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Penn Medicine Neuro News



The latest news about Neurology and Neurosurgery from Penn Medicine - the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Health System.



Copyright: 2009, The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania
 



Stressed-out Rats Consume More Alcohol, Revealing Related Brain Chemistry

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 18:00:00 GMT

Stress, defined broadly, is a well-known risk factor for later alcohol abuse; however, the brain chemistry underlying interactions between stress and alcohol remain largely unknown.



Minorities, Women Less Likely to Receive Life-Saving Stroke Treatment, Penn-led Study Suggests

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 20:00:00 GMT

Minorities and women suffering from a stroke may be less likely to receive the clot-busting treatment tPA, known as tissue plasminogen activator, according to a new study from Penn Medicine and other institutions published today in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. 



New Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center Forms National Hub for Alzheimers' Disease Research

Mon, 18 Jul 2016 18:00:00 GMT

Penn Medicine has established the Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center (PNGC) as a national focal point for Alzheimer's disease (AD) genetics research.



Rhythm of "Detox" and Feeding Genes in Fruitflies and Mice Coordinated by Neuropeptide, According to Penn Study

Tue, 17 May 2016 15:30:00 GMT

A 24-hour rhythm of cellular detoxification in flies and mammals is coordinated by a neuropeptide that also drives feeding in both organisms, found a team led by Amita Sehgal, PhD, a professor of Neuroscience and director of the Chronobiology Program, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn Study on Fragile X Syndrome Uses Fruitfly's Point of View to Identify New Treatment Paths

Mon, 26 Apr 2016 15:30:00 GMT

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common genetically inherited cause of intellectual disability in humans. New research shows how the hormone insulin – usually associated with diabetes -- is involved in the daily activity patterns and cognitive deficits in the fruitfly model of FXS, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine.



Penn Medicine Neuroscientist Highlights How Scientists Can Reduce Their Carbon Footprint

Thu, 31 Mar 2016 14:30:00 GMT

A neuroscientist from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, with a colleague from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, authored an essay calling for scientists to do what they can to reduce their carbon footprint while engaging in professional activities, such as fly less often to distant professional society meetings, urge those societies to meet less often, and make greater use of electronic communication to web conference.



Penn Study Describes the Molecular Cause of Common Cerebrovascular Disease

Wed, 30 Mar 2016 17:00:00 GMT

A team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has discovered the molecular mechanism that underlies cerebral cavernous malformations. They published their results this week online ahead of print in Nature.



Brain's "Reward" Molecule also Controls Learning to Avoid an Unpleasant Experience

Mon, 29 Feb 2016 18:30:00 GMT

The brain chemical dopamine regulates how mice learn to avoid a disagreeable encounter, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn Researchers Illuminate "Dark Side" of the Transcriptome

Tue, 09 Feb 2015 13:45:00 GMT

A new way of mapping the “transcriptome” -- the collection of RNA read-outs that are expressed by a cell’s active genes -- has been devised by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



It's all About the Timing: Fetal Expression of Core Clock Gene Determines Lifespan in Mice

Wed, 03 Feb 2015 18:00:00 GMT

Abolishing the 24-hour clock by knocking out a key gene during development accelerates aging and shortens lifespan by two thirds in mice, but this effect is absent if the gene deletion is delayed until after birth, according to a new study published this week in Science Translational Medicine by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn-Led Team Reprograms Social Behavior in Carpenter Ants Using Epigenetic Drugs

Mon, 31 Dec 2015 18:00:00 GMT

In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team anchored at University of Pennsylvania found that caste-specific behaviors of carpenter ants are not set in stone.



Penn Researchers Use Network Science to Help Pinpoint Source of Seizures

Mon, 21 Dec 2015 15:45:00 GMT

The ability to reliably pinpoint the anatomical source of seizures, different for each patient, remains elusive. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science and Perelman School of Medicine are looking for ways to refine this process by looking at networks of electrical activity in the brain just prior to the onset of a seizure.



Penn Study Shows that Certain Herpes Viruses Can Infect Human Neurons

Thu, 03 Dec 2015 19:45:00 GMT

Erle S. Robertson, PhD, and colleagues published in mBio this week that Epstein-Barr virus and a related virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, can infect and replicate in both cultured and primary neurons. 



