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Preview: KQED's The California Report Podcast

KQED’s The California Report



KQED’s statewide half-hour radio news program, providing daily coverage of issues, trends, and public policy decisions affecting California and its diverse population.



Last Build Date: Mon, 21 Aug 2017 07:03:20 +0000

Copyright: Copyright © 2017 KQED Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 



The California Report Magazine

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 23:20:24 +0000

An Eclipse Made This Atheist Photographer Find God For the first time in 40 years, people throughout North America can view a solar eclipse. And thousands of Californians are heading up to Oregon or to other parts of the country where the eclipse will be total. A team from the University of California, Berkeley and Google are producing a 90-minute film of the eclipse traveling all the way across the country. Among them, Mark Bender – who says viewing other eclipses has completely changed his life. KQED science reporter Lesley McClurg reports. Parents, Get Ready for the Eclipse With a Tennis Ball and a Hula Hoop If you can’t take a last-minute road trip to Oregon or another prime spot in the path of the eclipse - we will get to see at least a partial eclipse here in California. And if you don’t end up catching it, you can always re-enact it at home, thanks to the new children’s book, “When the Sun Goes Dark”. It’s co-authored by Andrew Fraknoi, who’s just retired as the chair of the astronomy department at Foothill College, in Northern California. The California Report’s Sasha Khokha talked with him. Strains of Puccini and Verdi Fill the Halls of Silicon Valley Tech Firms Tech companies in Silicon Valley pull in all sorts of celebrities and theatrical acts for lunchtime entertainment. That gave the folks at Opera San José an idea. What if they took advantage of those captive audiences to make a pitch for opera? KQED arts reporter Rachael Myrow went to check out a performance. After Trump’s Travel Ban, She Took Off Her Hijab and Learned Self-Defense The heightened visibility of white supremacist groups means a lot of people are feeling vulnerable. That includes Muslim Americans, already reeling from President Trump's proposed travel bans and an increase in hate crimes towards people perceived to be Muslim. That's all been weighing heavily on 22-year-old Marwa Abdelghani of Los Angeles. She reluctantly stopped wearing her headscarf after Trump took office, but she’s also preparing to fight back. Pasha Zolfaghari brings us the final installment in our series, “At Risk in the Trump Era,” produced in collaboration with student reporters from the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Published in LA, Banned in Iran: Ketab Books Fights Iran’s Censorship Southern California is home to the largest community of Iranians outside Iran, many of whom came as exiles after the Islamic revolution took power in 1979. Since then, a repressive regime has made Iran one of the world's most censored countries. In Los Angeles, Ketab Bookstore has been helping readers find ways around censorship for decades. Now the brick-and-mortar store is closing, but its owner vows to continue its work electronically. Reporter Valerie Hamilton has the story. At ‘Sound Maze’ Exhibit in Napa, Everyone Is a Musician Composer Paul Dresher fuses maker culture with music, with a collection of handmade instruments in an interactive exhibit called Sound Maze. Reporter Bianca Taylor went to the Napa Valley Museum to make some noise.


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The California Report

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:11:42 +0000

Opiates Epidemic is Hitting California In 2015, 2000 people almost died, 4000 went to the emergency room from opiate overdoses and in 2016 there were 24 million prescriptions for opioids in California. This according to the CA healthcare Foundation. And while numbers make a stat, names make a story. Tracy Helton is a public health worker, addition recovery advocate, and former heroin user herself. Reporter John Sepulvado Three Mothers Share Their Stories about Their Children Who Were Addicted to Opiates A non-narrative piece where mothers share their memories of their children Reporter John Sepulvado White Nationalists Consider Rallies in California  This week started by introducing you to California white supremacist Nathan Damigo. He's the leader of Identity Europa and helped organize the Charlottesville rally in Virginia. We're going to close our discussion this week by looking toward the weekend where white nationalists and other hard right groups are considering rallies in CA. Reporter John Sepulvado Using Your Phone for the Upcoming Eclipse We've got an eclipse coming up on Monday, but here in California, we won’t see it in totality. We’re just a little too far south for that. But the partial eclipse across the state will still be a good show. And there’s more to do than just watch. You can also whip out your phone and gather data for some country-wide citizen science projects. Sam Harnett


