Subscribe: Don Marti
http://zgp.org/~dmarti/blosxom/index.rss
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
bug  make  market  open source  open  protection  software  source  tracking protection  tracking  twitter  user  users  work 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Don Marti

Don Marti



personal blog feed



Last Build Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2017 13:51:20 GMT

 



Online ads don't matter to P&G

Fri, 28 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

In the news: P&G Cuts More Than $100 Million in ‘Largely Ineffective’ Digital Ads

Not surprising.

Proctor & Gamble makes products that help you comply with widely held cleanliness norms.

Digital ads are micro-targeted to you as an individual.

That's the worst possible brand/medium fit. If you don't know that the people who expect you to keep your house or body clean are going to be aware of the same product, how do you know whether to buy it?

Bonus link from Bob Hoffman last year: Will The P&G Story Bring Down Ad Tech? Please?




Got a reply from Twitter

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

I thought it would be fun to try Twitter ads, and, not surprisingly, I started getting fake followers pretty quickly after I started a Twitter follower campaign.

Since I'm paying nine cents a head for these followers, I don't want to get ripped off. So naturally I put in a support ticket to Twitter, and just heard back.

Thanks for writing in about the quality of followers and engagements. One of the advantages of the Twitter Ads platform is that any RTs of your promoted ads are sent to the retweeting account's followers as an organic tweet. Any engagements that result are not charged, however followers gained may not align with the original campaign's targeting criteria. These earned followers or engagements do show in the campaign dashboard and are used to calculate cost per engagement, however you are not charged for them directly.

Twitter also passes all promoted engagements through a filtering mechanism to avoid charging advertisers for any low-quality or invalid engagements. These filters run on a set schedule so the engagements may show in the campaign dashboard, but will be deducted from the amount outstanding and will not be charged to your credit card.

If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to reply.

That's pretty dense San Francisco speak, so let me see if I can translate to the equivalent for a normal product.

Hey, what are these rat turds doing in my raisin bran?

Thanks for writing in about the quality of your raisin bran eating experience. One of the advantages of the raisin bran platform is that during the production process, your raisin bran is made available to our rodent partners as an organic asset.

I paid for raisin bran, so why are you selling me raisin-plus-rat-turds bran?

Any ingredients that result from rodent engagement are not charged, however ingredients gained may not align with your original raisin-eating criteria.

Can I have my money back?

We pass all raisin bran sales through a filtering mechanism to avoid charging you for invalid ingredients. The total weight of the product, as printed on the box, includes these ingredients, but the weight of invalid ingredients will be deducted from the amount charged to your credit card.

So how can I tell which rat turds are "organic" so I'm not paying for them, and which are the ones that you just didn't catch and are charging me for?

(?)

Buying Twitter followers: Fiverr or Twitter?

On Fiverr, Twitter followers are about half a cent each ($5/1000). On Twitter, I'm gettting followers for about 9 cents each. The Twitter price is about 18x the Fiverr price.

But every follower that someone else buys on Fiverr has to be "aged" and disguised in order to look realistic enough not to get banned. The bot-herders have to follow legit follower campaigns such as mine and not just their paying customers.

If Twitter is selling those "follow" actions to me for nine cents each, and the bot-herder is only making half a cent, how is Twitter not making more from bogus Twitter followers than the bot-herders are?

If you're verified on Twitter, you may not be seeing how much of a shitshow their ad business is. Maybe the're going to have to sell Twitter to me sooner than I thought.




Incentivizing production of information goods

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Just thinking about approaches to incentivizing production of information goods, and where futures markets might fit in.

Artificial property

Article 1, Section 8, of the US Constitution still covers this one best.

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

We know about the problems with this one. It encourages all kinds of rent-seeking and freedom-menacing behavior by the holders of property interests in information. And the transaction costs are too high to incentivize the production of some useful kinds of information.

Commoditize the complement

Joel Spolsky explained it best, in Strategy Letter V. Smart companies try to commoditize their products’ complements. (See also: the list of business models in the Some Easily Rebutted Objections to GNU's Goals section of the GNU Manifesto)

This one has been shown to work for some categories of information goods but not others. (We have Free world-class browsers and OS kernels because search engines and hardware are complements. We don't have free world-class software in categories such as CAD.)

Signaling

Release a free information good as a way to signal competence in performing a service, or at least a large investment by the author in persuading others that the author is competent. Works at the level of the individual labor market and in consulting. Don't know if this works in other areas.

Game and market mechanisms

With "gamified crowdsourcing" you can earn play rewards for very low transaction costs, and contribute very small tasks.

