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Preview: WBUR: Here and Now

Here & Now



NPR and WBUR's live midday news program



Copyright: Copyright Trustees of Boston University
 



April 25, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 25 Apr 2018 15:01:55 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 25, 2018 full broadcast, political strategists Karine Jean-Pierre and Paris Dennard join us to discuss mounting questions in Congress amid allegations against White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's pick to be Veterans Affairs director. Also, with spring in full swing, our resident chef is experimenting with seasonal greens like watercress, arugula, chives and dandelion greens. And while toilet paper, paper towels and soap are freely provided in public restrooms, menstrual products are not. We speak with one advocate who says they should.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/605821264/npr_605821264.mp3?orgId=1&d=2624&p=510051&story=605821264&t=podcast&e=605821264&ft=pod&f=510051




April 25, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 25 Apr 2018 14:59:08 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 25, 2018 full broadcast, the suspect in the Toronto van attack that killed 10 people, primarily women, posted a message on his Facebook page that appears linked to a misogynistic online group of men who identify as "incel," or involuntarily celibate. We learn more about the group from a psychotherapist. Also, for Grammy Award-winning country music artist Keith Urban, the studio is "like a blank canvas." Most of the songs on his new album were written there. And a national memorial for victims of lynching opens Thursday in Montgomery, Alabama, that features engraved names of victims on blocks of rusted steel that hang from the ceiling of a large pavilion. One of those names is Wes Johnson, who was lynched in Tumbleton, Alabama, in 1937.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/605821280/npr_605821280.mp3?orgId=1&d=2698&p=510051&story=605821280&t=podcast&e=605821280&ft=pod&f=510051




April 24, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 24 Apr 2018 14:39:41 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 24, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Ayesha Rascoe joins us to discuss Tuesday's agenda as President Trump welcomes France's President Emmanuel Macron. Also, a new report by Bain & Company says automation could displace 2.5 million workers per year, or more than three times the rate between 1970 and 1990, when computers revolutionized the global economy. We get perspective on automation its potential impacts from the co-director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy. And novelist Lionel Shriver joins us to discuss her new story collection "Property," which explores how belongings and relationships often become intertwined.


Media Files:
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April 24, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 24 Apr 2018 13:42:18 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 24, 2018 full broadcast, we begin with the latest on the Toronto van attack from the CBC's David Common. Also, an FBI raid earlier this month turned up boxes of documents from Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer. Now a judge has to determine which documents fall under attorney-client privilege and can't be used in court. And a retired Marine Corps colonel who's writing a battlefield guide of Belleau Wood joins us to talk about the meaning behind French President Emmanuel Macron's gift to President Trump of a sapling from the World War I battlefield.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/605341720/npr_605341720.mp3?orgId=1&d=2650&p=510051&story=605341720&t=podcast&e=605341720&ft=pod&f=510051




April 23, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 14:08:16 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 23, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Ron Elving joins us to discuss President Trump's nominee to replace Rex Tillerson as secretary of state facing some opposition within the Senate, amid a state visit by French President Emmanuel Macron. Also, Madeline Miller's powerful new novel recasts the goddess Circe, best known for turning Odysseus' men into pigs in Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey," as a powerful feminist goddess. And there's ongoing distrust, anger and fear between communities of color and police, following a series of police shootings of unarmed black men. The president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement tells us how its members are responding.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/605007592/npr_605007592.mp3?orgId=1&d=2625&p=510051&story=605007592&t=podcast&e=605007592&ft=pod&f=510051




April 23, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 13:38:18 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 23, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest on a shooting early Sunday morning at a Waffle House restaurant in Tennessee that killed four people. Also, we visit the New York Historical Society to learn about a unique civics class there that uses art to teach immigrants the American history they need to know to pass their citizenship test. And the new album "Black Cowboys" is more than just a collection of songs from the Wild West — the record sheds light on the prominent but often-overlooked role African-American pioneers played in westward expansion.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/604991513/npr_604991513.mp3?orgId=1&d=2626&p=510051&story=604991513&t=podcast&e=604991513&ft=pod&f=510051




April 20, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:08:24 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 20, 2018 full broadcast, Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan this week called a snap election in June, more than a year ahead of schedule. We get the latest from the BBC's Mark Lowen in Istanbul. Also, in his book "In Sickness and In Health," Ben Mattlin chronicles "interabled" relationships between people with disabilities and people who are able-bodied. And more than 200 priests from around the world are in Rome this week for an annual Vatican training course on how to perform exorcisms. Demand is on the rise for the ritual, but one practitioner says it's not performed the way you might have seen in the movies.


