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Don Marti



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Last Build Date: Fri, 19 May 2017 17:10:46 GMT

 



What happened to Twitter? We can't look away...

Fri, 19 May 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Hey, everybody, check it out. Here's a Twitter ad. If you're "verified" on Twitter, you probably miss these, so I'll just use my Fair Use rights to share that one with you. You're welcome. Twitter is a uniquely influential medium, one that shows up on the TV news every night and on news sites all day. But somehow, the plan to make money from Twitter is to run the same kind of targeted ads that anyone with a WordPress site can. And the latest Twitter news is a privacy update that includes, among other things, more tracking of users from one site to another. Yes, the same kind of thing that Facebook already does, and better, with more users. And the same kind of thing that any web site can already get from an entire Lumascape of companies. Boring. If you want to stick this kind of ad on your WordPress site, you just have to cut and paste some ad network HTML—not build out a deluxe office space on Market Street in San Francisco the way Twitter has. But the result is about the same. What makes Twitter even more facepalm-worthy is that they make a point of not showing the ads to the influential people who draw attention to Twitter to start with. It's like they're posting a big sign that says STUPID AD ZONE: UNIMPORTANT PEOPLE ONLY. Twitter is building something unique, but they're selling generic impressions that advertisers can get anywhere. So as far as I can tell, the Twitter business model is something like: Money out: build something unique and expensive. Money in: sell the most generic and shitty thing in the world. Facebook can make this work because they have insane numbers of eyeball-minutes. Chump change per minute on Facebook still adds up to real money. But Facebook is an outlier on raw eyeball-minutes, and there aren't enough minutes in the day for another. So Twitter is on track to get sold for $500,000, like Digg was. Which is good news for me because I know enough Twitter users that I can get that kind of money together. So why should you help me buy Twitter when you could just get the $500,000 yourself? Because I have a secret plan, of course. Twitter is the site that everyone is talking about, right? So run the ads that people will talk about. Here's the plan. Sell one ad per day. And everybody sees the same one. Sort of like the back cover of the magazine that everybody in the world reads (but there is no such magazine, so that's why this is an opportunity.) No more need to excuse the verified users from the ads. Yes, an advertiser will have to provide a variety of sizes and localizations for each ad (and yes, Twitter will have to check that the translations match). But it's the same essential ad, shown to every Twitter user in the world for 24 hours. No point trying to out-Facebook Facebook or out-Lumascape the Lumascape. Targeted ads are weak on signal, and a bunch of other companies are doing them more cost-effectively and at higher volume, anyway. Of course, this is not for everybody. It's for brands that want to use a memorable, creative ad to try for the same kind of global signal boost that a good Tweet® can get. But if you want generic targeted ads you can get those everywhere else on the Internet. Where else can you get signal? In order to beat current Twitter revenue, the One Twitter Ad needs to go for about the same price as a Super Bowl commercial. But if Twitter stays influential, that's reasonable, and I make back the 500 grand and a lot more. [...]



Understanding the limitations of data pollution tools

Tue, 02 May 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Jeremy Gillula and Yomna Nasser write, on the EFF blog,

Internet users have been asking what they can do to protect their own data from this creepy, non-consensual tracking by Internet providers—for example, directing their Internet traffic through a VPN or Tor. One idea to combat this that’s recently gotten a lot of traction among privacy-conscious users is data pollution tools: software that fills your browsing history with visits to random websites in order to add “noise” to the browsing data that your Internet provider is collecting.

...

[T]here are currently too many limitations and too many unknowns to be able to confirm that data pollution is an effective strategy at protecting one’s privacy. We’d love to eventually be proven wrong, but for now, we simply cannot recommend these tools as an effective method for protecting your privacy.

This is one of those "two problems one solution" situations.

  • The problem for makers and users of "data pollution" or spoofing tools is QA. How do you know that your tool is working? Or are surveillance marketers just filtering out the impressions created by the tool, on the server side?

  • The problem for companies using so-called Non-Human Traffic (NHT) is that when users discover NHT software (bots), the users tend to remove it. What would make users choose to participate in NHT schemes so that the NHT software can run for longer and build up more valuable profiles?

So what if the makers of spoofing tools could get a live QA metric, and NHT software maintainers could give users an incentive to install and use their software?

NHT market as a tool for discovering information

Imagine a spoofing tool that offers an easy way to buy bot pageviews, I mean buy Perfectly Legitimate Data on how fast a site loads from various home Internet connections. When the tool connects to its server for an update, it gets a list of URLs to visit—a mix of random sites, popular sites, and paying customers.

