [...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205

2017-09-15T07:23:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205. Question 1 Meigs’ Syndrome resolves after removal of the tumour. What is the classic triad of Meigs’ Syndrome? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer The triad of ascites, pleural effusion and a benign ovarian tumour (ovarian fibroma, fibrothecoma, Brenner tumour, and occasionally granulose cell tumour). Named after Joe Vincent Meigs an American obstetrician and gynaecologist. [Reference]  Question 2 Aspergillus was first catalogued in 1729 by the Italian priest and biologist Pier Antonio Micheli. Viewing the fungi under a microscope, Micheli was reminded of the shape of an aspergillum (holy water sprinkler), from Latin spargere (to sprinkle), and named the genus accordingly. What are the five main diseases aspergillum can produce in humans? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Sinusitis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis – a condition characterised by an exaggerated response of the immune system to the Aspergillus. It occurs most often in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Aspergilloma, a “fungus ball” that can form within cavities such as the lung. Invasive aspergillosis – spreads throughout the body. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (malt workers lung) – from mouldy barley leading to a Type III hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity. Question 3 A male presents to you with recurrent chest infections, otitis media, infertility and quiet heart sounds on the left side of his chest. What genetic disease does he have? + Reveal the funtabulous answer! Primary ciliary dyskinesia (or Kartagener syndrome). It is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive disorder that causes defects in the action of cilia lining the respiratory tract (lower and upper, sinuses, Eustachian tube, middle ear), fallopian tube and flagella of the sperm cell. Siewert first described the classic triad of situs inversus, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis in 1904. However, Manes Kartagener  first recognized this clinical triad as a distinct congenital syndrome in 1933. Because Kartagener described this syndrome in detail, it bears his name. [Reference] Question 4 What is the relevance of the myth of Prometheus to cirrhosis of the liver?http://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/prometheus-eagle-eating-liver.jpg + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Prometheus was chained to a mountain and every eagle would visit him and eat his liver as punishment from the Olympian Gods for having given fire to humankind. Everyday his liver would grow back. What has this got to do with cirrhosis? There are many causes (many eagles), the liver has considerable powers of regeneration (it grows back), and it is often traced back to something that in retrospect really wasn’t a very good idea – such as excessive alcohol consumption, IV drug abuse or sex (giving fire to humankind)… Credit: Tim Koelmeyer Question 5 How is Calabar (in modern times, a city in Nigeria) related to Argyll Robertson pupils? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Argyll Robertson was consulted by a patient who lived in ‘Old Calabar’ about the ‘Calabar swellings’ that affected her eyes. He extracted filiarial Loa loa worms f[...]



