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Updated: 2017-11-19T23:13:00+00:00

 



LITFL Review 307

2017-11-19T23:13:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 307th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 307Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 307th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Here’s a series of integrated Sepsis lectures from the Maryland CCProject. [SO]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Don’t pull! Chad Simpkins and the EMDaily crew review what to do when an imminent breech delivery presents to the ED. Step 1: Call for help! [RP] CRACKcast is serving up 3 great podcast episodes covering core content in Rosen’s 9th edition on electrolyte disorders, diabetes, and rhabdomyolysis. [MG The EM Clerkship podcasts teaches a medical student approach for the ill recent traveler. [MG] The new PHEMcast is all about intraosseous access. [MG] Dr Smith has two great ECG cases, both with subtle findings that make the case. [MG] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care How does protocolized sepsis care play out in a resource-limited setting? The Bottom Line reviews a recent trial on the subject. [MS] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation Holy HITTS! A challenging ECMO case is presented by the team from the Alfred. [SO] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Want to know how to make your peripheral IVs last longer? Find out more in this study by @UCSDsono [CMD] The POCUS Atlas released the winning images in their “Golden Probe Award”. Don’t miss the Stone in the Sword! [LP] The Best of #FOAMped Pediatrics Distal fingertip injuries are even harder to manage when the target is moving. The team at Academic Life in Emergency Medicine has a great Trick of the Trade: the Finger Immobilization Technique. You’ll want to add this to your repertoire! [RP] The Best of #FOAMim Internal Medicine The Methods Man, F. Perry Wilson, reviews a recent JAMA Internal Medicine article comparing outcomes and resource utilization between hospitalists and primary care physicians. Could re-integration of PCPs lead to better outcomes? [RP] Remember this from last week? “Check out this podcast from The Healthy Debate’s Rounds Table, the first half of a lecture from the CSIM Annual Meeting detailing the first 2 of this year’s top 5 papers in internal medicine. [RP]” Well, a week later and the remaining 3 papers are online in Part 2.[ML] Take a deep breath and enjoy the video lecture on Asthma by Louisville Lectures. [ML] The Best of #FOANed Nursing Great podcast from the Resus Nurse on DKA management and pearls. [SR] The Best of #MedEd FOAM A well written piece on CORE EM, about the paradox of being an emergency medicine physician/trainee [SR] Reference Sources and Reading List Emergency Medicine and Critical Care blog/podcast list LITFL Global Blogroll FOAMEM RSS feed syndication for global FOAM #FOAMed – #FOAMcc – #FOAMres #FOAMped – #FOAMtox – #FOAMus – #FOAMim – #FOANed Brought to you by: Anand Swaminathan [AS] (EM:RAP, Core EM,REBEL EM and The Teaching Institute) Chris Connolly [CC] (RCEMFOAMed, FOAMShED) Chris Nickson [CN] (RAGE, INTENSIVE and SMACC) Cian McDermott [CMD] (POCUS Geelong, SMACC) Jeffrey Shih [JSh](ALiEM) Luke Phillips [LP] (POCUS Geelong) Manpreet ‘Manny’ Singh [MMS] (emDOCs.net) Marjorie Lazoff [ML] (TandemHealth) Mat Goebel [MG] Matt Siuba [MS] Philippe Rola [PR] (Thinkingcriticalcare) Salim Rezaie [SR] (REBEL EM, The Te[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 214