Media Files:
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April 20, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 13:20:19 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 20, 2018 full broadcast, we look back at a week in politics dominated by former FBI Director James Comey with NPR's Domenico Montanaro and Telemundo's José Díaz-Balart. Also, the Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger is known for his pioneering work describing the form of autism that now bears his name. But previously unexamined documents now show Asperger was also involved with a notorious euthanasia program run by Nazis in Austria. And we preview Sunday's London Marathon, which could be the hottest on record with temperatures in the 70s. The race follows Monday's Boston Marathon, which was run in some of the worst weather conditions in the 122-year history of that race.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/604420990/npr_604420990.mp3?orgId=1&d=2663&p=510051&story=604420990&t=podcast&e=604420990&ft=pod&f=510051




April 19, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 14:10:09 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 19, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota, who helped make a rules change allowing senators to bring their babies onto the Senate floor during votes. Also, Andrew Sean Greer's novel "Less" won this year's Pulitzer Prize for fiction. We revisit host Robin Young's conversation with Greer about the book from last July. And there have been protests in northern India this week over the rape and murder of an 8-year-old Muslim girl in January. Indian activist and former civil servant Aruna Roy was one of many who wrote a letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, calling his government's response "feeble and inadequate."


Media Files:
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April 19, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 13:22:11 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 19, 2018 full broadcast, we learn more about the U.S. Geological Survey releasing the results of a simulated 7.0 magnitude earthquake near Oakland: It predicts such a quake along the Hayward fault would kill up to 800 people and more than $100 billion in total damage. Also, Facebook has been under fire for weeks for its privacy practices and the way it monetizes user data. But there are many other companies tracking the data of unsuspecting users. And former Marine and author Phil Klay says a lack of clear mission, and a lack of debate about military missions in American society, are having deleterious effects on U.S. troop morale.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/604098796/npr_604098796.mp3?orgId=1&d=2605&p=510051&story=604098796&t=podcast&e=604098796&ft=pod&f=510051




April 18, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 14:29:09 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 18, 2018 full broadcast, chemical weapons inspectors still haven't entered Douma, where the U.S., U.K. and France say the Syrian government used poison gas to kill more than 40 people on April 7. We get the latest from a chemical weapons specialist. Also, a team of investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board has been sent to Philadelphia to figure out why an engine on a Southwest plane blew apart in midair Tuesday, shattering a window and nearly sucking a passenger outside. We hear more from a Wall Street Journal reporter. And, Larry Krasner won election as District Attorney in Philadelphia running on a platform of criminal justice reform and ending mass incarceration. We speak with Krasner about what he's accomplished in his first 100 days.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/603648220/npr_603648220.mp3?orgId=1&d=2613&p=510051&story=603648220&t=podcast&e=603648220&ft=pod&f=510051




April 18, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 13:16:19 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 18, 2018 full broadcast, following news that CIA Director Mike Pompeo made a secret trip to North Korea, we talk with retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and former supreme allied commander of NATO, about U.S.-North Korea talks and the likelihood of the North abandoning its nuclear weapons program. Also, we meet Scott Jurek, who broke the speed record for running the Appalachian Trail, navigating 2,189 miles — from Georgia to Maine — in 46 days, 8 hours and 7 minutes. And some baseball writers have called him "the Japanese Babe Ruth" and "the next big thing" in baseball: We learn more about Los Angeles Angels rookie sensation Shohei Ohtani.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/603622887/npr_603622887.mp3?orgId=1&d=2673&p=510051&story=603622887&t=podcast&e=603622887&ft=pod&f=510051




April 17, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 15:03:20 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 17, 2018 full broadcast, in an interview with NPR, former FBI Director James Comey said the FBI's reputation "would be worse today had we not picked the least bad alternatives." We speak with NPR's Steve Inskeep about that conversation. Also, at a deadly prison riot Sunday night in South Carolina, seven inmates were killed and 17 were injured. We get the latest. And, Gregory Pardlo won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2015. In his new memoir, he explores his relationship with his father, an air traffic controller who was fired during the PATCO strike of 1981. He joins us to talk about the book.