Jellybean 76 with Rinaldo Bellomo

2017-09-12T13:35:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog What is the future of Artificial Intelligence and critical care medicine? I ask Rinaldo Bellomo after 30 years at the pointy end of critical care research Jellybean 76 with Rinaldo BellomoDoug LynchLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog What is the future of Artificial Intelligence and critical care medicine? I ask Rinaldo Bellomo who, for the past 30 years, has been at the pointy end of critical care research including high technology and predictive algorithms. I managed to get Rinaldo Bellomo to talk to me at SMACC in Berlin. It was a bit of an intellectual mismatch. If you work in intensive care then you know who this man is. If you don’t work in intensive care you may somehow be unaware of the 1000+ articles he has authored, the gazillions of dollars of research grants he has won, the 150 conferences he has given talks at. From where I am standing it looks like he invented the kidney before he invented renal replacement therapy, before he invented every study ever about CRRT. I may be exaggerating there, there were some studies by other people. The great thing about Rinaldo is that he got to where he is with a child like enthusiasm and a wicked sense of humour. That is the sort of thing that makes a good Jellybean. So what do you talk to a man who has over 1000 PubMed citations about, I mean if I try to reference any studies he may well have published them as editor of Critical Care and Resuscitation, he may have reviewed them or he may have mentored the researcher. Otherwise he wrote almost all the remaining contents of PubMed. So I thought I might need to artificially enhance my own intelligence to be able to stand up to this bloke. Artificial Intelligence in medicine is a thing at the moment, we hear about Google investing in it and apps replacing GP consultations. As it happens Rinaldo has been working and publishing on this from the critical care stand point. Now if I was running Google I would have tried to interact with Rinaldo already. I presume organisations with those sorts of resources are constantly looking at research like his and seeing how they can use it. So I asked the Professor about artificial intelligence in medicine. I asked him how you deal with an approach from these enormous companies because he has had them. Then he gets going. I can hardly get a word in edge-ways. Which is a good thing. We try to get all Aldous Huxley about it. It is an interesting chat It’s all about humans at the end of the day. Rinaldo is just human too, how does he keep the studies coming, why does he keep working at it? Turns out it’s the voices in his head, this is his hobby, his passion and if you try to take this away from him he will at least be grumpy and possibly a lot more than grumpy. To finish off we started talking about dasSMACC and his debate with Peter Brindley on MeSearch vs Research. Trying to keep up with Peter Brindley without tripping up is pretty hard. Rinaldo nailed it. We pick apart the risks of doing that and the risks of using risqué humour. There was one joke which missed the mark about Irish people but in truth that moment really just spurred me on to get Rinaldo in on the podcast. This is a good one. He thinks and talks faster than me so see if you can get it on iTunes or any podcast player that you allows you to play it at half speed. Rinaldo Bellomo; living legend. References Bellomo, R. et al. A controlled trial of electronic automated advisory vital signs monitoring in general hospital wards. Crit Care Med. 2012 Aug;40(8):2349-61. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e318255d9a0. [PMID 22809908] Subbe CP, Duller B, Bellomo R. Effect of an automated notification system for de[...]



CCC Update 015

2017-09-11T03:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

New in the CCC: spontaneous breathing & mech ventilation, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), trismus, urine drug screens, and antimicrobial dosing & kill characteristics

CCC Update 015
Chris Nickson

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Updates to the CCC are still happening – sometimes I even find time to tell people about them…

Keep the feedback coming on this free guide to Critical Care encompassing over 1650 pages.

Here are some major updates since CCC Update 014:

Antimicrobial dosing and kill characteristics

A topic much loved by the CICM Fellowship examiners… and with good reason, it is important stuff! there is no point giving antibiotics if they don’t kill bacteria – getting the dosing and timing right is essential.

Spontaneous breathing and mechanical ventilation

Eventually, every mechanically ventilated ICU patient that survives needs to start breathing for themselves. However, timing is everything and there are pros and cons to spontaneous breathing during mechanical ventilation. How can we ensure it is safe?

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

Which drugs should you do it for and when? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring is probably under utilized in critically ill patients and is especially important for antibiotics and transplant immunosuppression.

Trismus and restricted mouth opening

Trismus can be scary for the patient and for the treating physician. This page emphasizes the differential diagnosis, complications, and treatment from the viewpoint of critical care and airway management.

Urine drug screen

The bane of the clinical toxicologist… Urine drug screens rarely change the management of acute toxicological cases and have numerous limitations. These include variations in the drugs assayed, false positives and negatives, and prolonged detection times. Perhaps their biggest limitation is a lack of awareness of their limitations by doctors…

