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Updated: 2018-01-17T17:53:00+00:00

 



Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 192

2018-01-17T17:53:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 192nd edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 192Justin MorgensternLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog   Welcome to the 192nd edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Justin Morgenstern and Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check out the full list of R&R contributors This Edition’s R&R Hall of Famer Education Brazil V. Translational simulation: not ‘where?’ but ‘why?’ A functional view of in situ simulation. Advances in Simulation. 2017; 2(1). DOI: 10.1186/s41077-017-0052-3 This free-to-access article in Advances in Simulation is a MUST READ if, like me, you share Victoria Brazil’s philosophy that simulation should be a service, not a center, and should translate into improved care of patients and patient outcomes. This article defines the concept of ‘translational simulation’ and is the perfect succinct, academic overview of this exciting area. Recommended by: Chris Nickson The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine Crowell EL, et al. Accuracy of Computed Tomography Imaging Criteria in the Diagnosis of Adult Open Globe Injuries by Neuroradiology and Ophthalmology. Acad Emerg Med. 2017. PMID: 28662312  Some people rely on CT scan of the orbits to rule in or rule out an open globe. This retrospective chart review, in which CT scans were reviewed independently by a blinded neuroradiologist and ophthalmologist (x2) argues that CT cannot be trusted as the sensitivity was 51% to 77%. The specificity was good at 97% but given this is a diagnosis we don’t want to miss, clinical exam by an ophthalmologist is warranted if you actually think a patient may have a ruptured globe. Recommended by: Lauren Westafer Critical CareAllingstrup MJ, et al. Early goal-directed nutrition versus standard of care in adult intensive care patients: the single-centre, randomised, outcome assessor-blinded EAT-ICU trial. Intensive care medicine. 2017; 43(11):1637-1647. PMID: 28936712 In acute, mechanically ventilated, adult ICU patients, delivering individualised nutrition (based on indirect calorimetry and urinary urea measurements) did not result in improved patient centred outcomes at 6-months, as compared to standard nutrition. Recommended by: Andrew Udy Emergency MedicineO’Hagan Lucy. Narrating Our Selves: Eric Elder Lecture Presented at the annual conference of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, July 2016. Journal of Primary Health Care.  1017;9:100-104. DOI: 10.1071/HC15925 This in an incredible piece of writing, specifically about general practice, but really just about being a doctor and a human. Must read whatever your specialty. Recommended by: Justin Morgenstern Emergency Medicine Zahed R et al. Topical Tranexamic Acid Compared With Anterior Nasal Packing for Treatment of Epistaxis in Patients Taking Antiplatelet Drugs: Randomized Controlled Trial. Acad Emerg Med 2017. PMID: 29125679 This randomized, open-label study comparing topical TXA to anterior packing demonstrated a 44% absolute difference in cessation of epistaxis[...]



Medmastery: The appendix

2018-01-11T14:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses. First we take a dive into Abdominal Ultrasound Essentials to help identify appendicitis with the help of ultrasound imaging

Medmastery: The appendix
Mike Cadogan

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

The team at Medmastery fresh from a second Comenius Award from the Society for Pedagogy, Information and Media (GPI) are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website.

First we take a dive into the Abdominal Ultrasound Essentials course and review strategies to help identify appendicitis with the help of ultrasound imaging

Further reading:

Guest post: Nikolaus Mayr, MD. Chief Resident of Radiology, Department of Radiology, and Nuclear Medicine at the Hospital of the Brothers of St. John of God in Salzburg.

Medmastery: The appendix
Mike Cadogan




Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 191

2018-01-10T19:26:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 191st edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 191Justin MorgensternLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog   Welcome to the 191st edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Justin Morgenstern and Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check out the full list of R&R contributors This Edition’s R&R Hall of Famer Resuscitation ART Trial Investigators. Effect of Lung Recruitment and Titrated Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) vs Low PEEP on Mortality in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2017; 318(14):1335-1345. PMID: 28973363 A multi-center non-blinded randomised controlled trial that found higher mortality in patients with moderate-to-severe ARDS who received an open lung ventilation strategy compared with those who got ARDSNet-style protective lung ventilation. The open lung approach involved higher PEEP settings and the use of a staircase recruitment manoeuvre. Questions remain about the external validity of the study and whether we can identify subgroups of patients who might benefit. Nevertheless, ART is a real shake up for ‘open lung’ practitioners. Recommended by: Chris Nickson The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine Roldan CJ, et al. Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial Comparing Haloperidol Combined With Conventional Therapy to Conventional Therapy Alone in Patients With Symptomatic Gastroparesis. Academic emergency medicine. 2017; 24(11):1307-1314. PMID: 28646590 This is a teeny tiny RCT of ED patients with previously diagnosed gastroparesis treated with either haloperidol 5 mg IV or placebo, in addition to conventional therapy (which were mostly PPIs, ondansetron, opioids, and metoclopramide and similar between groups). The mean pain score dropped by 5.37 in the haloperidol group compared to 1.11 in the placebo group, which was statistically significant. This is by no means a definitive trial but is a piece of literature in line with the current practice of many to give haloperidol to patients with this frustrating diagnosis (and may help with opioid sparing, although this is yet to be proven) Recommended by: Lauren Westafer Further reading: Gastroparesis – I Feel Like Throwing Up (The SGEM) Systems and AdministrationRosenbaum L. The Less-Is-More Crusade – Are We Overmedicalizing or Oversimplifying? The New England journal of medicine. 2017; 377(24):2392-2397. PMID: 29236644 Although I disagree with many of the individual points raised, the overall message of this essay is good: medical care is incredibly complex and all too often our conversations about it (and those of policy makers) are oversimplified. On the whole, I think it’s is clear that we are doing far too much in medicine; that over-treatment and over-diagnosis are far bigger problems than under-treatment and under-diagnosis. However, the author is spot on when she says, “the most accurate conclusion is that sometimes less is more, sometimes more is more, and often we just don’t kn[...]



