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Preview: All Sides with Ann Fisher Podcast

All Sides with Ann Fisher



All Sides with Ann Fisher is a two-hour daily public affairs talk show designed to touch all sides of the issues and events that shape life in central Ohio.



Last Build Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2017 12:03:17 +0000

Copyright: Copyright WOSU Public Media
 



A Conversation with Author and Dorothy Day's Granddaughter Kate Hennessy

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:34:15 +0000

" Dorothy Day: The World Will be Saved by Beauty " is a new biography by Day's youngest grandchild, Kate Hennessy . I spoke to Hennessy recently from her home in Vermont. Here's what she has to say about her grandmother, who may become the newest saint in the Catholic church.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/AllSides_KateHennessy.mp3




All Sides Weekend: Books

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

Join us today with guest host Christopher Purdy to discuss the latest in book news around Columbus with a panel of guests. Guests: Susanne Jaffe , former program director, Thurber House , author of 2 newly published novels, " Her Mother's Daughter " and " La Patrona " Kassie Rose , book critic, WOSU Robin Nesbitt , director, Columbus Metropolitan Library - Hilliard Branch(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_11.mp3




Nuclear Energy in Ohio

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

With the declining price of electricity, nuclear power plants are struggling to stay afloat. Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow one nuclear energy company to charge their customers more because of the growing costs for nuclear plants. Proponents of the bill argue it's about saving jobs, while others feel that customers shouldn't have to front the bill. Today we'll discuss this and the state of nuclear energy in Ohio with a panel of guests.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_6.mp3




Arbor Day and Tree Preservation

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

Arbor Day is an annual day of observance for the promotion of tree planting, care and preservation. Unfortunately, many tree species in the Midwest and across the country are facing rapid decreases in numbers due to disease and pest invasions. Today we'll discuss the best ways to care for trees and how to choose and plant them with a panel of guests. Guests: Barbara Arnold , Senior Horticulturist, Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Joe Russell , arborist and owner, Russell Tree Experts T. Davis Sydnor , Professor Emeritus, School of Environment and Natural Resources at Ohio State University Event: Celebrate Arbor Day with the Conservatory and Ahlum & Arbor Tree Preservation on April 28 and 29.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_11.mp3




Science and Politics

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

Scientists across the country are taking to the streets this weekend to march for science. The march was inspired by the success of the Women's March in January and is meant to be a response to political policies that are at odds with scientific findings and principals. However, some scientists argue that science should remain unpolitical, and that a march undermines the credibility of the field. Join us today as we discuss the March for Science and the intersection of science and politics with a panel of guests. Guests: Christian Büttner , OSU research graduate student, organizer of the March for Science - Columbus Laura Sammons , freelance science writer, organizer of the March for Science - Columbus Erik Nisbet , Associate Professor, Ohio State School of Communication Roger Pielke , Professor of Environmental Studies, University of Colorado(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_10.mp3




Wellness Wednesday: School Lunch Shaming, Loneliness, Marathon Training

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

New Mexico recently passed a bill that prohibits "lunch shaming" in public schools. Lunch shaming happens when a child can't pay a school lunch bill and is denied food. Across the country, children are often punished in some way for not being able to afford lunch. In Alabama, a child who could not afford lunch was stamped with the phrase "I Need Lunch Money." In some schools, kids are required to clean cafeteria tables or their food is simply thrown away if they are short on funds. Join us today as we discuss this and the latest in wellness news. Guests: Patricia Keane , president, New Mexico Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Jennifer Lange , president, School Nutrition Association of Ohio John Cacioppo , psychologist, University of Chicago Tom McGlynn , founder, RunCoach(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_10.mp3




Inequality and Segregation in American Cities

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

Many of today's major American cities are sprawling metropolises that cater to the extremely wealthy while also housing the very poor. Author Richard Florida describes the growth of inequality and segregation in cities as "the new urban crisis." Join us today as we discuss this phenomenon and what can be done to fix it.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_9.mp3




Tech Tuesday: Music, The Shadow Brokers, Burger King

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

Intros longer than 10 seconds in pop songs are a thing of the past, with vocals kicking in about 5 seconds into most songs released today. A new study suggests the shortening of intros and song titles has to do with the shortening of attentions spans due to streaming services like Spotify. Join us today as we discuss this and other tech news. Guests: Hubert Léveillé Gauvin , doctoral student in music theory, The Ohio State University Nicole Perlroth , cybersecurity reporter, New York Times Russell Holly , contributing editor, AndroidCentral.com(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_9.mp3




