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Preview: NPR: World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN Podcast

World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN



WXPN's live performance and interview program featuring music and conversation from a variety of important musicians



Copyright: Copyright 2016 WXPN University of Pennsylvania
 



No More Day Jobs for Mt. Joy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 17:00:00 -0500

Founded in the Philadelphia area by Sam Quinn and Matt Cooper, Mt. Joy's ambitions were to record songs. And that's what they did, before heading back to their day jobs, as a manager in the music industry, and as a lawyer. Everything changed, though, when they uploaded the song "Astrovan" to Spotify. Over 10 million plays later, the band has set up shop in Los Angeles, played Conan, and are a part of NPR's new music discovery program, Slingshot. Kallao talks to Matt and Sam about what it was like to quit their jobs to pursue their musical ambitions, what they get asked about on Facebook, and how long it took to craft their very first single, "Silver Lining".


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/588137888/npr_588137888.mp3?orgId=1&d=1328&p=510008&story=588137888&t=podcast&e=588137888&ft=pod&f=510008




No More Day Jobs for Mt. Joy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 09:30:00 -0500

Founded in the Philadelphia area by Sam Quinn and Matt Cooper, Mt. Joy's ambitions were to record songs. And that's what they did, before heading back to their day jobs, as a manager in the music industry, and as a lawyer. Everything changed, though, when they uploaded the song "Astrovan" to Spotify. Over 10 million plays later, the band has set up shop in Los Angeles, played Conan, and are a part of NPR's new music discovery program, Slingshot. Kallao talks to Matt and Sam about what it was like to quit their jobs to pursue their musical ambitions, what they get asked about on Facebook, and how long it took to craft their very first single, "Silver Lining".


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/588000454/npr_588000454.mp3?orgId=1&d=1332&p=510008&story=588000454&t=podcast&e=588000454&ft=pod&f=510008




O-M-Glen Hansard!

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 09:30:00 -0500

Talia here - I had a hard time holding it together while Glen Hansard emotionally wailed his guts out performing songs from his new album Between Two Shores. And the guy can spin a yarn too. Glen tells stories about the advice he got from Bruce Springsteen, the month he spent travelling from Ireland to Spain in a rowboat, and the way he remembers his late father.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/587639852/npr_587639852.mp3?orgId=1&d=1771&p=510008&story=587639852&t=podcast&e=587639852&ft=pod&f=510008




Sunny War Will Stop You In Your Tracks

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:30:00 -0500

It's difficult to describe Sunny's guitar virtuosity - but you can find her somewhere between the rooted blues of Robert Johnson,  the lightning plucky folk of Richard Thompson  and the dexterous wonder of Jack Rose. Sunny cut her performance chops busking for nearly a decade on Venice Beach, where she hung out with people she calls "gutter punks". We talk about the drug-induced near-death experience that landed her in a sober living facility, and how she honed a performance style as unique as it is arresting. Plus Sunny plays emotionally rich live songs from her latest album With The Sun.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/587264923/npr_587264923.mp3?orgId=1&d=1768&p=510008&story=587264923&t=podcast&e=587264923&ft=pod&f=510008




Unreleased Nashville Rock: Idle Bloom

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:00:00 -0500

Voted best local band by the Nashville Scene in 2016, Idle Bloom will release their sophomore album this summer. Since their founding 4 years ago the group has grown from its roots in the all ages punk community to a tight, tuneful ensemble whose songs are equal parts daring and dreamy. Lead singer Olivia Scibelli, guitarist Gavin Schriver, bassist Katie Banyay, and drummer Weston Sparks put out their Idle Bloom debut Little Deaths last year and they have a new disc called Flood the Dial coming this summer. They play some of the unreleased songs live and give their take on how the local music community is, and isn't, addressing the issue of sexism in rock in an interview with Nashville correspondent Ann Powers.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/587130572/npr_587130572.mp3?orgId=1&d=1369&p=510008&story=587130572&t=podcast&e=587130572&ft=pod&f=510008




Lana Del Rey: Fame, Feminism & Getting Free

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 06:15:00 -0500

From her collaborations with Stevie Nicks and the Weeknd on her latest album Lust for Life, to the advice she's gotten about fame from Eddie Vedder and Courtney Love, Lana Del Rey reflects on where she's at now. That includes her discomfort around singing the lyrics "he hit me and it felt like a kiss" from 2014's Ultraviolence and her thoughts on the #MeToo movement. Lana also reminisces about growing up in Lake Placid, New York and cops to being a tree-lover. Who knew?


