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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | USA

Christian Science Monitor | USA



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Denver Post hopes for help from wealthy locals to stay afloat

The Denver Post recently published an editorial criticizing its owner, Digital First Media, and asking to be purchased by local investors. The piece kickstarted a chorus of other voices from publications around the country who have successfully found private backers. 

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Memorial addresses history of lynching in the US

A new memorial for thousands of victims of lynching built by the Equal Justice Initiative is set to open in Montgomery, Ala. The memorial aims to commemorate the lives of victims and encourage discussion regarding the history of lynching in the United States.

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As its beaches recede, Florida shores up private ownership

A new law passed in March sets limits on public access to private beaches. Some conservatives say private beaches should be sacrosanct, pitting them against advocates for customary-use access along Florida's coastline. 

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UW-Madison announces plan to address history of racism

The plan comes out of a working group formed in response to the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., and aims to acknowledge the university's history and find ways to move forward and increase inclusivity of underrepresented groups.

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Former NFL player Chris Borland helps athletes and veterans adjust to retirement

The former 49er walked away from a promising football career after one year because of concerns over head injuries. Now he helps military veterans and other football players deal with the challenges they share reintegrating into society. 

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Churches struggle with their #MeToo moment

The #MeToo movement has forced Hollywood, Washington, and Wall Street to grapple honestly with patterns of sexual harassment and abuse. Many churches are still struggling to embrace such introspection and the disruption it brings.  

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Diversity on display at tech conference minus 'tech bros'

An alternative cybersecurity conference held this week in San Francisco was notable for its representation of women and minorities who are often absent at such events. Only one in ten cybersecurity workers are women. 

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On 19th anniversary, Columbine asks other schools to remember, not politicize

As students around the nation plan walkouts, Columbine will continue its tradition of commemorating the anniversary of the shooting with a day of service. 

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#MeToo's next challenge: domestic gun violence

The #MeToo movement has empowered thousands of women to tell their stories of harassment and abuse throughout America's workplaces. But advocates say women abused at home often face a more dangerous path.

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Promise of outdoor activities pulls new residents to rural areas

Rural communities with large recreation industries have seen a dramatic rise in population. The trend is part of what drove the overall slight growth of the rural population in the US from 2016 to 2017, even though many rural counties have been shrinking for years. 

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Senate to allow infants into the chamber

The tradition-bound institution voted to allow newborns of senators into the chamber. Though the rules change passed without issue, some senators voiced private concerns about allowing infants inside the chamber.

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Some male sexual assault victims feel left out by #MeToo

In response to the female-dominated #MeToo movement, male sexual assault victims have started tweeting with a #MenToo hashtag. Because of social stigma and feelings of shame, many men don't speak up about their abuse, say experts.

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Teachers engage in online activism in fight for funding

Tired of low wages and a lack of state funding, teachers began sharing their stories online. Their Facebook groups have drawn tens of thousands of members and played a key role in helping to organize demonstrations.

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Even at Starbucks? A conversation grows about hidden racial bias.

Two black men were waiting for a friend, but not making a purchase, in one of the most overtly progressive corporations in the nation. Their arrest, shared widely on social media, puts fresh focus on the challenge of latent racism.

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Why Bob Corker is bucking GOP tribalism, in a Tennessee tradition

At a Monitor breakfast, Tennessee’s retiring US senator sang the praises of the Democrat who hopes to succeed him, former Gov. Phil Bredesen. Their bipartisan collaborations go way back.

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Pompeo for State: Meeting Kim may help sell him as a diplomatic repairman

Pompeo's confirmation as secretary of State is uncertain, but Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, appearing at a Monitor Breakfast, called reports Pompeo met secretly with Kim Jong-un 'a plus.'

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'A real rock:' The one-of-a-kind warmth and steel of Barbara Bush

Mrs. Bush, who died yesterday, was one of the most popular first ladies in US history. She straddled a time when wives of presidents were evolving from a helpmeet model of the past to a more engaged, issue-oriented spouse.