Fake News

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

The epidemic of fake news is relatively new but has already largely impacted the way people consume and disseminate information online. Facebook recently began displaying ways to avoid fake news on its news feeds, but this puts the responsibility on the consumer to avoid fake news, rather than on Facebook to eliminate it from news feeds. Today we'll discuss what fake news is, where it comes from and how it can be avoided. Guests: Katie Sanders , deputy editor, PolitiFact Richard Hornik , director of overseas partnership programs, Stony Brook University's Center for News Literacy Peg Rosenfield , election specialist, League of Women Voters of Ohio Event: The League of Women Voters-Columbus presents Democracy Forums: The News Media, What is fake news and why are we talking about it? Tuesday, Apr. 18, 2017 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm at the Columbus Public Library - Main Branch 96 S. Grant Ave., Columbus, OH.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_8.mp3




Neuroscience of Emotions

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

Emotions are commonly believed to be something automatic, uncontrollable and expressed in similar ways in every person. New neuroscience research suggests that this is not the case, and emotions are more learned than naturally occurring. Today we'll discuss the science of emotions with a neuroscientist and author of the book "How Emotions are Made: the Secret Life of the Brain." Guests: Lisa Feldman Barrett , neuroscientist and author, “ How Emotions Are Made: the Secret Life of the Brain ”(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_8.mp3




Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

Ohio lawmakers have come up with a plan to address the projected $615 million revenue shortfall by restraining the growth in the budget by $400 million each fiscal year. County leaders across the state are already decrying proposed budget cuts that could cost some counties millions of dollars. Join us today to discuss this and the latest in state and national news with a panel of reporters. Guests: Marc Kovac , Ohio Statehouse Bureau Chief, Gatehouse Media Chrissie Thompson , Columbus Bureau Chief, The Cincinnati Enquirer Jo Ingles , Reporter, Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_7.mp3




The Role of Photojournalism in the 21st Century

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

A picture is worth a thousand words. No matter how often we read about the tumultuous events of the world around us, sometimes it is a photo that cements the events of our time as history in the making. Photographs can tease at tears in our eyes, or turn our mouths into grins. But more than that, they can make us think. Join us as we talk about the power of pictures and the future of photojournalism.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/022717b.mp3




Ohio Prison Oversight

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

The Correctional Institution Inspection Committee, which oversees prison operations in Ohio, will soon likely be closed with its workload shifted to the inspector general's office. The committee was established in 1977 to provide legislative oversight to the state’s prison system, and last year its director was forced to resign under pressure. Today we'll take a look at what this means for the future of Ohio prison oversight with a panel of guests. This show originally aired on March 23, 2017. Guests: Alan Johnson , Reporter, Columbus Dispatch Mike Brickner , Senior Policy Director, ACLU Ohio Michele Deitch , Co-Chair, American Bar Association's Subcommittee on Correctional Oversight(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/hour_1_1.mp3




Genetic Testing

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

23andMe was the first genomic company to receive FDA permission to provide consumers with information about potential genetic diseases or conditions, giving it a leg up over other companies in the genetic testing industry. Genetic testing can catch diseases and illnesses, giving doctors extra time to prevent or treat conditions they might not have otherwise caught in time. However, genetic testing companies are having to contend with issues like privacy and testing during pregnancy. Today we'll discuss the merits of genetic testing and the ethical issues it raises with a panel of guests. Event: Joselin Linder will be speaking about her book, The Family Gene, and the research that went into it at Gramercy Books in Bexley at 7:00pm on April 13th. She'll answer audience questions and will sign copies of The Family Gene, which will be available for purchase. Guests: Charles Piller , West Coast Editor, STAT Joselin Linder , author, “ The Family Gene: A Mission to Turn My Deadly Inheritance(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_7.mp3