Media Files:
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April 17, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 14:34:12 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 17, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., about a bipartisan effort to replace the 2001 and 2002 authorizations for use of military force (AUMFs) with an updated AUMF. Also, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports how music-induced hearing loss is a problem for classical musicians. And, Raúl Castro leaves office this week after two terms as president of Cuba. For the first time since 1959, Cuba will be run by someone other than a Castro. We get a view on life for Cubans after the Castros.


Media Files:
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April 16, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 15:02:16 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 16, 2018 full broadcast, a video that has garnered more than 9 million views on Twitter shows two black men being arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia. We get the latest from WHYY's Peter Crimmins. Also, with so much attention on North Korea and its nuclear weapons program, we may be overlooking some other nuclear issues in other countries, like China, Pakistan and Russia. We speak with one security analyst about nuclear proliferation around the world. And, despite driving rain and cooler-than-average temperatures, runners are competing in the 122nd Boston Marathon. Here & Now's Alex Ashlock reports from the finish line.


Media Files:
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April 16, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 13:26:04 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 16, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the Sunday night James Comey interview on ABC, as well as the reaction in Washington, with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic. Also, classical music columnist Fran Hoepfner joins us to discuss Leonard Bernstein's second symphony, "The Age of Anxiety." And, as Wall Street looks to dip into the marijuana market, we speak with a partner of Green Table, a networking business that has been bringing together investors and pot entrepreneurs who are looking for funding.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/602908527/npr_602908527.mp3?orgId=1&d=2728&p=510051&story=602908527&t=podcast&e=602908527&ft=pod&f=510051




April 13, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 13 Apr 2018 14:07:31 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 13, 2018 full broadcast, we check in with NPR's Ryan Lucas, who has an advance copy of fired FBI Director James Comey's much-anticipated memoir. Also, "The Simpsons" has reigned on TV for nearly three decades, but a recent episode drew new attention to how the show handles racial stereotypes. And an ocean current that helps regulate the global climate system is slowing down. That's the conclusion of two new studies published in the journal Nature. Scientists disagree about what's behind the weaker ocean currents, but it could be bad news for the climate.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/602277790/npr_602277790.mp3?orgId=1&d=2666&p=510051&story=602277790&t=podcast&e=602277790&ft=pod&f=510051




April 13, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 13 Apr 2018 13:21:12 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 13, 2018 full broadcast, CNN White House correspondent Abby Phillip and NPR's lead politics editor Domenico Montanaro join us to review the week in politics. Also, Loren Zitomersky is hoping to break a world record at the Boston Marathon on Monday. But Kenyan Geoffrey Mutai, who ran it in just over two hours in 2011, has nothing to worry about. And remember last fall when the character Rich Uncle Pennybags from the board game Monopoly lit up social media after photo-bombing a Senate hearing on the Equifax data breach? Well, so-called Monopoly Man appeared again Thursday, complete with a monocle, top hat and bushy white mustache.


Media Files:
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April 12, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 14:07:22 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 12, 2018 full broadcast, when Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) became the first senator to have a baby while in office, some also noted that she's 50 years old — prompting questions about the latest thinking on age and giving birth. Also, two historians speak with Here & Now's Lisa Mullins about the long history of American privacy and infringement, stretching back to Colonial-era search and seizure and the early origins of the National Security Agency. And Republicans often blame programs like Medicare in deficit discussions, and to one group of economists, that is "dishonest." We talk with one member of that group, Martin Neil Baily, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/601935288/npr_601935288.mp3?orgId=1&d=2705&p=510051&story=601935288&t=podcast&e=601935288&ft=pod&f=510051




April 12, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 13:21:52 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 12, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Republican Virginia Rep. David Brat about his support of a balanced budget amendment. Also, nationally, black students are suspended three times as often as their white peers. In Minnesota, it's eight times as often. The state's Department of Human Rights notified 43 Minnesota school districts and charters in February that their policies suggest discrimination. And there's a new museum in New York City that examines the Holocaust with an Orthodox Jewish perspective.