Jellybean 87 with Prof Mike Abernethy @FLTDOC1

2018-01-10T13:13:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Flying into a airport, or television studio, near you it’s @FLTDOC1 - Prof Mike Abernethy, one of the longest serving flight physicians in the world today.

Jellybean 87 with Prof Mike Abernethy @FLTDOC1
Doug Lynch

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Flying into a airport, or television studio, near you it’s @FLTDOC1

Prof Mike Abernethy is one of the longest serving flight physicians in the world today. He is a bit of a legend in his own lifetime. There is something about Mike’s story that reminds me of the golden age of flying, all glamour, sharp suits and Eero Saarinen’s fabulous TWA terminal at the JFK International Airport.

Maybe it’s his dashing good looks, maybe it’s his dress sense or maybe it’s his part time gig as a TV star!

In truth Mike is too young to have been swanning around when flying was still stylish. He is too young in all sorts of ways. He gets on like a kid. He has a child’s enthusiasm for what he does. He is an example to us all.

Mike has spent his life involved in what most of us consider a risky business and for laughs he spends his spare time involved in something most of us consider even riskier; messing with the mass media. Mike has appeared on the semi-reality show “Untold Stories of the ER”. So what was that like?

How do his peers view all this? I know more than a few of them do take the piss. Mike’s ability to laugh along with those that tease him is a bit like a secret super power.

Further Listening

(image)

Last update: Jan 10, 2018 @ 9:14 pm

Jellybean 87 with Prof Mike Abernethy @FLTDOC1
Doug Lynch




LITFL Review 314

2018-01-07T23:13:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 314th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 314Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 314th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The Bottom Line has a comprehensive review on the role of steroids in sepsis – where we’ve been and where the data guides us now. A fantastic review to make part of your critical care library. [AS]  Incredible talk from Diane Birnbaumer on the struggles, successes and rising challenges women face in medicine via the FeminEM podcast. [AS and the rest of the LITFL Review Committee]    The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Fire and Ice! CanadiEM’s CRACKCast continues to cover core content from Rosen’s, this week with chapters 141 on heat illness and 140 on accident hypothermia. [MG/MMS] The EM Clerkship podcast has a great review of bleeding disorders for medical students. [MG] Dr. Smith has another great ECG case examining ST-segment changes in aVL in a not so straight forward presentation. [MG/MMS] emDocs has a great review of postpartum endometritis. [MG] You think you know how to assess ACL injury, but if you’ve never heard of the Lever Test, read this awesome review over at CoreEM. [MG] A new PEC podcast is out, focusing on the “EMS Agenda for the Future.” [MG] The Journal of Emergency Medicine released their December audio summary. [MG] The Royal College of Emergency Medicine’s January podcast covers multiple topics as listed on the landing page, including myasthenia gravis and compassion fatigue, and a review of recent papers. [MG] The Resus Room covers a selection of recent papers for their January issue. [MG] As Taming the SRU notes, it may not be the reason why we joined Emergency Medicine but it is a commonly seen complaint: conjunctivitis. [CW] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care and #FOAMres Resuscitation The FDA may have approved angiotensin II for use in vasodilatory shock but Josh Farkas notes that the evidence is nowhere near strong enough to support its use. Another example of big pharma pushing a new expensive drug without first proving that it actually helps patients. [AS] Simon Carley presents his take on the recent consensus statement published in the BJA on Devastating Brain Injury.  If the neurosurgeon says ‘no’ then it’s not the end of the road…..maybe. [CC] Take a deep dive into running a code with a great podcast (interviewing two of our own!), to supplement their videocast core content from EM Sandbox. [MMS] You’re not going to want to miss this discussion of lactate myths from the sepsis soothsayer, Paul Marik, part of the iSepsis series at EMCrit. [RP] Velia Marta Antonini, ECMO specialist extraordinaire, shares a year’s worth of ECMO research with us. Enjoy the read! [SO] The Best of #FOAMtox Toxicology Change your thinking of when and how to use use activated charcoal in potential overdose. [MMS] The Best Tox Readings of 2017 is out. Check out The Poison Review’s 8th annual Alexander Awards. [MMS] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Just how good is Tracheal #POCUS to confirm ETT placement? [CMD] The Ultrasound Podcasts this week focuses on doing the basics well, reviewing how to scan the aorta. [MG][...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 221