2017-11-17T08:09:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 214 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 214Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 214. Question 1 Who first described the phenomenon of malignant hyperthermia? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Michael Denborough Question 2 Fox’s Sign is not Fox’s Sign! See the correct answer below as Mike Cadogan slowly corrects the wrongs of Wikipedia (and my FFFFs) and the phenomena of “copy and paste”? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Fox’s sign was thought to be: Bruising over the inguinal ligament that occurs in acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Named after the the dermatologist George Henry Fox according to Wikipedia. However, George Henry Fox never described this sign but instead “Apocrine miliaria” along with John Addison Fordyce. A chronic itchy papular condition occurring in areas of the skin with apocrine glands especially the axilla of young women. Chronic blockage of the sweat gland ducts with a secondary, non-bacterial inflammatory response to the secretions and cellular debris in the cysts. Similar to hidradenitis but without secondary bacterial infection so that no pus-draining sinuses are formed. Question 3 Some months ago, whilst dancing, I trod on the outer side of my foot, my heel at the moment being off the ground. Something gave way midway down my foot, and I at once suspected a rupture of the peroneus longus tendon. By the help of a friend I managed to walk to my cab, a distance of over 300 or 400 yards. The following morning I carefully examined my foot and discovered that my tendon was intact. There was a slight swelling over the base of the fifth metatarsal bone. I endeavored to obtain crepitus and failed. A finger on the spot gave exquisite pain. Who’s landmark paper is this the opening paragraph? + Reveal the funtabulous answer Sir Robert Jones Describing the eponymous Jones fracture he sustained whilst at a dance. FRACTURE OF THE BASE OF THE FIFTH METATARSAL BONE BY INDIRECT VIOLENCE – the article includes X-rays  of his own foot. Question 4 What evidence is there that Sir William Osler was a pimp? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Eye witness testimony: “Rounded with Osler today. Riddles house officers with questions. Like a Gatling gun. Welch says students call it ‘pimping.’ Delightful.” – Abraham Flexner Question 5 What was tested on orphans and condemned felons in Newgate before being given to the Royal family? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Inoculation against smallpox. Charles Maitland was granted the royal license to perform a trial of variolation on six prisoners in Newgate on August 9, 1721. The prisoners were granted the King’s favor if they submitted to this experiment. All prisoners survived the experiment, and those exposed to smallpox later proved to be immune. [Reference] Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 214Neil Long [...]



Jellybean 83 Pre-Hospital Medicine with Gregor Prosen

2017-11-14T01:24:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Pre-Hospital Medicine Slovenian Style with @GregorProsen Jellybean 83 Pre-Hospital Medicine with Gregor ProsenDoug LynchLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog ED people doing house visits? Medical retrieval teams having a cup of tea and taking a detailed social history? Emergency doctors going to someone’s home before they come to the ED and recommending treatment at home? Including End of Life treatment? Sound Crazy? Ever been to Maribor? Slovenia? I spoke with Slovenian Emergency Physician and Pre-Hospital Gregor Prosen at dasSMACC. He talks like an emergency physician. He curses like an emergency physician. Gregor just exudes a type of ultra-competent critical care cool. He can do some fantastic shit and he does do it. He also goes on home visits. He gets in a car or 4wd and heads out into the country to see little old ladies, big old men, kids and strudel-makers. That part represents fantastic shit too. Listen to Gregor talk you through pre-hospital medicine in Maribor. So here I am in Australia, in the western emergency medicine workforce. We are struggling with this and that. We are struggling with end of life care. We are struggling with the filter, or lack of a filter, between primary care and the so-called critical care service that emergency personality types all signed up for. We wanted to be intubating vomiting people, with no blood pressure, while upside down in a straitjacket and wrapped in chains and underwater. In a crater lake. Over an active volcano. Using an expensive machine. Any expensive machine really. That’s what we call rewarding. It’s just not fair. Whinge. Whinge. So you go and try a bit of retrieval medicine. It looks very cool. Especially in the promo videos. (To quote Alex Psirides; “Helicopters!!!”) However, when you are getting around in one of those helicopters, or some other platform, there is a certain pressure on your use of that platform. How many times have aeromedical retrieval teams gotten out to the “scene” and decided to NOT bring that patient back to the hospital? Maybe that’s the best thing to do? And if it is the best thing to do then will your service get paid as much? Will your service get paid at all? How much does it cost to run an aeromedical retrieval helicopter anyway? (Clue; shit-loads.) So at the end of the day it’s hard to use your judgement for some of the most important decisions. It’s hard not to get into the “You Call we Haul” trap. We even use “Time on Scene” as a KPI. The pilot, the crew, the co-ordinator and even the helicopter itself seems to want you to get back to base ASAP. It might be whirring overhead or if it has landed just sits there and bristles. I do love these impressive women and men. I love working with them. I love flying around over Australia. Slovenia clearly has a different history, different culture, different healthcare system, but maybe it has some seriously useful different perspectives. Gregor Prosen is pretty bloody cool. He does cool stuff. He has a cool job and some of that cool stuff is done really very differently. Let’s learn. I like FOAMed. I like it a lot. I would really like it to continue to facilitate knowledge transfer. We can learn something from the Slovenians. We can learn from the South Africans and Ugandans. We can learn something from the New Yorkers. It is not a one-way street. Long live FOAMed. Long live non-english speaking FOAMed. Long live FOAMed from everywhere for everyone. Long live the legendary Slovenian accordion player Bratko Bibič and thanks to him for the wonderful tune “Na Domačem Vrtu” or ”In the family garden” from the eponymous album by Bratko Bibič[...]