Media Files:
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April 11, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 11 Apr 2018 14:07:11 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 10, 2018 full broadcast, President Trump issued a new threat on Syria today, tweeting that Russia should "get ready" for a military strike after the alleged chemical weapons attack by Syria last weekend. We discuss with the BBC's Jeremy Bowen. Also, we welcome political strategists Alice Stewart and Jamal Simmons to discuss news today that House Speaker Paul Ryan will not seek re-election and renewed concerns that President Trump might fire special counsel Robert Mueller. And, a longtime opponent of the Endangered Species Act has been tapped to fill a key post guiding federal policy on wildlife. Environmental advocates say that could signal big changes.


Media Files:
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April 11, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 11 Apr 2018 13:26:06 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 11, 2018 full broadcast, you've likely heard the saying: "The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." But what is the true number of defensive gun uses? We speak with two researchers who have gone back and forth on that question. Also, the latest on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying before members of Congress for the second day Wednesday. And we talk with one man whose company aims to address both pollution and poverty by building facilities where plastic collectors can bring their wares and earn cash or credit in an online account.


Media Files:
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April 10, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 10 Apr 2018 14:07:33 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 10, 2018 full broadcast, West Virginia has become the first state to allow some military members deployed overseas to use a mobile app called Voatz to vote in a federal election. We discuss with West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner. Also, Puerto Rico is closing 283 schools this summer because thousands of families have migrated to the mainland. We look at what this means for the future of public education there. Plus, President Trump has signed an act encouraging U.S. officials to visit Taiwan. We look at the impact of this act on American relations with China, which considers Taiwan a rogue province. And, author Sharlee Glenn tells the story of the first bookmobile in the U.S.


Media Files:
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April 10, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 10 Apr 2018 13:26:06 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 10, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the latest on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's testimony before Congress with Edmund Lee of Recode. Also, Syrian government forces and their allies are on alert and taking precautionary measures Tuesday, amid fears of a U.S. strike in the wake of an apparent chemical weapons attack. The BBC's Martin Patience tells us more. And today marks the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement, which brought an end to decades of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. Former envoy and U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, who helped broker the deal, reflects on the peace deal's impact and the challenges that remain today.


Media Files:
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April 9, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 09 Apr 2018 13:57:21 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 9, 2018 full broadcast, teachers in Oklahoma are in the sixth day of their walkout today, as they fight to get increased state education funding. We get the latest. Also, in the first of two conversations with former lawmaker and diplomat George Mitchell, we discuss relations and conflict in the Middle East, where Mitchell served as an envoy. And, hair braiding doesn't require any chemicals, hair dyes or cutting. But to legally braid hair, 13 states require a cosmetology license. We speak with a woman who has fought and won the right to practice her profession without a license.


Media Files:
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April 9, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 09 Apr 2018 13:19:10 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 9, 2018 full broadcast, the Assad regime is suspected of carrying out a chemical attack on a rebel held town over the weekend, a charge Syria says is fabricated. We discuss the latest developments and the Trump administration's possible response with the BBC's Lina Sinjab. Also, why did Robert Mercer — the influential donor in conservative politics who helped President Trump get elected, and the New York billionaire behind Cambridge Analytica — become a volunteer member of a police force in a tiny New Mexico town? And we preview Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's much-anticipated testimony before Congress this week with The Atlantic's Derek Thompson.


Media Files:
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April 6, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 06 Apr 2018 14:15:19 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 6, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Berlin correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson fills us in as Viktor Orbán goes for a third consecutive term as prime minister of Hungary, his fourth overall, this weekend. Orbán is admired by Europe's far-right for his anti-migrant policies. Also, guitarist Bill Frisell is well-known for his collaborations with numerous prolific musicians. But with his new album, he's playing every instrument and composing every piece. And there's been a public outcry for months in Parrish, Alabama, after a private company parked train cars there full of treated sewage from New York and New Jersey.