"Mild Traumatic Brain Injury an Oxymoron:" New Protein Biomarker Highlights Damaged Brain Wiring After Concussion, Finds Penn Study

Mon, 23 Nov 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Physicians and others now recognize that seemingly mild, concussion-type head injuries lead to long-term cognitive impairments surprisingly often. A brain protein called SNTF, which rises in the blood after some concussions, signals the type of brain damage that is thought to be the source of these cognitive impairments, according to a study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.  



Transparent Zebrafish Reveal How Axons Regenerate on a Proper Path, Finds Penn Study

Thu, 05 Nov 2015 16:15:00 GMT

Using a transparent zebrafish model, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have identified key components of a mechanism that allows the nervous system to heal itself.



Autophagy Works in Cell Nucleus to Guard Against Start of Cancer, Finds Penn Study

Wed, 28 Oct 2015 18:00:00 GMT

Autophagy, literally self-eating or the degradation of unwanted cellular bits and pieces by the cell itself, has been shown for the first time to also work in the cell nucleus. In addition, in this setting it plays a role in guarding against the start of cancer, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



National Academy of Medicine Elects Three New Members from Penn

Mon, 19 Sep 2015 15:45:00 GMT

Three professors from the University of Pennsylvania have been elected members to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the nation's highest honors in biomedicine.



Sensitivity of Smell Cilia Depends on Location and Length in Nasal Cavity, Penn Researchers Find

Thu, 10 Sep 2015 16:00:00 GMT

A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found a location-dependent pattern in cilia length in the mouse nasal cavity that affects sensitivity to odors. The discovery may also have important implications for the study of sight and touch. 



Team Decodes Structure of Protein Complex Active in DNA Repair

Thu, 03 Sep 2015 16:00:00 GMT

A team led by Roger Greenberg, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Cancer Biology at Penn, and Frank Sicheri, PhD, in Toronto, report online in Molecular Cell ahead of print, the atomic structures of several BRCC36-containing complexes.



Penn Neuroscientists Receive $1 Million "BRAIN" Grant from National Science Foundation

Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:30:00 GMT

Joshua Gold, PhD, a professor of Neuroscience at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Joe Kable, PhD, Baird Term Associate Professor of Psychology in the School of Arts and Sciences, have been awarded a three-year $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation.



Penn Medicine Researcher Receives High Impact Neuroscience Resource Center Grant from National Institutes of Health

Mon, 10 Aug 2015 16:00:00 GMT

Sergei A. Vinogradov, PhD, an associate professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been awarded a four-year High Impact Neuroscience Research Resource Center Grant from the National Institutes of Health.



Sleepy Fruitflies Get Mellow: Sleep Deprivation Reduces Aggression, Mating Behavior in Flies, Penn Study Finds

Tue, 28 Jul 2015 17:30:00 GMT

A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania used fruitflies to probe deeper into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern aggression and sleep.



Hydraulic Fracturing Linked to Increases in Hospitalization Rates in the Marcellus Shale Region, According to Penn Study

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 18:00:00 GMT

Hospitalizations for heart conditions, neurological illness, and other conditions were higher among people who live near unconventional gas and oil drilling (hydraulic fracturing), according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University published this week in PLOS ONE.



Protein "Comet Tails" Propel Cell Recycling Process, Penn Study Finds

Thu, 18 Jun 2015 18:30:00 GMT

Several well-known neurodegenerative diseases, such as Lou Gehrig's (ALS), Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's disease, all result in part from a defect in autophagy – one way a cell removes and recycles misfolded proteins and pathogens. In a paper published this week in Current Biology, postdoctoral fellow David Kast, PhD, and professor Roberto Dominguez, PhD, and three other colleagues from the Department of Physiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, show for the first time that the formation of ephemeral compartments key in this process require actin polymerization by the Arp2/3 complex, a composite of seven proteins.



Penn Researchers Receive $2.9 Million in Awards from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund to Launch Biomedical Research Careers

Wed, 17 Jun 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Five early-career researchers from three schools at the University of Pennsylvania have received funding from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF) for their excellence in biomedical research, in topics including heart disease, sleep, and infectious diseases, as part of a nationwide program totaling $22.5 million.



Inflammation Stops the Clock: How the Immune System Controls the Human Biological Clock in Times of Infection

Fri, 18 May 2015 19:00:00 GMT

An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases, discovered collaborators at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Trinity College, Dublin.