(image)

Higher transaction costs are associated with "crowdfunding" which sounds similar but requires more collaboration and administration.

In the middle, between crowdsourcing and crowdfunding, is a niche for a mechanism with lower transaction costs than crowdfunding but more rewards than crowdsourcing.

By using the existing bug tracker to resolve contracts, a bug futures market keeps transaction costs low. By connecting to an existing cryptocurrency, a bug futures market enables a kind of reward that is more liquid, and transferrable among projects.

We don't know how wide the bug futures niche is. Is it a tiny space between increasingly complex tasks that can be resolved by crowdsourcing and increasingly finer-grained crowdfunding campaigns?

Or are bug futures capable of achieving low enough transaction costs to be an attractive incentivization mechanism for a lot of tasks that go into a variety of information goods?




My bot parsed 12,387 RSS feeds and all I got were these links.

Sun, 23 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Bryan Alexander has a good description of an "open web" reading pipeline in I defy the world and go back to RSS. I'm all for the open web, but 40 separate folders for 400 feeds? That would drive me nuts. I'm a lumper, not a splitter. I have one folder for 12,387 feeds. My chosen way to use RSS (and one of the great things about RSS is you can choose UX independently of information sources) is a "scored river". Something like Dave Winer's River of News concept, that you can navigate by just scrolling, but not exactly a river of news. with full text if available, but without images. I can click through if I want the images. items grouped by score, not feed. (Scores assigned managed by a dirt-simple algorithm where a feed "invests" a percentage of its points in every link, and the investments pay out in a higher score for that feed if the user likes a link.) I also put the byline at the bottom of each item. Anyway, one thing I have found out about manipulating my own filter bubble is that linklog feeds and blogrolls are great inputs. So here's a linklog feed. (It's mirrored from the live site, which annoys everyone except me.) Here are some actual links. This might look funny: How I ran my kids like an Atlassian team for a month. But think about it for a minute. Someone at every app or site your kids use is doing the same thing, and their goals don't include "Dignity and Respect" or "Hard Work Smart Work". Global network of 'hunters' aim to take down terrorists on the internet It took me a few days to figure things out and after a few weeks I was dropping accounts like flies… Google's been running a secret test to detect bogus ads — and its findings should make the industry nervous. (This is a hella good idea. Legit publishers could borrow it: just go ad-free for a few minutes at random, unannounced, a couple of times a week, then send the times straight to CMOs. Did you buy ads that someone claimed ran on our site at these times? Well, you got played.) For an Inclusive Culture, Try Working Less As I said, to this day, my team at J.D. Edwards was the most diverse I’ve ever worked on....Still, I just couldn’t get over that damned tie. The Al Capone theory of sexual harassment Initially, the connection eluded us: why would the same person who made unwanted sexual advances also fake expense reports, plagiarize, or take credit for other people’s work? Jon Tennant - The Cost of Knowledge But there’s something much more sinister to consider; recently a group of researchers saw fit to publish Ebola research in a ‘glamour magazine’ behind a paywall; they cared more about brand association than the content. This could be life-saving research, why did they not at least educate themselves on the preprint procedure.... Twitter Is Still Dismissing Harassment Reports And Frustrating Victims This Is How Your Fear and Outrage Are Being Sold for Profit (Profit? What about TEH LULZ??!?!1?) Fine, have some cute animal photos, I was done with the other stuff anyway: Photographer Spends Years Taking Adorable Photos of Rats to Break the Stigma of Rodents [...]



the other dude

Sat, 22 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Making the rounds, this is a fun one: A computer was asked to predict which start-ups would be successful. The results were astonishing.

  • 2014: When there's no other dude in the car, the cost of taking an Uber anywhere becomes cheaper than owning a vehicle. So the magic there is, you basically bring the cost below the cost of ownership for everybody, and then car ownership goes away.

  • 2018 (?): When there's no other dude in the fund, the cost of financing innovation anywhere becomes cheaper than owning a portfolio of public company stock. So the magic there is, you basically bring the transaction costs of venture capital below the cost of public company ownership for everybody, and then public companies go away.

Could be a thing for software/service companies faster than we might think. Futures contracts on bugs→equity crowdfunding and pre-sales of tokens→bot-managed follow-on fund for large investors.




Stupid ideas department

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Here's a probably stupid idea: give bots the right to accept proposed changes to a software project. Can automation encourage less burnout-provoking behavior?

A set of bots could interact in interesting ways.

