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Preview: WBUR: Here and Now

Here & Now



NPR and WBUR's live midday news program



Copyright: Copyright Trustees of Boston University
 



February 20, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 14:09:05 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 20, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Republican Florida State Sen. Greg Steube who says that shootings occur overwhelmingly in gun-free zones, and that schools should allow trained shooters into campus buildings. Also we speak with "Wallace and Gromit" creator Nick Park whose new film, "Early Man," goes prehistoric. And, in this week's Here & Now DJ Session, we discuss the latest in sentimental sounds and deep grooves, from Sufjan Stevens to Rhye.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/587333713/npr_587333713.mp3?orgId=1&d=2500&p=510051&story=587333713&t=podcast&e=587333713&ft=pod&f=510051




February 20, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 13:29:47 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 20, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Scott Horsley joins us to discuss the prospects for gun legislation following the Florida school shooting, and other news in politics. Also, Chris Hughes made a fortune as a co-founder of Facebook. But in a new book, he argues for a guaranteed income for workers paid for by taxing wealthy Americans like him. And Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School teacher Melissa Falkowski hid 19 students in her classroom closet when she learned there was an active shooter. We hear more from Falkowski about the experience, and how she is coping.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/587333761/npr_587333761.mp3?orgId=1&d=2557&p=510051&story=587333761&t=podcast&e=587333761&ft=pod&f=510051




February 19, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:01:08 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 19, 2018 full broadcast, we look at the ADA Education and Reform Act, which House Republicans passed last week, that would make it harder for people to sue businesses that do not comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Also, updates from Pyeongchang 2018, including the U.S. women's hockey team advancing to the gold medal game, a soldier-bobsledder competing at the games and U.S. cross-country skiing's medal drought. And, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is warning of the national security risk posed by Chinese-funded Confucius Institutes housed at U.S. universities. There are now renewed calls to shut the schools down.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/587128965/npr_587128965.mp3?orgId=1&d=2528&p=510051&story=587128965&t=podcast&e=587128965&ft=pod&f=510051




February 19, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:09:42 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 19, 2018 full broadcast, President Trump sent out some eyebrow-raising tweets over the weekend about FBI missteps and the Russia investigation. We round up the weekend in politics, and look ahead, with NPR's Domenico Montanaro. Also, just last March, a 30-year-old American crossed the border between North and South Korea, for the love of a sport — and made it back home. And the conflict in Syria appears to be escalating again. BBC Middle East editor Sebastian Usher joins us to share the latest developments.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/587101441/npr_587101441.mp3?orgId=1&d=2522&p=510051&story=587101441&t=podcast&e=587101441&ft=pod&f=510051




February 16, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:10:27 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 16, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss how social media has been reacting to the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, with Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English. Also, it's rare to see people with disabilities on television, and rarer still to see actors with disabilities in those roles. But a new show "This Close" is written by and stars deaf people. And at the Winter Olympics, American skier Mikaela Shiffrin failed to medal in the slalom, the event she has dominated for the last five years, including a gold medal win four years ago in Russia. NPR's Elise Hu shares the latest from Pyeongchang.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/586572362/npr_586572362.mp3?orgId=1&d=2523&p=510051&story=586572362&t=podcast&e=586572362&ft=pod&f=510051




February 16, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 13:25:21 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 16, 2018 full broadcast, Bloomberg News' Toluse Olorunnipa and ABC News' Rick Klein discuss how lawmakers have been reacting to the Florida school shooting, and whether there are indications laws will change. Also, we conclude our series on China's "Belt and Road" with a look at the influx of Chinese money into East Africa as part of the global infrastructure initiative. And actor John Lithgow had two inspirations for his one-man Broadway show, "Stories by Heart": his father, and an 80-year-old story book titled "Teller of Tales." We speak with Lithgow about the show, and how storytelling has influenced his life and family.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/586572450/npr_586572450.mp3?orgId=1&d=2550&p=510051&story=586572450&t=podcast&e=586572450&ft=pod&f=510051




February 15, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:07:42 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 15, 2018 full broadcast, authorities have identified 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz as the gunman who opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. We get the latest from Miami Herald reporter Joey Flechas. Also, an increasing number of athletes are adding a new component to their workouts that simulates the oxygen deprivation of altitude, without leaving sea level. And political disputes have long loomed over the Olympic Games. We look back at a few past examples with historians Brian Balogh and Nathan Connolly.


