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Shuffle: Two Must-See Bands At This Year's Highland Square PorchRokr FestivalShuffle: Two Must-See Bands At This Year's Highland Square PorchRokr Festival

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 09:26:00 +0000

This Saturday, more than 130 bands and musicians fill Akron’s Highland Square neighborhood for the annual PorchRokr Festival . They’ll perform on porches, sidewalks and stages on several city blocks. For this week’s Shuffle, The Devil Strip music editor Brittany Nader shares two of her favorite artists in the lineup. Shuggie Shooter Brittany Nader says the PorchRokr Festival offers an opportunity to see some underground bands on a public stage. One of those is Shuggie Shooter , whose real name is Dylan Olmedo of Akron. He used to go by GoldenBear and his sound is described as as lo-fi indie "basement pop" music. "It's very intimate but also reflects the mildewy, grimy feeling you get in a basement and those basement house shows you go to. But there's a pop element because it's very upbeat," Nader says. She says Shuggie Shooter is also a full DIY artist. He recorded some of his new album, "You Over Me," while he was a student at Ohio University. "He didn't like how it sounded, so he re


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Two Northeast Ohio CEOs Sat on Trump's Now Dissolved Economic Advisory PanelsTwo Northeast Ohio CEOs Sat on Trump's Now Dissolved Economic Advisory Panels

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:49:29 +0000

Two local industry leaders were among those sitting on President Trump's economic advisory panels , which were abruptly dissolved Wednesday. Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove and Timken Company CEO Richard Kyle were among the members. Kyle served on the President’s Manufacturing Council and Cosgrove on the Strategic and Policy Forum. The president Tweeted Wednesday he’s disbanding both groups. But the Forum CEOs had agreed to disband during a conference call earlier in the day. Members of both panels had been under public pressure to resign following President Trump’s statements blaming “many sides” for the violence in Charlottesville this past weekend. A joint statement from the CEOs who sat on the President’s Strategic Forum said the debate over participation in the group had become “a distraction” from the economic policy initiatives they were tasked to address. According to the statement, “the President and we are disbanding the Forum.” The statement also said racism and violence


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About 500 Gather in Downtown Akron to Mark Charlottesville and Call for An End to RacismAbout 500 Gather in Downtown Akron to Mark Charlottesville and Call for An End to Racism

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:38:35 +0000

About 500 people gathered in downtown Akron last night for a candlelight vigil honoring Heather Heyer and calling her death a potential catalyst for ending racism. The vigil and rally included the iconic sounds of the civil rights movement and evoked the images of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. But speakers, including former state senator and Bernie Sanders surrogate Nina Turner, dwelled most on Heather Heyer , the young woman killed last weekend as she protested the gathering of white supremacists and neo-Nazis in Charlottesville. “When we look in the mirror, we are Heather. That everything this young woman stood for and fought for is worth fighting for generation, after generation, after generation.” Sunny Matthews, a diversity trainer in Akron, says yesterday's funeral for Heather Heyer added poignancy and urgency to the Akron gathering. “And it seemed like her mom was trying to push us to recognize that this was a rally call. This was our chance to be like, ‘No we will not let


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Kent State Expands Its Conflict Management Center to Its Own SchoolKent State Expands Its Conflict Management Center to Its Own School

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:11:03 +0000

Kent State University is expanding its Center for Applied Conflict Management and refining its mission. The center, which used to be under the university’s political science department, will now be called the School of Peace and Conflict Studies and will have its own full-time faculty. The school’s director, Patrick Coy, says the change will give Kent State a bigger profile for its work in conflict management and social change. “So we’re not known just for conflict. We’re known for the constructive management of conflict, the constructive conflict responses to conflict and to violence and to war, and to bring about more sustainable peace with justice. And this is one of the reasons why we did this.” The school, originally known as the Center for Peaceful Change, was created in 1971 following the killing of four Kent State students by the National Guard the year before.


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Kasich Condemns White Nationalists and Criticizes Trump's Response to Them Kasich Condemns White Nationalists and Criticizes Trump's Response to Them

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:58:01 +0000

Gov. John Kasich has turned up the heat on President Donald Trump in the aftermath of Trump’s shaky position on white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the KKK and other hate groups. This marks another turn in the evolution of Kasich’s relationship with the Trump administration. During an interview on NBC’s Today Show , Gov. John Kasich outright condemned the hate groups behind this weekend’s march that turned violent in Charlottesville, Va. He said it was terrible that President Trump has not clearly denounced white nationalists, neo-Nazis and KKK behind it. “Now these folks are apparently going to go other places and they think that they had some sort of a victory. There is no moral equivalency between the KKK, the neo-Nazis, and anybody else,” he said. On Twitter, for the first time , Kasich ripped white nationalists saying there was no room for them in the Republican Party. Kasich said during the Today Show interview that he’s been restrained in his criticism of Trump , though he has been