  • Regression-test-bot: If a change only adds a test, applies cleanly to both the current version and to a previous version, and the previous version passses the test, accept it, even if the test fails for the current version.

  • Harmless-change-bot: If a change is below a certain size, does not modify existing tests, and all tests (including any new ones) pass, accept it.

  • Revert-bot: If any tests are failing on the current version, and have been failing for more than a certain amount of time, revert back to a version that passes.

Would more people write regression tests for their issues if they knew that a bot would accept them? Or say that someone makes a bad change but gets it past harmless-change-bot because no existing test covers it. No lengthy argument needed. Write a regression test and let regression-test-bot and revert-bot team up to take care of the problem. In general, move contributor energy away from arguing with people and toward test writing, and reduce the size of the maintainer's to-do list.




Playing for third place

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Just tried a Twitter advertising trick that a guy who goes by "weev" posted two years ago. It still works. They didn't fix it. Any low-budget troll who can read that old blog post and come up with a valid credit card number can still do it. Maybe Twitter is a bad example, but the fast-moving nationalist right wing manages to outclass its opponents on other social marketing platforms, too. Facebook won't even reveal how badly they got played in 2016. They thought they were putting out cat food for cute Internet kittens, but the rats ate it. This is not new. Right-wing shitlords, at least the best of them, are the masters of database marketing. They absolutely kill it, and they have been ever since Marketing as we know it became a thing. Some good examples: The 1920s version of the KKK Richard Viguerie's direct mail operation All the creepy surveillance marketing stuff they're doing today is just another set of tools in an expanding core competency. Every once in a while you get an exception. The environmental movement became a direct mail operation in response to Interior Secretary James G. Watt, who alarmed environmentalists enough that organizations could reliably fundraise with direct mail copy quoting from Watt's latest speech. And the Democrats tried that "Organizing for America" thing for a little while, but, man, their heart just wasn't in it. They dropped it like a Moodle site during summer vacation. Somehow, the creepier the marketing, the more it skews "red". The more creativity involved, the more it skews "blue" (using the USA meanings of those colors.) When we make decisions about how much user surveillance we're going to allow on a platform, we're making a political decision. Anyway. News Outlets to Seek Bargaining Rights Against Google and Facebook. The standings so far. Shitlords and fraud hackers Adtech and social media bros NEWS SITES HERE (?) News sites want to go to Congress, to get permission to play for third place in their own business? You want permission to bring fewer resources and less experience to a surveillance marketing game that the Internet companies are already losing? We know the qualities of a medium that you win by being creepier, and we know the qualities of a medium that you can win with reputation and creativity. Why waste time and money asking Congress for the opportunity to lose, when you could change the game instead? Maybe achieving balance in political views depends on achieving balance in business model. Instead of buying in to the surveillance marketing model 100%, and handing an advantage to one side, maybe news sites should help users control what data they share in order to balance competing political interests. Bonus links Rupert Murdoch ‘could use Sky data trove for political ends’ Newspapers’ Stand Against Tech Giants Won’t Save Them Publishers and the Pursuit of the Past Book Review: Twitter and Tear Gas, by Zeynep Tufekci ★ New on Daring Fireball: Display Ads The News Business Sinks Ever Closer to Rock Bottom [...]



Smart futures contracts on software issues talk, and bullshit walks?

Fri, 14 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Previously: Benkler’s Tripod, transactions from a future software market, more transactions from a future softwware market

Owning "equity" in an outcome

John Robb: Revisiting Open Source Ventures:

Given this, it appears that an open source venture (a company that can scale to millions of worker/owners creating a new economic ecosystem) that builds massive human curated databases and decentralizes the processing load of training these AIs could become extremely competitive.

But what if the economic ecosystem could exist without the venture? Instead of trying to build a virtual company with millions of workers/owners, build a market economy with millions of participants in tens of thousands of projects and tasks? All of this stuff scales technically much better than it scales organizationally—you could still be part of a large organization or movement while only participating directly on a small set of issues at any one time. Instead of holding equity in a large organization with all its political risk, you could hold a portfolio of positions in areas where you have enough knowledge to be comfortable.

Robb's opportunity is in training AIs, not in writing code. The "oracle" for resolving AI-training or dataset-building contracts would have to be different, but the futures market could be the same.

The cheating project problem

Why would you invest in a futures contract on bug outcomes when the project maintainer controls the bug tracker?

And what about employees who are incentivized from both sides: paid to fix a bug but able to buy futures contracts (anonymously) that will let them make more on the market by leaving it open?

