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iterating toward openness



pragmatism over zeal - aut inveniam viam aut faciam



Last Build Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2017 15:30:21 +0000

 



Information Underload and OER Leverage

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 17:28:32 +0000

I started to post this as a comment on Mike’s amazing essay Information Underload, but I’m going to put it here instead. Read Mike’s whole piece – it’s worth it. He writes: Endless thinkpieces have been written about the Netflix matching algorithm [including in education], but for many years that algorithm could only match you with […]



What Difference Does It Make?

Wed, 05 Jul 2017 17:42:00 +0000

Last week I shared a little of my thinking about the problems inherent in the way people in the field talk about OER. Primary among those problems is our bewildering refusal to talk about the permissions necessary to engage in the 5R activities. These permissions are a critical part of the definition of what it […]



The Sleight of Hand of “Free” vs “Affordable”

Fri, 30 Jun 2017 18:42:12 +0000

In a recent webinar about OER, organized by one of the major textbook publishers, there was a lot of conversation about whether OER are “free” or “affordable.” This conversation was problematic in two ways. Before I begin though, just to be clear, allow me to reaffirm that OER are free, plain and simple, full stop, […]



JSON Feed

Wed, 24 May 2017 18:27:14 +0000

This is just a quick note to say that if you’re following the work being done on JSON feeds (as a compliment to – or potential replacement for – RSS), I’ve activated JSON feeds on opencontent.org. If you want to try reading Iterating Toward Openness that way, you can access this new feed at https://opencontent.org/blog/feed/json.



TULIP: the Theoretical Upper Limit of Impact of Products

Wed, 03 May 2017 20:23:56 +0000

Today and tomorrow I’m at the EdTech Efficacy Research Academic Symposium in Washington, DC. The conversations here have been wonderful and have reminded me of something… For many years, several friends and I have argued about the following question: After accounting for all other differences – differences in a student’s age, race, gender, income, and […]



OER-Enabled Pedagogy

Tue, 02 May 2017 17:16:10 +0000

Over the last several weeks there has been an incredible amount of writing about open pedagogy and open educational practices (samples collected here by Maha). There have been dozens of blog posts. Countless tweets. There was a well-attended (and well-viewed) conversation via Google Hangout. At the Hewlett OER Meeting last week over a dozen people […]



Wandering Through the “Open Pedagogy” Maze

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 18:22:19 +0000

Some random thoughts emerging in my mind as a result of yesterday’s wonderful conversation on “open pedagogy.” Don’t work too hard to figure out how they’re supposed to connect up. What we do with tools and resources is more important than the tools and resources themselves. However, without tools and resources there is precious little […]



When Opens Collide

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 17:05:14 +0000

In my recent post How is Open Pedagogy Different?, I defined open pedagogy as ”the set of teaching and learning practices only possible or practical in the context of the 5R permissions” – a definition I have been using in my writing and public speaking since I first blogged about open pedagogy back in 2013 […]



Another Response to Stephen

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:30:21 +0000

A quick search via Google shows that Stephen Downes is mentioned over 500 times on the pages of Iterating Toward Openness. What would I do without him to disagree and argue with? I would certainly be intellectually impoverished. As I’ve said before, everyone needs a Stephen in their life. Anyway, here’s another page to add […]



Of Progress, Problems, and Partnerships

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 16:02:59 +0000

In 2012 Kim Thanos and I founded Lumen Learning because, through our Gates-funded work on the Kaleidoscope Project, we had seen first-hand how hard it was for faculty to replace publisher materials with OER. The 2000s were an inspiring decade as institutions and individuals created and published a huge amount of openly licensed educational materials […]