Media Files:
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April 6, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:45:11 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 6, 2018 full broadcast, NBC's Beth Fouhy and Associated Press reporter Jesse Holland join Here & Now's Lisa Mullins and Peter O'Dowd to discuss the week in politics, including EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's future and the latest on tariffs. Also, the U.K. ambassador to the U.S. tells us there's "no doubt" the nerve agent used in last month's poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia was Russian. And China is the largest importer of soybeans in the world, and the U.S. is one of the largest exporters. That means Chinese tariffs would be bad news for U.S. soy producers — but welcome news for soybean farmers in Brazil.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/600256856/npr_600256856.mp3?orgId=1&d=2570&p=510051&story=600256856&t=podcast&e=600256856&ft=pod&f=510051




April 5, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 05 Apr 2018 14:19:17 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 5, 2018 full broadcast, President Trump has signed a proclamation for the deployment of National Guard troops along the southern border with Mexico. We check in with Michel Marizco of KJZZ's Fronteras Desk. Also, while tariffs aren't yet in place, at least one wine producer in California has already had a shipment of 5,000 cases of wine to China put on hold because of the uncertainty. And one professor who researches the impact of social media says she would "be shocked if there aren't a lot more cases" of data scandals like the one involving Cambridge Analytica.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599890152/npr_599890152.mp3?orgId=1&d=2565&p=510051&story=599890152&t=podcast&e=599890152&ft=pod&f=510051




April 5, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 05 Apr 2018 13:15:20 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 5, 2018 full broadcast, we get an update from the Gaza-Israel border from NPR's Daniel Estrin. Also, Mexico's presidential campaign season is underway and one of the issues candidates are grappling with is a surge in violence related to drug cartels. And NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to discuss the relationship between Amazon and The Washington Post, amid President Trump's tweet calling the Post Amazon's "chief lobbyist."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599890262/npr_599890262.mp3?orgId=1&d=2532&p=510051&story=599890262&t=podcast&e=599890262&ft=pod&f=510051




April 4, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 04 Apr 2018 14:19:16 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 4, 2018 full broadcast, Russian authorities want to be part of a joint investigation into the poisoning of a former Russian spy and his daughter in the U.K. last month. We discuss with the BBC's Anna Holligan. Also we welcome political strategists Jamal Simmons and John Brabender to discuss President Trump's recent tweetstorm on immigration and push for new immigration legislation in Congress. And, more than 20,000 teachers from Oklahoma's 10 largest school districts are striking for a third day. We get the latest.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599557497/npr_599557497.mp3?orgId=1&d=2544&p=510051&story=599557497&t=podcast&e=599557497&ft=pod&f=510051




April 4, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 04 Apr 2018 13:14:22 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 4, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the latest on market reaction to Chinese tariffs affecting U.S. goods with Emily Glazer of The Wall Street Journal. Also, President Trump's claim that Mexico is doing "very little, if not nothing" to halt the flow of migrants along its southern border "does not match with the facts on the ground," one analyst says. And beloved British author Jane Austen wrote "Pride and Prejudice" and her other novels of manners partly as entertainment for family — and music was very much a part of those works. So, what might have been on her playlist? We talk with a pianist from The Austen Trio.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599527130/npr_599527130.mp3?orgId=1&d=2532&p=510051&story=599527130&t=podcast&e=599527130&ft=pod&f=510051




April 3, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 03 Apr 2018 14:02:49 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 3, 2018 full broadcast, we look at the latest in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, including Tuesday's expected sentencing of a Dutch lawyer with ties to former Trump associate Rick Gates. Also we remember the late writer and producer Steven Bochco with two stars from "L.A. Law," Jill Eikenberry and Michael Tucker. And, we talk about some of the laws that affect gun research, including one that has stymied efforts to trace guns, with one professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599223282/npr_599223282.mp3?orgId=1&d=2576&p=510051&story=599223282&t=podcast&e=599223282&ft=pod&f=510051