LITFL Review 306

2017-11-13T00:39:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 306th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 306Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 306th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week RebelEM unleashes his top 10 pearls from ACEP17 [LP] EPMonthly published an ER account of the huge number of ‘big sick’ folks in the wake of the mass shooting in Vegas.  Humbling and inspiring.  [CC] The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Steve Smith reviews a great case of NSTEMI and the guidelines of which NSTEMI patients warrant emergent cath lab. [SR] Two reviews from Rory Spiegel highlight the problems with problematic study designs. First he reviews the ORBITA trial, which looks at whether PCI improve burden of symptoms in stable angina. Second, he  breaks down a recent paper published on opioid combo medication vs non-opioid combo medication for extremity injuries.  [SR] The ALIEM AIR-Pro series is back yet again with a curated collection of the best neurology-based FOAM resources from around the web. [RP] The Journal of Emergency Medicine has published their November audio summary. [MG] ERcast has a segment on gunshot to the groin – how do you control bleeding where you can’t compress it? [MG] This weeks’ EM Clerkship podcast is a master class on diarrhoea. [MG] Rollcage Medic’s podcast updates us on the literature for concussion in motor sports [MG] This week’s Roshcast is boards review on some GI complaints and more [MG] CRACKcast covers Rosen’s 9th edition content on acid-base and electrolytes this week. [MG] Nice core content post on suture types as well as some suggestions for how to select the correct material for a given repair. [SR] Does early TXA save lives in trauma? Janos Baombe dissects a recent meta-analysis that’s been making waves on Twitter. [SO] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care Venous Excess and the Myth of Venous Return… Everyone loves Guyton diagrams, right? 1000 words of physiology, with none wasted. [CN] Hopefully you already know about–and subscribe to– the Critical Care Reviews Newsletter. Regardless, there’s a great bunch of free-to-access articles in this week’s ‘topic of the week’, Neurocritical Care. [CN] Would a specific strategy improving ICU admissions in those over 75 years improve outcomes? That’s what the ICE-CUB 2 study set out to do, and it’s reviewed this week by David Slessor for the Bottom Line. [SO] Deranged Physiology has updated some of its topics: Cardiac arrest post cardiac surgery, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and Therapeutic hypothermia for TBI. Enjoy! [SO] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation Our own Chris Nickson peer-reviewed Cardiac arrest on ECMO… does it still count? [ML] Justin Morgenstern has had a great series on airway management. In part 2, he discusses is your patient ready for intubation. [SR] The Best of #FOAMtox Toxicology RCEM has a great segment on paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose. [MG] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound A case presentation by Cleveland Medical Center on the utility of point-of-care ultrasound in a cardiac arrest patient [JSh] A great wrap up of the evidence for using POCUS to identify a source of sepsis in ED patients from t[...]



Sci-Hub Open access Pirate Paper Portal

2017-11-12T06:44:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Have a DOI, PMID or URL for a paper you need to read? University library not a subscriber? Then Sci-hub may come in useful...

Sci-Hub Open access Pirate Paper Portal
Mike Cadogan

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

We fight inequality in knowledge access across the world. The scientific knowledge should be available for every person regardless of their income, social status or geographical location

At this time the widest possible distribution of research papers, as well as of other scientific or educational sources, is artificially restricted by copyright laws. Such laws effectively slow down the development of science in human society.

Sci-Hub launched on 5th September 2011 to challenge the status quo. Sci-Hub is the first pirate website in the world to provide mass and public access to tens of millions of research papers – 64,500,000 articles to date. The Sci-Hub project supports Open Access movement in science. Research should be published in open access and be free to read, by anyone, anywhere, anytime…

Often on the move, there are multiple access points listed below – for up to date URL check the Facebook page.

 

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Last update: Nov 13, 2017 @ 10:10 am

Sci-Hub Open access Pirate Paper Portal
Mike Cadogan

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Mastering Intensive Care 020 with Jack Iwashyna

