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Preview: KQED's The California Report Podcast

KQED's The California Report



KQED's statewide half-hour radio news program, providing daily coverage of issues, trends and public policy decisions affecting California and its diverse population.



Last Build Date: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 02:30:55 PDT

Copyright: Copyright 2011 KQED
 



Familial Disparities, the College Struggle, Addressing Fresnos Poverty

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 23:00:00 PDT

Sometimes, even within one family, there are class disparities. Take Emiliano Villa. He's a reporter with Youth Radio who says growing up...things were very different for him than for his sister. Plus, generations of young people have believed that a college degree provides a path out of poverty, a way to get a piece of the California dreamand if you graduated high school during the 1950s in California...you easily got into the college of your choice. But thats not the case anymore, especially if youre a low-income Latino student at the University of California. And in Fresno, theyre trying out a different kind of solution to address obstacles for people living in poverty. Some residents are getting help from a government agency that usually deals with cattle and crops.



Familial Disparities, the College Struggle, Addressing Fresnos Poverty

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 18:30:00 PDT

Sometimes, even within one family, there are class disparities. Take Emiliano Villa. He's a reporter with Youth Radio who says growing up...things were very different for him than for his sister. Plus, generations of young people have believed that a college degree provides a path out of poverty, a way to get a piece of the California dreamand if you graduated high school during the 1950s in California...you easily got into the college of your choice. But thats not the case anymore, especially if youre a low-income Latino student at the University of California. And in Fresno, theyre trying out a different kind of solution to address obstacles for people living in poverty. Some residents are getting help from a government agency that usually deals with cattle and crops.



The California Report Magazine

Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:39:03 PDT

Sometimes, even within one family, there are class disparities. Take Emiliano Villa. He's a reporter with Youth Radio who says growing up...things were very different for him than for his sister. Plus, generations of young people have believed that a college degree provides a path out of poverty, a way to get a piece of the California dreamand if you graduated high school during the 1950s in California...you easily got into the college of your choice. But thats not the case anymore, especially if youre a low-income Latino student at the University of California. And in Fresno, theyre trying out a different kind of solution to address obstacles for people living in poverty. Some residents are getting help from a government agency that usually deals with cattle and crops.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcrmag/2016/09/2016-09-30-tcrmag.mp3




How Far Would You Ride a Bus to Get Your Homework Done?

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

This week we're featuring stories of young Latinos trying to hang onto the California dream. Latinos make up the majority of California's youth. So today we're focusing on their challenges, because their future helps shape the future of the state. We start at Desert Mirage High School, in the Eastern Coachella Valley. Host Sasha Khokha spent time with student Rosy Mendez, whose dream is to become an engineer. She's the daughter of farmworkers, and doesn't have internet access at home, so she depends on public transportation to get online and do her homework. The school library closes early, so the bus ride to the public library is her only choice.



When Economics Divides Siblings

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

Sometimes, even within one family, there are class disparities. Take Emiliano Villa, a reporter with Youth Radio, who says growing up things were very different for him than they were for his sister.



Is College Still a Path to Success in California?

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

Generations of young people have believed that a college degree provides a path out of poverty, a way to get a piece of the California dream. If you graduated high school during the 1950s in California, you easily got into the college of your choice. A decade later, even if your family had no money to send you to college, you could still attend a public university for little or no cost under a law called the Master Plan for Higher Education. That college degree was your ticket to the middle class. But that's not the case anymore, especially if you're a low-income Latino student at the University of California. Does higher education in California still lead to greater economic opportunities?



When a Job's Not Enough to Get You Off Food Stamps

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

In Fresno, they're trying out a different kind of solution to address obstacles for people living in poverty. Some residents are getting help from a government agency that usually deals with cattle and crops.



The California Report

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 15:51:02 PDT

Realignment 5 Years On: Counties Build Jails for Inmates With Mental Illness. Deadline Looms for Bills on Gov. Brown's Desk. Humboldt Retirement Homes Force Out Residents.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-30-tcr.mp3




Realignment 5 Years On: Counties Build Jails for Inmates With Mental Illness

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Five years ago Saturday, facing a Supreme Court order to reduce prison overcrowding, California shifted responsibility for low-level felons from state prison to county jails. On Thursday we reported on how some officials view the plan as a success. But for county facilities, built to hold people for a couple of months, the shift means they now hold some people for years including folks struggling with mental illness. We report on two communities that are taking very different approaches to the problem.