Now the spoofing tool maintainer will be able to to tell right away if the tool is really generating realistic traffic, by looking at the market price of pageviews. The maintainer will even be able to tell whose tracking the tool can beat, by looking at which third-party resources are included on the pages getting paid-for traffic.

The money probably won't be significant, since real web ad money is moving to whitelisted, legit sites and away from fraud-susceptible schemes anyway, but in the meantime it's a way to measure effectiveness.




NPM without sudo

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Setting up a couple of Linux systems to work with FilterBubbler, which is one of the things that I'm up to at work now. FilterBubbler is a WebExtension, and the setup instructions use web-ext, so I need NPM. In order to keep all the NPM stuff under my own home directory, but still put the web-ext tool on my $PATH, I need to make one-line edits to three files.

One line in ~/.npmrc

prefix = ~/.npm

One line in ~/.gitignore

.npm/

One line in ~/.bashrc

export PATH="$PATH:$HOME/.npm/bin"

(My /bashrc has a bunch of export PATH= lines so that when I add or remove one it's more likely to get a clean merge. Because home directory in git.) I think that's it. Now I can do

npm install --global web-ext

with no sudo or mess. And when I clone my home directory on another system it will just work.

Based on: HowTo: npm global install without root privileges by Johannes Klose




Traffic sourcing web obfuscator?

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

(This is an answer to a question on Twitter. Twitter is the new blog comments (for now) and I'm more likely to see comments there than to have time to set up and moderate comments here.)

Adfraud is an easy way to make mad cash, adtech is happily supporting it, and it all works because the system has enough layers between CMO and fraud hacker that everybody can stay as clean as they need to. Users bear the privacy risks of adfraud, legit publishers pay for it, and adtech makes more money from adfraud than fraud hackers do. Adtech doesn't have to communicate or coordinate with adfraud, just set up a fraud-friendly system and let the actual fraud hackers go to work. Bad for users, people who make legit sites, and civilization in general.

But one piece of good news is that adfraud can change quickly. Adfraud hackers don't have time to get stuck in conventional ways of doing things, because adfraud is so lucrative that the high-skill players don't have to stay in it for very long. The adfraud hackers who were most active last fall have retired to run their resorts or recording studios or wineries or whatever.

So how can privacy tools get a piece of the action?

One random idea is for an obfuscation tool to participate in the market for so-called sourced traffic. Fraud hackers need real-looking traffic and are willing to pay for it. Supplying that traffic is sketchy but legal. Which is perfect, because put one more layer on top of it and it's not even sketchy.

And who needs to know if they're doing a good job at generating real-looking traffic? Obfuscation tool maintainers. Even if you write a great obfuscation tool, you never really know if your tricks for helping users beat surveillance are actually working, or if your tool's traffic is getting quietly identified on the server side.

In proposed new privacy tool model, outsourced QA pays YOU!

Set up a market where a Perfectly Legitimate Site that is looking for sourced traffic can go to buy pageviews, I mean buy Perfectly Legitimate Data on how fast a site loads from various home Internet connections. When the obfuscation tool connects to its server for an update, it gets a list of URLs to visit—a mix of random, popular sites and paying customers.

Set a minimum price for pageviews that's high enough to make it cost-ineffective for DDoS. Don't allow it to be used on random sites, only those that the buyer controls. Make them put a secret in an unlinked-to URL or something. And if an obfuscation tool isn't well enough sandboxed to visit a site that's doing traffic sourcing, it isn't well enough sandboxed to surf the web unsupervised at all.

Now the obfuscation tool maintainer will be able to to tell right away if the tool is really generating realistic traffic, by looking at the market price. The maintainer will even be able to tell whose tracking the tool can beat, by looking at which third-party resources are included on the pages getting paid-for traffic. And the whole thing can be done by stringing together stuff that IAB members are already doing, so they would look foolish to complain about it.




Interesting stuff on the Internet

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Just some mindless link propagation to tweak making the links on my blog the right shade of blue.

Good news: Portugal Pushes Law To Partially Ban DRM, Allow Circumvention

Study finds Pokémon Go players are happier and The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel. Get your phone charged up, get off Facebook, and get out there.