2017-11-10T12:15:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Mastering Intensive Care: Andrew Davies speaks with Jack Iwashyna about time-limited life support trials, regular talks with families & more. Mastering Intensive Care 020 with Jack IwashynaAndrew DaviesLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Jack Iwashyna – ICU adventure camp, time-limited life support trials and regular talks with families (DasSMACC special episode) Do you play the role of the exemplary leader in the ICU? Are you charming, funny, friendly and extroverted – even when these aren’t your natural personality characteristics? Do you throw yourself into your series of consecutive days in the ICU like you are going away to adventure camp? Do you outline specific objectives that a patient should meet over a timeframe of a few days to decide whether treatment should continue? And how regularly do you talk to your patient’s family when you are pretty sure the patient is dying? These are some of the questions you may ask yourself after listening to this episode of the Mastering Intensive Care podcast with American intensivist Jack Iwashyna. This is the fifth in a series of DasSMACC special episodes, where I interviewed speakers from the recent DasSMACC conference held in Berlin. Jack is Associate Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan where he is a practising medical intensivist at both the University of Michigan and the VA Ann Arbor Health System. He also devotes significant energy to training clinician scientists and is best known for his work defining the concept of “survivorship” after ICU and measuring aspects of the post-intensive care syndrome. Jack’s keynote talk at DasSMACC was entitled “Persistent Critical Illness” and as you’ll hear in this podcast he is the perfect person to talk about this given he does 14 day blocks in his ICU allowing him ample opportunity to understand what happens in the evolution of a patient’s critical illness. Despite Jack self-proclaiming he is introverted, this episode of the podcast reveals him to be a diverse conversationalist with well-matured thoughts, views and reflections on his own experience about how a consultant intensivist should act, whether that be in throwing ourselves 100% into our clinical service, playing a specifically crafted leader’s role, wisely mentoring less experienced clinicians, regularly communicating to patient’s families, simply having fun doing our job with our colleagues and respecting our spouses and families for supporting the work that we do. We cover a myriad of topics including: Jack’s powerful answer as to why he loves his job How invigorating it can be to talk to people he has only just met How he has previously done 30-day stretches of continual clinical service As a researcher he tries not to study his own ICUs too closely Our fixation on short-term survival is inadequate for most patient families His use and the benefits of time-limited trials of life support How he uses a school-like A-F range grading to mark patient’s progress The benefits of taking his children away on academic trips His somewhat raw reflections about not feeling as good a father and husband as he is a doctor The difference between mentoring in research and in clinical practice Our role is to try to help all trainees to improve, however good we perceive them to be Burnout is a systems issue – where the system is being run too hard The importance of sleep and afternoon naps This podcast is my quest to improve patient care, in ICUs all around the world, by inspiring all of us to bring our best selves to work to more masterfull[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 213

2017-11-09T22:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 213 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 213Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 213. Question 1 What is this piece of equipment? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer An ETT for an Elephant! Anyone know what the catheter would look like? The elephant that had this ETT had tidal volumes of 100L during the operation. [Reference] Question 2 What knee test is more sensitive than the Lachman, anterior draw and Pivot shift test in acute partial tears? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer The Lever or Lelli test According to the inventor study, Alessandro Lelli, all tests were nearly 100 % sensitive for patients with chronic, complete tears of the ACL. However, for patients with acute, partial tears, the sensitivity was much lower for the Lachman test (0.42), Anterior Drawer test (0.29), and Pivot Shift test (0.11), but not the Lever Sign test (1.00) [Reference] Question 3 Which Scottish Physician’s advocacy of randomized controlled trials eventually led to the development of the Cochrane Library database? + Reveal the funtabulous answer Archibald Leman Cochrane (12 January 1909 – 18 June 1988) Noted for his book Effectiveness and Efficiency: Random Reflections on Health Services. This book advocated for the use of randomized control trials to make medicine more effective and efficient. [Reference] Question 4 A forensic pathologist examines the body of a recently deceased man. The pathologist notes a drop of seminal fluid at the tip of the dead man’s penis. Does this indicate that the man was engaged in sexual activity just before death? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer No. The seminal vesicles may contract as part of rigor mortis, resulting in the expulsion of seminal fluid. Rigor mortis is the post-mortem contraction of muscle fibers due to the locking of actin-myosin filaments when ATP is depleted. [Reference] Question 5 In 1993, evidence appeared which suggested that a high dietary intake of what substance may worsen asthma in men? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Salt [Reference] Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 213Neil Long [...]



