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Preview: Don Marti

Don Marti

personal blog feed

Last Build Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2018 18:09:52 GMT


A good question, from Twitter

Sun, 31 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

Good question on Twitter, but one that might take more than, what is it now, 280 characters? to answer.

ICYMI, great performance optimization: Firefox 57 delays requests to tracking domains

Boring: you're operating a 4500-pound death machine. Exciting: three Slack notifications and a new AR game! Yes, Smartphone Use Is Probably Behind the Spike in Driving Deaths. So Why Isn’t More Being Done to Curb It?

I love "nopoly controls entire industry so there is no point in it any more" stories: The Digital Advertising Duopoly Good news on advertising. The Millennials are burned out on advertising—most of what they're exposed to now is just another variant of "creepy annoying shit on the Internet"—but the generation after the Millennials are going to have hella mega opportunities building the next Creative Revolution.

Another must-read for the diversity and inclusion department. 2017 Was the Year I Learned About My White Privilege by Max Boot.

Predictions for 2018

Thu, 28 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

Bitcoin to the moooon: The futures market is starting up, so here comes a bunch more day trader action. More important, think about all the bucket shops (I even saw an "invest in Bitcoin without owning Bitcoin" ad on public transit in London), legit financial firms, Libertarian true believers, and coins lost forever because of human error. Central bankers had better keep an eye on Bitcoin, though. Last recession we saw that printing money doesn't work as well as it used to, because it ends up in the hands of rich people who, instead of priming economic pumps with it, just drive up the prices of assets. I would predict "Entire Round of Quantitative Easing Gets Invested in Bitcoin Without Creating a Single New Job" but I'm saving that one for 2019. Central banks will need to innovate. Federal Reserve car crushers? Relieve medical deby by letting the UK operate NHS clinics at their consulates in the USA, and we trade them US green cards for visas that allow US citizens to get treated there? And—this is a brilliant quality of Bitcoin that I recognized too late—there is no bad news that could credibly hurt the value of a purely speculative asset. The lesson for regular people here is not so much what to do with Bitcoin, but remember to keep putting some well-considered time into actions that you predict have unlikely but large and favorable outcomes. Must remember to do more of this. High-profile Bitcoin kidnapping in the USA ends in tragedy: Kidnappers underestimate the amount of Bitcoin actually available to change hands, ask for more than the victim's family (or fans? a crowdsourced kidnapping of a celebrity is now a possibility) can raise in time. Huge news but not big enough to slow down something that the finance scene has already committed to. Tech industry reputation problems hit open source. California Internet douchebags talk like a positive social movement but act like East Coast vampire squid—and people are finally not so much letting them define the terms of the conversation. The real Internet economy is moving to a three-class system: plutocrats, well-paid brogrammers with Aeron chairs, free snacks and good health insurance, and everyone else in the algorithmically-managed precariat. So far, people are more concerned about the big social and surveillance marketing companies, but open source has some of the same issues. Just as it was widely considered silly for people to call Facebook users "the Facebook community" in 2017, some of the "community" talk about open source will be questioned in 2018. Who's working for who, and who's vulnerable to the risks of doing work that someone else extracts the value of? College athletes are ahead of the open source scene on this one. Adfraud becomes a significant problem for end users: Powerful botnets in data centers drove the pivot to video. Now that video adfraud is well-known, more of the fraud hackers will move to attribution fraud. This ties in to adtech consolidation, too. Google is better at beating simple to midrange fraud than the rest of the Lumascape, so the steady progress towards a two-logo Lumascape means fewer opportunities for bots in data centers. Attribution fraud is nastier than servers-talking-to-servers fraud, since it usually depends on having fraudulent and legit client software on the same system—legit to be used for a human purchase, fraudulent to "serve the ad" that takes credit for it. Unlike botnets that can run in data centers, attribution fraud comes home with you. Yeech. Browsers and privacy tools will need to level up from blocking relatively simple Lumascape trackers to blocking cleverer, more aggressive attribution fraud scripts. Wannabe fascists keep control of the US Congress, because your Marketing budget: "Dark" social campaigns (both ads and fake "organic" activity) are still a thing. In the USA, voter suppression and gerrymandering have been cleverly enough done that social manipulat[...]

Salary puzzle

Sun, 24 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

Short puzzle relevant to some diversity and inclusion threads that encourage people to share salary info. (I should tag this as "citation needed" because I don't remember where I heard it.)

Alice, Bob, Carlos, and Dave all want to know the average salary of the four, but none wants to reveal their individual salary. How can the four of them work together to determine the average? Answer below.















Alice generates a random number, adds it to her salary, and gives the sum to Bob.

Bob adds his salary and gives the sum to Carlos.

Carlos adds his salary and gives the sum to Dave.

Dave adds his salary and gives the sum to Alice.

Alice subtracts her original random number, divides by the number of participants, and announces the average. No participant had to share their real salary, but everyone now knows if they are paid above or below the average for the group.