Deadline Looms for Bills on Gov. Brown's Desk

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

It's coming down to the wire for Gov. Jerry Brown to deal with all the bills on his desk. He has until midnight Friday night to sign, veto, or do nothing with them. He's already signed a bunch, like an Olympics bill setting aside $250 million for cost over-runs so that California can compete with Paris and Budapest to host the 2024 Olympics.



Humboldt Retirement Homes Force Out Residents

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

This week, the state department of public health approved a plan that would close three retirement homes in Humboldt County. All the homes are owned by a subsidary of Brius Healthcare, the largest nursing home provider in the state, which says the homes are short-staffed and losing money. Now, relatives of about 150 elderly nursing home residents in this rural area must find a new home for their loved ones.



The California Report

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 13:24:59 PDT

Lawyer: El Cajon Shooting Victim Went Through 'Rough Times' Before Death. Five Years Later, Many See Criminal Justice Realignment as Success. Rembering Vin Scully's Call of the Kirk Gibson Homer. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-29-tcr.mp3




Lawyer: El Cajon Shooting Victim Went Through 'Rough Times' Before Death

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

We begin with Tuesday's police shooting death of an unarmed black man in El Cajon. The mayor is vowing a full investigation of the incident. In the meantime we're getting more details about the victim, Alfred Olongo. Believed to be 38 years old, Olongo was an African refugee, a father of a 16-year-old, and grieving the loss of one of his best friends when he was shot by an El Cajon police officer. San Diego attorney Dan Gilleon represents his family. He tells us that Olongo's sister called 911 after Olongo began acting erratically.



Five Years Later, Many See Criminal Justice Realignment as Success

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Saturday marks five years since the state of California rolled out a major change to its criminal justice system, known as realignment. It was aimed at helping the state comply with a federal court order to remove more than 30,000 inmates from overcrowded state prisons. Under realignment, nonviolent offenders like drug dealers and shoplifters were sent to local jails instead of state prisons.



Rembering Vin Scully's Call of the Kirk Gibson Homer

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Vin Scully is retiring as announcer of the L.A. Dodgers after this weekend's series against the Giants in San Francisco. We look back on his call of Kirk Gibson's legendary home run in Game One of the 1988 World Series.



The California Report

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 13:27:47 PDT

El Cajon Police Shoot and Kill Unarmed Man. Booming Marijuana Industry Creates Unlikely Union in Trinity County. State Weighs Closure of Humboldt County Nursing Homes. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-28-tcr.mp3




El Cajon Police Shoot and Kill Unarmed Man

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

A police officer with the city of El Cajon shot and killed an unarmed black man on Tuesday. El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis said an officer responded to calls from a woman who said her brother was "not acting like himself." Several dozen protesters gathered around the El Cajon police department.



Booming Marijuana Industry Creates Unlikely Union in Trinity County

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

If the polling holds up, Californians are likely to pass Proposition 64 in November, legalizing recreational marijuana. Cannabis cultivation is already a mainstay in the Emerald Triangle counties of Mendocino, Humboldt and Trinity. But it's also a source of tension. Efforts to protect the community against an influx of outsiders are bringing together people who've been at odds for decades: environmentalists and their mortal enemies, loggers.



State Weighs Closure of Humboldt County Nursing Homes

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

By the end of the day Wednesday, the state Department of Public Health should decide if three skilled nursing homes in Humboldt County have met state criteria to close. Some 190 frail and elderly residents might have to relocate, about 150 of them out of the county. The facilities are owned by Los Angeles-based Brius Healthcare Services, which owns five of the six nursing homes in the County and many more around the state.



The California Report

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 13:47:21 PDT

Silicon Valley Confronts Its Diversity Problem With Chief Diversity Officers. Chowchilla High School Must Drop 'Redskins' Mascot Under New Law.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-27-tcr.mp3




Silicon Valley Confronts Its Diversity Problem With Chief Diversity Officers

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

The tech industry has long been criticized for undervaluing diversity, resulting in a overwhelmingly white, male work force. There's a push to change that, as we enter the age of the Chief Diversity Officer.