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The California Report

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:01:00 +0000

Doctor Locked Up in Vacaville State Prison for Reporting Abuse A prison psychologist says she was locked in alone in a unit with a convicted rapist, because she reported repeated incidents of abuse against gay and transgender prisoners. Reporter Ryan Levi Department of Justice Issues Warrant over IP addresses From a Website that Helped Protests at President Trump's Inauguration DreamHost, a Los Angeles-based web hosting company, reported that the federal government is trying to compel them for a large amount of digital records. This data would include IP addresses for more than a million people who visited a website called Disrupt-j-20.org. This website helped organized protests at President Trump's inauguration. Reporter John Sepulvado Winegrowers See a Labor Shortage The California Reports’ Tiffany Camhi spoke with Karissa Kruse of Sonoma County Winegrowers to find out what’s causing the labor crunch and what growers are doing to make sure no grape goes unpicked. Reporter Tiffany Camhi NAFTA Re-negotiation May Affect Farmers and Ranchers in California California exported about 4-and-a-half billion dollars worth of agricultural products to Canada and Mexico in 2015. So with NAFTA renegotiation talks under way this week, there may be a lot at stake for farmers and ranchers in the state. Reporter Vanessa Rancano


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The California Report

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:33:58 +0000

CBO: If Trump Cuts Payments to Insurance Companies, It Will Cost Taxpayers A new report from the Congressional Budget Office shows President Trump’s newest strategy on health care could cost taxpayers $194 billion  over the next decade. Reporter: April Dembosky San Diego Mayor Pushes NAFTA, and “New California Republicans” Today the United States, Mexico and Canada will begin to renegotiate NAFTA, the free trade agreement between the three countries. President Trump has called the agreement a “disaster” for factory workers in this country. But San Diego Republican Mayor Kevin Faulconer is using his platform as a border mayor to advocate for keeping NAFTA intact. Reporter: Guy Marzorati Advocates Rally, Opponents Threaten Lawsuit After Five Years of DACA This week marks five years since president Obama began the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. But eight months into a new administration DACA’s future is in doubt. Reporter: Steven Cuevas


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The California Report

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 14:19:07 +0000

California's Investment Into Struggling Schools Show Little Improvement Many schools in California are back in session and we thought it was a good idea to look at questions surrounding education, including school funding money. The formula the state uses is called the Local Control and Accountability Plan or the LCAP. Lawmakers have pumped tens of billions of dollars into struggling schools, but there’s no evidence of improvement in 15 districts. Guest: Jessica Calefati, CALmatters


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The California Report

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:39:21 +0000

Reactions Across the State to Charlottesville Events In Oakland, protesters shut down part of the 580 near Lake Merritt. They marched through oncoming traffic before locking hands and blocking the roadways for about twenty minutes. Meanwhile, to the south in Los Angeles, there were more subdued protests downtown. Meanwhile, a California man was arrested for his role in the melee, organized by white nationalists. Nathan Damigo is the founder of the California-based white supremacist group Identity Evropa. On Saturday he tweeted that he was picked up by police on the scene. Before leaving for Charlottesville, Damigo told The California Report he was trying to set up events on college campuses around the country, including at UC Berkeley. He spoke to KQED during an earlier protest this summer about the need for high-profile, high-drama events as a recruitment tool. Reporters John Sepulvado and Steven Cuevas Survey Shows Young Men are Embracing Racist Beliefs According to the research done by San Diego State Psychologist Jean Twenge, more young men are hardening in embracing racist beliefs. Twenge recently spoke with us about a survey showing a minority of people under 25 with hardening racial attitudes, because of the ways they answered certain questions Reporter John Sepulvado Supporters of Quarterback Colin Kaepernick Protest in Los Angeles Dozens of people protested outside LA Memorial Colisseum. Reporter Jenny Hamel Tea Party Held in Fresno Over the Weekend The group is sick of the Republican Party status quo. Reporter Vanessa Rancaño Korean-Americans in Los Angeles React to North Korea California has the largest Korean population of any state in the U.S. Reporter Susan Valot


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The California Report Magazine

Sat, 12 Aug 2017 01:25:47 +0000

How a ‘Hippie Clinic’ in the Haight-Ashbury Started a Medical Revolution San Francisco. 50 years ago. The Summer of Love. A time now synonymous with hippies, music, flowers and drugs. But it was also a summer of sickness. Free love meant venereal disease. Drugs led to overdoses. When one young doctor in San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury opened what he called a “free clinic,” it was instantly mobbed because many young people couldn’t – or wouldn’t – go anywhere else. It was a revolutionary idea in health care that's still helping people today. Cultural Life Flourishes in This ‘Almost’ Ghost Town Near Death Valley From counter culture in San Francisco, to one on the edge of Death Valley: Darwin, in Inyo County. Chances are, people who live in the almost ghost town will see you coming way before you see them. Your tires will kick up five miles of dust along the single washboard road that drops into town from the highway. Writer and artist Kathy Goss emailed us a couple months back after hearing a story about Joshua Tree that took The California Report's L.A. bureau chief Steven Cuevas close to Darwin. Next time, she said, why not pay a visit? So, Steven did. Not So Sentimental Journeys in New Albums From 2Mex and Frankie Rose The California Report's Suzie Racho and our pop music critic Steve Hochman are here to talk about some of the latest releases from Golden State artists. Today, they’ve got music inspired by journeys: one physical, the other cosmic, from 2Mex and Frankie Rose. The 5th Dementia: Group Brings Teens and Seniors Together to Make Music When you think of the debilitating, painful trauma of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, you probably don’t think of people climbing onstage to belt out feel-good classics from the Great American Songbook. But then you’re probably not thinking of the 5th Dementia. The LA group keeps folks with neurodegenerative disease in the moment by playing music of the past, with help from a few teenage musicians. Reporter Peter Gilstrap has more.