April 3, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 03 Apr 2018 13:15:12 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 3, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest on the Environmental Protection Agency setting up a legal battle with California over a key part of former President Obama's legacy on climate change. Also, actor Jason Clarke and director John Curran reflect on making the new film "Chappaquiddick," which explores the events surrounding Mary Jo Kopechne's death in a car driven by Sen. Ted Kennedy in July 1969. And in response to U.S. tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum, China has put tariffs on 128 U.S. goods — including ginseng. We get reaction from a business owner in Wisconsin, the state that produces nearly all of the ginseng grown in the United States.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/599192744/npr_599192744.mp3?orgId=1&d=2572&p=510051&story=599192744&t=podcast&e=599192744&ft=pod&f=510051




April 2, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 02 Apr 2018 14:20:24 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's April 2, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with a former researcher at the CDC about the agency's work on the causes of gun violence, something that has fallen off since the so-called Dickey Amendment of 1996. Also, do you want more control over your Facebook page? We speak with tech correspondent Ben Johnson about a new layer of protection Facebook has announced for users and their data. And, on what would be Marvin Gaye's 79th birthday, we visit the archive of the "Prince of Soul" in our latest DJ Session.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598876665/npr_598876665.mp3?orgId=1&d=2560&p=510051&story=598876665&t=podcast&e=598876665&ft=pod&f=510051




April 2, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 02 Apr 2018 13:15:11 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's April 2, 2018 full broadcast, the 2016 election caused author Steve Almond to rethink the stories that Americans tell themselves about what's happening in their country and the world. He says many of those stories are "bad" — fraudulent by design or negligence. Also, Kentucky teachers are rallying Monday at the state capitol amid a pension overhaul bill that state lawmakers passed last week. We get the latest from Frankfort. And The Atlantic's Derek Thompson joins us to discuss controversy facing the country's biggest owner of local television stations, Sinclair Broadcast Group, which made its news anchors read a scripted promo decrying "false news" and echoing conservative rhetoric about bias in the media.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598852284/npr_598852284.mp3?orgId=1&d=2571&p=510051&story=598852284&t=podcast&e=598852284&ft=pod&f=510051




March 30, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 30 Mar 2018 14:22:23 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 30, 2018 full broadcast, we take a closer look at reports that Walmart may be in talks to buy the insurance company Humana, and the potential impacts of a deal, with Michael Regan of Bloomberg News. Also, author Lisa Genova talks with us about her new book "Every Note Played," which tells the fictional story of a concert pianist whose career comes to an abrupt end when he is diagnosed with ALS. And NPR TV critic Eric Deggans weighs in on how the new "Roseanne" reboot is contributing to the political conversation.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598379637/npr_598379637.mp3?orgId=1&d=2572&p=510051&story=598379637&t=podcast&e=598379637&ft=pod&f=510051




March 30, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 30 Mar 2018 13:21:14 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 30, 2018 full broadcast, we review the week in politics — including tit-for-tat expulsions of diplomats, Veteran Affairs Secretary David Shulkin's firing and Stormy Daniels fallout — with NPR's Ron Elving and CNN's Juana Summers. Also, we meet SoFi, a robot fish created by roboticists at MIT that can swim underwater and help researchers study ocean life up close. And New Jersey is one of a number of states trying to pass new gun laws, following the school shooting in Parkland, Florida. We talk with president of the New Jersey Second Amendment Society, who's against measures passed by the state assembly this week, including a limit on the magazine capacity of guns.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598328350/npr_598328350.mp3?orgId=1&d=2573&p=510051&story=598328350&t=podcast&e=598328350&ft=pod&f=510051




March 29, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 29 Mar 2018 15:07:15 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 29, 2018 full broadcast, we get perspective on the leaders of North and South Korea meeting next month for the first time in more than a decade from Evans J.R. Revere, who was deputy chief of the U.S. team negotiating with North Korea in 1998. Also, recent staff shake-ups at the White House have rattled agencies from the FBI to the State Department. One cabinet member who hasn't received as much attention is Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. And utility companies are looking toward electric vehicles to revive the demand for electricity, which has been falling due to improved energy efficiency.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598058864/npr_598058864.mp3?orgId=1&d=2537&p=510051&story=598058864&t=podcast&e=598058864&ft=pod&f=510051