In order for the market to function, the total reputation of the project and contributors must be high enough that outside participants believe that developers are more motivated to maintain that reputation than to "take a dive" on a bug.

That implies that there is some kind of relationship between the total "reputation capital" of a project and the maximum market value of all the futures contracts on it.

Open source metrics

To put that another way, there must be some relationship between the market value of futures contracts on a project and the maximum reputation value of the project. So that could be a proxy for a difficult-to-measure concept such as "open source health."

Open source journalism

Hey, tickers to put into stories! Sparklines! All the charts and stuff that finance and sports reporters can build stories around!




Blind code reviews experiment

Thu, 13 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

In case you missed it, here's a study that made the rounds earlier this year: Gender differences and bias in open source: Pull request acceptance of women versus men:

This paper presents the largest study to date on gender bias, where we compare acceptance rates of contributions from men versus women in an open source software community. Surprisingly, our results show that women's contributions tend to be accepted more often than men's. However, women's acceptance rates are higher only when they are not identifiable as women.

A followup, from Alice Marshall, breaks out the differences between acceptance of "insider" and "outsider" contributions.

For outsiders, women coders who use gender-neutral profiles get their changes accepted 2.8% more of the time than men with gender-neutral profiles, but when their gender is obvious, they get their changes accepted 0.8% less of the time.

We decided to borrow the blind auditions concept from symphony orchestras for the open source experiments program.

The experiment, launching this month, will help reviewers who want to try breaking habits of unconscious bias (whether by gender or insider/outsider status) by concealing the name and email adddress of a code author during a review on Bugzilla. You'll be able to un-hide the information before submitting a review, if you want, in order to add a personal touch, such as welcoming a new contributor.

Built with the WebExtension development work of Tomislav Jovanovic ("zombie" on IRC), and the Bugzilla bugmastering of Emma Humphries. For more info, see the Bugzilla bug discussion.

Data collection

The extension will "cc" one of two special accounts on a bug, to indicate if the review was done partly or fully blind. This lets us measure its impact without having to make back-end changes to Bugzilla.

(Yes, WebExtensions let you experiment with changing a user's experience of a site without changing production web applications or content sites. Bonus link: FilterBubbler.)

Coming soon

A first release is on a.m.o., here: Blind Reviews BMO Experiment, if you want an early look. We'll send out notifications to relevant places when the "last" bugs are fixed and it's ready for daily developer use.




Two approaches to adfraud, and some good news

Fri, 07 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Adfraud is a big problem, and we keep seeing two basic approaches to it.

Flight to quality: Run ads only on trustworthy sites. Brands are now playing the fraud game with the "reputation coprocessors" of the audience's brains on the brand's side. (Flight to quality doesn't mean just advertise on the same major media sites as everyone else—it can scale downward with, for example, the Project Wonderful model that lets you choose sites that are "brand safe" for you.)

Increased surveillance: Try to fight adfraud by continuing to play the game of trying to get big-money impressions from the cheapest possible site, but throw more tracking at the problem. Biggest example of this is to move ad money to locked-down mobile platforms and away from the web.

The problem with the second approach is that the audience is no longer on the brand's side. Trying to beat adfraud with technological measures is just challenging hackers to a series of hacking contests. And brands keep losing those. Recent news: The Judy Malware: Possibly the largest malware campaign found on Google Play.

Anyway, I'm interested in and optimistic about the results of the recent Mozilla/Caribou Digital report. It turns out that USA-style adtech is harder to do in countries where users are (1) less accurately tracked and (2) equipped with blockers to avoid bandwidth-sucking third-party ads. That's likely to mean better prospects for ad-supported news and cultural works, not worse. This report points out the good news that the so-called adtech tax is lower in developing countries—so what kind of ad-supported businesses will be enabled by lower "taxes" and "reinvention, not reinsertion" of more magazine-like advertising?

Of course, working in those markets is going to be hard for big US or European ad agencies that are now used to solving problems by throwing creepy tracking at them. But the low rate of adtech taxation sounds like an opportunity for creative local agencies and brands. Maybe the report should have been called something like "The Global South is Shitty-Adtech-Proof, so Brands Built Online There Are Going to Come Eat Your Lunch."