Media Files:
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February 15, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:32:25 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 15, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest from NPR's Sarah McCammon on the shooting Wednesday at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Also, some including author Cheyenne Montgomery say they're disturbed by the age difference between the two protagonists in the Oscar-nominated film "Call Me by Your Name" — one portrayed as a boy, the other a man. And American Mikaela Shiffrin won the gold medal in the women's giant slalom Thursday. We round up news from Pyeongchang with sports analyst Mike Pesca.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/586125547/npr_586125547.mp3?orgId=1&d=2526&p=510051&story=586125547&t=podcast&e=586125547&ft=pod&f=510051




February 14, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 14:07:14 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 14, 2018 full broadcast, we welcome political strategists Jamal Simmons and Alice Stewart to discuss the White House's handling of domestic abuse allegations against former staff secretary Rob Porter. Also, the new film "The Party" turns a festive occasion into a feast of unexpected revelations and recriminations. We speak with writer-director Sally Potter and actor Patricia Clarkson. And, this Valentine's Day, we look at how online dating apps have changed the game of dating and mating — for better or worse.


Media Files:
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February 14, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 13:15:18 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 14, 2018 full broadcast, we get an update from NPR's Melissa Block on snowboarder Shaun White taking gold for third time in his Olympic career, and more of the latest from Pyeongchang. Also, China's "Belt and Road" initiative evokes the ancient Silk Road network of trade routes that once connected Europe to East Asia. As China updates that idea for the 21st century, the China Ocean Shipping Company has spent billions of dollars acquiring stakes in European ports. And Frederick Douglass, a former slave who became an abolitionist, would have marked his 200th birthday Wednesday. Two descendants of Frederick Douglass join us to discuss his legacy, and what he might make of America today.


Media Files:
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February 13, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 14:10:23 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 13, 2018 full broadcast, we hear from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., about continued debate on immigration policy in the Senate. Also we look at the push from one Alzheimer's researcher to continue immunotherapy trials despite setbacks in the field. Plus, we look at how years of constant conflict in Afghanistan have affected the state of mental health in the country. And, this week's DJ Session explores the legacy of the cello, from Johann Sebastian Bach to modern works by Philip Glass and Bright Sheng.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/585533110/npr_585533110.mp3?orgId=1&d=2531&p=510051&story=585533110&t=podcast&e=585533110&ft=pod&f=510051




February 13, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 13:31:09 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 13, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Greg Myre joins us to discuss the latest as top intelligence officials testify about "worldwide threats" before a Senate committee Tuesday. Also, we continue our series on China's "Belt and Road" initiative with a look at Khorgos, a remote town in Kazakhstan that's undergoing rapid development as a result of Chinese investment in a massive "dry port." And the much-anticipated Marvel superhero movie "Black Panther," the first to star a majority black cast, opens Friday. Author and journalist Jesse J. Holland says Hollywood executives now realize that "you can tell these types of stories, with characters of different colors and gender, and everyone will want to see them."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/585447887/npr_585447887.mp3?orgId=1&d=2514&p=510051&story=585447887&t=podcast&e=585447887&ft=pod&f=510051




February 12, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 14:09:54 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 12, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the latest headlines from Washington, including congressional debates on immigration and infrastructure, and the resignation of two White House staffers who were both accused of domestic abuse. Also, wages for judicial branch employees in Kansas are so low that folks at Sedgwick County District Court have started a food pantry for co-workers. And, two black bears badly burned in California's Thomas Fire last year are headed back into wild — thanks in part to an unorthodox treatment: bandages made of tilapia skin. We speak with UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital's chief of the integrative medicine service to learn more.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/585155145/npr_585155145.mp3?orgId=1&d=2496&p=510051&story=585155145&t=podcast&e=585155145&ft=pod&f=510051