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/586362924/npr_586362924.mp3?orgId=1&d=2134&p=510008&story=586362924&t=podcast&e=586362924&ft=pod&f=510008




From Gospel to Personal: Blind Boys of Alabama

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:32:00 -0500

For over 70 years, Blind Boys of Alabama have put their stamp on gospel standards. But their latest album Almost Home is filled with songs that tell the personal tales of the two original surviving members Jimmy Carter and Clarence Fountain - stories about being sent to a school for the blind when they were kids, touring the segregated South in the 40s, and the unwavering faith that got them through. Jimmy and Clarence's stories were adapted into new music by songwriters including John Leventhal, Marc Cohn, Valerie June and Steve Berlin of Los Lobos. Hear an interview with Jimmy, and a live performance by Blind Boys of Alabama.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/586172495/npr_586172495.mp3?orgId=1&d=1643&p=510008&story=586172495&t=podcast&e=586172495&ft=pod&f=510008




Sex, Race and Rock 'N' Roll: Good Booty

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 08:30:00 -0500

In her book Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music, Ann Powers explores how music has both reflected and shaped America's relationship with sexuality, and how race figures into the equation. Powers shares stories with host Talia Schlanger about the women who often didn't receive the credit they deserved – from the girl groups of the 60s like the Shirelles to one of the most recognizable but perhaps undervalued voices of the 70s, disco hitmaker Donna Summer. Plus more insight into the work of stars you know – including why Little Richard re-wrote the lyrics to his song "Tutti Frutti" and how Elvis learned to rock by way of gospel performers in Memphis. Dip your toes into a history of music you won't easily forget.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/585699431/npr_585699431.mp3?orgId=1&d=1511&p=510008&story=585699431&t=podcast&e=585699431&ft=pod&f=510008




A Harp Walks Into Two Barrs...

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:30:00 -0500

The Barr Brothers are a beautiful folky sort of band made up of brothers Andrew and Brad Barr, along with their secret weapon - harpist Sarah Pagé. Sarah has rigged this incredible instrument (taller than our 6'2" producer John Myers) with pickups and effects pedals normally used on electric guitar. In this session Sarah breaks down her unique setup, and The Barr Brothers perform live music from their latest album "Queens of The Breakers."


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/585080182/npr_585080182.mp3?orgId=1&d=1631&p=510008&story=585080182&t=podcast&e=585080182&ft=pod&f=510008




Beyonce & Solange: Political & Personal

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 08:30:00 -0500

In 2016 the Knowles sisters each made career and culture-defining new albums. Solange released A Seat at the Table and Beyonce dropped Lemonade. Both were named to numerous Best of the Year lists, and last July, when NPR created Turning the Tables, the list of the 150 greatest albums by women, they extended the time period for consideration to end in 2016 instead of 2014 just because of strong demand to include these two discs. Ann Powers, who spearheaded Turning the Tables, is joined by three NPR Music colleagues, Marissa Lorusso, Katie Presley, and Sidney Madden, to discuss why people feel so strongly about these two albums, their impact of each artist's career, and how they changed the cultural conversation at large in presenting two black women's experiences with power and emotion.


Media Files:
https://play.podtrac.com/npr-510008/npr.mc.tritondigital.com/NPR_510008/media/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/510008/584502605/npr_584502605.mp3?orgId=1&d=1757&p=510008&story=584502605&t=podcast&e=584502605&ft=pod&f=510008