Applying proposed principles for content blocking

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

(I work for Mozilla. None of this is secret. None of this is official Mozilla policy. Not speaking for Mozilla here.) In 2015, Denelle Dixon at Mozilla wrote Proposed Principles for Content Blocking. The principles are: Content Neutrality: Content blocking software should focus on addressing potential user needs (such as on performance, security, and privacy) instead of blocking specific types of content (such as advertising). Transparency & Control: The content blocking software should provide users with transparency and meaningful controls over the needs it is attempting to address. Openness: Blocking should maintain a level playing field and should block under the same principles regardless of source of the content. Publishers and other content providers should be given ways to participate in an open Web ecosystem, instead of being placed in a permanent penalty box that closes off the Web to their products and services. See also Nine Principles of Policing by Sir Robert Peel, who wrote, [T]he police are the public and that the public are the police, the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence. Web browser developers have similar responsibilities to those of Peel's ideal police: to build a browser to carry out the user's intent, or, when setting defaults, to understand widely held user norms and implement those, while giving users the affordances to change the defaults if they choose. The question now is how to apply content blocking principles to today's web environment. Some qualities of today's situation are: Tracking protection often doesn't have to be perfect, because adfraud. The browser can provide some protection, and influence the market in a positive direction, just by getting legit users below the noise floor of fraudbots. Tracking protection has the potential to intensify a fingerprinting arms race that's already going on, by forcing more adtech to rely on fingerprinting in place of third-party cookies. Fraud is bad, but not all anti-fraud is good. Anti-fraud technologies that track users can create the same security risks as other tracking—and enable adtech to keep promising real eyeballs on crappy sites. The "flight to quality" approach to anti-fraud does not share these problems. Adtech and adfraud can peek at Mozilla's homework, but Mozilla can't see theirs. Open source projects must rely on unpredictable users, not unpredictable platform decisions, to create uncertainty. Which suggests a few tactics—low-risk ways to apply content blocking principles to address today's adtech/adfraud problems. Empower WebExtensions developers and users. Much of the tracking protection and anti-fingerprinting magic in Firefox is hidden behind preferences. This makes a lot of sense because it enables developers to integrate their work into the browser in parallel with user testing, and enables Tor Browser to do less patching. IMHO this work is also important to enable users to choose their own balance between privacy/security and breaking legacy sites. WebExtension API for improved tracking protection API for managing tracking protection Implement browser.privacy.trackingProtection API Inform and nudge users who express an interest in privacy. Some users care about privacy, but don't have enough information about how protection choices match up with their expectations. If a user cares enough to turn on Do Not Track, change cookie settings, or install an ad blocker, then try suggesting a tracking protection setting or tool. Don't assume that just because a user has installed an ad blocker with deceptive privacy settings tha[...]



more transactions from a future software market

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Previously: Benkler’s Tripod, transactions from a future software market

Why would you want the added complexity of a market where anyone can take either side of a futures contract on the status of a software bug, and not just offer to pay people to fix bugs like a sensible person? IMHO it's worth trying not just because of the promise of lower transaction costs and more market liquidity (handwave) but because it enables other kinds of transactions. A few more.

Partial work I want a feature, and buy the "unfixed" side of a contract that I expect to lose. A developer decides to fix it, does the work, and posts a pull request that would close the bug. But the maintainer is on vacation, leaving her pull request hanging with a long comment thread. Another developer is willing to take on the political risk of merging the work, and buys out the original developer's position.

Prediction/incentivization With the right market design, a prediction that something won't happen is the same as an incentive to make it happen. If we make an attractive enough way for users to hedge their exposure to lack of innovation, we create a pool of wealth that can be captured by innovators. (Related: dominant assurance contracts)

Bug triage Much valuable work on bugs is in the form of modifying metadata: assigning a bug to the correct subsystem, identifying dependency relationships, cleaning up spam, and moving invalid bugs into a support ticket tracker or forum. This work is hard to reward, and infamously hard to find volunteers for. An active futures market could include both bots that trade bugs probabilistically based on status and activity, and active bug triagers who make small market gains from modifying metadata in a way that makes them more likely to be resolved.