February 12, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 13:09:14 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 12, 2018 full broadcast, we hear reaction to President Trump's infrastructure plan from Ed Rendell, former Democratic governor of Pennsylvania, who says the plan is "a joke." Also, even as we watch what's happening in Pyeongchang, there are other athletes now working toward the next Summer Games. And we speak with The Atlantic's Ed Yong, who realized in 2016 that only around 24 percent of the sources for his stories were female, and went about trying to correct that.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/585139807/npr_585139807.mp3?orgId=1&d=2567&p=510051&story=585139807&t=podcast&e=585139807&ft=pod&f=510051




February 9, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 15:37:08 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 9, 2018 full broadcast, we break down a tumultuous week on Wall Street with Michael Regan, senior editor for Bloomberg News. Also, about 5 percent of people in the U.S. suffer from the form of clinical depression brought on, most often, by the change of seasons: seasonal affective disorder. One professor of psychology tells us more about the causes and ways to treat it. And Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with the BBC's Stephanie Hegarty about her report on a young girl who survived being kidnapped by Boko Haram.


Media Files:
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February 9, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 15:25:08 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 9, 2018 full broadcast, we recap the week's political news, from Congress passing a budget deal to domestic abuse allegations against White House staffer Rob Porter, with Univision's Enrique Acevedo and NPR's Domenico Montanaro. Also, we speak with Maryland State Sen. Jim Rosapepe about a bill he co-sponsored to create an individual mandate to have health insurance in the state. And The Los Angeles Times has been sold to a California-based billionaire doctor for $500 million. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to discuss the deal, and what's next for the paper.


Media Files:
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February 8, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 14:03:15 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 8, 2018 full broadcast, Democratic Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth joins us to weigh in on efforts to keep the government funded, President Trump asking the Pentagon to draw up plans for a military parade in Washington and whether there's any end in sight for the war in Afghanistan. Also, in August 2015, Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos and Spencer Stone helped thwart a terrorist attack on a high-speed train bound for Paris. They now play themselves in a new Clint Eastwood film about the incident. And the Colorado Department of Transportation has found that wildlife crossings are reducing animal-related car crashes by in some cases up to 90 percent.


Media Files:
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February 8, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 13:08:11 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 8, 2018 full broadcast, the opening ceremonies for the 2018 Winter Olympics are set to take place Friday night in South Korea. We get a preview from sports analyst Mike Pesca. Also, White House chief of staff John Kelly has issued conflicting statements about the sudden resignation of staff secretary Rob Porter, raising questions about what Kelly knew when about allegations of domestic abuse from Porter's ex-wives. And a bill on the table in New Jersey could make it the first state to ban the sale of menthol cigarettes. We talk with a professor of public health sciences and psychiatry about how menthol cigarettes impact people differently than other kinds of cigarettes.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/584315173/npr_584315173.mp3?orgId=1&d=2519&p=510051&story=584315173&t=podcast&e=584315173&ft=pod&f=510051




February 7, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 14:07:11 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 7, 2018 full broadcast, Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall discusses why his state Suing OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma. Also we welcome political strategists Jamal Simmons and John Brabender to discuss the latest on government budget talks and immigration deals. Plus, this week's DJ Session with KCRW's Travis Holcombe features the latest funk-infused songs from artists like Superorganism and Kali Uchis. And, we speak with Under Armour Chief Innovation Officer Clay Dean who discusses the company's hopes for redemption at the 2018 Winter Olympics.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/584046229/npr_584046229.mp3?orgId=1&d=2485&p=510051&story=584046229&t=podcast&e=584046229&ft=pod&f=510051