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Euclid Police Chief Apologizes for His Delayed Response to Video of His Officer Punching a MotoristEuclid Police Chief Apologizes for His Delayed Response to Video of His Officer Punching a Motorist

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:53:58 +0000

The Euclid police chief has apologized for not responding sooner to a Saturday morning incident involving a white officer caught on video repeatedly punching a black man following a traffic stop. Police Chief Scott Meyer says the incident is being “thoroughly and fairly” investigated. Euclid Officer Michael Amiott stopped Richard Hubbard III for a traffic violation. According to the police report, Hubbard resisted arrest leading to what the report calls “a violent struggle lasting over three minutes.” The incident was caught on video and appears to show the officer slamming the man’s head into the pavement. According to Amiott’s police report, he used “closed fist strikes to the face and head.” In a written statement, Chief Meyer says he understands the “great concern and alarm of those who have seen or heard of the videos.” He asks for patience while the incident is being investigated. Hubbard was treated for injuries, charged with resisting arrest and driving with a suspended license


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Ohio Report Finds Little Progress So Far In The Trump Administration's Blue Collar Job RestorationOhio Report Finds Little Progress So Far In The Trump Administration's Blue Collar Job Restoration

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:45:09 +0000

Policy Matters Ohio says President Trump has a long way to go before delivering on his promise to restore blue-collar jobs in the state . The left-leaning group’s newest Blue-Collar Jobs report finds that since December, Ohio has lost more than 2,000 manufacturing jobs. While it says the state has added more than 8,000 construction jobs, researcher Hannah Halbert says Ohio needs to add nearly 84,000 blue collar jobs to reach pre-recession levels. “We’re not really much different than where we are back in, say in March of last year. It’s really early in the (Trump) administration to expect all of that 84,000 back. But there’s not a lot happening that signals we’re going to see some sort of big renaissance.” She adds that Trump administration labor policies limiting protections for workers will likely hurt blue-collar jobs and many other workers in the state.


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A Third Ohio City Uses Technology to Track Gunfire in Real-TimeA Third Ohio City Uses Technology to Track Gunfire in Real-Time

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:33:54 +0000

A third Ohio city is adding a audio-surveillance system to track gunfire. Cincinnati is rolling out ShotSpotter technology this month. In 2010, Youngstown became the first Ohio city to install the system. Canton followed in 2013. ShotSpotter uses microphones to detect and pinpoint the sound of gunshots, which then sends an alert to dispatchers. University of Virginia researcher Jennifer Doleac says the technology can improve response times. " If there’s a victim who needs to be transported to the emergency room, they could potentially save more lives that way. They might be able to either catch the person while they’re still on the scene, who fired the gun or (if they know) where the gun was fired, they are better able to collect evidence like shell casings. She says there is no evidence the system could reduce gun violence and suggests cities should perform studies to see if ShotSpotter will benefit an area. Canton police are still adjusting how to prioritize responses to gunshots


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Radio Host Files Defamation Suit Against Ohio Man Behind White Nationalist Website Radio Host Files Defamation Suit Against Ohio Man Behind White Nationalist Website

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:28:25 +0000

The central Ohio man who’s behind the white nationalist website The Daily Stormer has gotten a lot of attention since this weekend’s violence in Virginia. He’s now facing a defamation lawsuit filed in Columbus by a well-known Muslim comedian, columnist and radio host. SiriusXM Radio host Dean Obeidallah says he’s received death threats since Worthington-native Andrew Anglin posted fake tweets about him on Anglin’s Daily Stormer site. Those tweets claim Obeidallah was the terrorist mastermind behind the Ariana Grande concert bombing in England in May. After this weekend’s events at a white supremacist march in Charlottesville , Obeidallah says he and the group Muslim Advocates filed the lawsuit to hold Anglin accountable. “I’ve defended anti-Muslim figures that put up posters in New York City that demonize Muslims. I will defend the Klan to have peaceful rallies. This goes beyond any discussions or opinions,” he said. Obeidallah also notes the Daily Stormer has been linked to people


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The View From Pluto: Indians Ownership Is All In; Now Players Must FollowThe View From Pluto: Indians Ownership Is All In; Now Players Must Follow

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 09:23:00 +0000

The Indians are entering a crucial part of their up-and-down season. The team has six weeks to distance itself from the rest of the AL Central division for a return trip to the playoffs. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says, “Welcome to the real pennant race.” The Indians are in first place in the division, six games ahead of Minnesota and Kansas City. And, the team has an important week, with road series against against those two teams. “They could win five out of seven and be up eight or 10 games, or they could have a week to forget. This is a key part of the season.” Ownership invests big Pluto says like last year, ownership made another big mid-season trade. Relief pitcher Andrew Miller was the key in last year’s World Series run. This year, the team traded for outfielder Jay Bruce , who hit 29 home runs so far this season with the New York Mets. Pluto says picking up Bruce’s nearly $4 million salary shows that the Dolans are committed to winning. It lifts the team’s total payroll to