Jellybean 82 with Wesam Al-Basaam

2017-11-07T11:30:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Jellybean 82 with Dr Wesam Al-Basaam; Extraordinary tales of ordinary heroism. An Iraqi Story. Jellybean 82 with Wesam Al-BasaamDoug LynchLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Jellybean 82; Extraordinary tales of ordinary heroism. An Iraqi Story. The best thing about making the jellybeans is that I get to meet some thoroughly excellent people. While at the CICM ASM in Sydney I was introduced to a gentleman named Wesam Al-Basaam and he had a story to tell. When I say gentleman I really mean gentleman. Wesam is a consultant intensivist at the Austin Hospital. That is a pretty good job. It’s a very good hospital and most of us would be very happy to get a gig there. For Wesam the road to the Austin was serpentine, three countries, three systems, war, death, terror, trauma, uncertainty, adversity, hard work and ultimately a new start. A new start here in Australia. Wesam is very highly respected by his peers, he is a high performing clinician in an elite ICU. (I know this because those peers told me as much.) Australia is lucky to have him. He feels lucky to be here but the people that access his public hospital ICU are also lucky. Every moment that I experience the best of the free services we have here in Australia I feel lucky. Free emergency and intensive care services are common and usually excellent here in Australia. It is not the same for every specialty and I am proud to work in the part of a system that does not require people to pay up front just because they are sick and need healthcare. I get paid. Wesam and all the other doctors and nurses that worked like him in Iraq often didn’t get paid. He shares just a few stories from his early post-graduate years when his country didn’t even have a government. No one got paid. And yet they worked. They worked in a dangerous environment with little or no support and little or no equipment. There were no camera crews. There was no glory. They still worked. Wesam didn’t think of his story as exceptional. Unfortunately he is correct. But that doesn’t stop him being a hero. A role model. He is the sort of Australian that makes me feel like I want to be part of this country. Thank you Wesam. Thanks for sharing your talents, your story and your hard earned wisdom. Thank you also to Rahim Alhaj and Amjad Ali Khan, playing the aptly named Common Destination from their album Ancient Sounds. You can find that on iTunes. I found it on Soundcloud where you can find all the jellybeans arranged in playlists based on themes. This Jellybean is in the War, Terror and Catastrophe playlist, a playlist I would rather not exist. But it does exist. War is happening. People are being raped. People are dying. I write this on “Melbourne Cup Day”. On ”Melbourne Cup Day” war is happening. On “Melbourne Cup Day” people are being raped. On “Melbourne Cup Day” people are dying. Get in touch. Leave a comment or contact me via Twitter @TheTopEnd Further Listening iTunes JellyBean Podcast link Stitcher JellyBean Podcast link Last update: Nov 7, 2017 @ 7:31 pm Jellybean 82 with Wesam Al-BasaamDoug Lynch [...]



LITFL Review 305

2017-11-05T22:34:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 305th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 305Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 305th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week What’s on the Trauma Professional’s blog this week? Lots as usual! Learn about bucket handle injuries of the intestine, a cool concept for estimating blood loss prehospital, and remember that stuff you sterilise with may not be sterile. [CN]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine The RCEM Learning Podcast for November is out; the link provides access to this month;s dozen or so podcasts, [MG] CRACKCast covers core content from Rosen’s 9th edition, Chapter 110 on dermatologic presentations. [MG] The EM Clerkship podcast discusses which core, high yield CT scans students need to know. [MG] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care Can coffee make you happy? This post doesn’t answer the question but, uses it as a launching point for an excellent succinct discussion of some basic statistic concepts. [AS] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation The latest ResusRoom podcast looks at recent literature for oxygen therapy and PE. [MG] Should emergency physicians initiate ECMO CPR? Learn about the EROCA trial on the ED ECMO podcast, which hopes to answer the question. [CN] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Learn about Enhanced Peritoneal Stripe Sign (EPSS), the subtle ultrasound finding in pneumoperitoneum, in this week’s 5minSono. [MMS] TEE in the ED? With the passing of the ACEP TEE Guidelines for Cardiac Arrest  TEE is now well within our scope of practice in the ED. Learn how you can get your TEE program off the ground with this two part video lecture (Part 1 / Part 2). The future is here, it’s just not evenly distributed yet! [MMS] Check your renal ultrasound skills with this s/p kidney transplant case from UC San Diego. [MG] The Best of #FOAMim Internal Medicine Looking for more internal medicine FOAM? Check out Core IM, a new offering within  Clinical Correlations, NYU Langone Online Journal of Medicine. Mind the Gap podcast this week on paracentesis in admitted cirrhotics. [AS] We have the opportunity this week to learn about Opportunistic Infections in HIV by Louisville Lectures. [ML] The Best of #MedEd FOAM Harvard Business Review’s Strategic Development Feedback provides pointers for everyone on how to give learners constructive tough love.  [MMS] The Simulcast October Journal Club Wrap Up is out. Articles this month discuss practice standards for simulated patients, as well as the pillars of simulated patient programs, a randomised trial of simulation-based mastery learning for thoracentesis, and a documentation framework for simulation-based quality improvement activities. [CN] The latest podcast from the International Clinical Educators’ KeyLIME team gets heavy: they explore the death rate of doctors-in-training in KeyLIME Podcast146 – The mortality rate of residency education. ICENet also has a three-part series on “teaching” – in the OR, the clinic, and the ward. Are the ED and the ICU different, I wonder? [CN] In Only one way to[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 212