February 7, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 13:13:16 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 7, 2018 full broadcast, we hear reaction to President Trump asking the Pentagon to plan a military parade in Washington this year from retired Major Gen. Paul Eaton, who says it's "a bad idea." Also, actor and director Tim Robbins stars in HBO's "Here and Now" (a great name, if you ask us) which premieres Sunday. He says the show explores "what it is to be an American right now, what it is to be a multicultural family and the challenges that are faced in Trump America." And there were 12 different flu vaccines offered in the past year by four different companies. Some of those options might be better than others.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/584027773/npr_584027773.mp3?orgId=1&d=2520&p=510051&story=584027773&t=podcast&e=584027773&ft=pod&f=510051




February 6, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 16:07:07 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 6, 2018 full broadcast, we hear the latest on the Democratic response to the Republican memo about alleged surveillance abuses. Also, what is life after deportation like for those leaving the U.S.? For most, it means trying to get back over the border and the possibility of being deported multiple times. Plus, Alfonso Aguilar, president of the Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, explains why he is backing President Trump's immigration framework. And, the founder and owner of one high-end restaurant in London explains how a new, dynamic approach to meal pricing is affecting business.


Media Files:
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February 6, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 13:19:21 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 6, 2018 full broadcast, former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers joins us to weigh in on reaction to the Dow Jones industrial average experiencing the worst point drop in its history Monday. Also, the new Broadway hit "The Band's Visit" revolves around an Egyptian police band's arrival in a tiny Israeli desert village. But the show is remarkable for what doesn't happen. And groups that take federal funding for some family planning services are facing a looming deadline. We take a closer look at what might be ahead for Title X funding, which provides about $250 million for those services.


Media Files:
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February 5, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 15:33:08 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 5, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest on stock market movement with the Dow Jones opening down Monday after its worst day since 2016 on Friday. Also, ahead of Friday's opening ceremony, we turn to South Korea for the latest in Winter Olympics lead-up. Plus we speak with the founder of the British charity Action Hunger, which is giving people who are homeless access to free vending machines that dispense items like food, socks, shampoo and books. And we revisit the music of avant-garde composer Julius Eastman, whose challenging, political and minimalist works are on view at the "Julius Eastman: That Which Is Fundamental" exhibit in New York.


Media Files:
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February 5, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 13:33:55 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 5, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins us for the latest from Washington, where a Republican memo alleging misconduct by the FBI has stoked partisan divides as lawmakers near a deadline to keep the government funded. Also, in his new book, Scott Tong looks back at the China's history from the late 19th to early 21st centuries through the stories of members of his extended family. And we speak with one railroad expert who says a spate of recent deadly Amtrak crashes is unusual, and that a crash in South Carolina over the weekend appears to have been preventable.


Media Files:
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February 2, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 14:22:46 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 2, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with NPR's Phil Ewing about the political firestorm surrounding the release Friday of a controversial GOP memo alleging FBI surveillance abuse. Also, Nick Martino will be in Minneapolis for Super Bowl LII. His grandfather saw the Philadelphia Eagles win the 1960 NFL championship game. And this week Republican Rep. Trey Gowdy of South Carolina and Democratic Rep. Bob Brady of Pennsylvania became the latest lawmakers to announce the end of their careers in Congress, bringing the number of representatives who are retiring or leaving their seats to run for another office to 49. We take a look at the implications with Nathan Gonzales, editor and publisher of Inside Elections.


Media Files:
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February 2, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 13:14:37 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 2, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss a week in politics dominated by discussion surrounding a controversial GOP memo alleging FBI surveillance abuse with White House correspondents Brian Bennett of The Los Angeles Times and CNN's Abby Phillip. Also, ESPN writer Kevin Arnovitz joins us to take a closer look at the NBA's ratings bump, which comes amid a ratings slump for another major sports league. And we speak with Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry, Pakistan ambassador to the U.S., about a spate of deadly violence in Afghanistan, President Trump's criticism of Pakistan and more.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/582772394/npr_582772394.mp3?orgId=1&d=2519&p=510051&story=582772394&t=podcast&e=582772394&ft=pod&f=510051




February 1, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 14:05:53 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Feb. 1, 2018 full broadcast, we take a closer look at Olympics infrastructure in South Korea, including the brand-new Olympic stadium in Pyeongchang — which will only be used four times before it's decommissioned. Also, presidents throughout history have made their mark on the State of the Union address since George Washington delivered the first in 1790. We explore the evolution of the address with historians Ed Ayers and Brian Balogh. And we hear the latest from Kenya, where the country's government shut down three TV stations after they tried to broadcast an event held by an opposition politician Tuesday.