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Ohio's Family Docs Made a Lot of Money From the Opioid IndustryOhio's Family Docs Made a Lot of Money From the Opioid Industry

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:49:18 +0000

It’s not unusual for pharmaceutical companies to offer payments to doctors – for speaking fees, for travel expenses, for lunches and for gifts. But a new study shows one in five family doctors in America have received a payment involving an opioid medication – and Ohio is among the top states in the country in terms of dollars involved in those payments. The study in the current edition of the American Journal of Public Health shows opioid drug makers paid more than $46 million to more than 68,000 American doctors in a 28-month period ending in December 2015. Ohio, which has been in a full-blown opioid crisis for several years, ranked eighth for total payments from opioid manufacturers to doctors. Scott Hadland is a pediatrician at Boston Medical Center and a specialist in helping adolescents and young adults struggling with addiction to opioids that, in most cases, they got as prescription painkillers from their doctors. He’s also one of the authors of the study, which was done by


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Cleveland Council Members Push for an Earlier Council Meeting so Q's Referendum Can Make the BallotCleveland Council Members Push for an Earlier Council Meeting so Q's Referendum Can Make the Ballot

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:39:51 +0000

Four Cleveland city council members are calling on the council president to reschedule a meeting in the hopes of putting the Q deal referendum on the Nov. 7 ballot. The referendum would ask voters whether they support the city's plan to spend tax dollars on renovating Quicken Loans Arena. The city council clerk at first refused to accept petitions calling for a referendum. But the Ohio Supreme Court ruled this month that the city must accept the petitions. The battle now is about timing and the city's charter. The charter requires a referendum to be held at least 60 days after the council clerk notifies the council at a regularly scheduled meeting. That's why four council members – including Jeff Johnson, who’s running for mayor -- want the council president to move up next month's meeting to Sept. 6. "You went down there; you caused the delay; you have to find a solution to this that doesn't cost the people any more money," he said. If the issue isn't on the ballot in November, the


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Cleveland Contests Its Near-Bottom Ranking in SustainabilityCleveland Contests Its Near-Bottom Ranking in Sustainability

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:34:33 +0000

Cleveland is taking issue with a study from a group affiliated with the United Nations that says Northeast Ohio's largest city is one of the least sustainable big cities in the country. The study by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network ranked the city 99 th out of the 100 most-populated cities. The report takes into account poverty, unemployment and high CO2 emissions. Cleveland's chief of sustainability, Matt Gray, says the study uses old data and leaves out many important factors like fresh water. “You know, (Cleveland) has one of the most sustainable fresh- water sources in the world and Cleveland water is a great utility for providing good clean drinking water. But you’ll notice cities that are in the desert generally perform much better on water than cities like Cleveland that are on the Great Lakes.” He says the report also ranked cities driven by the service sector higher than ones relying on manufacturing.


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The ACLU Will Teach a Workshop Focused on the Dos and Don'ts of ProtestingThe ACLU Will Teach a Workshop Focused on the Dos and Don'ts of Protesting

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:29:09 +0000

There are important dos and don’ts that come with protesting, according to a group that’s holding a workshop in Columbus to teach people how to demonstrate within their constitutional rights. Protests and demonstrations are protected under the First Amendment. But protests that get out of hand and turn violent are no longer peaceful assemblies and can lose Constitutional protection. That’s among the concepts the ACLU will go over in the workshop. The ACLU’s Elizabeth Bonham says the same constitutional protections and parameters cover hate groups as well. And while she condemns their racism, Bonham says allowing free speech is better than keeping those ideas in the shadows. “They fester and they become even more dangerous and what the First Amendment does is that it entitles everyone to hear every attitude outside in the light of day,” she says. She adds that gives other groups an opportunity to rally a counter protest.


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Facebook Announces Its New Data Center in Ohio Will Open in 2019Facebook Announces Its New Data Center in Ohio Will Open in 2019

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:18:53 +0000

Facebook plans to build its 10th data center in New Albany in central Ohio, to open in 2019. The $750 million project comes with a mixture of local and state funding incentives. Facebook’s Rachel Peterson says the project, which will get unspecified local and state tax credits, will be good for Ohio. “It’s going to be delivering hundreds of millions of dollars of investment to the local community here and to the state, as well as thousands of construction jobs and hundreds of full-time operational jobs,” she said. State leaders say the project will spur development from other tech companies. But Wendy Patton with Policy Matters Ohio isn’t so sure. “Big money deal, a lot of impact, very little information. So it’s the way the game is played, but we think there’s a lot that could be done to improve the game,” she said. The data center will create about a hundred permanent jobs. JobsOhio says this deal is the second largest in its four-year history.