March 29, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 29 Mar 2018 14:16:59 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 29, 2018 full broadcast, Washington Post reporter Lisa Rein joins us to discuss fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin's tenure at the agency, and what to expect from Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, who's been nominated by President Trump to replace Shulkin. Also, state lawmakers like Rep. Kim Osborn are contending with a worsening budget crisis and other burdens, after years of tax cuts didn't have the results they'd hoped for. And this fall marks the 50th anniversary of the release of Van Morrison's album "Astral Weeks" — released to little fanfare but regarded as one of the most important records of the rock era. We learn more about the album's little-known Boston ties.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/598035266/npr_598035266.mp3?orgId=1&d=2545&p=510051&story=598035266&t=podcast&e=598035266&ft=pod&f=510051




March 28, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 28 Mar 2018 14:28:22 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 28, 2018 full broadcast, we bring on political strategists Karine Jean-Pierre and Paris Dennard to discuss how President Trump's approval rating has fared amid news about his alleged affair with adult film actress Stormy Daniels. Also, as Easter and Passover approach, University of Connecticut music professor Robert Stephens joins us to discuss the evolution of gospel music. And, recent news that Russian hackers had penetrated some of the most sensitive U.S. infrastructure has many concerned about the possible rise of a Cold War situation.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597729690/npr_597729690.mp3?orgId=1&d=2582&p=510051&story=597729690&t=podcast&e=597729690&ft=pod&f=510051




March 28, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 28 Mar 2018 13:39:11 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 28, 2018 full broadcast, we learn more about new efforts to track opioid use through wastewater from the deputy town manager of Cary, North Carolina, which is piloting the technology. Also, as the #deletefacebook hashtag continues to trend in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, we meet writer Ezinne Ukoha, who stopped using Facebook in 2016 and says she has no regrets. And No. 11 seed Loyola University Chicago has become this season's March Madness Cinderella story. Historians Ed Ayers and Brian Balogh join us to look back at America's longstanding affinity for the underdog.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597694279/npr_597694279.mp3?orgId=1&d=2569&p=510051&story=597694279&t=podcast&e=597694279&ft=pod&f=510051




March 27, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 27 Mar 2018 14:43:17 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 27, 2018 full broadcast, we start with a look at the U.S. Commerce Department's announcement that it will reinstate a citizenship question in the 2020 census. Also we speak with two-time Academy Award-winning actor Sean Penn, who has just published his first novel, "Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff." And, one political science professor explains how Democrats and Republicans both are willing to compromise moral convictions for the party line when it comes to scandals.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597373743/npr_597373743.mp3?orgId=1&d=2634&p=510051&story=597373743&t=podcast&e=597373743&ft=pod&f=510051




March 27, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 27 Mar 2018 13:21:19 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 27, 2018 full broadcast, we welcome security analyst Jim Walsh to discuss what the impact of the U.S. and other Western countries expelling Russian diplomats might be on Russia and President Vladimir Putin, following a nerve agent attack in the U.K. Also, a new, 10-year-long National Institutes of Health study aiming to determine whether there are benefits to moderate alcohol consumption is being funded by the alcohol industry, according to a New York Times investigation. We talk with the Times journalist who's been reporting the story. And the city of Atlanta is still reeling from a cyberattack that took out many online city services. Emily Cureton of Georgia Public Broadcasting brings an update, as hackers hold the city's data hostage.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597349324/npr_597349324.mp3?orgId=1&d=2617&p=510051&story=597349324&t=podcast&e=597349324&ft=pod&f=510051




March 26, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 26 Mar 2018 15:02:01 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 26, 2018 full broadcast, we look at the latest in politics, including Stormy Daniels' interview on "60 Minutes" with Anderson Cooper, the news that attorneys Joe diGenova and Victoria Toensing won't be joining President Trump's Russia legal team and the potential for more shake-ups in the administration. Also we speak with actor and comedian Patton Oswalt, whose late wife, Michelle McNamara, had been researching a serial rapist and murderer she dubbed the "Golden State Killer" before her death. Her book on the subject is out now. And we speak with a Marjory Stoneman Douglas teacher who was at the "March For Our Lives" rally in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597093312/npr_597093312.mp3?orgId=1&d=2504&p=510051&story=597093312&t=podcast&e=597093312&ft=pod&f=510051