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The California Report

Fri, 11 Aug 2017 16:34:44 +0000

Despite Numerous Lawsuits, Natural Gas Reservoir Re-opens in Southern California After a year and a half of being in near-shutdown mode, California’s largest natural gas reservoir in Aliso Canyon is back in service. KPCC’s Sharon McNary has been this and she says it’s a dream for lawyers, and a nightmare for the plaintiffs. Reporter John Sepulvado Federal Court Judge Thelton Henderson Reflects on His Career as He Retires Over the course of his 37 years on the bench in San Francisco, federal district court Judge Thelton Henderson has handled some very high profile cases and handed down some very controversial decisions. Reporter Scott Shafer Appeals Panel Tosses Out Deportation Order Against Immigrant Dad A Los Angeles man picked up his child from school and he was picked up by immigration officers. The detention was caught on video. The video went viral. Romolo Avileca Gonzales went nowhere, sitting in a cell, scheduled for deportation. But a last minute reversal by the Board of Immigration has thrown out that order. Reporter John Sepulvado Google CEO Appears at an Event for Girl Coders after a Controversial Memo on Gender was release by a Google Engineer KQED's Queena Kim was there and speaks to host John Sepulvado. Reporter Scott Shafer As Deadline Approaches, Los Angeles Officials Haven't Responded on Hosting 2028 Olympics The International Olympic Committee offered Los Angeles the chance to host the 2028 Olympic games. Technically, LA hasn’t taken the deal yet. Reporter Andrea Bernstein


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The California Report

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:17:57 +0000

Solano County Court Agrees to Stop Suspending Licenses of Low-Income Drivers The agreement settles a lawsuit brought by a coalition of civil rights advocates last year. Reporter Peter Jon Shuler North Korea Missiles Could Reach California, But Is an Attack Realistic? David Schermler, a nonproliferation analyst at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, joins us to discuss North Korea. Reporter Penny Nelson Powering Farm Machinery By Cow Manure Straus Family Creamery in Northern California has been a leader in sustainable and organic farm practices for years. Now, what was a wild idea eight years ago has finally been realized: to power the machinery that feeds the dairy cows...with their own poop. Reporter Tiffany Camhi 5 Transgender Troops Sue to Stop Trump Plan to Ban Them A lawsuit was filed yesterday to block President Trump’s proposed ban on transgender military members from becoming policy. The ban was announced by Trump two weeks ago on Twitter. Reporter Scott Shafer State Residents Want California Juvenile Detentions to Close On any given day about six thousand kids in California are locked up…and the majority of those youngsters are African-American and Latino. Now, 60 percent of residents want to close the state’s juvenile detention facilities, according to a new survey from the California Endowment. Reporter Sukey Lewis


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The California Report

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 14:05:14 +0000

Los Angeles Now Requires City Contractors to Reveal If They Bid On Border Wall Work The L.A. City Council drew its own line in the sand yesterday on Donald Trump’s border wall. Reporter: Andrea Bernstein State Sheriffs Association Looks to Amend 'Sanctuary State' Legislation Some state lawmakers want to head off the Trump administration's push to deport more immigrants with a bill that would make California a so-called "sanctuary state." But yesterday, the State Sheriff’s Association said the bill is a bad move for public safety. Reporter: Marisa Lagos As California Bilingual Education Grows, Teacher Training is Key Last year, voters made it easier for California public schools to start bilingual education programs. Now, demand for teachers who can work in those programs is growing. But school administrators are finding out that it’s hard to find teachers whose academic Spanish is as good as their academic English. Some teachers are using the summer to step up their bilingual teaching game. Reporter: Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Produce Company Behind Popular ‘Cuties’ Fined Over Pesticide Drift A California company tied to the famous "Cuties" brand of oranges has been fined for violating pesticide rules in connection with a chemical drift incident that sickened more than three dozen Central Valley farmworkers this spring. Reporter: Ted Goldberg Google Fires Employee Who Wrote Controversial Diversity Memo Google fired James Damore, the engineer who wrote a 10-page memo saying the gender gap in computer engineering is due to “biological” differences that disadvantage women. All of this has sparked a heated debate. But some lawyers say Google’s action was clear cut. Reporter: Queena Kim