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Ohio Democrat Cautiously Supports Trump's Renegotiation of NAFTAOhio Democrat Cautiously Supports Trump's Renegotiation of NAFTA

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:15:20 +0000

The Trump administration is to begin renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement tomorrow and has the qualified support of Ohio Democrats like Congressman Tim Ryan. But as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, issues like transparency, labor rights and the environment may erode that support. Midwesterm Democrats like the Youngstown area’s Ryan have maintained for years that NAFTA needs to be reworked. He says it has helped shift jobs overseas and lower wages here, while doing nothing to boost wages for one of the key partners, Mexico. But Ryan also is calling for transparency during negotiations, including access to staff negotiating documents and a final version of the agreement. “This is not a private company that the administration is running. It’s a public entity; it’s a government that has elected officials involved in it. And you’ve got to have transparency and you’ve got to make sure that organized labor’s included in these discussions, that the environmental organizations are


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Charlottesville: 'It's A Teacher's Worst Nightmare'Charlottesville: 'It's A Teacher's Worst Nightmare'

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 02:25:49 +0000

The Ohio man accused of driving his car into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday was photographed earlier in the day apparently marching with a group of self-proclaimed fascists. James Alex Fields has been charged with one count of second-degree murder. Before moving to Maumee, Ohio, Fields lived in Northern Kentucky. One of his high school teachers says Fields was fascinated with Nazi Germany. Derek Weimer taught Fields in three classes at Randall K. Cooper High School in Union. He says Fields was intelligent and didn't cause trouble. But he says the quiet boy was also deeply into Adolf Hitler and white supremacy. Weimer says he did his best to steer Fields away from those interests. "Your mission as a teacher is really you're teaching these kids valuable fundamentals and skills to be successful in life. When you see something like what culminated in James Fields, it's a complete defeat." Weimer says he used historical examples and events. He drew on stories of his


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Akron Welcomes Rosie the Underground RiveterAkron Welcomes Rosie the Underground Riveter

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 02:11:57 +0000

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan christened Rosie today . “I christen thee Rosie, in honor of the brave residents like Rosie May Jacob who went to war on the homefront here in Akron during World War II.” The passenger-jet-sized machine will soon be boring a mile-long tunnel under the city. Rosie will create the 30-foot-high tunnel as part of Akron’s billion-dollar sewer project . The machine was built in Solon and transported in sections to its starting point near downtown. The city paid $184 million for Rosie, which looks like the fuselage of a 747, but -- at 1,00 tons -- is much heavier. Horrigan says the work Rosie is doing will help people in Northeast Ohio for decades to come. “In a typical year, this tunnel will treat almost half-a-billion gallons of combined sewer overflow so it can be safely returned to the Cuyahoga River.” Rosie is the culmination of three decades of planning for engineer Pat Gsellman. “The front basically has a lot of little drilling elements that will actually drill


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State Senators Debate Which Kasich Vetoes to OverrideState Senators Debate Which Kasich Vetoes to Override

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 02:05:17 +0000

Last month, state representatives voted to override a budget veto for the first time in 40 years. They actually overrode 11 of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 vetoes. Senators are now deciding which of those overrides to vote on. And they may ask the House to consider overriding more vetoes as well. Republican Senate President Larry Obhof of Medina says not all of the 11 House overrides so far may be voted on at the session on Aug. 23. But he says some will be. And he’s also hoping the House will eventually override Kasich’s veto of the freeze on enrollment in Medicaid expansion . “I’m in favor of the freeze – it was actually my amendment. But there are a number of things that the House has done already that they’ve sent to us that we’ll be taking up.” Obhof says one of those overrides the Senate will consider is Kasich’s veto of the plan to require his administration ask for permission twice a year from a small panel of lawmakers to spend some Medicaid expansion money.


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Following Massillon Incident, National Nurses Union Develops Protocols For Opioid ExposureFollowing Massillon Incident, National Nurses Union Develops Protocols For Opioid Exposure

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 01:59:34 +0000

A national nurses union is developing protocols for treating opioid patients after three Massillon nurses they represent were treated for fentanyl exposure. The nurses from Affinity Medical Center were treated with Narcan after cleaning a patient’s room last week. Michelle Mahon is with National Nurses United . “People who are paying attention will see that this epidemic is really turning into a much more widespread problem, affecting emergency responders, nurses, as well as police officers out in the field and paramedics. We encourage hospitals to examine their policies and practices immediately.” The protocol will be used to raise awareness of contamination in healthcare workplaces, as well as suggesting additional protections.


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