If corporations are people, you wouldn't be mean to a person, would you? Managing for the Long Term

Yay, surprise presents for Future Me! Why Kickstarter Decided To Radically Transform Its Business Model

Skateboarding obviously doesn't cause hip fractures, because the age groups least likely to skateboard break their hips the most! Something is breaking American politics, but it's not social media

From Spocko, pioneer of Internet brand safety campaigns: Values: Brand, Corporate & Bill O’Reilly’s

In Spite of People Having Meetings, Bears Still Shit in the Woods: In Spite Of The Crackdown, Fake News Publishers Are Still Earning Money From Major Ad Networks

There's another dead bishop on the landing. Alabama Senate OK's church police bill

Productivity is awesome: How to Avoid Distractions and Finish What You

Computer Science FTW: Corrode update: control flow translation correctness

More good news: Kentucky Coal Mining Museum converts to solar power

This is going to be...fun. Goldman Sachs: VC Dry Powder Hits Record Highs

If you want to prep for a developer job interview, here's some good info: Hexing the technical interview




Bunny: Internet famous?

Sat, 08 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

(image)

I bought this ceramic bunny at a store on Park Street in Alameda, California. Somehow I think I have seen it before.




Memo to self: make dentist appointment

Tue, 04 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

(Hey, I said this was a personal blog.)

But I was just thinking—people started adding lots of refined sugar to their diets long before anybody discovered how dental caries works.

And today we have Internet distractions, and surveillance marketing, doing to our brains what sugar did to people's teeth.

And people have both sugar and teeth today. Dental hygiene is awesome: it's a set of norms, technologies, and habits, grounded in scientific understanding. Mental hygiene is just getting started.

The sugar industry moved faster to start with, but people agree that teeth matter. So do brains.




Confusion about why we call adtech adtech

Mon, 03 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

If you want people on the Internet to argue with you, say that you're making a statement about values.

If you want people to negotiate with you, say that you're making a statement about business.

If you want people to accept that something is inevitable, say that you're making a statement about technology.

The mixup between values arguments, business arguments, and technology arguments might be why people are confused about Brands need to fire adtech by Doc Searls.

The set of trends that people call adtech is a values-driven business transformation that is trying to label itself as a technological transformation.

Some of the implementation involves technological changes (NoSQL databases! Nifty!) but fundamentally adtech is about changing how media business is done. Adtech does have a set of values, none of which are really commonly held even among people in the marketing or advertising field, but let's not make the mistake of turning this into either an argument about values (that never accomplishes anything) or a set of statements about technology (that puts those with an inside POV on current technology at an unnecessary advantage). Instead, let's look at the business positions that adtech is taking.

  • Adtech stands for profitable platforms, with commodity producers of news and cultural works. Michael Tiffany, CEO of advertising security firm White Ops, said The fundamental value proposition of these ad tech companies who are de-anonymizing the Internet is, Why spend big CPMs on branded sites when I can get them on no-name sites? This is not a healthy situation, but it's a chosen path, not a technologically inevitable one.

  • Adtech stands for the needs of low-reputation sellers over the needs of high-reputation sellers. High-reputation and low-reputation brands need different qualities from an ad medium and adtech has to under-serve the high-reputation ones. Again, not technologically inevitable, but a business position that high-reputation brands and their agencies don't have to accept.

  • Adtech stands for making advertisers support criminal and politically heinous activity. I'll just let Bob Hoffman explain that one. Fraudulent and brand-unsafe content is just the overspray of the high value platforms/commoditized content system, and advertisers have to accept it in order to power that system. Or do they?

People have a lot of interesting decisions to make: policy, contractual, infrastructural, and client-side. When we treat the adtech movement as simply technology, we take the risk of missing great opportunities to negotiate for the benefit of brands, publishers, and the audience.




Welcome RSS users

Sat, 01 Apr 2017 07:00:00 GMT

Welcome RSS users.

I am setting up a redirect from my old feed to the new one.

You might see a few old entries.

This new blog has better CSS for reading on small screens and has a Let's Encrypt certificate.




Welcome. How is everyone's tracking protection working?