Penn-Sponsored Million Dollar Bike Ride to Raise Awareness about Rare Diseases

Tue, 28 Apr 2015 16:00:00 GMT

The second annual Million Dollar Bike Ride will be held on Saturday, May 9, 2015, to support research and raise awareness about rare diseases.



Genomewide Screen of Learning in Zebrafish Identifies Enzyme Important in Neural Circuit

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe the first set of genes important in learning in a zebrafish model in the journal Neuron this week. "Using an in-depth analysis of one of these genes, we have already revealed an important relevant signaling pathway," says senior author Michael Granato, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. 



Common Biomarkers of Sleep Debt Found in Humans, Rats, Penn Study Finds

Wed, 11 Feb 2015 18:30:00 GMT

In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Penn Medicine researchers found common molecules signifying perturbed metabolism in response to sleep restriction in a comprehensive metabolic profiling of blood from both rats and humans.



Study Reveals Possible Therapeutic Target for Common, But Mysterious Brain Blood Vessel Disorder

Mon, 26 Jan 2015 16:00:00 GMT

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. Now, cardiovascular scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have studied this pathway in heart development to discover an important set of molecular signals, triggered by CCM-linked gene defects, that potentially could be targeted to treat the disorder.



Penn Medicine Biochemist Receives "Bucket Challenge" Funds to Study Biology of Lou Gehrig's Disease

Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:15:00 GMT

James Shorter, PhD, an associate professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania received a grant from the ALS Association and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) for research aimed at finding a potential therapy for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.



Penn Medicine Team Develops Cognitive Test Battery to Assess the Impact of Long Duration Spaceflights on Astronauts' Brain Function

Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:30:00 GMT

Penn Medicine researchers have developed a cognitive test battery, known as Cognition, for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) to measure the impact of typical spaceflight stressors (like microgravity, radiation, confinement and isolation, exposure to elevated levels of CO2, and sleep loss) on cognitive performance.



Penn Researchers Identify Protein Elevated in Blood That Predicts Post-Concussion Symptom Severity in Professional Athletes

Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:00:00 GMT

New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes.



Penn Medicine Researchers Receive Funding from CDC to Advance Brain Health

Thu, 13 Nov 2014 19:00:00 GMT

Researchers affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania's newly-created Prevention Research Center (PRC), have received two grants totaling over $860,000 from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Special Interest Project (SIP) to advance the CDC's Healthy Brain Initiative.



Penn Researchers Untangle the Biological Effects of Blue Light

Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:30:00 GMT

Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control.



See-Through, One-Atom-Thick, Carbon Electrodes are a Powerful Tool for Studying Epilepsy, Other Brain Disorders, Penn Study Finds

Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:45:00 GMT

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have used graphene -- a two-dimensional form of carbon only one atom thick -- to fabricate a new type of microelectrode that solves a major problem for investigators looking to understand the intricate circuitry of the brain.



Penn Physiologist Given NIH Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award for Research on Neurodegeneration

Mon, 04 Aug 2014 19:30:00 GMT

Erika Holzbaur, PhD, a professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health. She was selected by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and will receive over $1.5 million over the next four years, with another $1.2 million pending satisfactory progress, to study molecular motors and their role in axonal transport and neurodegeneration.



Penn Researchers Show Human Learning Altered by Electrical Stimulation of Dopamine Neurons

Tue, 13 May 2014 21:00:00 GMT

Stimulation of a certain population of neurons within the brain can alter the learning process, according to a team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons at the University of Pennsylvania.



Role of Calcium in Familial Alzheimer's Disease Clarified

Tue, 13 May 2014 21:00:00 GMT

A Penn Medicine team has found that suppressing the hyperactivity of calcium channels alleviated FAD-like symptoms in mice models of the disease.



Penn Medicine Stroke Experts Identify Geographic, Gender Disparities Among Stroke Patients

Mon, 28 April 2014 13:30:00 GMT

Stroke researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will unveil a map demonstrating geographic hotspots of increased stroke mortality across the United States, among a series of stroke studies being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.



Penn Neurologists Report on Promise of Potential Targets and Interventions for Parkinson's Disease

Fri, 25 April 2014 18:45:00 GMT

A trio of studies from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate new approaches to understanding, treating and potentially staving off Parkinson's disease (PD).