2018-01-05T18:38:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 221 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 221Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 221. Question 1 The Adverts, a UK punk band in the 1970s wrote the song “Looking through Gary Gilmore’s eyes”. Who is Gary Gilmore and why would two people be looking through his eyes? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Gary Gilmore was an American criminal who demanded the death sentence for himself for two murders he committed in Utah. He was the first person in almost 10 years to be executed in the United States. He figured that many of his organs would be useless post firing squad so requested his corneas be transplanted and within 2 hours post his death two patients received his corneas. [Reference] Question 2 Why could this arachnid make you vegetarian? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer The lone star tick can give you a meat allergy (along with the European Castor bean tick and the paralysis tick in Australia) The tick is found in eastern United States and Mexico and transmits a carbohydrate: Gal 1-3Gal Beta 1-4GlcNAc-R (a type of alpha-gal), unfortunately humans, apes and Old world monkeys have the natural antibody ‘anti-Gal’ and resultant meat consumption can cause anaphylaxis. Although it is a common myth that you would need to become vegetarian after sustaining a bite as there is actually no alpha-gal in poultry or fish. Of note there is alpha-gal in the anti-cancer drug cetuximab, Gelofusin, haemaccel and porcine heart valves. There is one reported case of a patient developing anaphylaxis post a porcine heart valve transplant. [Reference] Question 3 The term ‘basket case’ stems from World War One. What would have occurred to you as a soldier to be called a basket case? + Reveal the funtabulous answer The loss of both your arms and legs requiring you to be carried around in a basket. [Reference]   Question 4 Which smelly food-stuff inhibits aspergillus growth and has been used to treat otomycosis (swimmers ear)? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Garlic! (Allium sativum, also known as poor man’s treacle) Researchers at the University of New Mexico compared the antifungal properties of aqueous garlic extract (AGE) and concentrated garlic oil (CGO) with three commercial preparations commonly used in practice, i.e., cresylate otic solution, Lotrimin, and ketoconazole cream. Using agar disks inoculated with the fungi, the authors demonstrated a dose response of both garlic extracts against the three dermatophytes studied, i.e., Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, and A. terreus. When compared to the commercial products, CGO was found to have greater inhibitory activity than the three antifungal agents. AGE had less activity than Lotrimin but greater activity than cresylate and equal activity to ketoconazole cream.[Reference]   Question 5 What psychoactive agent did pharmacoethnobotatnist Wade Davis describe as: “being shot out of a rifle barrell lined with baroque paintings and landing in a sea of electricity” and that it should not be considered hallucinogenic because after its taken “no one is home anymore to experience the hallucination”? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Ayahuasca Ayahuasca tea has been used for centuries by shamans in the Amazon river basin as part of healing rituals. The general idea seem[...]



Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 190

2018-01-03T18:46:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 190th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 190Justin MorgensternLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 190th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Justin Morgenstern and Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check out the full list of R&R contributors This Edition’s R&R Hall of Famer Resuscitation Hicks C, Petrosoniak A. The Human Factor Optimizing Trauma Team Performance in Dynamic Clinical Environments. Emerg Med Clin N Am 2018; 36: 1-17. PMID: 29132571 Anand: Fantastic discussion of the tools necessary to build optimal teams in the clinical arena. A must read for the resuscitationist Chris: This is the best state-of-the-art review of how to prepare and perform as a team managing acute medical crises. Though the focus is trauma, the principles and techniques are widely applicable in resuscitation, emergency medicine and critical care. I have worked with the authors in multiple workshops over the years at SMACC and it is great to see how they have distilled many of the concepts they have been exploring into such an enlightening, readable article. A MUST READ. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan and Chris Nickson The Best of the Rest Critical Care Marik PE, et al. Hydrocortisone, Vitamin C, and Thiamine for the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Retrospective Before-After Study. Chest. 2017; 151(6):1229-1238. PMID: 27940189 Although the results of this study are very promising, it is important to remember that this is only a hypothesis generating study. We still need an external validation before implementation (How many other treatments in sepsis have been touted as a “cure” and not panned out in subsequent studies?). Recommended by:Salim R. Rezaie Research and Critical Appraisalvan Møller MH, et al. The Magic Bullet in Sepsis or the Inflation of Chance Findings? Chest. 2017; 152(1):222-223. PMID:28693775 Marik’s “Cure for Sepsis” has raised s lot of eyebrows. Is it really a magic bullet? Certainly the numbers in the original article are impressive, but the study suffers from several methodological flaws most of which are underlined in this letter to the editor. Recommended by: Søren Steemann Rudolph  Education Rudolph JW, Raemer DB, Simon R. Establishing a safe container for learning in simulation: the role of the presimulation briefing. Simulation in healthcare. 2014; 9(6):339-49. PMID: 25188485 This is the seminal article for establishing psychological safety in simulation-based education. It is core material for anyone facilitating simulation sessions, but has wider application to education and our workplaces in general. The article was discussed in the November 2017 Simulcast Journal Club (see link). Recommended by: Chris Nickson Further Reading: Building a Safe Container (Debrief to Learn) and Journal Club Podcast 10 (Simulcast) Emergency Medicine Ubhaya[...]



LITFL Review 313

2017-12-31T18:52:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 313rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 313Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 313rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Hard to be skeptical about the Skeptic’s Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) this year! Christmas day EBM goodness from SGEM is for anyone interested in providing excellent emergency care. A free downloadable PDF tome in a case-focused format, Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine Volume 3 covers cases 85-126. It is so good it begs the question: where can we access cases 1-84? Content from Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine {BEEM}, “a nonprofit, international, emergency medicine knowledge translation project started in 2004 at McMaster University, the centre for evidence-based medicine…[with the goal to] find, select, appraise, and summarize the most recent and relevant emergency medicine-related studies.”   [MMS/ML] ED Note: Appreciate SGEM sharing the URLs to Volume 1 (2012) and Volume 2 (2015).    The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Winter is coming! Learn to manage the spectrum of cold ED injuries on this episode of RochCast’s CRACKCast covering Rosen’s Chapter 139. RoshCast continues its free weekly sampling of content from its fee-based proprietary Q&A bank. The resource is aimed at emergency medicine and pediatric house staff and non-physician practitioners preparing for formal tests. Editorial process and primary sources of content were not found on the free web site [MMS/MG/ML] Refresh yourself on cases of hyperacute T-waves and subtle-STEMI courtesy of Dr. Smith. [MMS] The Prehospital Emergency Podcast wraps up 2017 by reviewing the latest PEC journal – manuscripts address mobile integrated healthcare, wilderness medicine, among other topics.  [MG] emDOCs has a case on portal vein thrombosis. [MG] The December issue of Annals of Emergency Medicine audio summary is out. Note that the link accesses all podcasts from January 2016. [MG] Reuben Strayer is back at EM Updates with a straightforward and effective summary of epistaxis management in the ED. [RP] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care and #FOAMres Resuscitation The EDECMO podcast episode 41 is going back to basics by covering the 3 stages of eCPR, this time in the context of a very special story. [MG] Intensive Care Network continues their “how I manage” series, this time covering thrombocytopenia. [MG] The intimate relationship between the cardiovascular and respiratory systems demands consideration of how each interacts with the other. It’s a complex interplay, and one that Jon-Emile Kenny at PulmCCM explains in 1000 words + a VideoCast! [RP] End-of-year twofers: Start the new year in style by listening to Paul Young’s top 10 papers of 2017, as presented at the recent Australian College of Intensive Care Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting. [SO] And…you can’t miss this rapid review of the top articles in critical care from 2017, from Dr. David Lyness at Propofology! [RP] The Maryland Critical Care Project discusses the use of ROTEM in their latest podcast. [SO] The Best o[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 220