CCC Update 015
Chris Nickson

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LITFL Review 297

2017-09-10T20:47:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 297th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 297Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 297th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Cliff Reid discusses the role of the Emergency Physician as a leader in reducing the burden of suffering–not just for patients but for family, providers and staff. [AS]  The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine First10EM features an excellent dive into the evidence behind calcium channel blockers and adenosine in the treatment of SVT. [AS] Scancrit carries a great review of the DET2OX-SWEDEHEART study.  Oxygen in MI, 6000 patients, primary endpoint death……what do you reckon? [CC]  The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care I reviewed the recent paper on Time to treatment and mortality during emergency care in Sepsis along with my team mates at The Bottom Line. [SO] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation Scott Weingart discusses an interesting case that can be used to test your resus room logistics. [SO] The Best of Medical Education and Social Media Think you’re a good medical leader?  Think it has a positive effect? In what way?  CanadiEM give a short review on a really interesting paper on leadership style and patient safety. [CC] News from the Fast Lane Check out what’s new amongst the 1,650+ pages of the Critical Care Compendium in CCC Update 014 [CN] Reference Sources and Reading List Emergency Medicine and Critical Care blog/podcast list LITFL Global Blogroll FOAMEM RSS feed syndication for global FOAM #FOAMed – #FOAMcc – #FOAMres #FOAMped – #FOAMtox – #FOAMus – #FOAMim – #FOANed Brought to you by: Anand Swaminathan [AS] (EM:RAP, Core EM,REBEL EM and The Teaching Institute) Chris Connolly [CC] (RCEMFOAMed, FOAMShED) Chris Nickson [CN] ( iTeachEM, RAGE, INTENSIVE and SMACC) Jesse Spurr [JS] (Injectable Orange, Simulcast, The Teaching Institute) Marjorie Lazoff [ML] (TandemHealth) Mat Goebel [MG] Salim Rezaie [SR] (REBEL EM, The Teaching Institute) Segun Olusanya [SO] (JICSCast, The Bottom Line) Last update: Sep 12, 2017 @ 11:46 am LITFL Review 297Marjorie Lazoff, MD [...]



UCEM rejects claims that it is stupidist

2017-09-08T04:36:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Despite unheralded efforts on behalf of the college there is still a subgroup of people who appear actively discriminated against during the Fellowship examination process. The unprepared. UCEM rejects claims that it is stupidistMike CadoganLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The Utopian College of Emergency for Medicine has hurriedly become an advocate of/for political correctness. Over the last 9½ months the college has engaged the College Executive, its fondling members, graduands and community health leaders globally to help stamp out direct and indirect discrimination in all forms. The College has implemented the recommendations of 27 working parties, 13 steering groups and 14 secretariats; engaged multiple Utopian stakeholders and set countless KPI’s in unobtanium perpetuum yet still has been deemed to have fallen short in one specific area – the Fellowship examination. Despite unheralded efforts on behalf of the college there is still a subgroup of people who appear actively discriminated against during the Fellowship examination process. The under-prepared. The College has been unable to find a way to remove the perceived bias against those candidates who fail do not manage to attain the required standard during subjective/objective/cumulative/simulated/ independently reviewed assessments and has therefore developed an UCEM Participation (Equality) Award. The written examination Over the last 50 years the College has relied on a written examination testing a candidates knowledge of X-ray, ECG, clinical image and laboratory results interpretation. Examination had been in the form of short answers, multiple choice questions and essay writing. However, the latest examinations have been re-written and manipulated to reduce discrimination. The multiple choice examination was felt to be numberist and letterist. Now, for the sake of equality, candidates are presented with a single stem response to choose from. Where more than one potential response is presented these will not be lettered or numbered and any/all responses provided will be marked in the affirmative as all answers are deemed equally correct. The short answer and essay component of the examination have been converted to single word responses to reduce the discriminatory impact of sentence structure. Where a more detailed response is required the accumulation of words provided will be translated into ancient Greek and presented to the examiner as a haiku . The oral examination The secretariat for enunciative egalitarianism suggested a degree of two-way indirect discrimination may occur during the examination process. As a result, the prosodic features of intonation and inflection such as tone, pitch, loudness and tempo are subdued with the Monotonous Anti-Discriminatory Ambiguous Speech Scrambler (MAD-ASS TM). This removes contextual speech pattern recognition from the examination process and prevents inflection-interference proffered by the examiner/patient. Humanistic interaction through speech which may be perceived as belittling, demeaning, questioning, encouraging or re-assuring will no longer impact the candidate. The anti-aesthetic visual discrimination working party reported from their Bali retreat, that in some circumstances it may be possible to determine a persons race, creed, skin colour, sex, height, odour, weight and aesthetics…just by looking at them. To prevent injustice and bias introduced by the visual assault of a candidates physical appearance the college has introduced the Triple-blind Amorphous Blob Interactive Simu[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204