Penn Medicine Neurologists to Receive Honors at American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting

Fri, 25 April 2014 18:45:00 GMT

Two neurologists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have received high honors from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).



Media Toolkit: Penn Medicine at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting 2014

Fri, 25 April 2014 18:30:00 GMT

More than 90 Penn Medicine neurologists and researchers will present over 120 studies and abstracts at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.



Sleeping Away Infection: Penn Researchers Find Link between Sleep and Immune Function in Fruitflies

Tue, 22 April 2014 14:15:00 GMT

When we get sick it feels natural to try to hasten our recovery by getting some extra shuteye. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that this response has a definite purpose, in fruitflies: enhancing immune system response and recovery to infection. Their findings appear online in two related papers in the journal SLEEP, in advance of print editions in May and June.



Penn Medical Ethicist: Policy Changes Urgently Needed as Millions of Americans to Start Receiving Early Label of Alzheimer's Disease

Mon, 07 April 2014 16:30:00 GMT

How will we, as individuals, and a society, live with brains at risk for Alzheimer's disease dementia? As part of Health Affairs' April issue, a theme issue focusing on Alzheimer's, a neurodegenerative disease ethicist and clinician with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offers keen observations to help navigate ethically-charged points on the course of the disease progression.



Bedside Optical Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow Shows Promise for Individualized Care in Stroke Patients

Thur, 20 Mar 2014 20:00:00 GMT

Using a University of Pennsylvania-designed device to noninvasively and continuously monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in acute stroke patients, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Penn Arts and Sciences are now learning how head of bed (HOB) positioning affects blood flow reaching the brain.



Protein Key to Cell Motility Might Stop Cancer Metastasis

Wed, 12 Mar 2014 14:45:00 GMT

"Cell movement is the basic recipe of life, and all cells have the capacity to move," says Roberto Dominguez, PhD, professor of Physiology at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Motility — albeit on a cellular spatial scale — is necessary for wound healing, clotting, fetal development, nerve connections, and the immune response, among other functions. On the other hand, cell movement can be deleterious when cancer cells break away from tumors and migrate to set up shop in other tissues during cancer metastasis.



Penn Researchers Model a Key Breaking Point Involved in Traumatic Brain Injury

Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:00:00 GMT

Even the mildest form of a traumatic brain injury, better known as a concussion, can deal permanent, irreparable damage. Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in this kind of injury, with an eye toward protecting the brain from its long-term consequences.



Three Penn hospitals Receive Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Awards

Thur, 06 Mar 2014 21:00:00 GMT

Pennsylvania Hospital, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center and Chester County Hospital have received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award.



Disparities Run Deep: Parkinson's Patients Utilization of Deep Brain Stimulation Treatment Reduced within Demographic Groups

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 14:00:00 GMT

Among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, female, black, and Asian patients are substantially less likely to receive proven deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to improve tremors and motor symptoms, according to a new report by a Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania researcher who identified considerable disparities among Medicare recipients receiving DBS for Parkinson's disease. The study, published in Neurology, found that patients from neighborhoods of lower socioeconomic status were less likely to receive DBS, regardless of race or sex. And patients of minority-serving physician practices were also less likely to receive DBS, irrespective of race. The study demonstrates a need to adjust policy and incentives to provide state of the art care for all Parkinson's patients.



Penn Medicine Named as Inaugural Member of NIH Network to Revolutionize Stroke Clinical Research

Fri, 13 Dec 2013 15:45:00 GMT

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will join a new national network of 25 regional stroke centers selected to advance stroke research on prevention, treatment and recovery.



Dietary Amino Acids Relieve Sleep Problems after Traumatic Brain Injury in Animals

Wed, 11 Dec 2013 20:15:00 GMT

A new study suggests a potential dietary treatment - a cocktail of key amino acids that improved sleep disturbances caused by brain injuries in mice - for millions of people affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI)—a condition that is currently untreatable.



Blood Test Accurately Diagnoses Concussion and Predicts Long Term Cognitive Disability

Tue, 19 Nov 2013 14:30:00 GMT

A new blood biomarker correctly predicted which concussion victims went on to have white matter tract structural damage and persistent cognitive dysfunction following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).