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Laws limiting LGBT rights stall in US legislatures

Only two of the 120 laws being tracked by LGBT activists this year remain under serious consideration, in part due to moderate GOP lawmakers and business leaders' fears of economic backlash. 

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Former first lady Barbara Bush remembered for wit, supportiveness

Barbara Bush, the former first lady and mother of a president, brought an honest, grandmotherly style to Washington as first lady. She described her time in the White House as 'the best job in America.'

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On-campus food pantries help struggling students succeed in school

Across the United States, a growing number of colleges and universities are establishing free food pantries to help students who regularly experience food insecurity make ends meet. 

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Starbucks to close 8,000 US stores for several hours for racial bias training

In response to a racially charged incident inside a Philadelphia Starbucks, the coffee giant will temporarily close all United States company-owned stores on May 29 to conduct training for nearly 175,000 workers. 

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Maple syrup inc.: Vermont’s maple syrup tradition goes high tech, high finance

In the past decade, the Vermont maple syrup industry has boomed, bringing outside investors, private equity firms, and a host of new challenges and opportunities to the Green Mountain State.

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In Puerto Rico, the public pushes for more say in school reform

The government recently announced the closure of 283 schools and a new pilot plan for charter schools and vouchers. Meanwhile, education nonprofits, parent-teacher associations, and teachers’ union members are seeking solutions of their own.

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Nepalese woman prepares for 9th Everest summit

As a young girl, Lhakpa Sherpa would bring gear to Everest base camps, despite women being discouraged from climbing. 'I wanted to show that a woman can do men's jobs.... I climb for all women,' she says. 

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Some California communities say no to 'sanctuary state'

After the Justice Department sued California over its so-called 'sanctuary state' laws that seek to protect undocumented immigrants, some Republican pockets in the otherwise Democratic state are siding with the federal government.

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Mudslide survivors reconnected with treasured personal belongings months later

A Facebook page is helping to connect hundreds of lost items with their owners months after the disastrous Montecito mudslides. Finding personal items can be an important part of recovery in the wake of a traumatic event, say psychology experts.

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Legal question swirls around Trump: What constitutes obstruction of justice?

In a new book, former FBI Director James Comey blasts President Trump over obsession with personal loyalty and possible obstruction of justice. But some scholars say presidents have wide authority over things like investigations and firing officials.

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Forget prom king – they're running for governor

In Kansas, a lack of a minimum age requirement for gubernatorial candidates has led at least six teenagers to throw their hats in the ring – another example of the surging youth movement in politics today.

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Mueller probe: As Trump mulls retaliation, where do Republicans draw the line?

Some GOP strategists aren’t so sure that a Trump move against Mueller's supervisor, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, would spark a massive uproar among most Republicans on Capitol Hill.

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Tulsa experiment: Can investing in children early reverse poverty cycle?

Billionaire George Kaiser’s foundation aims to match tens of thousands of low-income families with the social services they need, from nursing and birth control to childcare and early education. The Monitor is following three families, and others like them, over the next year to see the challenges and opportunities that they encounter.

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With walkouts over, Oklahoma teachers run for office

At least a dozen teachers from Oklahoma have filed to run for office in the November midterm elections. Many of these activists are first-time candidates who feel their representatives failed to secure better funding for public schools and higher wages.

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National testing: What does it mean for a student to be 'proficient'?

The 2017 NAEP scores were released this week, and with them came more analysis about the state of US education. Some critics suggest that more needs to be done to dispel the idea that 'proficient' means 'on grade level'.

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Gun control advocates to send voter registration birthday packages to teens

A group of organizations including the Giffords Law Center is planning on distributing voter registration forms to teens as they turn 18. The effort seeks to motivate a demographic that has traditionally been less politically active to participate in November's elections. 

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California agrees to send troops to Mexican border, but limits their scope

California Gov. Jerry Brown announced that he would cooperate with President Trump's call for National Guard fortifications along the US-Mexico border, but refused to authorize officers to assist in immigration enforcement. 