March 26, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 26 Mar 2018 13:14:37 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 26, 2018 full broadcast, Washington Post reporter Emma Brown joins us to discuss the adult film actress known as Stormy Daniels saying in her "60 Minutes" interview Sunday night she was threatened if she didn't stay silent about her alleged affair with Donald Trump. Also, in a time of deep divisions, changes are being proposed at one federal agency that aims to heal those divisions and broker compromise. We talk with the former director of the Department of Justice's Community Relations Service about its future, and ways to find common ground. And The Atlantic's Derek Thompson tells us about the latest privacy controversy to envelop Facebook: users discovering that the company has been collecting text message and phone call data from their Android devices.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/597050038/npr_597050038.mp3?orgId=1&d=2579&p=510051&story=597050038&t=podcast&e=597050038&ft=pod&f=510051




March 23, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 23 Mar 2018 14:43:06 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 23, 2018 full broadcast, we get reaction to President Trump tapping John Bolton to become his next national security adviser from Leon Panetta, who served as both CIA director and secretary of defense under President Obama. Also, we wrap up our weeklong series on bullying with a closer look at the advocacy of first lady Melania Trump, and why technology companies have been mostly reluctant to get involved. And earlier this week doctors in some hospitals began using gene therapy to treat a rare vision disorder that can lead to blindness. Eric Boodman of our partners at the health and medicine publication STAT shares more.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/596504609/npr_596504609.mp3?orgId=1&d=2588&p=510051&story=596504609&t=podcast&e=596504609&ft=pod&f=510051




March 23, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 23 Mar 2018 13:10:17 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 23, 2018 full broadcast, ABC News political director Rick Klein and Univision's Enrique Acevedo join us to discuss the week's political developments, including John Bolton being named President Trump's new national security adviser, and the $1.3 trillion budget deal that Congress negotiated down to the wire this week. Also, we meet one man who was homeless in New York City for a period of time, and bucks many of the common assumptions about members of the homeless population. And 15 years ago this week, U.S. forces invaded Iraq, launching a controversial war that in some respects hasn't ended. We speak with a former Marine who was there and is now writing about his experience.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/596486773/npr_596486773.mp3?orgId=1&d=2550&p=510051&story=596486773&t=podcast&e=596486773&ft=pod&f=510051




March 22, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 22 Mar 2018 14:20:43 -0400

In hour two of Here & Now's March 22, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest on Russia and the U.K. trading harsh words Thursday over British accusations that the Kremlin was behind the recent poisoning of a former Russian spy. Also, we continue our weeklong bullying series by speaking with transgender woman Meredith Talusan, executive editor of the magazine them, who's confronting her own past as a bully. And De Lux's "Cause for Concern" and "A Girl Like You" by Alaskalaska are among KCRW DJ Mario Cotto's latest, danciest, favorites. He shares those tracks and more in this week's DJ Session.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/596135907/npr_596135907.mp3?orgId=1&d=2564&p=510051&story=596135907&t=podcast&e=596135907&ft=pod&f=510051




March 22, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 22 Mar 2018 13:27:09 -0400

In hour one of Here & Now's March 22, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins us to discuss the latest in politics, including President Trump's lead lawyer in the Russia investigation resigning and lawmakers in Congress reaching a $1.3 trillion budget deal. Also, we meet Isaac Shapiro, an 87-year-old who lived through the bombing of Tokyo, and as a young teen found work with U.S. forces sent in to survey the destruction of Hiroshima. And a new study led by researchers at Harvard Medical School identifies key cellular mechanisms that cause blood vessels to age. Now, they're looking for ways to apply what they found in mice studies to human health.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/596112141/npr_596112141.mp3?orgId=1&d=2559&p=510051&story=596112141&t=podcast&e=596112141&ft=pod&f=510051