Chowchilla High School Must Drop 'Redskins' Mascot Under New Law

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

A high school in the Central Valley town of Chowchilla is one of four in California that has to drop its mascot -- the Redskins -- to follow a new state law. The debate over what is identity and what is offensive is literally playing out on main street.



The California Report

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 12:56:08 PDT

Poll Finds Mix of Support, Confusion on Drug Pricing Measure. 5 California Debate Questions for Trump and Clinton. Queen 'Mary Jane': Long Beach Cruise Ship Hosts Marijuana Conference. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-26-tcr.mp3




Poll Finds Mix of Support, Confusion on Drug Pricing Measure

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Half of voters say they support a prescription drug pricing measure on the November ballot, according to a new Field Poll. But a good number of voters are totally confused about what Proposition 61 would do.



5 California Debate Questions for Trump and Clinton

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Monday night's presidential debate isn't in California. In fact, the event at Hofstra University on Long Island is about as far from the Golden State as you can get within the continental U.S. But California, with more than 10 percent of the nation's population, should at least be part of the discussion. We look at two issues coming out of Silicon Valley which could come to the forefront of tonight's presidential debate: cyber-security and the future of the nation's economy.



Queen 'Mary Jane': Long Beach Cruise Ship Hosts Marijuana Conference

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

The cruise ship Queen Mary in Long Beach is the setting for the two-day State of Marijuana conference this week. The event features a blend of growers, policy makers and entrepreneurs.



Bud-n-Breakfast

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 23:00:00 PDT

Meet a family of marijuana growers who hope legal weed could attract tourists to the farm.



Bud-n-Breakfast

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:30:00 PDT

Meet a family of marijuana growers who hope legal weed could attract tourists to the farm.



The California Report Magazine

Sat, 24 Sep 2016 00:08:42 PDT

Meet a family of marijuana growers who hope legal weed could attract tourists to the farm.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcrmag/2016/09/2016-09-23-tcrmag.mp3




Will Small Marijuana Growers Stay Competitive if California Legalizes Pot?

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

We begin with a visit to a family farm, the kind of mom-and-pop operation where everyone gathers around a table after the harvest to share a meal. Except this small farm grows marijuana. And the couple that run it are worried about their fate if Proposition 64 passes, making recreational pot legal. Will it squeeze out the little guys if bigger, corporate farms try to make it big in the green rush? Or will there be a boost in business for small farmers like them?



Blue Cut Fire Destroys Iconic Summit Inn

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

If you've made the drive between Los Angeles and Las Vegas any time in the last 64 years, you've passed the Summit Inn. An iconic diner, gas station and gift shop. A rest stop for Hollywood stars and tired motorists. Twelve Naugahyde booths, 18 seats at the horseshoe counter and a jukebox. Last month, it all burned to the ground in the Blue Cut Fire. We visit the remains of the Inn, on the 15 freeway, once a section of historic Route 66.



California's 'Godfather of Chicano Theater' Wins National Medal of Arts

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

For 50 years, playwright Luis Valdez has been bringing the stories of immigrants and farmworkers to audiences across the golden state. He built the main stage for his theater company, Teatro Campesino, in an old fruit packing warehouse in San Juan Bautista. This week, President Obama awarded him the National Medal of Arts for bringing Chicano and Latino culture to American stage and screen.



Meet a Laotian Refugee in Fresno Who Won a National Heritage Fellowship

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

Blues guitarist BB King had one. So did the creator of bluegrass, Bill Monroe. Every year up to nine artists in the United States receive a National Heritage Fellowship. There's no higher award honoring traditional and folk arts in America. Rarely are the artists as famous as the king of the blues, but they are masters of their work, connecting people to a sense of place. We get the story of one of this year's recipients, from a Laotian refugee community in Fresno.



New Music, New Perspectives: The Gaslamp Killer, Warpaint and Dwight Yoakam

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:30:00 PDT

Every month, we check in with our pop music critic Steve Hochman about the latest releases from artists in the Golden State. Today, it's music from an experimental hip-hop producer, indie rockers from L.A. and a champion of the Bakersfield sound.



The California Report

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 13:54:16 PDT

Immigrants a Largely Hidden Segment of L.A.'s Homeless Population.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-23-tcr.mp3




Immigrants a Largely Hidden Segment of L.A.'s Homeless Population

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Los Angeles' growing homeless population includes one group that's not so visible: working immigrants, some of them unauthorized, squeezed by high rent and a tough economy that's landed them on the street.



