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Preview: All Sides with Ann Fisher Podcast

All Sides with Ann Fisher



All Sides with Ann Fisher is a two-hour daily public affairs talk show designed to touch all sides of the issues and events that shape life in central Ohio.



Last Build Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 10:49:32 +0000

Copyright: Copyright WOSU Public Media
 



Tech Tuesday: Chatbots, Email & the 4th Amendment

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Today at 11am Messaging apps are increasingly using artificial intelligence-driven in-app services called chatbots to simplify user experiences. With these chatbots, it is easier than ever to call an Uber car or schedule a meeting without leaving your messaging conversation. A new Google platform called Allo, has a chatbot feature that suggests message responses.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092716b.mp3




First Presidential Debate Analysis

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

Today at 10am Candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump went head to head last night at Hofstra University in the first presidential debate of this election season, moderated by Lester Holt. We analyze Trump and Clinton’s performances, discussing their strengths, weaknesses, and policy positions.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092716a.mp3




Central Ohio Real Estate

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Sales in central Ohio hit a new August record last month but while mortgage prices rise, the number of available properties is decreasing. Still real estate experts are optimistic about the future of housing development in central Ohio.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092616b.mp3




Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will face off Monday night in the first presidential debate. We consider the candidates’ approaches in style and preparation. Plus, Ohio Gov. John Kasich stands up to the GOP leadership.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092616a.mp3




All Sides Weekend: Books

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Today guest host Christopher Purdy discusses new reads with a panel of other bookworms. Among the books to be discussed is The Reactive by Masande Ntshanaga, and Don't Go Back by Lina M. Ferreira.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92128a_0.mp3




Caring for Sick Pets

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

A recent distemper outbreak that spread throughout Franklin County Dog Shelter resulted in the euthanization of at least 84 dogs at the shelter. But detecting an illness in pets can be tricky, although certain changes in behavior can be signifiers. This hour, we explore how to identify when a pet is sick.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092216b_4.mp3




Creating Upward Mobility for Children Born Below the Poverty Line

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

This week, WOSU and NPR stations across the country are participating in a national week of conversations called A Nation Engaged. We’re asking this question: “What can we do to create economic opportunity for more Americans?” Recent U.S Census Bureau data shows that median incomes are up and poverty is down, but here in Ohio 1 in 5 children live in poverty. Central Ohio is often cited as region of economic resilience, but research shows that Columbus ranks among the worst cities in upward mobility. This hour, a conversation about creating economic opportunity for children born into poverty.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092216a_13.mp3




The Evolving Role of the American Military

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

The U.S. Military has changed its mission. Back during World War II, it was about battles and winning. Everybody understood. Now, the mission is less clear. Post 9-11, the war is never ending, and there’s no particular nation target. The role of the military is constant, but not always about battles and winning. Coming up, the evolving role of the military in a changing world with law professor, former pentagon official and author Rosa Brooks.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92118a_0.mp3




Tech Tuesday: E-Books, Self-Driving Ubers, and Kid's Tech

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Uber unleashed four self-driving cars to the streets of Pittsburgh last week. The partnership with the ride-share company is part of the city’s plan to brand itself as a tech friendly hub. Uber is speeding ahead in the race against competitors like Google, which don’t have plans to unveil autonomous cars till 2020. Plus, a look at trends in e-book reading and a guide on choosing a smartwatch for kids.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092016b.mp3




The Heroin Epidemic's Impact on Children

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

In early September, police in East Liverpool, Ohio, posted a photo of a 4-year-old boy in the backseat of a car while his grandmother and her boyfriend were passed out in the front, unconscious from an apparent heroin overdose. The photo was posted to shed light on how the heroin and opioid epidemic is impacting children in that northeastern Ohio city. East Liverpool is not alone. And as the number of overdoses in Ohio increases, social service agencies and addiction recovery centers are stepping up efforts to help the children left behind.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/092016a.mp3




The Slaves of U.S. Presidents

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Slavery is rooted in American history, including the history of the presidency. Ten of the first fifteen U.S. presidents were slave owners, or grew up in a slave owning household. George Washington once bought teeth from enslaved people to be worn in his dentures. This hour, we discuss the lives and stories of the men and women owned by past presidents.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/091916b.mp3




Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

Polls indicate that Democrat Hillary Clinton has lost her post-convention bump, and that her race with Republican Donald Trump is tightening. Plus, the U.S. Supreme Court officially denied Ohio Democrats attempt to reinstate Golden Week, the period in which Ohio residents could register to vote and also cast their ballot early. Also today, we discuss the latest updates regarding the fatal shooting of 13-year-old Tyre King by a white Columbus police officer.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/091916a.mp3




All Sides Weekend: Arts

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

For the second time, the Columbus flagship performing arts organizations are joining forces. Opera Columbus, BalletMet, and the Columbus Symphony will come together for a sequel performance of their successful show, Twisted. Also, VSA will be hosting an Arts and Autism Conference next week.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92128a.mp3




Fall Bird Watching in Ohio

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

If the birds out your window start to get a bit noisy it’s because September is peak fall migration time for songbirds. Birding during fall migration is a bit trickier than Spring, as the birds coloring is muted. Despite the subtlety, there's still plenty to see in the next coming months. Join us today to discover the ins and outs of Ohio birding in the fall.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/091516b.mp3




The Crackdown on For-Profit Colleges

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

ITT Technical Institutes closed its 137 campuses across the nation last week after 50 years in operation. The move arrives after the U.S. Department of Education said ITT would be barred from enrolling students who use federal financial aid. The ITT closures leave thousands of students scrambling for the next option and raise doubts about the future of for-profit colleges and universities, which have been criticized for high loan default rates and deceptive recruitment strategies.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/091516a.mp3




Wellness Wednesday

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Hillary Clinton captured headlines this week after she appeared to nearly collapse during a 9/11 memorial ceremony in New York City. Her doctor later revealed that she had been diagnosed with pneumonia the previous Friday. But pneumonia is common and treatable. More than two million Americans are diagnosed with a mild form of the infection every year.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92120b_1.mp3




Zero Tolerance Policies in Schools

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

Suspension and expulsion rates in schools have exploded over the last two decades in part because of so-called Zero tolerance policies. Now, educators and activists point to the negative and unintended consequences of zero tolerance, its connection to the school to prison pipeline and how it disproportionately affects the lives of young men of color and inner-city kids.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92118a.mp3




Tech Tuesday: Internet Law, Refugee Social Media, and Apple Products

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Twenty years after Congress signed it into law, the Communication Decency Act’s protection of websites is being challenged. Refugees are using smartphones and social networks for survival and to find resources in Greece. Apple is releasing the new iPhone 7 as well as the Apple Watch Series 2, unveiling controversial new features.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/091316b_0.mp3




Ohio State in the Sixties

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 09:01:00 +0000

Ohio State's campus is a vastly different place today than it was 50 years ago. Social movements were shaping the campus and student body throughout the 1960’s. Equal rights for women, civil rights and antiwar sentiments fueled tensions that eventually erupted in violent protests and rioting in 1970.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92112b.mp3




Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 09:00:00 +0000

Clinton and Trump continue to battle it out in Ohio, while voters interest in third party candidates is increasing. Medical marijuana is now legal in the state, but it could take up to two years before patients can get their hands on the drug. Also, a new abortion proposal could make it's way to the ballot.(image)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2016/09/92110a.mp3