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 07:00:00 GMT

This is a brand new blog, so I'm setting up the basics. I just realized that I got the whole thing working without a single script, image, or HTML table. (These kids today have it easy, with their media queries and CSS Grid and stuff.) One big question that I'm wondering about is: how many of the people who visit here are using some kind of protection from third-party tracking? Third-party tracking has been an unfixed vulnerability in web browsers for a long time. Check out the Unofficial Cookie FAQ from 1997. Third-party cookies are in there...and we're still dealing with the third-party tracking problem? In order to see how bad the problem is on this site, I'm going to set up a little bit of first-party data collection to measure people's vulnerability to third-party data collection. The three parts of that big question are: Does first-party JavaScript load and run? Does third-party JavaScript (from a site on popular filter lists) load and run? Can a third-party tracker see state from other sites? This will be easy to do with a little single-pixel image and the Aloodo tracking detection script. Step one: add an image and two scripts to the page footer This blog is on Metalsmith, so the right place to put these scripts will be in layouts/partials/footer.html. The lines that matter are: (image) I'm including a single-pixel image and two scripts: the Aloodo one and a new first-party script. In most tracking protection configurations, the Aloodo script will be blocked, because ad.aloodo.com appears on the commonly used tracking protection lists. Step two: write the first-party script The local script is simple: /code/check3p All it does is swap out the tracking image source three times. When the script runs, to check that this is a browser with JavaScript on. When the Aloodo tracking script runs, to check if this browser is blocking the script from loading. When the Aloodo script confirms that tracking is possible. The work is done in the setupAloodo function, which runs after the page loads. First, it sets the src for the tracking pixel to js.png, then sets up two callbacks: one to run after the Aloodo script is loaded, and switch the image to ld.png, and one to run if the script can track the user, and switch the image to td.png. Step three: check the logs Now I can use the regular server logs to compare the number of clients that load the original image, and the JavaScript-switched one, to the number that load the two tracking images. (There are two different tracking callbacks because of the details of how Aloodo has to detect Privacy Badger, among other things. Not all tracking protection works the same.) I'll run some reports on the logs and post again about the results. (If you want to see your own results in the meantime, you can take a tracking protection test.) [...]



Am I metal yet?

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 07:00:00 GMT

This is a blog. Started out with A Beginner's Guide to Crafting a Blog with Metalsmith by Parimal Satyal, but added some other stuff.

Metalsmith is pretty fun. The basic pipeline from the article seems to work pretty well, but I ran into a couple of issues. I might have solved these in ways that are completely wrong, but here's what works for me.

First, I needed to figure out how to get text from an earlier stage of the pipeline. My Metalsmith build is pretty basic:

  1. turn Markdown into HTML (plus article metadata stored with it, wrapped up in a JavaScript object)

  2. apply a template to turn the HTML version into a complete page.

That's great, but the problem seems to be with getting a copy of just the HTML from step 1 for building the index page and the RSS feed. I don't want the entire HTML page from step 2, just the inner HTML from step 1.

The solution seems to be metalsmith-untemplatize. This doesn't actually strip off the template, just lets you capture an extra copy of the HTML before templatization. This goes into the pipeline after "markdown" but before the "layouts" step.

.use(untemplatize(
    { key: 'bodycopy'
}))

I also ran into the Repeat runs with collections adds duplicates issue. Strange to see the same blog items come up twice on the index page. The link on that bug page from Spacedawwwg goes to his fork of metalsmith-collections that seems to do the right thing.

Webfonts

GitHub

There's a GitHub repo of this blog.




World's Simplest Privacy Tool

Tue, 16 Feb 2016 08:00:00 GMT

Here's the world's simplest Firefox add-on, which just turns on Tracking Protection (ordinarily buried somewhere in about:config) and sets third-party cookie policy to a sane value.

install pq from addons.mozilla.org

So far it has 15 users and one review -- five stars. It doesn't do much, or for very many people, but what it does do it does with five-star quality.

Bonus link: How do I turn on Tracking Protection? Let me count the ways.




MSIE on Fedora with virt-manager

Thu, 22 Oct 2015 07:00:00 GMT

Internet meetings are a pain in the behind. (Clearly online meeting software is controlled by the fossil fuel industry, and designed to be just flaky enough to make people drive to work instead.)

Here's a work in progress to get an MSIE VM running on Fedora. (Will edit as I check these steps a few times. Suggestions welcome.)

Download: Download virtual machines.

Untar the OVA

tar xvf IE10\ -\ Win8.ova

You should end up with a .vmdk file.

Convert the OVA to qcow2

qemu-img convert IE10\ -\ Win8-disk1.vmdk -O qcow2 msie.qcow2

Import the qcow2 file using virt-manager.

Select Browse, then Browse Local, then select the .qcow2 file.

That's it. Now looking at a virtual MS-Windows guest that I can use for those troublesome web conferences (and for testing web sites under MSIE. If you try the tracking test, it should take you to a protection page that prompts you to turn on the EasyPrivacy Tracking Protection List. That's a quick and easy way to speed up your web browsing experience on MSIE.)




Temporary directory for a shell script

Fri, 22 Aug 2014 07:00:00 GMT

Set up a temporary directory to use in a Bash script, and clean it up when the script finishes:

TMPDIR=$(mktemp -d)
trap "rm -rf $TMPDIR" EXIT



Automatically run make when a file changes

Thu, 08 Aug 2013 07:00:00 GMT

Really simple: do a makewatch [target] to re-run make with the supplied [target] when any files relevant to that target change.

makewatch script

Andrew Cowie has written something similar. The main thing that this one does differently is to ask make which files matter to it, instead of doing an inotifywatch on the whole directory. Comments and suggestions welcome.