Media Files:
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February 1, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 13:24:49 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Feb. 1, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the implications surrounding the GOP snooping memo with former career intelligence officer Malcolm Nance. Also, marijuana is now legal for recreational use in California, and some cities have announced they'll dismiss or expunge thousands of low-level marijuana offenses dating back to 1975. And ahead of the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles squaring off in Minneapolis on Sunday in Super Bowl LII, we learn more about Minneapolis' music scene in the latest edition of our DJ Sessions — and take a listen to tracks that emerged from the each team's respective city.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/582476654/npr_582476654.mp3?orgId=1&d=2543&p=510051&story=582476654&t=podcast&e=582476654&ft=pod&f=510051




January 31, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 14:08:56 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 31, 2018 full broadcast, we bring in political strategists Karine Jean-Pierre and Paris Dennard to discuss their reactions to President Trump's State of the Union address Tuesday night. Also, Nuseir Yassin was working at a high-paying, high-tech job in New York when he realized that one-third of his life was over. We talk to the man who decided to quit his job to travel the world and make one-minute videos. And, resident chef Kathy Gunst made a trip to the recent Good Food Mercantile show. Her main takeaway? Fermentation is hot right now in the world of specialty food.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/582191418/npr_582191418.mp3?orgId=1&d=2522&p=510051&story=582191418&t=podcast&e=582191418&ft=pod&f=510051




January 31, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 13:46:35 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 31, 2018 full broadcast, we check in with Trump voters from Alabama and California for reaction to President Trump's State of the Union address Tuesday night, and hear analysis from NPR's Scott Horsley. Also, the latest season of FX's "American Crime Story" focuses on the murder of fashion designer Gianni Versace, who was gunned down on the front steps of his home in Miami Beach, Florida, on July 15, 1997. The show's executive producers join us to discuss "The Assassination of Gianni Versace." And Trump called for $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending in his address last night. But Ray LaHood, who was secretary of transportation under President Obama from 2009 to 2013, says the "math just doesn't work out."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/582191494/npr_582191494.mp3?orgId=1&d=2516&p=510051&story=582191494&t=podcast&e=582191494&ft=pod&f=510051




January 30, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 14:04:34 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 30, 2018 full broadcast, we welcome Rep. Mike Johnson of Louisiana, a Republican, to discuss what he hopes to see from President Trump's State of the Union address, as well as ongoing negotiations over immigration policy. Also according to actor and comedian John Leguizamo, history books and public school curricula don't do enough to highlight Latino contributions to U.S. history. His show "Latin History for Morons" aims to fix that. And, a new study finds that the legal limit of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to get behind a wheel should be lowered from 0.08 to 0.05. We speak with one of the study's authors.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581905190/npr_581905190.mp3?orgId=1&d=2508&p=510051&story=581905190&t=podcast&e=581905190&ft=pod&f=510051




January 30, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 13:16:39 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 30, 2018 full broadcast, we preview President Trump's first State of the Union address with NPR's Kelsey Snell. Also, President Trump's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem "has made getting negotiations much more difficult" between Israelis and Palestinians, according to former Democratic Sen. George Mitchell, who was special envoy for Middle East peace under President Obama. And on Wednesday morning, there will be combination of three celestial events — a supermoon, blue moon and total lunar eclipse, known as a blood moon — for the first time since 1982. Kelly Beatty of Sky & Telescope magazine tells us about when and where to get the best view.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581900675/npr_581900675.mp3?orgId=1&d=2556&p=510051&story=581900675&t=podcast&e=581900675&ft=pod&f=510051