International Group Finds 11 New Alzheimer's Genes to Target for Drug Discovery, Adding New Clues into Complex Disease Puzzle

Mon, 28 Oct 2013 13:15:00 GMT

The largest international Alzheimer's disease genetics collaboration to date has found 11 new genetic areas of interest that contribute to late onset Alzheimer's Disease (LOAD), doubling the number of potential genetics-based therapeutic targets to interrogate.



Severe Psoriasis Doubles Risk of Kidney Disease, Penn Medicine Study Shows

Wed, 16 Oct 2013 17:15:00 GMT

The latest look at connections between psoriasis and other serious medical conditions revealed for the first time that people with more serious cases of psoriasis are at twice the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and four times the risk of developing end stage renal disease requiring dialysis.



Penn Experts Reveal New Data-Driven Machine Learning Method that Effectively Flags Risk for Post-Stroke Dangers

Fri, 04 Oct 2013 13:30:00 GMT

A team of experts in neurocritical care, engineering, and informatics, with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have devised a new way to detect which stroke patients may be at risk of a serious adverse event following a ruptured brain aneurysm. This new, data-driven machine learning model, involves an algorithm for computers to combine results from various uninvasive tests to predict a secondary event.



Treating Cancer that Has Spread to the Brain Locally with Neurosurgical Resection and Chemotherapeutic Wafers Can Improve Cognitive Function

Wed, 25 Sept 2013 17:00:00 GMT

A new approach to treating cancer that has spread to the brain is able to preserve and, in some cases, improve cognitive function in patients, while achieving local control of tumor progression. A study led by researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that 98 percent of patients who deferred whole brain radiation therapy and had chemotherapeutic wafers placed around the areas where metastatic tumors in the brain had been surgically removed showed preserved cognitive function in one or more of three domains; 65 percent showed preservation in all areas tested: memory, executive function, and fine motor skills.



Comprehensive Parkinson's Biomarker Test Has Prognostic and Diagnostic Value, Penn Medicine Team Reports

Mon, 26 August 2013 20:00:00 GMT

Perelman School of Medicine researchers at the University of Pennsylvania report the first biomarker results reported from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI), showing that a comprehensive test of protein biomarkers in spinal fluid have prognostic and diagnostic value in early stages of Parkinson's disease.



Researchers Agree that Alzheimer's Test Results Could be Released to Research Participants, if Guidance and Counseling in Place

Wed, 21 August 2013 20:00:00 GMT

A leading group of Alzheimer's researchers contends that, as biomarkers to detect signals of the disease improve at providing clinically meaningful information, researchers will need guidance on how to constructively disclose test results and track how disclosure impacts both patients and the data collected in research studies. A survey conducted by a group including experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a majority of Alzheimer's researchers supported disclosure of results to study participants.



Penn Medine's Matthew Stern, MD, Begins Two-year Term President of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

Wed, 07 August 2013 20:00:00 GMT

Matthew B. Stern, MD, director of the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Pennsylvania Hospital and Professor of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is serving a two-year term as president of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.



Migraine is Associated with Variations in Structure of Brain Arteries, Penn Study Reports

Fri, 26 July 2013 21:00:00 GMT

The network of arteries supplying blood flow to the brain is more likely to be incomplete in people who suffer migraine, a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania reports. Variations in arterial anatomy lead to asymmetries in cerebral blood flow that might contribute to the process triggering migraines.



Isolated Psychiatric Episodes Rare, but Possible, in Common Form of Autoimmune Encephalitis

Thur, 25 July 2013 18:30:00 GMT

A small percentage of people diagnosed with a mysterious neurological condition may only experience psychiatric changes - such as delusional thinking, hallucinations, and aggressive behavior - according to a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



AAIC: Path of Plaque Buildup in Brain Shows Promise as Early Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease

Tue, 17 July 2013 20:30:00 GMT

The trajectory of amyloid plaque buildup—clumps of abnormal proteins in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease—may serve as a more powerful biomarker for early detection of cognitive decline rather than using the total amount to gauge risk, researchers from Penn Medicine's Department of Radiology suggest in a new study published online July 15 in Neurobiology of Aging. An abstract (#O4-07-03) on the topic was also presented July 17 at the 2013 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Boston.



Penn Study Shows Vascular Link in Alzheimer's Disease with Cognition

Wed, 10 July 2013 00:01:00 GMT

Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that, across a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular disease affecting circulation of blood in the brain was significantly associated with dementia.