transactions from a future software market

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

More on the third connection in Benkler’s Tripod, which was pretty general. This is just some notes on more concrete examples of how new kinds of direct connections between markets and peer production might work in the future. Smart contracts should make it possible to enable these in a trustworthy, mostly decentralized, way. Feature request I want emoji support on my blog, so I file, or find, a wishlist bug on the open source blog package I use: "Add emoji support." I then offer to enter into a smart contract that will be worthless to me if the bug is fixed on September 1, or give me my money back if the bug is unfixed at that date. A developer realizes that fixing the bug would be easy, and wants to do it, so takes the other side of the contract. The developer's side will expire worthless if the bug is unfixed, and pay out if the bug is fixed. "Unfixed" results will probably include bugs that are open, wontfix, invalid, or closed as duplicate of a bug that is still open. "Fixed" results will include bugs closed as fixed, or any bug closed as a duplicate of a bug that is closed as fixed. If the developer fixes the bug, and its status changes to fixed, then I lose money on the smart contract but get the feature I want. If the bug status is still unfixed, then I get my money back. So far this is just one user paying one developer to write a feature. Not especially exciting. There is some interesting market design work to be done here, though. How can the developer signal serious interest in working on the bug, and get enough upside to be meaningful, without taking too much risk in the event the fix is not accepted on time? Arbitrage I post the same offer, but another user realizes that the blog project can only support emoji if the template package that it depends on supports them. That user becomes an arbitrageur: takes the "fixed" side of my offer, and the "unfixed" side of the "Add emoji support" bug in the template project. As an end user, I don't have to know the dependency relationship, and the market gives the arbitrageur an incentive to collect information about multiple dependent bugs into the best place to fix them. Front-running Dudley Do-Right's open source project has a bug in it, users are offering to buy the "unfixed" side of the contract in order to incentivize a fix, and a trader realizes that Dudley would be unlikely to let the bug go unfixed. The trader takes the "fixed" side of the contract before Dudley wakes up. The deal means that the market gets information on the likelihood of the bug being fixed, but the developer doing the work does not profit from it. This is a "picking up nickels in front of a steamroller" trading strategy. The front-runner is accepting the risk of Dudley burning out, writing a long Medium piece on how open source is full of FAIL, and never fixing a bug again. Front-running game theory could be interesting. If developers get sufficiently annoyed by front-running, they could delay fixing certain bugs until after the end of the relevant contracts. A credible threat to do this might make front-runners get out of their positions at a loss. CVE prediction A user of a static analysis tool finds a suspicious pattern in a section of a codebase, but cannot identify a specific vulnerability. The user offers to take one side of a smart contract that will pay off if a vulnerability matching a certain pattern is found. A software maintainer or key user can take the other side of these contracts, to encourage researchers to disclose information and focus attention on specific areas of the codebase. Security information leakage Ernie and Bert discover a softwa[...]



Software: annoying speech or crappy product?

Mon, 03 Jul 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Zeynep Tufekci, in the New York Times: Since most software is sold with an “as is” license, meaning the company is not legally liable for any issues with it even on day one, it has not made much sense to spend the extra money and time required to make software more secure quickly. The software business is still stuck on the kind of licensing that might have made sense in the 8-bit micro days, when "personal computer productivity" was more aspirational than a real thing, and software licenses were printed on the backs of floppy sleeves. Today, software is part of products that do real stuff, and it makes zero sense to ship a real product, that people's safety or security depends on, with the fine print "WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TOTALLY HALF-ASS OUR JOBS" or in business-speak, "SELLER DISCLAIMS THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY." But what about open source and collaboration and science, and all that stuff? Software can be both "product" and "speech". Should there be a warranty on speech? If I dig up my shell script for re-running the make command when a source file changes, and put it on the Internet, should I be putting a warranty on it? It seems that there are two kinds of software: some is more product-like, and should have a grown-up warranty on it like a real busines. And some software is more speech-like, and should have ethical requirements like a scientific paper, but not a product-like warranty. What's the dividing line? Some ideas. "productware is shipped as executables, freespeechware is shipped as source code" Not going to work for elevator_controller.php or a home router security tool written in JavaScript. "productware is preinstalled, freespeechware is downloaded separately" That doesn't make sense when even implanted defibrillators can update over the net. "productware is proprietary, freespeechware is open source" Companies could put all the fragile stuff in open source components, then use the DMCA and CFAA to enable them to treat the whole compilation as proprietary. Software companies are built to be good at getting around rules. If a company can earn all its money in faraway Dutch Sandwich Land and be conveniently too broke to pay the IRS in the USA, then it's going to be hard to make it grow up licensing-wise without hurting other people first. How about splitting out the legal advantages that the government offers to software and extending some to productware, others to freespeechware? Freespeechware licenses license may disclaim implied warranty no anti-reverse-engineering clause in a freespeechware license is enforceable freespeechware is not a "technological protection measure" under section 1201 of Title 17 of the United States Code (DMCA anticircumvention) exploiting a flaw in freespeechware is never a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act If the license allows it, a vendor may sell freespeechware, or a derivative work of it, as productware. (This could be as simple as following the You may charge any price or no price for each copy that you convey, and you may offer support or warranty protection for a fee. term of the GPL.) Productware licenses: license may not disclaim implied warranty licensor and licensee may agree to limit reverse engineering rights DMCA and CFAA apply (reformed of course, but that's another story) It seems to me that there needs to be some kind of quid pro quo here. If a company that sells software wants to use government-granted legal powers to control its work, that has to be conditioned on not using those powers just to protect irresponsible releases. [...]