2017-11-03T13:49:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 212 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 212Mark CordenLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 212 – a “where in the world” edition from Dr Mark Corden – paediatric fellow in Melbourne. Question 1 Where in the world was insulin discovered? www.diabetes.co.uk + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Toronto, Canada; 1921. Frederick Banting, a surgeon, wanted to isolate pancreatic islet extracts by ligating the pancreatic duct of dogs, keeping them alive until the acini degenerated, thus leaving the islets for isolation.  John Macleod, professor of physiology and department head at the University of Toronto, granted him a laboratory space, ten dogs for experiments, a student research assistant (Charles Best). The experiments began on May 17, 1921, and by September they showed that the depancreatized dog developed diabetes and that intravenous injection with their pancreatic extract, which they named isletin, then lowered the blood glucose. [Reference] Question 2 Where in the world was the first (somewhat unintentional) appendicectomy performed? Photos by Dr. Vladislav Rogozov (son of the surgeon/patient Leonid Rogozov) + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer George’s Hosptial, London; 1735. The first report on an operated case of appendicitis is described by Claudius Aymand who operated on an 11-year-old boy with a right scrotal hernia and fistula. He identified the appendix, perforated by a pin within the scrotum, ligated the appendix and then removed it. The first operation with intent for acute appendicitis was instead performed by J. Mestivier in 1759. Mestivier described the case of a 45-year-old patient admitted to St. Andrew Hospital in Bordeaux for a mass localized on the right side of the umbilical area. The mass was fluctuant and was opened at which a pint of pus came out.  The patient died shortly after and during autopsy it was found the abscess had started from a small pin covered with salts perforating the appendix. [Reference] Question 3 Where in the world was valproate discovered? + Reveal the funtabulous answer! Grenoble, France; 1962. Like many important discoveries in the history of medicine, the anticonvulsant activity of Valproate was serendipitously discovered by Pierre Eymard in France in 1962. Valproate was first synthesized in 1882, by Burton, and it was used as a lipophilic vehicle to dissolve water-insoluble compounds during preclinical drug testing. He and colleagues were testing new substances but found Valproate alone exerted an anticonvulsant effect. [Reference] Question 4 Where in the world was phototherapy for neonatal jaundice developed? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Vermont, USA; 1968. Although arguably in 1956 at Rochford General Hospital in Essex, England, Sister J. Ward noted that sunshine decreased neonatal jaundice. She was in charge of the premature unit due to her ability to rear puppies. [Reference] Meanwhile, hospital biochemists noted erroneously low bilirubin levels in samples sitting in sunlight before processing. The first evidence for phototherapy as an effective therapy for infantile hyperbilirubinemia was published a decade later in Pediatrics, 1968, an RCT trial by Jerold Lucey: Lucey J, Ferriero&[...]



UCEM OSCE SCENARIO 2017.2

2017-10-30T01:06:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog After years of preparation, extensive reading, sleepless nights, marriage breakdowns and caffeine - your show pony week has arrived. F.UCEM UCEM OSCE SCENARIO 2017.2Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog After years of preparation, extensive reading, sleepless nights, marriage breakdowns and caffeine – your week of being show ponies has arrived as the F.UCEM examinations are upon us. Giving hope to those who pray to the Utopian FSM we have managed to locate and leak one of the OSCE examination questions for this weeks exam – hope it helps. UCEM OSCE SCENARIO You are the ED Consultant in charge of a tertiary hospital ED You take handover from the night team. Issue one: Please speak to the resident who has been constantly vomiting all night and taking hot showers. The overnight registrar suspected cannabinoid hyperemesis and advised capsaicin cream application. Unfortunately the resident failed to wash his hands prior to urinating and is now blaming the night registrar for his fiery genitals. He feels persecuted and paranoid. He denies drug use and would like to remind you that his uncle is chair of the executive board. Issue two: At morning handover you are briefed that the night team diligently managed all the acutely psychotic patients and no staff were injured. The most feisty of these interactions involved an individual vehemently claiming to be the King of a small African country and speaking in tongues. You are informed that the gentleman in question was appropriately restrained both chemically and mechanically when he failed to succeed to verbal de-escalation. However, in the light of morning news reports pertaining to the disappearance of a Senegalese Ambassador; a Google search for recently arrived Regal diplomats and the attendance of 6 armed militia at triage…your presence has been requested in cubicle 12. Issue three: Today is accreditation day. The nursing shift co-ordinator is not concerned with the armed militia. They are more troubled by the fact that the emergency generator has been running now for 6 hours;  4 psychotic sedated patients have been co-cubicled to share  restraints; one of your residents suffering from an attack of tinnitus disabled all the monitoring equipment alarms overnight and the missing enflurane cylinder has been located, entrained into the oxygen supply of the resus bays. The accreditors arrive in 30 minutes. Issue four: Local celebrity chef, Fou-de-FaFa attended during handover, triaged as a category 5 with an index finger ice-splinter injury. They are currently being interviewed by 60-minutes in the waiting room, infuriated they have had to endure a 45 minute wait with a potentially limb-threatening injury. Your presence is requested for comment. Please manage the department. You have 7 minutes to complete this task. UCEM OSCE SCENARIO 2017.2Neil Long [...]