The California Report

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:30:23 PDT

Drinking Water of Some Californians Exceeds Limit for 'Erin Brockovich' Chemical. Would California's Proposed Tobacco Tax Hike Reduce Smoking? Just Ask New Yorkers.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-22-tcr.mp3




Drinking Water of Some Californians Exceeds Limit for 'Erin Brockovich' Chemical

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

When Erin Brockovich went after PG&E for poisoning groundwater in the desert town of Hinkley -- a campaign that later became a film starring Julia Roberts -- the toxic chemical was a heavy metal called hexavalent chromium. Also known as chromium 6, it's listed as causing cancer, developmental harm and reproductive harm in both men and women. A new report finds Hinkley isn't the only California city with chromium 6 contamination.



Would California's Proposed Tobacco Tax Hike Reduce Smoking? Just Ask New Yorkers

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

In November, voters in California and three other states will decide on whether to raise their tobacco tax. California currently has one of the lowest cigarette taxes in the nation at 87 cents per pack. If voters pass Proposition 56, the tax would go up to $2.87 a pack. The money would fund health care for the poor and cessation programs. So, do tobacco taxes work to help people quit?



The California Report

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 14:48:29 PDT

Kamala Harris Widens Lead in U.S. Senate Race. Governor Weighs Whether to Bar Some Private Immigration Lockups.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-21-tcr.mp3




Kamala Harris Widens Lead in U.S. Senate Race

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

A new poll out Wednesday shows California Attorney General Kamala Harris with a steady lead in the race to replace U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer. But it also finds a sizable portion of likely Republican voters plan to skip voting for either of the Senate candidates.



Governor Weighs Whether to Bar Some Private Immigration Lockups

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Private prisons have been in the news a lot lately. First, the Dept. of Justice announced it would stop using them. Soon after, the Department of Homeland Security said it would review whether hundreds of thousands of immigrants should be detained in private lockups. The state of California might beat them to the punch. A bill that would bar cities and counties from contracting with private prisons to hold immigrant detainees is sitting on the governor's desk. Three facilities would be impacted by Senate Bill 1289, authored by state Sen. Ricardo Lara.



The California Report

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 14:26:36 PDT

Why Not Register College Students to Vote When They Sign Up for Classes?. Brown Signs Climate Bill to Limit Methane and Soot. Town Moves on After Hershey's Plant Departure, Bittersweetness Lingers. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-20-tcr.mp3




Why Not Register College Students to Vote When They Sign Up for Classes?

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

California is one of five state where residents will be registered to vote automatically when they interact with the DMV. That should be rolled out by 2018. California is also one of 32 which allows online voting registration. Now, Secretary of State Alex Padilla has some new ideas to register college students. One big strategy? Allow students to register to vote when they're signing up for classes.



Brown Signs Climate Bill to Limit Methane and Soot

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Monday mandating reductions in soot from factories and methane from cow manure. It's part of a drive by state policymakers to slow global climate change.



Town Moves on After Hershey's Plant Departure, Bittersweetness Lingers

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

Imagine living in a place that smells like chocolate. For decades that described the town of Oakdale, about an hour and a half east of San Francisco, once home to a Hershey's chocolate plant. KQED's Scott Shafer visited the city nine years ago, when Hershey announced it was closing the plant. As part of our week-long collaboration with NPR called "A Nation Engaged," Shafer returned to Oakdale to hear how folks who live there are doing now.



The California Report

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 13:16:14 PDT

Why California Has Nation's Highest Poverty Rate. California, Restaurant Group to Partner in Nation's First Largescale Transgender Jobs Program. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2016/09/2016-09-19-tcr.mp3




Why California Has Nation's Highest Poverty Rate

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

The U.S. Census released new figures last week that showed California still has the highest rate of poverty in the nation at just over 15 percent. Chris Hoene, executive director of the California Budget and Policy Center, describes what life looks like for poor Californians, and what housing costs have to do with those persistently high poverty numbers.



California, Restaurant Group to Partner in Nation's First Largescale Transgender Jobs Program

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 08:50:00 PDT

About 5 percent of Americans are out of work, but the job market is far different for transgender people. They are unemployed at about double that rate. A new, ambitious program in California aims to get more of them hired.