2017-09-07T22:47:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204. Question 1 Richard Doll published an epidemiology paper in 1950. What had he discovered? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer The link between smoking and lung cancer Initially the research team thought lung cancer was due to car fumes or tarmac. On discovering the link between smoking and lung cancer he quickly gave up his habit thereafter. [Reference] Question 2 A junior member of your team is working up a patient with pyrexia of unknown origin. They show you this picture they’ve managed to acquire on their smart phone of the patient’s retina. What sign have they found?http://jaoa.org/article.aspx?articleid=2094475 + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Roth spots, named after Moritz Roth who identified the spots in 1872. They are retinal haemorrhages with white or pale centers. They can be composed of coagulated fibrin including platelets, focal ischemia, inflammatory infiltrate, infectious organisms, or neoplastic cells. Roth’s spots may be observed in leukaemia, diabetes, subacute bacterial endocarditis, pernicious anaemia, ischaemic events, hypertensive retinopathy and rarely in HIV retinopathy. Question 3 Your junior returns after seeing the patient again in question 2. While doing the blood cultures the patient stated that they forgot to mention they had SLE. What type of endocarditis could this patient be at risk for? + Reveal the funtabulous answer! Libman-Sacks endocarditis It is a form of nonbacterial endocarditis that is seen in association with SLE. The vegetations are small and are formed from strands of fibrin, neutrophils, lymphocytes and histiocytes typically on the mitral valve. Libman–Sacks lesions rarely produce significant valve dysfunction and the lesions only rarely embolise. Question 4 From what disease did J.F. Kennedy suffer? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Addison’s Disease Addison’s disease is named after Thomas Addison, the British physician who first described the condition in On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules (1855). [Reference] All of Addison’s six original patients had tuberculosis of the adrenal glands. Question 5 What was the ‘ring of roses’ in the childhood nursery rhyme? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer A bubo of the bubonic plague (hence ‘we all fall down’). Bubonic plague is one of three types of bacterial infection caused by Yersinia pestis In the bubonic form of plague, the bacteria enter through the skin through a flea bite and travel via the lymphatic vessels to a lymph node causing it to swell and sometimes burst. Globally there are about 650 documented cases a year which result in ~120 deaths, most commonly in Africa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubonic_plague Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204Neil Long [...]



Jellybean 075 with Little Medic Aidan Baron

2017-09-05T04:37:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Government #FOAMed Warning; Life in the Fast Lane is apparently addictive. You have been warned. (It’s Jellybean 075 with Aidan Baron; @ALittleMedic ) Jellybean 075 with Little Medic Aidan BaronDoug LynchLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Government #FOAMed Warning; Life in the Fast Lane is apparently addictive. You have been warned. (It’s Jellybean 075 with Aidan Baron; @ALittleMedic ) Aidan Baron is not really that little when you meet him. He is quite big. If you do twitter you will have noticed this man before. I had doubts that he really existed. Was he something like Max Headroom or Ultron or Hobbs? No! He is a lovely man! He is a lovely man that has been enthusiastic about Para-medicine since, like, forever! Being a self confessed social media nerd he was way ahead of that curve when he stumbled upon all the #FOAMed fuss! He reached out to some of the people that he really admired, people like Cliff Reid (@cliffreid) and the rest is history. So lets get stuck in to some of his areas of interest because, basically, they are interesting. Even before paramedic training Aidan had a strong focus on ultrasound and #POCUS. He is a proper enthusiast too, he brought an ultrasound machine with him to Nepal just after he left school. Then it started to snow ball and ultrasound seems to have become a great partner in his training journey. The next thing you know he is writing a Masters on U/S and Paramedics. He is pushing paramedic research forward and using the SoMe skills he has gained to contribute. He has also recently spoken at the DFTB17 conference on the matter of LGBTQIA access to healthcare. “Communicating with every colour of the rainbow.” is the title. The DFTB People are releasing talks from next month so see if you can find it, follow the blog or put dontforgetthebubbles.com in “Feedly” or whatever you do. It is topical stuff as the Liberal-National Australian Government is presently trying to stir up homophobia to complement their established excellence in the areas of racism and the multi-modal torture of asylum seekers. Aidan is one of the good guys. Check him out and check out Fake Thom too. Little Medic Blog Paramedic Research @FakeThom (Thom O’Neill) YouTube Doctor ThomONeill DFTB The identity of Youth LGBTQ References iTunes JellyBean Podcast link Stitcher JellyBean Podcast link Last update: Sep 5, 2017 @ 12:38 pm Jellybean 075 with Little Medic Aidan BaronDoug Lynch [...]