LITFL Review 304

2017-10-29T23:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 304th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 304Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 304th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The Intensive Care Network has uploaded talks from the latest CICM ASM. Start with this one from Charlie Corke on what people value most. [SO]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Fantastic post by Justin Morgenstern on Optimizing the Basics of Airway Management prior to intubation. [SR] Who needs empiric coverage for HSV Encephalitis?  A great question and review via Josh Farkas [SR] Should you embrace fixed dosing for PCC? The EM PharmD says yes and gives a nice argument and algorithm this week. [AS] The Trauma Professional’s blog is incredibly prolific. This week there are great posts on Trauma Team Activation: What’s It Like For Your Patient? (remember, they hear and feel everything) and When Is A Physician Too Old To Practice? (is it time for mandatory testing of wellness and competency?). [CN] Expand your knowledge on thiamine deficiency with an excellent in-depth post from emDocs. [SO] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care Absolutely incredible video from Philippe Rolle on pericardiocentesis and placement of a pericardial drain in a patient with tamponade. [AS] Bruno Tomazini, of Brazillian blog ICU Revisited, spoons in piles of salt on top of the gaping recruitment manoeuvre wound in The ART trial and how lung recruitment died. Hmm, nothing dies an EBM-related death that easy… [CN] Paul Marik discusses the rationale behind the CLASSIC trial in another iSepsis post. [SO] The Best of #FOAMres Resuscitation Fantastic post by Justin Morgenstern on Optimizing the Basics of Airway Management prior to intubation. [SR] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Get back to basics with an excellent review of musculoskeletal ultrasound physics & tissue appearance from the Ultrasound Site [LP] The World Congress on Ultrasound in Medical Education as held in Montreal last week. There are some great pearls in its twitter feed and listen to this podcast with Dr Danielle Royer as she discusses integrating ultrasound into anatomy teaching. [LP] The Best of #FOAMped Pediatrics Take your tech savviness to the next level! Learn about pediatric vagal nerve stimulators, intrathecal pumps and ventricular assist devices from Timothy Horeczko [MMS] Thought-provoking blog post from the DFTB guys on the non specific ways in which a brain tumour can present.  Do you measure head circumference in persistent vomiting?  Now you do. [CC] The Best of #FOAMim Internal Medicine The dreaded upper variceal hemorrhage is the subject of this week’s Louisville Lectures. [ML] The Best of #MedEd FOAM Canadi-EM turn their eye to the topic of deliberate practice and hand motion feedback in the sim lab for teaching and refining CVC insertion. [CC] News from the Fast Lane The R&R in the Fastlane team needs YOU! [CN] Andrew Davies and Alex Psirides have a storming conversation on end of life care. Listen to LITFL’s  Masters of Intens[...]



Smarter Homes for All | British Gas

2017-07-21T14:46:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Welcome to the 304th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web

LITFL Review 304
Marjorie Lazoff, MD
















A festive message from British Gas

2016-12-14T07:59:00+00:00




Your British Gas Heating Adviser Visit

2016-11-21T16:07:00+00:00




























Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:23:01+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street. A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”Read more at this link.You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.The article Latest Gas Safety News can be see at this siteIn the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a prope[...]



Latest Gas Safety News | Gas Safety Information

2016-06-05T22:23:00+00:00

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Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:10:00+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.   A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of […]

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.

 

A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.

The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).

Responsible for 50 deaths each year
It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.

In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.

 

Read the full article here.

Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.