Shape-shifting Disease Proteins May Explain Variable Appearance of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Penn Study Finds

Wed, 03 July 2013 16:00:00 GMT

Neurodegenerative diseases are not all alike. Two individuals suffering from the same disease may experience very different age of onset, symptoms, severity, and constellation of impairments, as well as different rates of disease progression. Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have shown one disease protein can morph into different strains and promote misfolding of other disease proteins commonly found in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other related neurodegenerative diseases.



Staging System in ALS Shows Potential Tracks of Disease Progression, Penn Study Finds

Wed, 19 June 2013 15:30:00 GMT

The motor neuron disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, progresses in a stepwise, sequential pattern which can be classified into four distinct stages, report pathologists with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in the Annals of Neurology.



Intractable Seizures Halted with Experimental Treatment for Rare Pediatric "Pretzel Syndrome"

Thur, 25 April 2013 20:15:00 GMT

With a better understanding of underlying mechanisms that cause a rare neurodevelopmental disorder in the Old Order Mennonite population, referred to as Pretzel syndrome, a new study reports that five children were successfully treated with a drug that modifies the disease process, minimizing seizures and improving receptive language.



Binge Eating Curbed by Deep Brain Stimulation in Animal Model, Penn Study Shows

Tue, 23 April 2013 22:00:00 GMT

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a precise region of the brain appears to reduce caloric intake and prompt weight loss in obese animal models, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.



Alzheimer Gene ABCA7 Significantly Increases Late-Onset Risk Among African Americans

Mon, 09 April 2013 16:15:00 GMT

A variation in the gene ABCA7 causes a twofold increase in the risk of late onset Alzheimer disease among African Americans, according to a meta-analysis by a team of researchers including experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the largest analysis to date to determine genetic risk associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) specifically in African American individuals. The study appears in the April 10 issue of JAMA, a genomics theme issue.



Personalized Brain Mapping Technique Preserves Function Following Brain Tumor Surgery, Penn Review Reports

Mon, 01 April 2013 16:15:00 GMT

Neurosurgeons can visualize important pathways in the brain using an imaging technique called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to better adapt brain tumor surgeries and preserve language, visual and motor function while removing cancerous tissue. In the latest issue of Neurosurgical Focus, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania review research showing that this ability to visualize relevant white matter tracts during glioma resection surgeries can improve accuracy and, in some groups, significantly extend survival (median survival of 21.2 months) compared to cases where DTI was not used (median survival of 14 months).



Acute Stroke Therapy Used Three Times More at Certified Primary Stroke Centers

Tue, 26 March 2012 21:00:00 GMT

Certified Primary Stroke Centers are three times more likely to administer clot-busting treatment for strokes than non-certified centers, reports a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Debate Unsettled, Latest Evidence Unconvincing on PFO Closure Treatments, Penn-authored Editorial Reports

Fri, 22 March 2012 15:30:00 GMT

The results of two long-awaited clinical trials, testing a closure device versus medication to prevent stroke recurrence in young stroke survivors who have an opening in the atrial wall, have not provided enough evidence to conclude who, if anyone, is likely to benefit from the interventional procedure, according to an accompanying editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine co-authored by a Perelman School of Medicine researcher at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn Researchers Show that Suppressing the Brain's "Filter" Can Improve Performance in Creative Tasks

Mon, 18 March 2013 15:15:00 GMT

The brain's prefrontal cortex is thought to be the seat of cognitive control, working as a kind of filter that keeps irrelevant thoughts, perceptions and memories from interfering with a task at hand. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that inhibiting this filter can boost performance for tasks in which unfiltered, creative thoughts present an advantage.



Telestroke Program Increases "Golden Hour" Access to Stroke Care by 40 Percent

Fri, 15 March 2013 15:00:00 GMT

Telestroke programs substantially improve access to life-saving stroke care, extending coverage to less populated areas in an effort to reduce disparities in stroke care access. A new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013, found that telemedicine programs in Oregon pushed stroke coverage into previously uncovered, less populated areas and expanded coverage by approximately 40 percent.



Tau Transmission Model Opens Doors for New Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Therapies

Fri, 15 March 2013 15:00:00 GMT

Injecting synthetic tau fibrils into animal models induces Alzheimer's-like tau tangles and imitates the spread of tau pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013.