2017-12-29T02:17:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 220 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 220Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 220. Question 1 What deceased Nobel Prize winner’s eyes are currently sitting in a safety deposit box in New York City? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Albert Einstein Not only did Dr. Thomas Stolz Harvey illegally perform Einstein’s autopsy and steal his brain, he also stole his eyes. He gave the eyes to Einstein’s eye doctor, Henry Abrams, one of Albert Einstein’s confidants. They are kept in a safety deposit box in New York City to this day. [Reference]   Question 2 Dr. Lattimer studied at Columbia University and became the urologist-in-chief of Presbyterian Hospital, but what piece of urological history did he obtain to prohibit its display and mockery? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Napoleon Bonepart’s Penis After his game-changing defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon was exiled to the British island of St. Helena, where it is now believed that he was ultimately poisoned with arsenic. It seems that Napoleon’s doctor removed his penis during the autopsy, and then gave it to a priest, Vignali, who then smuggled it to Corsica. In 1916, a British collector obtained the penis and it was eventually displayed in New York, 1927. It was ultimately mocked for its small size and referred to by curious spectators as a small piece of leather or a shriveled eel. In 1977, the penis found itself on the auction block once again when Lattimer purchased it and it is kept within the family until this day in New Jersey. [Reference] Question 3 Which gaming company tried to make monitoring glucose for juvenile diabetes more fun by adding a glucose monitor to their consoles? + Reveal the funtabulous answer Nintendo [Reference] Question 4 Which infective skin condtion was called Ignis Sacer? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Erysipelas. It is an infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics, usually caused by beta-hemolytic group A streptococcus. Erysipelas is more superficial than cellulitis, and is typically more raised and demarcated. The term is from Greek ἐρυσίπελας, meaning “red skin”. Other names include holy fire and St. Anthony’s fire. [Reference] Question 5 Clutton’s joints are a manifestation of which congenital disease? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Syphilis. They are painless symmetrical swollen joints due to fluid accumulation, typically in the knees. [Reference]   …and finally unicyclemedicFuntabulously Frivolous Friday Five 220Neil Long[...]



LITFL Review 312

2017-12-25T01:53:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 312nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the web LITFL Review 312Marjorie Lazoff, MDLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 312nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week SGEM often posts thoughtful “skeptical” reviews on logical-sounding procedures and treatments, as it has this week: discover the non-value of therapeutic hypothermia in convulsive status epilepticus. [MG]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine NSAIDs, acetaminophen or both in minor extremity trauma? St. Emlyn’s reviews a recent article looking at the question. [AS] Crack-Cast is back with an awesome dive into skin infections. We can’t get enough of these clinical pearls. [CC/MG] Beware the unexplained tachycardia…..some learning for us all with case-based quality in EM discussions from EM-Docs! [CC] Ryan Radecki reminds us that while the benefits of antibiotics in upper respiratory infections (strep throat, sinusitis etc) are suspect, the harms are well established and, likely outweigh the benefits. [AS] CoreEM reviews the evidence for pelvic exam in first trimester bleeding, and IVC collapsibility for fluid responsiveness. [MG] Dr Smith has another great ECG case: a 70 year old woman with syncope. [MG] The Journal of Emergency Medicine November audio summary is finally out. [MG] RoshCast’s Episode 38 continues its free weekly sampling of content from its fee-based proprietary Q&A bank. The resource is aimed at emergency medicine and pediatric medical students and non-physician practitioners. Alas, the editorial process and primary sources of content were not found on the free web site. [MG/ML] The Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care and #FOAMres Resuscitation Do prehospital antibiotics matter in sepsis? EM in Focus discusses a recent Lancet article on the topic. [AS] What are the antibiotic considerations for infective endocarditis from an EM pharmacist’s perspective? [MG] The team at The Bottom Line present their top 10 trials of 2017 as ranked by the reviewers. Have you read them all? [SO] Nudrat Rashid discusses her management of delirium in a top talk from the Australian College of Intensive Medicine annual meeting. [SO] The Best of #FOAMus Ultrasound Find out if POCUS affects pericardial effusion time-to-treatment [MG] The Best of #FOAMpeds Pediatrics Managing an airway emergency in a child is nerve wracking, but learning how to manage it to avoid intubation is more tricky. [MMS] Learn a step-by-step technique for managing tracheostomy emergencies from Tessa Davis at DFTB. [MMS] The Best of #FOAMim Internal Medicine From the Louisville Lectures, Dr. Lushniak discusses how dermatology fits into the public health model with a focus on various skin cancers [ML] The Best of #MedEdFOAM and #FOAMsim Becoming an effective team doesn’t happen overnight, it takes choreography to provide high-quality resuscitation. Valuable free resource from Penn CC Project to take back to your shop. [MMS] Emergency Medicine Ireland has a great overview of how to record and edit a podcast. [MG] Simulcast has a great review of literature on debriefin[...]



Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219

2017-12-21T22:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219Neil LongLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219, Christmas Edition. Question 1 On average, how many calories will the British consume on Christmas day? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer 6000 calories, and its not the compulsory roast that is to blame, most Brits will have consumed a days worth of calories by mid-day prior to the first cracker being pulled. For example, by consuming: Quality Streets or equivalent chocolates, mince pies, alcohol, crisps and nuts. The equivalent calories can be consumed by eating: 118 chicken nuggets, 26 doughnuts, 12 Big Macs, 22 pork pies, 55 two-finger Kit-Kats, 32 slices of pizza, 53 bags of Quavers, 131 Jaffa Cakes. You could consume the above guilt free by going on an 8 hours run or 21.5 hour walk on boxing day [Reference]   Question 2 How fast does Father Christmas need to fly in order to reach all the good children in the world? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer According to Arnold Pompos of Purdue University, Santa would have to travel a total of 160,000,000km – further than the distance from the Earth to the Sun – to visit 200 million children. He would have about 10 hours, from 8pm to 6am, to deliver the presents. Luckily, children happen to be spread across a wide range of time zones, buying Santa an additional 24 hours. Even so, covering this distance in 34 hours is certainly no mean feat. Crunching the figures, we get a speed of 4,705,882km/h, far slower than the speed of light, but still fast enough that the air resistance is likely to vaporise Santa, along with all the children’s gifts… if he wasn’t riding a magic sleigh. [Reference] Question 3 What could Father Christmas look like (according to the TAC in Victoria, Australia) in order to best survive a sleigh crash? + Reveal the funtabulous answer Graham, a human designed by artist Patricia Piccinini to survive a car crash Question 4 How many babies are born on Christmas Day? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Usually, on average about 220,000 babies are born each day but on Christmas day only about 172,000 babies are born More babies are born on a Tuesday than any other day – except if Tuesday falls on Christmas day. But the Christmas holiday is special for another reason: most babies are born in August and September meaning that more babies are conceived during Christmas season than at any other time. [Reference] Question 5 What did this woman react to over the Christmas period? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer Colophonium, the sticky substance from pine and spruce after she decorated her Christmas tree. In a European study from 2015, up to 2% of adolescents were affected and a Canadian study from 1970 thought up to 7% of patients presenting with respiratory symptoms or allergies might be Christmas tree related. [Reference] …and finally Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219Neil Long[...]



A Very Special Callout

2017-12-20T07:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF...introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219
Neil Long




Conversations with our Fathers

2017-12-19T20:00:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Reflecting on father-son conversations, Ben Symon explains why relying on those at the bottom to 'speak up' for patient safety is not enough. Conversations with our FathersChris NicksonLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical BlogLITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog This is a guest post by Dr Ben Symon (@symon_ben). Ben is a paediatric emergency physician in Queensland and one of the creators of Simulcast. When I was thirteen years old, my father told me about the Milgram Shock Experiment. I vividly remember sitting at our kitchen table as he told me that study participants willingly dialled up the voltage of an electric shock on another person and that despite believing the shock might kill the confederate, the majority completed the orders when told: “You have no other choice but to continue”. The story stuck with me, and while I’m not sure exactly why Dad told it to me, I like to think he did it because he was teaching me that speaking up is hard. That fear of rejection is powerful. When I was fifteen years old, I tearfully confided to my father that I thought something was wrong with me. That I had been built wrong. We didn’t discuss details but in comforting me he let me know that “while some parents might say something like having a son who was homosexual is horrifying, to me you are perfect. You can tell me anything.” He just let that statement sit. We didn’t touch on the conversation again for a very long time. When I was eighteen years old, I sent my parents a letter telling them that I was gay and that I had a boyfriend. He was handsome and charming and he wanted to change the world. I told them that I wanted to share that with them and that I hoped they still loved me. It had taken three years since that open invitation to discuss ‘anything’ for me to speak to them both. I sat by the phone for an agonising afternoon awaiting their phone call, nauseated with fear. When he finally rang Dad told me how he’d gone to find a gay co-worker and asked him how he could best show me I was accepted and loved. Fear of rejection is powerful. My parents’ acceptance was an indescribable relief. When my partner was thirty-six years old he told his religious, traditional Cantonese family that he had a boyfriend. We had been together eight years. He had delayed that conversation extensively, and I had become increasingly frustrated, baffled by his reluctance to do something I’d done almost twenty years earlier. I maintain he only eventually told them because we were five months into a surrogate pregnancy and about to have our son. Not telling them wasn’t really an option. But when the pregnancy became rocky and he asked his father to pray for us, we were advised he would be praying “For God’s will to be done.”. It turns out my partner hadn’t avoided speaking up to his family out of weakness or conflict avoidance, he’d just correctly assessed the situation. Speaking up is hard because Rejection is Powerful. I mention these stories because at every corporate orientation I go to we get a little speech on ‘Speaking Up For Safety’. It is well-intentioned and feels nice. Everybody is moved at watching some video about a plane almost crashing, and they smile and nod and say they will definitely speak up. But in the back of my head, I hear my father’s talk on the Milgram Shock Experiment and think “But we won’t. Not most of us.”. Why do we think [...]



Smarter Homes for All | British Gas

2017-07-21T14:46:00+00:00

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Reflecting on father-son conversations, Ben Symon explains why relying on those at the bottom to 'speak up' for patient safety is not enough.

Conversations with our Fathers
Chris Nickson
















A festive message from British Gas

2016-12-14T07:59:00+00:00




Your British Gas Heating Adviser Visit

2016-11-21T16:07:00+00:00

























Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:23:01+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street. A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”Read more at this link.You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.The article Latest Gas Safety News can be see at this siteIn the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).Responsible for 50 deaths each year It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.Read the full article here.Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leakFIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a prope[...]