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The California Report

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 14:51:37 +0000

State Fire Marshal's Office to Get More Resources for Oil Pipeline Inspections The state agency that oversees California’s vast oil pipeline network is staffing up. This comes after several pipelines ruptured and spilled oil into California waterways. Reporter: Ted Goldberg Is ‘Green Spot’ a Sign of More Trouble for Oroville Dam? The Oroville Dam spillway failed back in February, causing about 180,000 people to have to evacuate. We check in on the dam’s current status and find out what a mysterious green spot that’s appeared on the left side of its downstream face is. Reporter: Dan Brekke CSU Nixes Remedial Classes, Placement Tests The California State University system is getting rid of placement tests and remedial classes for incoming freshmen beginning in 2018. But a growing number of faculty members are angry, calling the dramatic move announced last week politically motivated. Reporter: Ana Tintocalis Antelope Valley's Only Homeless Shelter to Close Amid Growing Homeless Numbers It's no secret that the city of Los Angeles has a large and growing homeless population. There's a lot less people living on the street up in the Antelope Valley north of L.A. But the numbers there are growing too. And resources are scarce. Even more so now that the Valley’s only homeless shelter shut down this weekend. Reporter: Steven Cuevas  


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The California Report

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 14:03:17 +0000

SLO Mayor Sued Over Repeal of Rental Program In San Luis Obispo, a spat over local politics has resulted in allegations that Mayor Heidi Harmon and other city officials have broken the law. Reporter: Greta Mart Oscar Winning Director’s Harrowing Virtual Reality Exhibit Dares You to Walk in Immigrants’ Shoes Oscar-winning director Alejandro Inarritu has created an interactive experience that puts the viewer literally in the footsteps of border crossing immigrants. Reporter: Steven Cuevas How Much Drinking Water Has California Lost to Oil Industry Waste? No One Knows Almost half the state’s water supply in dry years comes out of the ground, from groundwater aquifers.  It’s the job of state regulators to protect that groundwater from contamination.  And for decades in the San Joaquin Valley, they didn’t do it.  State officials allowed oil companies to dispose of wastewater into aquifers that were supposed to be protected. Reporter: Lauren Sommer Hang 20! Thousands Show Up for World Dog Surfing Championships Real surf fans are waiting until winter for the next big Northern California surf  competition, called Mavericks. But this past weekend, over a thousand fans showed up for a lesser known, though still highly-anticipated surf contest south of San Francisco. Reporter: Laura Klivans


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The California Report Magazine

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 23:20:45 +0000

Jailing Immigrants Means Money and Jobs for Poor Areas. Is This Deal Humane? The culmination of a nine-month investigation into a local jail in rural Yuba County by KQED reporters Lisa Pickoff-White and Julie Small. The jail depends on millions of dollars a year from the federal government to hold immigrants facing deportation. But the jail has come under fire for poor medical care. We talk to an inmate who was seriously ill and says jail doctors wouldn’t give him the medicine. We also hear from Yuba County locals who depend on money from the jail to fund the sheriff’s department. They say the county’s getting caught in the political crossfire over immigration.


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The California Report

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 16:47:45 +0000

Attorney General Jeff Sessions Singles Out San Bernardino and Stockton in Latest Immigration Initiative After weeks of being verbally battered by the President on Twitter, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is asserting his authority. In separate letters to city officials, Sessions singled out San Bernardino and Stockton as municipalities refusing to help federal authorities deport undocumented immigrants. Reporter Frank Stoltze Zillow Releases a new Study on Homelessness A new study by the real estate media site Zillow shows that if rent were to increase in Los Angeles by just 5 percent, then another 2,000 people would be homeless. Zillow Senior economist Skylar Olsen explains. Reporter John Sepulvado Jailing Immigrants Means Money and Jobs for Poor Areas. Is This Deal Humane? Reporters Julia Small and Lisa Pickoff-White discuss their investigation of Yuba County Jail, which is made up of immigrations held in Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The county has been under court order to improve the jail's conditions for 38 years. Reporter John Sepulvado Hackers at DefCon Show How to Break into Voting Systems We begin with the security of voting systems. Last week we reported on claims that hackers changed voter registrations in Riverside county. A month ago, we told you about a third party vendor that contracts with Humboldt county -- a vendor who was apparently compromised by Russian hackers, according to leaked NSA documents. So, when we heard that hackers at the DefCon conference in Las Vegas were trying to compromise mock voting systems, we had to get the scoop. Reporter Queena Kim


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