January 29, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 29 Jan 2018 14:11:13 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 29, 2018 full broadcast, we continue looking ahead to Tuesday's State of the Union address, which White House officials say will set a tone of bipartisanship. Plus, Ohio State University professor Randall Schweller, who supports Trump, looks back on the president's first year in office, saying the policies mark a "return to realist principles." And, the fitness app Strava helps users track and share their runs on a map. But military analysts have noticed a public heat map of compiled data reveals potentially sensitive military data.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581639824/npr_581639824.mp3?orgId=1&d=2532&p=510051&story=581639824&t=podcast&e=581639824&ft=pod&f=510051




January 29, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 29 Jan 2018 13:18:46 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 29, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with an infectious disease expert about how this brutal flu season compares to what doctors and health officials have seen in the past. Also, how does a gecko manage to walk on the ceiling? And what happens when a dog shakes water off its coat? We get answers from Matin Durrani and Liz Kalaugher, the authors of "Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life." And The Atlantic's Derek Thompson joins us to discuss which moments from Sunday night's Grammy Awards are driving discussion, including the reading of excerpts from the book "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581639889/npr_581639889.mp3?orgId=1&d=2521&p=510051&story=581639889&t=podcast&e=581639889&ft=pod&f=510051




January 26, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 26 Jan 2018 14:32:31 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 26, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Democratic Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva about the Trump administration's immigration proposal. Also, the team of Indianapolis Star reporters who broke the Larry Nassar sexual abuse story joins us to discuss reaction following the verdict, challenges they faced reporting the story and what might be ahead. And Minnesota is gearing up to host the Super Bowl in less than two weeks. The state is also embracing a new identity — instead of being part of the Midwest, it's branding itself as "the North."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581145155/npr_581145155.mp3?orgId=1&d=2515&p=510051&story=581145155&t=podcast&e=581145155&ft=pod&f=510051




January 26, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 26 Jan 2018 13:16:32 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 26, 2018 full broadcast, ABC News political director Rick Klein and USA Today immigration reporter Alan Gomez join Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young to discuss the week's political developments. Also, we speak with Harrison Mills and Clayton Knight of the electronic music duo ODESZA about their introspective music, high-production live shows and Pacific Northwest influences. And as President Trump and Congress debate what's next for immigration, one journalist is working to trace the immigration roots of lawmakers and other public figures who are in favor of a crackdown on the issue.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/581092713/npr_581092713.mp3?orgId=1&d=2538&p=510051&story=581092713&t=podcast&e=581092713&ft=pod&f=510051




January 25, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 25 Jan 2018 14:30:53 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 25, 2018 full broadcast, Baltimore City Councilor Brandon Scott joins us to discuss the city's new police commissioner, and how the Baltimore Police Department is grappling with a record number of killings. Also, Bill Richardson, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, tells us why he quit the international panel formed to advise Aung San Suu Kyi on the Rohingya crisis. And Here & Now tech correspondent Ben Johnson fills us in on the hugely popular trivia game app HQ.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580833556/npr_580833556.mp3?orgId=1&d=2511&p=510051&story=580833556&t=podcast&e=580833556&ft=pod&f=510051




January 25, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 25 Jan 2018 14:10:36 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 25, 2018 full broadcast, President Trump is in Switzerland for the World Economic Forum, where he's expected to push a message that the U.S. is "open for business." NPR's Scott Horsley joins us with the latest. Also, we consider the legacy of California Gov. Jerry Brown, the state's longest-serving governor, with KQED reporter Scott Shafer. And last week the volunteer group No More Deaths released a video compilation of U.S. Border Patrol agents sabotaging what the group says is humanitarian work. We hear from a volunteer with the group.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580807053/npr_580807053.mp3?orgId=1&d=2541&p=510051&story=580807053&t=podcast&e=580807053&ft=pod&f=510051