Latest Gas Safety News | Gas Safety Information

2016-06-05T22:23:00+00:00

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Latest Gas Safety News

2016-06-05T22:10:00+00:00

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.   A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of […]

In the latest gas safety news, the has been a petition calling for TV warnings about carbon monoxide poisoning on the Isle of Wight, see article below.

 

A petition calling for prime time TV warnings about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to save lives has been launched by Isle of Wight based campaigner, Stephanie Linda Trotter, OBE.

The petition urges the Government to provide warnings against the dangers of the carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly gas can be emitted from faulty cooking or heating appliances powered by any carbon based fuel (such as gas, coal, wood, oil, diesel, petrol etc.).

Responsible for 50 deaths each year
It states that less than 2% of CO in the air can kill in between one and three minutes and these deaths and injuries cost the taxpayer £178 million a year.

In the UK, carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to around 50 deaths a year and more than 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning.

 

Read the full article here.

Other news from around the country, another suspected carbon monoxide leak, read below.

 

Dartmouth fire crews called to suspected carbon monoxide leak

FIRE crews in Dartmouth were called on on Tuesday night after a suspected carbon monoxide leak at a property in the town.

Crews donned breathing apparatus and using a gas detector to check the property in Lower Street.
A fire service spokesman said: “Fortunately no gas was detected and the building was cleared of this danger and handed to a responsible person.”

They added: “Carbon monoxide is a gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. It is recommended that if you have a room that burns a solid fuel (i.e wood or coal) then you should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, also as gas appliances can emit carbon monoxide it is also encouraged that you should have one fitted in a room that has a gas fires or gas appliances (boiler).”

Read more at this link.

You can find out more and see more carbon monoxide articles here.




Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-31T19:45:00+00:00

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Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:44:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.Read the original post here…Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.The original article can be viewed by clicking on this link[...]Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to[...]



Builder Health And Safety Offences Leads To Carbon Monoxide Tragedy

2016-05-31T19:29:00+00:00

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question […]

Many times injuries and deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning could be avoided if we were to take action and install a carbon monoxide sensing device. However, there are times when our fate is not in our hands but those of professionals. Unfortunately in the article below, the professional in question took actions that resulted in the death of a man. In this instance, recognising the symptoms fast enough may help but sometimes the worst happens all too fast.

 

A builder in his 60s has been given a suspended prison sentence after building work resulted in the death of a business owner in Wandsworth Road.

Muhammad Javid Butt, 63, was found slumped against the wall of Taniya Dry Cleaners on October 5 2013.

Officers were called to the scene, where they noticed a strong smell of gas inside.

They left the drycleaners and Mr Butt, of Wensleydale Avenue, Ilford, to retrieve gas masks from their vehicle.

London Fire Brigade crews were called to help move Mr Butt outside before paramedics attempted to resuscitate him.

A post-mortem examination gave cause of death as carbon monoxide poisoning.

Tests of the property showed that the carbon monoxide levels were 10 times greater than the minimum level required to be toxic to humans.

Enquiries revealed the boiler’s external flume, used to ventilate fumes, had been cut back to about 5ft above the ceiling during building works undertaken by 6699 Limited.

Builder with the firm Keith ‘Bruno’ Morris’, 66, of Ackland House, Beckenham, admitted to cutting the the pipe to make it safer for the builders to work around.

The 66-year-old pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Friday, April 29 and was sentenced on Tuesday May 31 to eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years.

He must carry out 200 hours of unpaid community work and pay £1,000 in costs.

The company pleaded guilty to failure to plan, manage and monitor works, contrary to regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 207 and section 33(1)(c) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Sentencing for 6699 Limited will take place at the Old Bailey on Thursday, July 28.

 

Read the original post here

Further news stories about carbon monoxide can be found at this feed.




Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:20:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater.The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas.Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death.‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now.‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely.‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIESIn January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi.In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home.During 2006–07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia.In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCCThe odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion.Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly.Read the full article at the Daily MailAn interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article.A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerable people.Carbon monoxide could be linked to dementiaCarbon monoxide is a colourless, odourless gas that can be toxic to humans and in large concentrations it is known to be a ‘stealth killer’.The Gas Safety Trust has discussed carbon monoxide as being one of factors which could be affecting peop[...]



Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-30T15:19:00+00:00

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Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

2016-05-30T15:05:00+00:00

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning […]The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.   A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater. The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas. Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image) Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death. ‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now. ‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely. ‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIES In January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi. In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home. During 2006-07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia. In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCC The odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion. Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly. Read the full article at the Daily Mail   An interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article. A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerabl[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:16:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device.The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors.As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair.Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors.“To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires.The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next generation of gas sensors,” Prof Sowwan commented. “In contrast to other techniques, our approach is cost effective and suitable for mass production.”This new method could also help scientists in better understanding the sensor lifetime. The performance of a sensor decreases overtime, and this is a[...]



