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International Journal of Stress Management - Vol 23, Iss 4



International Journal of Stress Management is a forum for the publication of peer-reviewed and thus high-quality original articles—empirical, theoretical, review, and historical articles as well book reviews and editorials. International Journal of Stre



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Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Psychological Association
 



Guided eye movement (GEM) in trauma therapy: Hypothetical neurological routes and initial results of a sample N = 35.

2016-02-15

Recent studies and clinical evidence indicate that eye movement by itself has a direct and positive role in neural processing, especially in processing emotion and, thus, trauma. The influence of eye movement on electroencephalography is amply documented but is generally taken as artifacts. This article comments on existing neurological research that may explain the positive effects—on both acute and posttraumatic stress—of guided eye movement in combination with cognitive therapy. Results of a minimally directive method for applying guided eye movement in a clinical setting are given. The method does not require extensive or specialized training and therefore may be applied by nontherapists. This simple form of guided eye movement was applied as trauma therapy to a sample of 35 subjects, in combination with active empathic listening. The short and medium term results (1–12 months) are presented here in detail. These clinical results point to neurological possibilities supporting the idea that the positive effects of the mere guided movement of the eyes during the recounting of a traumatic experience may depend on a physical, and not a psychological, mechanism. This opens possibilities for faster and more economic forms of trauma treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)(image)



Perceived organizational support, emotional exhaustion, and turnover: The moderating role of negative affectivity.

2016-04-07

Using principles from conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989), this study examined the time-lagged relationship between perceived organizational support (POS; measured at Time 1), emotional exhaustion (measured 6 months later), and turnover (measured 1 year after Time 1), and included negative affectivity (NA) as a moderator. Drawing on a sample of employees from multiple organizations (N = 135), we found POS to be unrelated to emotional exhaustion but the latter to be negatively related to turnover. NA moderated the relationship between POS and emotional exhaustion and POS’s indirect relationship to turnover, these relationships being stronger and positive at high levels of NA. Moreover, NA moderated the link between emotional exhaustion and turnover, this link being stronger and positive when NA was low. We discuss the relevance of conservation of resource theory as a useful framework for interpreting POS’s effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)(image)



Work routine and psychological strain during unsafe living circumstances: Toward an integrative model.

2016-04-07

This study takes an integrative, multidimensional approach to study the role of work in civilians’ lives during continuous unsafe circumstances. Two hundred ninety-four individuals working and living in northern Israel completed a survey following the Second Lebanon War (July-August, 2006). Attendance work routine (i.e., reporting to work as usual) was found to be associated with low levels of war-related strain, whereas performance constraints (i.e., barriers to the ability to perform as usual) were found to be associated with high levels of war-related strain. The need to engage in extra effort at work was positively related to strain only among civilians reporting high war preparedness. War preparedness also amplified the negative association between attendance and strain. Finally, among employees who felt that they were involuntary forced to attend work during the war, the negative association between attendance and strain was amplified. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)(image)



Effect of perceived organizational support on employee creativity: Moderating role of job stressors.

2016-04-07

Perceived organizational support is thought to enhance employee creativity, yet recent studies have indicated an inconsistent relationship between perceived organizational support and employee creativity. Drawing from social exchange theory, this study argued that the moderating effects of job stressors, including challenge and hindrance stressors, can explain this inconsistent relationship. Different types of job stressors may influence employees’ degree of identification of reciprocity norm, and thus strengthen or weaken the effect of perceived organizational support on employee creativity. Empirical data collected from 198 employees in 6 Korean companies were tested with the hierarchical regression method. The results showed that job stressors moderated the relationship between perceived organizational support and employee creativity, specifically, such a relationship was positive when challenge stressors were high or hindrance stressors were low. When challenge stressors were low or hindrance stressors were high, the effect of perceived organizational support on employee creativity became insignificant. Implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)(image)