LITFL Review 296

2017-09-03T21:51:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 296th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 296Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 296th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Casey Parker writes a magnificent piece, focusing not only on the science but on the humanity and compassion in medicine.  [SR]    The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicin A pair of great resources on Delirium in ED, an underdiagnosed life threatening emergency with the awesome CrackCast from the CanadiEM guys and a blog post from the ACCS Survivor. [CC] The University of Maryland has a quick read about concussion outcomes. [MG] Dr Smith features another case of wide complex rhythm. [MG] The August summary of the Annals of Emergency Medicine is out! [MG] Get some core content on hypertension from FOAMCast. [MG] Learn about troublesome tracheostomies at Taming the SRU. [MG] Another trial has been published exploring the efficacy of supplemental oxygen in myocardial infarction- trust Rory Spiegel to talk us through the DETO2X trial. [SO]  The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care The Bottom Line discuss a classic trial: the POISE trial which looked at perioperative beta-blockade. Lovely work from Peter Szedlak. [SO] The latest Master in Intensive Care to talk to Andrew Davies is Peter Brindley– discussing burnout and being a good person. [SO] Michael Allison discusses volume responsiveness in the critically ill via the Maryland CCP. [SO] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation Josh Farkas has a fascinating discussion on brain death, its mimics, and how flow scans can help us. [SO] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Do you TAPSE? Learn over at the Ultrasound GEL podcast. [MG] Use ultrasound in cardiac arrest better, thanks to a new podcast from the Ultrasound Podcast crew. [SO] News from the Fast Lane Check out what’s new amongst the 1,650+ pages of the Critical Care Compendium in CCC Update 014 [CN] Reference Sources and Reading List Emergency Medicine and Critical Care blog/podcast list LITFL Global Blogroll FOAMEM RSS feed syndication for global FOAM #FOAMed – #FOAMcc – #FOAMres #FOAMped – #FOAMtox – #FOAMus – #FOAMim – #FOANed Brought to you by: Anand Swaminathan [AS] (EM:RAP, Core EM,REBEL EM and The Teaching Institute) Chris Connolly [CC] (RCEMFOAMed, FOAMShED) Chris Nickson [CN] ( iTeachEM, RAGE, INTENSIVE and SMACC) Jesse Spurr [JS] (Injectable Orange, Simulcast, The Teaching Institute) Marjorie Lazoff [ML] (TandemHealth) Mat Goebel [MG] Salim Rezaie [SR] (REBEL EM, The Teaching Institute) Segun Olusanya [SO] (JICSCast, The Bottom Line) Last update: Sep 5, 2017 @ 12:54 pm LITFL Review 296Marjorie Lazoff, MD [...]



Smarter Homes for All | British Gas

2017-07-21T14:46:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Welcome to the 296th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web

LITFL Review 296
Marjorie Lazoff, MD
















A festive message from British Gas

2016-12-14T07:59:00+00:00




Your British Gas Heating Adviser Visit

2016-11-21T16:07:00+00:00




























Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:23:01+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street. A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”Read more at this link.You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.The article Latest Gas Safety News can be see at this siteIn the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a prope[...]



Latest Gas Safety News | Gas Safety Information

2016-06-05T22:23:00+00:00

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Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:10:00+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.   A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of […]

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.

 

A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.

The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).

Responsible for 50 deaths each year
It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.

In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.

 

Read the full article here.

Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.

 

Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leak

FIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.

Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street.
A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”

They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”

Read more at this link.

You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.




Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-31T19:45:00+00:00

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Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:44:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.Read the original post here…Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.The original article can be viewed by clicking on this link[...]Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to[...]



Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:29:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question […]

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.

 

A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.

Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.

Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.

They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.

London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.

A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.

Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.

Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.

Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.

The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.

He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.

The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.

 

Read the original post here

Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.




Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:20:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater.The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas.Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death.‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now.‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely.‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIESIn January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi.In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home.During 2006–07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia.In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCCThe odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion.Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly.Read the full article at the Daily MailAn interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article.A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerable people.Carbon monoxide could be linked to dementiaCarbon monoxide is a colourless, odourless gas that can be toxic to humans and in large concentrations it is known to be a ‘stealth killer’.The Gas Safety Trust has discussed carbon monoxide as being one of factors which could be affecting peop[...]



Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-30T15:19:00+00:00

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Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:05:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning […]The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater. The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas. Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. ‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now. ‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely. ‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIES In January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi. In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home. During 2006-07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia. In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCC The odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion. Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly. Read the full article at the Daily Mail   An interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article. A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerabl[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:16:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device.The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors.As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair.Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors.“To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires.The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next generation of gas sensors,” Prof Sowwan commented. “In contrast to other techniques, our approach is cost effective and suitable for mass production.”This new method could also help scientists in better understanding the sensor lifetime. The performance of a sensor decreases overtime, and this is a[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:00:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air […]Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors. As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair. Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors. “To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires. The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next genera[...]



The importance of having a co detector | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-24T17:28:00+00:00

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The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:27:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church.What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives.“At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.”The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound.“My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.”The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide.“It still feels kind of surreal — like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.”Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained.“Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.”The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now.The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools.Original posted here -https://medium.com/media/83d9b1a843930a083e39bd128a3b923a/hrefGreat news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible(STAFF) — The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning.The service received a donation of more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors courtesy of the Insurance Bureau of Canada.Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth was on hand, along with the bureau’s manager of government relations, Matt Hiraishi, to do the h[...]



The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:17:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and […]Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church. What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives. “At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.” The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound. “My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.” The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide. “It still feels kind of surreal – like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.” Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained. “Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.” The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now. The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools. Original posted here – Brand new carbon monoxide detector saves family Great news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible (STAFF) – The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning. [...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules critics argue

2016-05-22T14:53:01+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock.During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance.Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000.A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations.However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway.Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties.A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation.She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector.“However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties.“In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.”“We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.”Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.”He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.Read the full article at the published source here…While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. Laura Kavanagh-Jones from SFRS’s Prevention team said: “Carbon Monoxide is a deadly gas that you can’t see, smell or taste.Too many people are dying or suffering needlessly from carbon monoxide poisoning. That’s why I am urging every resident in Shropshire to make sure they and their love[...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-22T14:53:00+00:00

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Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue

2016-05-22T14:18:00+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. […]For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.   A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock. During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance. Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000. A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations. However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway. Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties. A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation. She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector. “However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties. “In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.” “We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.” Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.” He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.   Read the full article at the published source here…   While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.   Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at rai[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:30:01+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.How carbon monoxide detectors workCarbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer.How carbon monoxide killsCarbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body.Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death.How carbon monoxide detectors workThere are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around.Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into and out of it. A small voltage is applied between two of the electrodes (called the working and the reference electrodes). When carbon monoxide enters the sensor, it reacts with the oxygen also present in the atmosphere, releasing an electron and creating a small current between the electrodes. Some sensors use electrodes coated wi[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-20T19:30:00+00:00

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How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:18:00+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on […]This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.   How carbon monoxide detectors work Carbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer. How carbon monoxide kills Carbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body. Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death. How carbon monoxide detectors work   There are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around. Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into [...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:30:01+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety informationFather of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaignA man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad.Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG).Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher.She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater.Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad.He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it.“Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness.“We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.”Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully.On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm.David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned.“We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in order to empower people to protect themselves from the silent killer, both at home and abroad.Please read the full article here…All of us should be remaining aware, not just for ourselves but also for friends and family. You, or someone you know is probably going on holiday some time soon. Ensure they are awar[...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-18T19:30:00+00:00

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Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:24:00+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean […]A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety information   Father of teacher killed by  carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign A man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad. Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG). Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher. She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater. Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad. He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it. “Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness. “We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.” Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully. On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm. David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned. “We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in [...]