New Technologies In Carbon Monoxide Detection

2016-05-26T20:00:00+00:00

Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air […]Here are some interesting updates in the detection of carbon monoxide gases in the air. Being so difficult to detect, it requires special sensors and any update in this technology can only assist us all further. Get to know your device. The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a poisonous gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odour, taste, or colour and hence it is difficult to detect. Scientists have been investigating sensors that can determine CO concentration, and a team from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in tandem with the University of Toulouse, has found an innovative method to build such sensors. As a tool for CO detection, scientists use extremely small wires: copper oxide nanowires. Copper oxide nanowires chemically react with CO, creating an electrical signal that can be used to quantify CO concentration. These nanowires are so thin that it is possible to fit more than 1,000 of them in the average thickness of a human hair. Two issues have hampered the use of nanowires. “The first problem is the integration of nanowires into devices that are big enough to be handled and that can also be easily mass produced,” said Prof Mukhles Sowwan, director of the Nanoparticles by Design Unit at OIST. “The second issue is the ability to control the number and position of nanowires in such devices.” Both these difficulties might have been solved by Dr Stephan Steinhauer, postdoctoral scholar at OIST, together with Prof Sowwan, and researchers from the University of Toulouse. They recently published their research in the journal ACS Sensors. “To create copper oxide nanowires, you need to heat neighbouring copper microstructures. Starting from the microstructures, the nanowires grow and bridge the gap between the microstructures, forming an electrical connection between them,” Dr Steinhauer explained. “We integrated copper microstructures on a micro-hotplate, developed by the University of Toulouse. A micro-hotplate is a thin membrane that can heat up to several hundred Celsius degrees, but with very low power consumption.” Thanks to the micro-hotplate, researchers have a high degree of control over the quantity and position of the nanowires. Also, the micro-hotplate provides scientists with data on the electrical signal that goes through the nanowires. The final result is an exceptionally sensitive device, capable of detecting very low concentrations of CO. “Potentially, miniaturized CO sensors that integrate copper oxide nanowires with micro-hotplates are the first step towards the next genera[...]



The importance of having a co detector | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-24T17:28:00+00:00

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The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:27:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church.What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives.“At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.”The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound.“My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.”The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide.“It still feels kind of surreal — like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.”Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained.“Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.”The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now.The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools.Original posted here -https://medium.com/media/83d9b1a843930a083e39bd128a3b923a/hrefGreat news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible(STAFF) — The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning.The service received a donation of more than 100 carbon monoxide detectors courtesy of the Insurance Bureau of Canada.Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth was on hand, along with the bureau’s manager of government relations, Matt Hiraishi, to do the h[...]



The importance of having a co detector

2016-05-24T17:17:00+00:00

Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and […]Having a carbon monoxide detector installed in the home is definitely a life saver. Here we have yet another news story about how this device can save lives. Please read and learn and connect on Facebook or Twitter.   REXBURG, Idaho — It was a normal Sunday for Chris and Julia Marcum. They ate breakfast and spent some time playing with their young daughters before church. What they didn’t know was there was an invisible danger lurking in their home and it’s likely a small detector saved their lives. “At first I couldn’t really find what the noise was,” Chris Marcum tells EastIdahoNews.com. “We actually had recently purchased our carbon monoxide detector like a month and a half ago.” The detector was left forgotten in the Marcum’s furnace room until Sunday, May 15 when carbon monoxide levels became life threatening and the alarm started to sound. “My husband was like, ‘Everyone get out of the house,’” Julie Marcum says. “I got the baby up from her nap, grabbed the dog and my six-year-old was already outside crying. I think she thought our house was on fire.” The Madison County Fire Department responded to the house and found the furnace was leaking carbon monoxide. “It still feels kind of surreal – like we were actually in danger,” Chris says. “That day felt like just a normal day and there was nothing special about it. That’s how it would have felt even if we didn’t have it (the detector), I’m grateful that we did get the detector when we did.” Madison County assistant fire chief Mikel Walker says this situation is a reminder of how important it is that gas appliances are installed properly and maintained. “Make sure that your stuff is vented, your furnace is vented properly and your gas stove is vented if it has a chimney,” Walker says. “If your alarm goes off, open your windows, call the fire department, exit the house and protect yourself.” The Marcum’s two-year-old daughter did get sick from the carbon monoxide but she has recovered and is doing well now. The family says they’re grateful to be alive and hope those who don’t have smoke detectors will consider getting the life-saving tools. Original posted here – Brand new carbon monoxide detector saves family Great news for Barrie in Canada with the fire service having been given more than 100 CO alarms for distribution to help with the battle against carbon monoxide. Install your sensor as soon as possible (STAFF) – The Barrie Fire & Emergency Service received a special lifesaving delivery Friday morning. [...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules critics argue

2016-05-22T14:53:01+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock.During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance.Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000.A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations.However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway.Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties.A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation.She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector.“However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties.“In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.”“We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.”Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.”He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.Read the full article at the published source here…While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. Laura Kavanagh-Jones from SFRS’s Prevention team said: “Carbon Monoxide is a deadly gas that you can’t see, smell or taste.Too many people are dying or suffering needlessly from carbon monoxide poisoning. That’s why I am urging every resident in Shropshire to make sure they and their love[...]



Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-22T14:53:00+00:00

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Council putting lives at risk by dodging carbon monoxide detector rules, critics argue

2016-05-22T14:18:00+00:00

For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. […]For a while now, it has been law for landlords to fit carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, a long with smoke alarms. However, it looks like councils can get away with this. Although some are fitting CO detectors regardless, others are avoiding the expense, see the article below. Rss feed news here.   A COUNCIL has been accused of dodging its own rules and risking tenants’ safety by failing to fit carbon monoxide detectors in its housing stock. During a cabinet meeting last month, Castle Point Council introduced Government legislation stating that private landlords need to fit detectors in properties with a solid fuel burning appliance. Landlords breaching the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations 2015 can be fined up to £5,000. A loophole means that council homes are exempt from the regulations. However, Basildon Council and South Essex Homes, which manages Southend Council’s housing stock, have both installed the detectors anyway. Rochford Housing Association, which bought Rochford Council’s housing supply in 2007, said it has also has fitted them to all properties. A Castle Point council spokesman told the Echo it is considering installing the detectors in light of the new legislation. She said: “The council housing stock does not come under the legislation which has recently been introduced for properties available in the private rental sector. “However, whilst we don’t currently have carbon monoxide detectors in our properties we are considering a programme of works to implement these within relevant properties. “In the meantime we have a very proactive programme of regular gas safety checks across all our properties where gas is installed, whereby the annual checks are now undertaken on a rolling ten month basis.” “We have also committed to an extensive programme of boiler replacements which commenced last year to bring all our boilers to a better standard.” Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is disappointed the authority is “taking a chance with residents’ safety.” He has urged the council to act quickly to resolve the issue.   Read the full article at the published source here…   While we have some councils, perhaps, shirking their responsibilities in fitting co alarms, the Shropshire fire and rescue service have recently launched a campaign to raise the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning, see below. Learn more at our Tumblr blog.   Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service has launched a campaign aimed at rai[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:30:01+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.How carbon monoxide detectors workCarbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer.How carbon monoxide killsCarbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body.Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death.How carbon monoxide detectors workThere are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around.Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into and out of it. A small voltage is applied between two of the electrodes (called the working and the reference electrodes). When carbon monoxide enters the sensor, it reacts with the oxygen also present in the atmosphere, releasing an electron and creating a small current between the electrodes. Some sensors use electrodes coated wi[...]



How carbon monoxide detectors work | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-20T19:30:00+00:00

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How carbon monoxide detectors work

2016-05-20T19:18:00+00:00

This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on […]This is a great article posted on the cnet.com website, giving details about how carbon monoxide detectors work. It also looks at why CO is so dangerous and breaks down what the alarms are doing when they detect CO gases in the environment . More CO blog posts available on Medium.   How carbon monoxide detectors work Carbon monoxide is a killer. This colorless, odorless gas is a normal side product of the combustion of things such as the gas or oil that heats your house. Normally, this is only released in very small amounts and is dispersed into the atmosphere through a vent or chimney. However, if a heater is only partially burning fuel or there isn’t enough ventilation, it can quickly become a problem, because even small amounts can be fatal. That’s why laws were passed that required carbon monoxide detectors to be fitted to most homes, offices and other buildings. Let’s look at how these devices detect this stealthy killer. How carbon monoxide kills Carbon monoxide is a stealthy killer. An amount as low as 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause headaches, and 600 ppm levels can quickly lead to unconsciousness and, eventually, death. That’s how it kills most people: it puts them to sleep, then kills them while they sleep. The effect of low concentrations mounts over time, with even a very low concentration causing adverse effects if you are exposed for long enough. That’s because of the sneaky way it harms the body. Carbon monoxide blocks the ability of your blood to carry oxygen, replacing the spot that oxygen takes on the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. This iron-rich compound is how your blood carries oxygen around the body, and carbon monoxide bonds to hemoglobin much tighter than oxygen alone. Over time, as more and more hemoglobin is blocked from doing its job by carbon monoxide, your blood just can’t carry enough oxygen to keep your tissues going, especially the brain. They begin to fail, causing headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, and eventually, death. How carbon monoxide detectors work   There are several different ways to detect carbon monoxide, but most home carbon monoxide detectors use an electrochemical sensor. These rely on how the behavior of a chemical changes when carbon monoxide is around. Inside the carbon monoxide alarm is a small sensor with three electrodes on it. These three electrodes lead into a container of a chemical called the electrolyte. This container is gas permeable, meaning that gas from the atmosphere can pass freely into [...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:30:01+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety informationFather of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaignA man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad.Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG).Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher.She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater.Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad.He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it.“Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness.“We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.”Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully.On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm.David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned.“We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in order to empower people to protect themselves from the silent killer, both at home and abroad.Please read the full article here…All of us should be remaining aware, not just for ourselves but also for friends and family. You, or someone you know is probably going on holiday some time soon. Ensure they are awar[...]



Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign | Gas Safety Information

2016-05-18T19:30:00+00:00

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Father of teacher killed by carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign

2016-05-18T19:24:00+00:00

A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean […]A great concept that we wholly agree with. There is not enough awareness when it comes to carbon monoxide poisoning, especially when other things are on our mind like of the young woman in the story below. Moving abroad or just moving in general, as well as holidays can mean our guard is down when it comes to CO safety. It is important to remain aware at all times, read the article and get behind the campaign. Read our blog for more CO safety information   Father of teacher killed by  carbon monoxide poisoning calls for national campaign A man whose daughter was killed by carbon monoxide poisoning has called for greater awareness among Brits abroad. Mark Dingley spoke at Westminster last week at an event convened by the All Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group (APPCOG). Mr Dingley’s daughter Francesca died in Chengdu, China, in February 2015 aged 22, having just moved to the country to start work as an English teacher. She was killed in her flat by carbon monoxide fumes from an incorrectly installed water heater. Mr Dingley urged for alarms to be seen as “essential” travel items and for the industry to do more to encourage the public to take detectors with them when they go abroad. He said: “People die needlessly from carbon monoxide simply because they know nothing about it. “Educating the general population is key, the government, travel industry and energy suppliers could all do far more to raise awareness. “We would like to see prominent and robust warnings in government travel advice, at airports and in ferry terminals, in railway and bus stations, in holiday brochures and on travel websites. Detectors should be available in the shops at airports and ferry terminals as well as in the travel sections of large retailers.” Mr Dingley called for a national advertising campaign, and said advice on government websites must be delivered more forcefully. On its website, the Foreign Office recommends those living in China should ensure their home contains a working carbon monoxide alarm. David Burrowes, MP for Enfield Southgate and APPCOG member, said: “I was pleased to bring the Dingley family’s tragic loss to the attention of Parliament so that vital lifesaving lessons are learned. “We are calling for action from the travel industry to make holiday and longer stay destinations safer, and for more awareness about the risks amongst the wider population, in [...]