Improved Detection of Frontotemporal Degeneration May Aid Clinical Trial Efforts

Fri, 15 March 2013 14:00:00 GMT

A series of studies demonstrate improved detection of the second most common form of dementia, providing diagnostic specificity that clears the way for refined clinical trials testing targeted treatments. The new research is being presented by experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania at the American Academy of Neurology’s 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013.



MEDIA TOOLKIT: Penn Medicine at the 2013 American Academy of Neurology’s 65th Annual Meeting

Fri, 15 March 2013 14:00:00 GMT

Penn experts will be presenting the latest advances in treatment and diagnosis of neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and stroke at the American Academy of Neurology 65th Annual Meeting. Given the high global burden of rain disorders, which cause at least 25 percent of death and disability globally, the Penn team will gather with neurologists from around the world in San Diego, CA from March 16-23 as the field discusses the latest advances in neurological medicine, science and education.



Penn Study Confirms No Transmission of Alzheimer's Proteins Between Humans

Thur, 4 February 2013 19:15:00 GMT

Mounting evidence demonstrates that the pathological proteins linked to the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders are capable of spreading from cell-to-cell within the brains of affected individuals and thereby "spread" disease from one interconnected brain region to another. A new study found no evidence to support concerns that these abnormal disease proteins are "infectious" or transmitted from animals to humans or from one person to another. The study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in conjunction with experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Department of Health and Human Services, appears online in JAMA Neurology.



Untreated Parkinson's Disease Patients No More Likely to Have Impulse Control Disorders

Mon, 07 Jan 2013 21:00:00 GMT

While approximately one in five Parkinson's disease patients experience impulse control disorder symptoms, the disease itself does not increase the risk of gambling, shopping, or other impulsivity symptoms, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A new study is the first to show in a large sample that people with untreated Parkinson's were no more likely to have an increased impulsivity than people without the disease.



Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Receives Advanced Certification for Comprehensive Stroke Centers from The Joint Commission and AHA/ASA

Thur, 03 Jan 2013 16:00:00 GMT

The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) has been recognized by The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) as meeting The Joint Commission's standards for Disease-Specific Care Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification, becoming the first center in Philadelphia and among a select few hospitals in the United States to be named as part of an elite group of providers focused on complex stroke care.



MRI Can Screen Patients for Alzheimer's Disease or Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Using Penn-designed Model

Wed, 26 Dec 2012 20:00:00 GMT

When trying to determine the root cause of a person's dementia, using an MRI can effectively and non-invasively screen patients for Alzheimer's disease or Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Alzheimer's Association Awards Zenith Fellows Award to Penn's Robert Siman for Clever Research into Alzheimer's Drivers

Thur, 20 Dec 2012 16:30:00 GMT

Robert Siman, PhD, Research Professor of Neurosurgery in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a Zenith Fellows Award from the Alzheimer's Association for his personal commitment to the advancement of Alzheimer's disease research, and his research contributions to better understanding and curing the disease.



Alzheimer's Patients with Non-Spousal Caregivers are Less Likely to Participate in Clinical Trials

Wed, 19 Dec 2012 16:00:00 GMT

People with Alzheimer's disease are less likely to participate in a clinical trial if they have non-spouse caregivers, according to a study by a team of researchers including the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn Researchers Show Cocaine Addiction Resistance May Be Passed Down from Father to Son

Mon, 17 Dec 2012 15:30:00 GMT

New research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) reveals that sons of male rats exposed to cocaine are resistant to the rewarding effects of the drug, suggesting that cocaine-induced changes in physiology are passed down from father to son.



Penn Researchers Create a Universal Map of Vision in the Human Brain

Thur, 04 Oct 2012 16:00:00 GMT

Nearly 100 years after a British neurologist first mapped the blind spots caused by missile wounds to the brains of soldiers, Perelman School of Medicine researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have perfected his map using modern-day technology.



Surgery Has a More Profound Effect than Anesthesia on Brain Pathology and Cognition in Alzheimer's Animal Model, Finds Penn Study

Thur, 13 Sep 2012 19:30:00 GMT

A year ago, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania reported that Alzheimer's pathology, as reflected by cerebral spinal fluid biomarkers, might be increased in patients after surgery and anesthesia. However, it is not clear whether the anesthetic drugs or the surgical procedure itself was responsible. To separate these possibilities, the group turned to a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The results, published online this month in the Annals of Surgery, show that surgery itself, rather than anesthesia, has the more profound impact on a dementia-vulnerable brain.