Fun with dlvr.it

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Check it out—I'm "on Facebook" again. Just fixed my gateway through dlvr.it. If you're reading this on Facebook, that's why.

Dlvr.it is a nifty service that will post to social sites from an RSS feed. If you don't run your own linklog feed, the good news is that Pocket will generate RSS feeds from the articles you save, so if you want to share links with people still on Facebook, the combination of Pocket and dlvr.it makes that easy to do without actually spending human eyeball time there.

There's a story about Thomas Nelson, Jr., leader of the Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War.

During the siege and battle Nelson led the Virginia Militia whom he had personally organized and supplied with his own funds. Legend had it that Nelson ordered his artillery to direct their fire on his own house which was occupied by Cornwallis, offering five guineas to the first man who hit the house.

Would Facebook's owners do the same, now that we know that foreign interests use Facebook to subvert America? Probably not. The Nelson story is just an unconfirmed patriotic anecdote, and we can't expect that kind of thing from today's post-patriotic investor class. Anyway, just seeing if I can move Facebook's bots/eyeballs ratio up a little.




Stuff I'm thankful for

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

I'm thankful that the sewing machine was invented a long time ago, not today. If the sewing machine were invented today, most sewing tutorials would be twice as long, because all the thread would come in proprietary cartridges, and you would usually have to hack the cartridge to get the type of thread you need in a cartridge that works with your machine.




1. Write open source. 2. ??? 3. PROFIT

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Studies keep showing that open source developers get paid more than people who develop software but do not contribute to open source.

Good recent piece: Tabs, spaces and your salary - how is it really? by Evelina Gabasova.

But why?

Is open source participation a way to signal that you have skills and are capable of cooperation with others?

Is open source a way to build connections and social capital so that you have more awareness of new job openings and can more easily move to a higher-paid position?

Does open source participation just increase your skills so that you do better work and get paid more for it?

Are open source codebases a complementary good to open source maintenance programming, so that a lower price for access to the codebase tends to drive up the price for maintenance programming labor?

Is "we hire open source people" just an excuse for bias, since the open source scene at least in the USA is less diverse than the general pool of programming job applicants?




Catching up to Safari?

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Earlier this month, Apple Safari pulled ahead of other mainstream browsers in tracking protection. Tracking protection in the browser is no longer a question of should the browser do it, but which browser best protects its users. But Apple's early lead doesn't mean that another browser can't catch up. Tracking protection is still hard. You have to provide good protection from third-party tracking, which users generally don't want, without breaking legit third-party services such as content delivery networks, single sign-on systems, and shopping carts. Protection is a balance, similar to the problem of filtering spam while delivering legit mail. Just as spam filtering helps enable legit email marketing, tracking protection tends to enable legit advertising that supports journalism and cultural works. Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances. — Sun Tzu In the long run, just as we have seen with spam filters, it will be more important to make protection hard to predict than to run the perfect protection out of the box. A spam filter, or browser, that always does the same thing will be analyzed and worked around. A mail service that changes policies to respond to current spam runs, or an unpredictable ecosystem of tracking protection add-ons that browser users can install in unpredictable combinations, is likely to be harder. But most users aren't in the habit of installing add-ons, so browsers will probably have to give them a nudge, like Microsoft Windows does when it nags the user to pick an antivirus package (or did last time I checked.) So the decentralized way to catch up to Apple could end up being something like: When new tracking protection methods show up in the privacy literature, quietly build the needed browser add-on APIs to make it possible for new add-ons to implement them. Do user research to guide the content and timing of nudges. (Some atypical users prefer to be tracked, and should be offered a chance to silence the warnings by affirmatively choosing a do-nothing protection option.) Help users share information about the pros and cons of different tools. If a tool saves lots of bandwidth and battery life but breaks some site's comment form, help the user make the right choice. Sponsor innovation challenges to incentivize development, testing, and promotion of diverse tracking protection tools. Any surveillance marketer can install and test a copy of Safari, but working around an explosion of tracking protection tools would be harder. How to set priorities when they don't know which tools will get popular? What about adfraud? Tracking protection strategies have to take adfraud into account. Marketers have two choices for how to deal with adfraud: flight to quality extra surveillance Flight to quality is better in the long run. But it's a problem from the point of view of adtech intermediaries because it moves more ad money to high-reputation sites, and the whole point of adtech is to reach big-money eyeballs on cheap sites. Adtech firms would rather see surveillance-heavy responses to adfraud. One way to help shift marketing budgets away from surveillance, and toward flight to quality, is to make the returns on surveillance investments less predictable. This is possible to do without making value judgments about certain kinds of sites. If you like a site enough to let it see your personal info, you should be able to do it, even if in my humble opinion it's a crappy site. But yo[...]



