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Preview: NPR Topics: Author Interviews

Author Interviews : NPR



NPR interviews with top authors and the NPR Book Tour, a weekly feature and podcast where leading authors read and discuss their writing. Subscribe to the RSS feed.



Last Build Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:04:00 -0400

Copyright: Copyright 2017 NPR - For Personal Use Only
 



Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:04:00 -0400

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep.



Amy Tan Revisits The Roots Of Her Writing Career In 'Where The Past Begins'

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:01:00 -0400

In a new memoir, the Joy Luck Club author searches her past for the sources of her creativity. She says, "I certainly think that the bad experiences ... shaped me as a writer."



Tom Hanks Is Obsessed With Typewriters (So He Wrote A Book About Them)

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 04:53:00 -0400

The actor's new collection of short fiction — his debut book as an author — is called Uncommon Type, and each story has something to do with the machine close to his heart.



From Hamilton To Grant: Ron Chernow Paints A 'Farsighted' President in New Biography

Sun, 15 Oct 2017 17:56:00 -0400

After the massive success of his last book, which inspired an award-winning Broadway musical, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Ron Chernow is back with a new biography of President Ulysses S. Grant.



'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

Sun, 15 Oct 2017 08:02:04 -0400

Tobacco enemas? Mercury pills? Ice pick lobotomies? A new book explains how throughout history, miracle "cures" often didn't just fail to improve people's health, they maimed and killed.



Mortician Explores Cultures' Many Paths For 'Sacred Transition' Of Death

Sun, 15 Oct 2017 08:02:00 -0400

Caitlin Doughty, whose Los Angeles funeral home specializes in alternative ceremonies, traveled the world to collect stories about how different peoples send loved ones off to the great beyond.



'The Butchering Art': How A 19th Century Physician Made Surgery Safer

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 17:28:00 -0400

Before surgeons accepted germ theory, operations often killed patients. All Things Considered host Robert Siegel talks with the author of a new biography of antiseptic advocate Joseph Lister.



Jimmy Fallon On The School Of 'SNL' And His Tendency To Smile Too Much

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:22:00 -0400

"There was a report card from kindergarten and the comment from the teacher was, 'Jimmy smiles too much,' " Fallon says. "I think I would smile even when I was getting yelled at."



75 Years Later, A Look At The 'Life, Legend, and Afterlife' Of 'Casablanca'

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 14:20:33 -0400

Film historian Noah Isenberg revisits the making of the classic Hollywood film in his new book, We'll Always Have Casablanca. "Seventy-five years after its premiere, its still very timely," he says.



'The Year I Was Peter The Great': A Young American In Soviet Russia

Tue, 10 Oct 2017 16:49:00 -0400

Marvin Kalb's new book is about a very interesting year — 1956 — that he spent on a diplomatic mission to what was then the U.S.S.R. It's part memoir, part context for understanding the Cold War.



Marc Maron On Robin Williams, Barack Obama And Learning To Be A Good Listener

Tue, 10 Oct 2017 05:08:00 -0400

NPR interviewed Maron in the cramped garage where he tapes most of his podcast, WTF. When he's the interviewer, he says, "I generally don't have a page full of questions, like you have there."



'Red Famine' Revisits Stalin's Brutal Campaign To Starve The Peasantry In Ukraine

Mon, 09 Oct 2017 13:18:00 -0400

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Applebaum explains how Stalin killed millions in the '30s by orchestrating a famine to suppress the nationalist movement and strengthen Russian influence in Ukraine.



Poet Rupi Kaur: 'Art Should Be Accessible To The Masses'

Mon, 09 Oct 2017 04:58:00 -0400

Rupi Kaur came to Canada from India when she was four years old and didn't learn English well for years; she says her raw, minimalist poems are tailored for readers like her, with limited English.



In 1960s New York, Witchy Women Learn 'The Rules Of Magic'

Sun, 08 Oct 2017 07:52:42 -0400

In Alice Hoffman's prequel to Practical Magic, two sisters uncover their family's supernatural gifts and curses while growing up in the city.



Out Of Bounds: Jen Welter On Breaking Barriers In Football

Sun, 08 Oct 2017 07:52:41 -0400

Jen Welter is the first woman to ever coach in the NFL and she's out with a new book called Play Big. She talks to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro about her time in the NFL and its controversies.