What we have, what we need

Sat, 23 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

Stuff the Internet needs: home fiber connections, symmetrical, flat rate, on neutral terms.

Stuff the Internet is going nuts over: cryptocurrencies.

Big problem with building fiber to the home: capital.

Big problem with cryptocurrencies: stability.

Two problems, one solution? Hard to make any kind of currency useful without something stable, with evidence-based value, to tie its value to. Fiat currencies are tied to something of value? Yes, people have to pay taxes in them. Hard to raise capital for "dumb pipe" Internet service because it's just worth about the same thing, month after month. So what if we could combine the hotness and capital-attractiveness of cryptocurrencies with the stability and actual usefulness of fiber?

quick question on tracking protection

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

One quick question for anyone who still isn't convinced that tracking protection needs to be a high priority for web browsers in 2018. Web tracking isn't just about items from your online shopping cart following you to other sites. Users who are vulnerable to abusive practices for health or other reasons have tracking protection needs too.


Who has access to the data from each of the 24 third-party trackers that appear on the American Cancer Society's Find Cancer Treatment and Support page, and for what purposes can they use the data?

Forbidden words

Sun, 17 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

You know how the US government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now forbidden from using certain words?


(source: Washington Post)

Well, in order to help slow down the spread of political speech enforcement that is apparently stopping all of us cool innovator type people from saying the Things We Can't Say, here's a Git hook to make sure that every time you blog, you include at least one of the forbidden words.

If you blog without including one of the forbidden words, you're obviously internalizing censorship and need more freedom, which you can maybe get by getting out of California for a while. After all, a lot of people here seem to think that "innovation" is building more creepy surveillance as long as you call it "growth hacking" or writing apps to get members of the precariat to do the stuff that your Mom used to do for you.

You only have to include one forbidden word every time you commit a blog entry, not in every file. You only need forbidden words in blog entries, not in scripts or templates. You can always get around the forbidden word check with the --no-verify command-line option.

Suggestions and pull requests welcome. script on GitHub

Are bug futures just high-tech piecework?

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT

Are bug futures just high-tech piecework, or worse, some kind of "gig economy" racket? Just to catch up, bug futures, an experimental kind of agreement being developed by the Bugmark project, are futures contracts based on the status of bugs in a bug tracker. For developers: vist Bugmark to find an open issue that matches your skills and interests. Buy a futures contract connected to that issue that will pay you when the issue is fixed. Work on the issue, in the open—then decide if you want to hold your contract until maturity, or sell it at a profit. Report an issue and pay to reward others to fix it For users: Create a new issue on the project bug tracker, or select an existing one. Buy a futures contract on that issue that will cost you a known amount when the issue is fixed, or pay you to compensate you if the issue goes unfixed. Reduce your exposure to software risks by directly signaling the project participants about what issues are important to you. Invest in futures on an open source market Bug futures also open up the possibility of incentivizing other kinds of work, such as clarifying and translating bug reports, triaging bugs, writing failing tests, or doing code reviews—and especially arbitrage of bugs from project to project. Bug futures are different from open source bounty systems, what have been repeatedly tried but have so far failed to take off. The big problem with conventional open source bounty systems is that, as far as I can tell, they fail to incentivize cooperative work, and in a lot of situations might incentivize un-cooperative behavior. If I find a bug in a web application, and offer a bounty to fix it, the fix might require JavaScript and CSS work. A developer who fixes the JavaScript and gets stuck on the CSS might choose not to share partial work in order to contend for the entire bounty. Likewise, the developer who fixes the CSS part of the bug might get stuck on the JavaScript. Because of how bounties are structured, if the two wanted to split the bounty they would need to find, trust, and coordinate with each other. Meanwhile, if the bug was the subject of a futures contract, the JavaScript developer could write up a good commit message explaining how their partial work made progress toward a fix, and offer to sell their side of the contract. A CSS developer could take on the rest of the work by buying out that position. Futures trading and risk shifts But will bug futures tend to shift the risks of software development away from the "owners" of software (the owners don't have to be copyright holders, they could be those who benefit from network effects) and toward the workers who develop, maintain, and support it? I don't know, but I think that the difference between bug trackers and piecework is where you put the brains of the operation. In piecework and the gig economy, the matching of workers to tasks is done by management, either manually or in software. Workers can set the rate at which they work in conventional piecework, or accept and reject tasks offered to them in the gig economy, but only management can have a view of all available tasks. Bug futures operate within a commons-based peer production environment, though. In an ideal peer production scene, all participants can see all available tasks, and select the most rewarding tasks. Somewhere in the economics literature there is probably a model of task selection in open source development, and if I knew where to find it I could put an impressive LaTeX equation right around here. Of course, open source still has all kinds of barriers that make matching of workers to tasks less than ideal, but it's a good goal to keep in mind. If you do bug futures right, they interfere as little as possible with the peer production advantage—that it enables workers to match themselves to tasks. And t[...]