Printer for Linux

Wed, 02 Nov 2011 07:00:00 GMT

Picking a printer for Linux?

The process is going to be a little different from what you might be used to with another OS. If you shop carefully (and reading blogs is a good first step) then the drivers you will need are already available through your Linux distribution's printer setup tool.

HP has done a good job with enabling this. The company has already released the necessary printer software as open source, and your Linux distribution has already installed it. So, go to printers fully supported with the HPLIP software, pick a printer you like, and you're done.

If you want a recommendation from me, the HP LaserJet 3055, a black and white all-in-one device, has worked fine for me with various Linux setups for years. It's also a scanner/copier/fax machine, and you get the extra functionality for not much more than the price of a regular printer. It also comes with a good-sized toner cartridge, so your cost per page is probably going to be pretty reasonable.

Other printer brands have given me more grief, but fortunately the HP LaserJets are widely available and don't jam much.

It's important not to show a smug expression on your face while printing if users of non-Linux OSs are still dealing with driver CDs or vendor downloads.




Landmarks in instructions

Sun, 05 Sep 2010 07:00:00 GMT

When you give travel directions, you include landmarks, and "gone too far" points. Turn left after you cross the bridge. Then look for my street and make a right. If you go past the water tower you've gone too far.

System administration instructions are much easier to follow if they include those kind of check-ins there, too. For example, if you explain how to set up server software you can put in quick "landmark" tests, such as, "at this point, you can run nmap and see the port in the results." You can also include "gone too far" information by pointing out problems you can troubleshoot on the way.

A full-scale troubleshooting guide is a good idea, but quick warning signs as you go along are helpful. Much better than finding yourself lost at the end of a long set of setup instructions.




dotted quad to decimal in bash

Wed, 24 Dec 2008 08:00:00 GMT

GNU seq doesn't accept dotted quads for ranges, but fortunately most of the commands that accept an IP address will also take it in the form of a regular decimal. (Spammers used to use this to hide their naughty domains from scanners that only looked for the dotted quad while the browser would happily go to http://3232235520/barely-legal-mortgage.html or something.)

So here's an ugly-ass shell function to convert an IP address to a decimal. If you have a better one, please let me know and I'll update this page. (Yes, I know this would be one line in Perl.)

dq2int()
{
    if [ $(echo $1 | grep -q '\.') ]; then
        dq2int $(echo $1 | tr '.' ' ')
    elif [ $# -eq 1 ]; then
        echo $1
    else
        total=$1; next=$2; shift 2
        dq2int $(($total*2**8+$next)) $@
    fi
}

Seth Schoen has two shorter versions:

dq2int(){
a=0
for b in $(echo $1 | tr . ' '); do
    a=$((256*$a+$b))
done
echo $a
}

dq2int(){
a=0
for b in ${1//./ }; do
    a=$((256*$a+$b))
done
echo $a
}

And if you want to go the other way, Seth points out that you can set the "obase" variable for bc. Here's an int2dq function based on that idea.

int2dq()
{
    { echo obase=256; echo $1; } | \
        bc | tr ' ' . | cut -c2-
}

To quote the GNU bc manual, "For bases greater than 16, bc uses a multi-character digit method of printing the numbers where each higher base digit is printed as a base 10 number."

Trick.




Transaction mail or junk mail? Check the postage.

Sun, 09 Apr 2006 07:00:00 GMT

It says "Personal and Confidential" or "IMPORTANT CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING YOUR OVERPAYMENT" on the envelope—can you really discard it without opening it? You sure can. Some junk mailers disguise their mail pieces as important correspondence from companies you actually do business with, and the USPS helped them out a lot by renaming "Bulk Mail" to "Standard Mail". But you can look at the postage to discard "stealth" junk mail without opening it.

Postal regulations require that any bills or mail containing specific information about your business relationship with the company must be mailed First Class.

So, if "Standard Mail" or "STD" appears in the upper right corner, it's not a bill, it's not your new credit card, and it's not a check. It's just sneaky junk mail.




Force ssh not to use ssh-agent

Sun, 17 Apr 2005 07:00:00 GMT

If you make a new ssh key and try to use it with ssh -i while running ssh-agent, ssh tries the agent first. You could end up using a key provided by the agent instead of the one you specify. You can fix this without killing the agent. Use:

env -u SSH_AUTH_SOCK ssh -i newkey host