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Anchorage takes historic step toward challenging bathroom bills

The city of Anchorage is set to be the first US voting jurisdiction to defeat a referendum restricting access to public bathrooms based on gender assigned at birth. With only several hundred votes left to be counted, opponents of the measure have claimed victory. 

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Speaker Ryan to retire: What that says about the GOP, midterms

A young speaker who is third in line to the presidency is willingly leaving the nexus of power when his party controls the White House, the Senate, and the House. The timing is notable for what it signals about a divided GOP and the approaching midterm elections.

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Pence replacing Trump at Peru summit. But name that matters most is Monroe.

The Monroe Doctrine's revival, even if only as a rhetorical tool, is likely to mean a wary reception for Pence at the Summit of the Americas, analysts say. And any attempt by the US to browbeat its neighbors over economic ties to China is certain to be received with a collective 'Too late!'

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Need help winning an argument? Ask a Kansas high-schooler.

At a time when reasoned discussion seems to be vanishing from US politics, the speech and debate scene is brimming with articulate teenagers. Among the top producers is Kansas.

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Data showing 'Trump slump' in tourism may not be accurate

Government statistics indicating a drop in international arrivals to the US in 2017 may be wrong, the US Commerce Department says. While officials rework the data, some travel experts remain concerned that foreign tourists are staying away to avoid President Trump.

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Most US legislatures keep no public sexual harassment records

The majority of state legislatures have no publicly available records of any sexual misconduct claims over the past decade. Lawmakers say a failure to confront the problem causes victims to hesitate from coming forward.

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Behind shock of Cohen raid, signs of a meticulous process

In many ways, Monday's seizure by federal law enforcement of piles of documents from Michael Cohen seems an extraordinary event, an inflection point for the legal problems gradually creeping up on current and former Trump campaign and administration officials.

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Federal court finds pay differences based on prior salaries discriminatory

By using prior salaries to determine future pay, employers perpetuate pay differences between women and men, a federal appeals court ruled. The plaintiff in the case, Aileen Rizo, said the case is 'about all women and the chance that we have for pay equity.'

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Utah's 'free-range' parenting law sparks interest across the country

Supporters say 'free-range' parenting, giving kids the independence to do more on their own, like walking to school or exploring a playground, makes kids happier, healthier, and more resilient. 

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In California, debate brews over criminal justice reform

In November, two conflicting law enforcement initiatives could appear together on the California ballot. Many groups in the state continue to push for more lenient punishments, but an increasingly visible coalition is calling for a return to strict anti-crime policies. 

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States adopt 'reinsurance pools' to keep premiums low

With health insurance premiums rising, patients around the country are facing fewer coverage options. Now, states are increasingly turning to so-called 'reinsurance pools' to support insurers and reduce individual costs.

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In Syria, changing tack to match new realities

A US military response could come as early as Monday evening after this weekend's chemical attack on civilians in Syria. That represents something of a turnaround: Last week, President Trump was publicly insisting it was time for US forces in Syria to come home.

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Transgender athletes compete at Boston, other marathons

With a growing number of transgender athletes at the amateur level looking to compete openly, marathon organizers say transgender athletes are welcome to register and race as the gender they identify as. 

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Members of school gun teams say learned skills include patience and discipline

Teens and young adults who participate in 5,000 gun clubs across the United States say shooting teaches essential life skills, including responsibility, leadership, and goal setting.

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Fragile, early American Congregational church records will soon be online

Researchers will be locating, securing, and digitizing the Congregational Church's records from 1630 to 1800 and making available them online for free with a grant from the NEH. The records provide a rare look into the lives and thoughts of Colonial New Englanders.

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Is Trump draining the swamp – or is the water rising?

So far, the president's efforts to 'drain the swamp' seem more focused on deregulation and shrinking the federal workforce than making sure his team adheres to the norms and rules of ethical behavior for government officials.

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