January 24, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 24 Jan 2018 14:08:38 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 24, 2018 full broadcast, we welcome political strategists Karine Jean-Pierre and Matt Mackowiak to tackle the latest Washington news, from a lack of progress with a new deal on DACA, to Republican lawmakers' criticism of the FBI in relation to the agency's Russia investigation. Also, amid momentum created by the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements, we discuss issues facing domestic workers in the U.S. with Ai-Jen Poo, executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance. And author Jonathan Kauffman says much of the food introduced to Americans by the 1960s and '70s counterculture still influences what we eat today. He joins us to talk about his book, "Hippie Food."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580393025/npr_580393025.mp3?orgId=1&d=2510&p=510051&story=580393025&t=podcast&e=580393025&ft=pod&f=510051




January 24, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 24 Jan 2018 13:08:50 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 24, 2018 full broadcast, President Trump's attorneys are reportedly laying the groundwork for an interview with special counsel Robert Mueller as part of the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election. We get the latest on the investigation from NPR's Phil Ewing. Also, we take a closer look at gerrymandering amid redistricting cases around the country, and what the cases may mean for the future of elections in the U.S. And parents are grappling with how to prevent their children from becoming too tied to technology. We speak with Brian Barrett of Wired about some possible solutions, like implementing parental controls.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580357866/npr_580357866.mp3?orgId=1&d=2514&p=510051&story=580357866&t=podcast&e=580357866&ft=pod&f=510051




January 23, 2018: Hour 2

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 14:11:30 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 23, 2018 full broadcast, we look at what the Trump administration's decision to impose tariffs on washing machines, solar energy cells and solar panels might mean for the solar industry in the U.S. Also, the 2018 Academy Award nominations were announced Tuesday morning. Claudia Puig, president of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, shares the top takeaways. And, the World Bicycle Relief has handed out about 145,000 bicycles to students in developing countries. We learn how the organization follows in the tradition of changing women's lives with wheels.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580060029/npr_580060029.mp3?orgId=1&d=2509&p=510051&story=580060029&t=podcast&e=580060029&ft=pod&f=510051




January 23, 2018: Hour 1

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 13:10:26 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 23, 2018 full broadcast, the federal government is open Tuesday, but negotiations on an immigration overhaul still loom. We take a look at the deal struck Monday, and what's ahead, with NPR's Kelsey Snell. Also, a trial begins in March in Wichita, Kansas, for three men accused of plotting to bomb an apartment complex in Garden City, Kansas, where Somali refugees live and maintain a mosque. Jessica Pressler has written about the story for New York Magazine, and tells us more about the men's alleged motivations and the role an undercover FBI agent played in stopping the plot. And we get an update from Michigan, where there could be a sentence as soon as Wednesday for Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics team doctor who has admitted to using his position to sexually abuse underage girls.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/580032768/npr_580032768.mp3?orgId=1&d=2519&p=510051&story=580032768&t=podcast&e=580032768&ft=pod&f=510051




January 22, 2018: Hour 2

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 14:32:33 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 22, 2018 full broadcast, we continue with updates from Washington, D.C., on the latest regarding the partial government shutdown. Also, beginning March 1, restrictions in China that will limit imports of solid waste from other countries are set to go into full effect. What will this mean for recycling in the United States? And, with the Winter Olympics only weeks away, excitement is mounting for participating athletes. But that joy has been marred by recent tragedies, including the deaths of two skiers. The accidents leave some asking whether the risks of winter sports are at best unreasonable and at worst immoral.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579785209/npr_579785209.mp3?orgId=1&d=2502&p=510051&story=579785209&t=podcast&e=579785209&ft=pod&f=510051




January 22, 2018: Hour 1

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 14:26:37 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 22, 2018 full broadcast, NPR's Ron Elving joins us from Washington to discuss the latest developments on the government shutdown. Also, the town of Norwich, Vermont, has put an athlete on every U.S. Winter Olympic team but one since 1984. New York Times sports reporter Karen Crouse's new book takes a closer look at the tiny community's prolific sports culture. And four new flavors of Diet Coke are going on sale this week as Coca-Cola tries to attract young people and former customers to the brand. We speak with The Atlantic's Derek Thompson about what Thompson calls Diet Coke's "moment of panic."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579763588/npr_579763588.mp3?orgId=1&d=2523&p=510051&story=579763588&t=podcast&e=579763588&ft=pod&f=510051