Perelman School of Medicine Granted $11.9 Million Renewal of NINDS Support for Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Center of Excellence

Thur, 30 August 2012 15:30:00 GMT

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine will receive $11.9 million over the next five years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) for the Penn Udall Center for Parkinson's Disease (PD) research.



The Joint Commission Certifies Pennsylvania Hospital and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center as Primary Stroke Centers

Tue, 21 August 2012 13:00:00 GMT

Two Penn Medicine hospitals have received Primary Stroke Center certification from The Joint Commission for efforts to achieve long-term success in improving outcomes for stroke patients.



Biomarkers in Blood May Detect Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mon, 20 August 2012 17:00:00 GMT

Efforts to develop a blood test for Alzheimer's disease are progressing, as a new study co-authored by experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) found a group of biomarkers that hold up in statistical analyses in three independent groups of patients. 



Anti-Tau Drug Improves Cognition, Decreases Tau Tangles in Alzheimer's Disease Models, Penn Researchers Report

Thur, 19 July 2012 16:00:00 GMT

While clinical trial results are being released regarding drugs intended to decrease amyloid production - thought to contribute to decline in Alzheimer's disease - clinical trials of drugs targeting other disease proteins, such as tau, are in their initial phases.



Penn Expert Addresses Ethical Implications of Testing for Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Tue, 17 July 2012 16:00:00 GMT

Diagnostic tests are increasingly capable of identifying plaques and tangles present in Alzheimer's disease, yet the disease remains untreatable.



Penn Neurologist First American to Receive Highest Ecuadorean Scientific Prize

Mon, 9 July 2012 16:00:00 GMT

The Ecuadorean National Assembly has bestowed its highest scientific award to Donald Silberberg, MD, professor emeritus and former Chair of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, for his efforts spanning two decades to raise awareness, enhance medical education and improve patient care for neurological and psychiatric conditions globally, and in Ecuador.



Penn Study Describes Molecular Machinery that Pulls Apart Protein Clumps

Tue, 19 June 2012 21:00:00 GMT

Amyloid fibers are protein aggregates associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, for which there are no effective treatments.



Frances E. Jensen, MD, named Chair of the Department of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Thur, 14 June 2012 19:00:00 GMT

Frances E. Jensen, MD, has been named Chair of the Department of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Invitation to Cover: Penn Medicine Hosts Premier of "Head Games" Documentary on Sports Concussions

Thur, 6 June 2012 14:00:00 GMT

On the evening of Thursday, June 7th, Penn Medicine and Penn Athletics will host a Red Carpet premiere of a new film, Head Games, a revealing documentary about the concussion crisis in sports.



Sundown Syndrome-like Symptoms in Fruit Flies May be Due to High Dopamine Levels

Mon, 14 May 2012 14:00:00 GMT

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania researchers have discovered a mechanism involving the neurotransmitter dopamine that switches fruit fly behavior from being active during the day (diurnal) to nocturnal.



Gatekeeper of Brain Steroid Signals Boosts Emotional Resilience to Stress

Tue, 24 Apr 2012 16:00:00 GMT

A cellular protein called HDAC6, newly characterized as a gatekeeper of steroid biology in the brain, may provide a novel target for treating and preventing stress-linked disorders, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Penn Medicine Study Calls for Range of Diagnostic Spinal Fluid Tests to Help Clinicians Differentiate Concurrent Neurodegenerative Diseases

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 20:40:00 GMT

In a series of studies being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 64th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Penn researchers demonstrated that, while tests created for AD are effectively diagnosing the condition when it's clear cut, additional tests are needed to address the many cases with mixed pathology.



ALS Patients Differ on Treatment Choices in Later Phases of Disease, Penn Medicine Study Shows

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 20:00:00 GMT

Two new studies analyzing treatment decisions in late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients shed light onto treatments aimed to extend the duration and quality of life in this progressively debilitating neuromuscular disorder.



Early Treatment Improves Outcomes in Rare, Often Undiagnosed Form of Encephalitis, Penn Researchers Find

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 11:00:00 GMT

A mysterious, difficult-to-diagnose, and potentially deadly disease that was only recently discovered can be controlled most effectively if treatment is started within the first month that symptoms occur, according to a new report by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.