 

Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leak

FIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.

Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street.
A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”

They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”

Read more at this link.

You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.




Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-31T19:45:00+00:00

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Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:44:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.Read the original post here…Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.The original article can be viewed by clicking on this link[...]Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to[...]



Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:29:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question […]

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.

 

A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.

Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.

Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.

They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.

London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.

A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.

Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.

Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.

Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.

The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.

He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.

The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.

 

Read the original post here

Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.




Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:20:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater.The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas.Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death.‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now.‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely.‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIESIn January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi.In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home.During 2006–07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia.In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCCThe odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion.Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly.Read the full article at the Daily MailAn interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article.A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerable people.Carbon monoxide could be linked to dementiaCarbon monoxide is a colourless, odourless gas that can be toxic to humans and in large concentrations it is known to be a ‘stealth killer’.The Gas Safety Trust has discussed carbon monoxide as being one of factors which could be affecting peop[...]



Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-30T15:19:00+00:00

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Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:05:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning […]The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater. The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas. Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. ‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now. ‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely. ‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIES In January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi. In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home. During 2006-07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia. In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCC The odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion. Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly. Read the full article at the Daily Mail   An interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article. A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerabl[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:16:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device.The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors.As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair.Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors.“To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires.The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next generation of gas sensors,” Prof Sowwan commented. “In contrast to other techniques, our approach is cost effective and suitable for mass production.”This new method could also help scientists in better understanding the sensor lifetime. The performance of a sensor decreases overtime, and this is a[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:00:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air […]Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors. As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair. Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors. “To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires. The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next genera[...]



The importance of having a co detector | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-24T17:28:00+00:00

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The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:27:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church.What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives.“At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.”The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound.“My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.”The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide.“It still feels kind of surreal — like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.”Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained.“Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.”The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now.The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools.Original posted here -https://medium.com/media/83d9b1a843930a083e39bd128a3b923a/hrefGreat news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible(STAFF) — The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning.The service received a donation of more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors courtesy of the Insurance Bureau of Canada.Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth was on hand, along with the bureau’s manager of government relations, Matt Hiraishi, to do the h[...]



The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:17:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and […]Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church. What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives. “At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.” The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound. “My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.” The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide. “It still feels kind of surreal – like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.” Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained. “Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.” The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now. The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools. Original posted here – Brand new carbon monoxide detector saves family Great news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible (STAFF) – The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning. [...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules critics argue

2016-05-22T14:53:01+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock.During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance.Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000.A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations.However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway.Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties.A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation.She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector.“However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties.“In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.”“We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.”Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.”He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.Read the full article at the published source here…While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. Laura Kavanagh-Jones from SFRS’s Prevention team said: “Carbon Monoxide is a deadly gas that you can’t see, smell or taste.Too many people are dying or suffering needlessly from carbon monoxide poisoning. That’s why I am urging every resident in Shropshire to make sure they and their love[...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-22T14:53:00+00:00

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Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue

2016-05-22T14:18:00+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. […]For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.   A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock. During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance. Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000. A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations. However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway. Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties. A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation. She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector. “However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties. “In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.” “We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.” Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.” He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.   Read the full article at the published source here…   While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.   Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at rai[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:30:01+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.How carbon monoxide detectors workCarbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer.How carbon monoxide killsCarbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body.Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death.How carbon monoxide detectors workThere are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around.Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into and out of it. A small voltage is applied between two of the electrodes (called the working and the reference electrodes). When carbon monoxide enters the sensor, it reacts with the oxygen also present in the atmosphere, releasing an electron and creating a small current between the electrodes. Some sensors use electrodes coated wi[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-20T19:30:00+00:00

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How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:18:00+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on […]This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.   How carbon monoxide detectors work Carbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer. How carbon monoxide kills Carbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body. Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death. How carbon monoxide detectors work   There are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around. Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into [...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:30:01+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety informationFather of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaignA man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad.Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG).Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher.She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater.Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad.He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it.“Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness.“We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.”Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully.On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm.David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned.“We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in order to empower people to protect themselves from the silent killer, both at home and abroad.Please read the full article here…All of us should be remaining aware, not just for ourselves but also for friends and family. You, or someone you know is probably going on holiday some time soon. Ensure they are awar[...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-18T19:30:00+00:00

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Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:24:00+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean […]A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety information   Father of teacher killed by  carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign A man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad. Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG). Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher. She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater. Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad. He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it. “Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness. “We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.” Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully. On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm. David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned. “We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in [...]