January 19, 2018: Hour 2

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 14:11:36 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 19, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican, about why he voted "yes" last night for a stopgap spending bill to avoid a government shutdown at midnight tonight, after initially not backing it. Also, Saturday marks one year since Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States. We take a look back at President Trump's inaugural address. And, for some women, the sexual misbehavior allegations against comedian Aziz Ansari highlight broken sexual culture. We speak with one author who says the conversation surrounding Ansari says something about the way young people are taught about sex at an early age.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579233105/npr_579233105.mp3?orgId=1&d=2539&p=510051&story=579233105&t=podcast&e=579233105&ft=pod&f=510051




January 19, 2018: Hour 1

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 13:22:37 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 19, 2018 full broadcast, a government shutdown looms ahead of a midnight deadline on Friday. We look at the latest developments in the efforts to avert a shutdown. Also, every day, several hundred people lose their DACA status because of President Trump's decision to end the program. We speak with one woman who has lost her status and is trying to reapply. And, what makes a "good immigrant?" That's the question that Americans have debated throughout the country's history. We look back at the history of U.S. immigration exclusion.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579233139/npr_579233139.mp3?orgId=1&d=2602&p=510051&story=579233139&t=podcast&e=579233139&ft=pod&f=510051




January 18, 2018: Hour 2

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:40:16 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 18, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam about their respective concerns about the Trump administration's plan to open up coastal waters to drilling. Also we get the latest on Amazon's list of 20 cities that are finalists to get the bid for the company's second headquarters. And, Mormon land developer David Hall has bought up 1,800 acres in Vermont to build a utopian, self-sustainable community. But he's facing pushback from those living in four surrounding towns.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579078776/npr_579078776.mp3?orgId=1&d=2537&p=510051&story=579078776&t=podcast&e=579078776&ft=pod&f=510051




January 18, 2018: Hour 1

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:36:51 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 18, 2018 full broadcast, as the threat of a government shutdown draws near, lawmakers are scrambling to reach a deal on immigration. We speak with the president of an immigration advocacy group. Also, though the kangaroo is an Australian icon, it is also widely hunted as a pest. Filmmakers Kate McIntyre Clere and Michael McIntyre discuss their new documentary, "Kangaroo: A Love-Hate Story." And, you may have seen an illustration on Martin Luther King Jr. Day showing the civil rights leader with a hand over President Trump's mouth, trying to get the president to stop tweeting. We speak with the artist of that piece, Watson Mere.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/579078792/npr_579078792.mp3?orgId=1&d=2594&p=510051&story=579078792&t=podcast&e=579078792&ft=pod&f=510051




January 17, 2018: Hour 2

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 14:09:16 -0500

In hour two of Here & Now's Jan. 17, 2018 full broadcast, we welcome political strategists Jamal Simmons and John Brabender to discuss the politics of a DACA immigration deal, and a possible government shutdown on Friday night. Also, Adam Rippon grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania, being bullied and feeling out of place. Now, he's on his way to the Olympics as the first openly gay man chosen to represent the U.S. at the Winter Games. And we hear a report on an emerging industry that's trying to answer the question of how much marijuana you can have in your system and still get behind the wheel.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/578636305/npr_578636305.mp3?orgId=1&d=2578&p=510051&story=578636305&t=podcast&e=578636305&ft=pod&f=510051




January 17, 2018: Hour 1

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 13:47:35 -0500

In hour one of Here & Now's Jan. 17, 2018 full broadcast, we get the latest from NPR's Domenico Montanaro on negotiations in Congress over the budget and DACA. Also, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell about nine of the National Park Service advisory board's 12 members resigning Monday night. And McDonald's has announced that it will produce all its packaging from recycled or renewable materials by 2025. The company's chief sustainability officer explains what it will take to make the change.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510051/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510051/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510051/578636338/npr_578636338.mp3?orgId=1&d=2514&p=510051&story=578636338&t=podcast&e=578636338&ft=pod&f=510051