Apple's kangaroo cookie robot

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

I'm looking forward to trying "Intelligent Tracking Prevention" in Apple Safari. But first, let's watch an old TV commercial for MSN. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/Cmcyb1A_D0E?start=133" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Today, a spam filter seems like a must-have feature for any email service. But MSN started talking about its spam filtering back when Sanford Wallace, the "Spam King," was saying stuff like this. I have to admit that some people hate me, but I have to tell you something about hate. If sending an electronic advertisement through email warrants hate, then my answer to those people is "Get a life. Don't hate somebody for sending an advertisement through email." There are people out there that also like us. According to spammers, spam filtering was just Internet nerds complaining about something that regular users actually like. But the spam debate ended when big online services, starting with MSN, started talking about how they build for their real users instead of for Wallace's hypothetical spam-loving users. If you missed the email spam debate, don't worry. Wallace's talking points about spam filters constantly get recycled by surveillance marketers talking about tracking protection. But now it's not email spam that users supposedly crave. Today, the Interactive Advertising Bureau tells us that users want ads that "follow them around" from site to site. Enough background. Just as the email spam debate ended with MSN's campaign, the third-party web tracking debate ended on June 5, 2017. With Intelligent Tracking Prevention, WebKit strikes a balance between user privacy and websites’ need for on-device storage. That said, we are aware that this feature may create challenges for legitimate website storage, i.e. storage not intended for cross-site tracking. If you need it in bullet points, here it is. Nifty machine learning technology is coming in on the user's side. "Legitimate" uses do not include cross-site tracking. Safari's protection is automatic and client-side, so no blocklist politics. Surveillance marketers come up with all kinds of hypothetical reasons why users might prefer targeted ads. But in the real world, Apple invests time and effort to understand user experience. When Apple communicates about a feature, it's because that feature is likely to keep a user satisfied enough to buy more Apple devices. We can't read their confidential user research, but we can see what the company learned from it based on how they communicate about products. (Imagine for a minute that Apple's user research had found that real live users are more like the Interactive Advertising Bureau's idea of a user. We might see announcements more like "Safari automatically shares your health and financial information with brands you love!" Anybody got one of those to share?) Saving an out-of-touch ad industry Advertising supports journalism and cultural works that would not otherwise exist. It's too important not to save. Bob Hoffman asks, [H]ow can we encourage an acceptable version of online advertising that will allow us to enjoy the things we like about the web without the insufferable annoyance of the current online ad model? The browser has to be part of the answer. If the browser does its job, as Safari is doing, it can play a vital role in re-connecting users with legit advertising—just as users have come to trust legit email newsletters now that they hav[...]



Apple user research revealed, sort of

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 07:00:00 GMT

This is not normally the blog to come to for Apple fan posts (my ThinkPad, desktop Linux, cold dead hands, and so on) but really good work here on "Intelligent Tracking Prevention" in Apple Safari.

Looks like the spawn of Privacy Badger and cookie double-keying, designed to balance user protection from surveillance marketing with minimal breakage of sites that depend on third-party resources.

(Now all the webmasters will fix stuff to make it work with Intelligent Tracking Prevention, which makes it easier for other browsers and privacy tools to justify their own features to protect users. Of course, now the surveillance marketers will rely more on passive fingerprinting, and Apple has an advantage there because there are fewer different Safari-capable devices. But browsers need to fix fingerprinting anyway.)

Apple does massive amounts of user research and it's fun to watch the results leak through when they communicate about features. Looks like they have found that users care about being "followed" from site to site by ads, and that users are still pretty good at applied behavioral economics. The side effect of tracking protection, of course, is that it takes high-reputation sites out of competition with the bottom-feeders to reach their own audiences, so Intelligent Tracking Prevention is great news for publishers too.

Meanwhile, I don't get Google's weak "filter" thing. Looks like a transparently publisher-hostile move (since it blocks some potentially big-money ads without addressing the problem of site commodification), unless I'm missing something.