Nuclear Energy in Ohio

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

With the declining price of electricity, nuclear power plants are struggling to stay afloat. Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow one nuclear energy company to charge their customers more because of the growing costs for nuclear plants. Proponents of the bill argue it's about saving jobs, while others feel that customers shouldn't have to front the bill. Today we'll discuss this and the state of nuclear energy in Ohio with a panel of guests. Guests: Sen. John Eklund , R-Chardon, Ohio Senate Sam Belcher , Chief Nuclear Officer, FirstEnergy Dan Gearino , Energy Reporter, Columbus Dispatch Todd A. Snitchler , spokesperson, Alliance for Energy Choice Harvey Wasserman , writer, environmental activist and editor, NukeFree.org(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_6.mp3




Wellness Wednesday: Children's Dental Health, the Science of Fat, Body Donation

Wed, 12 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic conditions among children and teens, but research found nearly one in four children in Ohio have not had a preventative dental visit in the previous 12 months. Sealants provided in schools can be an effective way to prevent tooth decay in children, and a new national report by the Sealant Work Group provides recommendations for school-based sealant programs. Join us today as we discuss this, body donor programs, and the latest in wellness news. Guests: Eva Harrison , Dental Sealant Program Manager, Columbus Public Health Ginny Black , licensed school nurse, Columbus City Schools Dr. David Katz , founder, Yale University's Prevention Research Center Eileen Kalmar , Assistant Professor Clinical, Director of Anatomical Services & Body Donor Program Kirk McHugh , Divisional Director and Professor, Ohio State University Department of Biomedical Education and Anatomy(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_6.mp3




Columbus Blue Jackets and the Stanley Cup Playoffs

Wed, 12 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

The Columbus Blue Jackets are back in the Stanley Cup playoffs for the first time since 2014 after their best season in franchise history. They'll be facing off against the defending champions of the cup, the Pittsburgh Penguins. Join us today as we discuss the history of the Stanley Cup and how the Blue Jackets are looking to shape up in the playoffs. Guests: Aaron Portzline , sports reporter, Columbus Dispatch Eric Zweig , author and hockey historian(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_5.mp3




Tech Tuesday: Cyberbullying, the Power of Facebook, Google Fighting Fake News

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

An 11-year-old in Michigan took his own life last week after his girlfriend used social media to lead him to believe she had died by suicide. Bullying was the second largest child health concern in 2015 according to a study done by the University of Michigan, but parents are split on what actually is considered cyberbullying and how it should be dealt with. Join us today as we discuss the implications of cyberbullying, if Facebook has too much power and the latest in tech news. If you or someone you know is showing warning signs of suicide, consider contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK. Guests: Larry Magid , syndicated tech columnist and CEO, ConnectSafely.org Brian Bergstein , Editor-at-Large, MIT Technology Review Russell Holly , contributing editor, AndroidCentral.com(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_5.mp3




U.S. Missile Strike on Syria

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 09:00:00 +0000

President Donald Trump ordered a missile strike on Syria late last week in response to a chemical attack carried out against Syrian citizens. The move received mixed reactions from foreign policy analysts and government officials, and some fear the strike could have deeply damaged U.S. and Russian relations. Join us today as we discuss the consequences of this strike and what future U.S. policy regarding Syria might look like. Guests: Dan Lamothe , national security reporter, The Washington Post Christopher Gelpi , chair of peace studies and conflict resolution, Mershon Center for International Security Studies and professor of political science, Ohio State University Paul Salem , Vice President for policy and research at The Middle East Institute James Phillips , senior research fellow for Middle Eastern affairs at The Heritage Foundation(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/1_4.mp3




Gender Equity in the Workplace and Billie Jean King

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 09:01:00 +0000

According to a Pew Research Center analysis, women only made 83 percent of what men made in 2015. The pay gap has been declining since 1980, but large disparities still exist in the workplace. Billie Jean King has worked throughout her life to close the gap between women and men in the world of tennis, and through her nonprofit, she has been working to create changes to how men and women operate in the world. Today we'll discuss gender equity in the workplace and talk with Billie Jean King about her work and the upcoming movie about her life. Guests: Julie Graber , CEO, GenderEQA Julie Anderson , Senior Research Associate, The Institute for Women's Policy Research Billie Jean King , renowned tennis player, founder of the Billie Jean King Leadership Initiative and the co-founder of World TeamTennis Event: Billie Jean King will be at an event called Keyholder 2017: Changing the Game sponsored by the Women's Fund of Central Ohio on May 4th.(image)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wosu2/audio/2017/04/2_4.mp3