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Preview: PENN Medicine Stem Cell News

PENN Medicine Stem Cell News



The latest news from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Health System.



Copyright: 2008, The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania
 



Penn Study Brings New Understanding to How Fundamental DNA Sequences Govern Gene Activity

Thu, 07 Apr 2016 16:00:00 GMT

A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have shed new light on how the structure of regulatory sequences in DNA is packaged in a cell.



Study Reveals How to Regenerate Mouse Ears Without a Scar

Fri, 30 Oct 2015 13:30:00 GMT

In contrast to amphibian tissue regeneration, traumatic injuries in mammals typically heal with a fibrous scar. Researchers discovered that some strains of mice heal without a scar, by disrupting a protein, called Sdf1, that normally recruits white blood cells to sites of injury.



Nancy A. Speck, PhD, Named Chair of the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Wed, 21 Sep 2015 15:00:00 GMT

Nancy A. Speck, PhD, a widely recognized international leader in the field of blood-cell development, has been named chair of the department of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Fruitfly Sperm Cells Reveal Intricate Coordination in Stem Cell Replication, Penn Study Finds

Thu, 25 Jun 2015 19:00:00 GMT

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are making headway in this area by studying stem cells in their natural environment in an organism. Stem cell populations reside in areas called niches deep within different types of organs. Scientists think that these niches control stem cell behavior, that is “telling” the stem cell when to produce more stem cells or when to produce daughter cells that will be the workhorses for that tissue or organ.



Penn Researchers Identify Stem-like Progenitor Cell that Exclusively Forms Heart Muscle

Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:00:00 GMT

Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have just taken an important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like "progenitor" cell that produces only heart muscle cells.



Penn Study Describes First Steps in Basic Biological Process that Could be Harnessed to Make Therapeutic Cells

Thu, 16 Apr 2015 18:00:00 GMT

Understanding the molecular signals that guide early cells in the embryo to develop into different types of organs provides insight into how tissues regenerate and repair themselves. By knowing the principles that underlie the intricate steps in this transformation, researchers will be able to make new cells at will for transplantation and tissue repair in such situations as liver or heart disease.



Limber Lungs: One Type of Airway Cell Can Regenerate Another Lung Cell Type

Mon, 13 Apr 2015 09:00:00 GMT

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought.



Cutting Out the Cellular Middleman: New Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts For a New Role

Tue, 16 Dec 2014 9:00:00 GMT

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells.



Invite to Cover: Celebrating Women in Science Symposium to be Held at Penn

Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:30:00 GMT

An all-female panel of luminaries in fields including epigenetics and stem cell biology will come together at a Penn symposium entitled Celebrating Women in Science. The Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, has organized the symposium, which will take place this week on Wednesday, October 29th, 2014.



Penn Researchers Unlock Molecular Origin of Blood Stem Cells

Fri, 09 Jan 2009 14:00:00 GMT

A research team led by Nancy Speck, PhD, Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has identified the location and developmental timeline in which a majority of bone marrow stem cells form in the mouse embryo. The findings, appearing online this week in the journal Nature, highlight critical steps in the origin of hematopoietic (or blood) stem cells (HSCs), says senior author Speck, who is also an Investigator with the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at Penn.



Newly Discovered Esophagus Stem Cells Grow Into Transplantable Tissue

Mon, 15 Dec 2008 14:00:00 GMT

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered stem cells in the esophagus of mice that were able to grow into tissue-like structures and when placed into immune-deficient mice were able to form parts of an esophagus lining. The investigators report their findings online this month in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.



Stem Cells with Potential to Regenerate Injured Liver Tissue Identified

Wed, 12 Nov 2008 12:00:00 GMT

A novel protein marker has been found that identifies rare adult liver stem cells, whose ability to regenerate injured liver tissue has the potential for cell-replacement therapy. For the first time, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine led by Linda Greenbaum, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, have demonstrated that cells expressing the marker can differentiate into both liver cells and cells that line the bile duct.



Penn Researchers Find Key Developmental Pathway Activates Lung Stem Cells
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that the activation of a molecular pathway important in stem cell and developmental biology leads to an increase in lung stem cells. Harnessing this knowledge could help develop therapies for lung-tissue repair after injury or disease.



Penn Experts to Present at the International Society for Stem Cell Research Annual Meeting, June 11-14
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine will be presenting at the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISCCR) as well as participating in a Workshop and an Evening Public Symposium on Stem Cell Biology. The Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the School of Medicine Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, and the ISSCR are hosting the free Workshop and Evening Public Symposium on June 10, just prior to the scientific meeting.



Loss of Stem Cells Correlates with Premature Aging
Researchers at the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute of the University of Pennsylvania have found that deleting a gene important in embryo development leads to premature aging and loss of stem cell reservoirs in adult mice. This gene, ATR, is essential for the body’s response to damaged DNA, and mutations in proteins in the DNA damage response underlie certain types of cancer and other disorders in humans. This work appears in the inaugural issue of Cell Stem Cell.



Penn Researchers Demonstrate Key Pathway Linked to Heart Development and Regeneration
By manipulating a critical cell-to-cell signaling pathway, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have successfully increased the number cells required for the normal development of right-sided structures in the heart, including the right ventricle. Penn scientists were able to increase the numbers of a cardiac stem cell population, called Isl-1 positive cardiac progenitors, in the developing embryo and in tissue grown in a culture dish by activating the Wnt pathway. The finding suggests a potential therapeutic strategy whereby influencing this pathway would be used to generate specialized heart cells to repair or replace cells damaged by cardiac disease.



First Demonstration of New Hair Follicle Generation
Most research on Lou Gehrig's disease therapeutics has been based on the assumption that its two forms (sporadic and hereditary) are similar in their underlying cause. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found an absolute biochemical distinction between these two disease variants, suggesting that current approaches to drug discovery should be re-examined.



New Source of Adult Stem Cells in Human Hair Follicles
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have isolated a new source of adult stem cells that appear to have the potential to differentiate into several cell types. If their approach to growing these cells can be scaled up and proves to be safe and effective in animal and human studies, it could one day provide the tissue needed by an individual for treating a host of disorders, including peripheral nerve disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury.