Subscribe: National Geographic Photo of the Day
http://feeds.feedburner.com/ngpod
Preview: National Geographic Photo of the Day

National Geographic Photo of the Day



Daily images from the National Geographic magazine archives.



Updated: 2007-01-07T05:11:04+00:00

 




2007-01-07T02:11:04-08:00

(image)

Photograph by

(image)

Photograph by




Greenwich, England

2007-01-06T02:06:51-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Bruce Dale "One hop bridges east and west at Greenwich, England, where a brass strip marks zero longitude. First used by sailors to fix their position, Greenwich mean time was adopted by railroads and, after 1884, worldwide as the standard for time of day. Time is now set not by earth's rotation, but by satellite and atomic clock."(Text and photograph from "The Enigma of Time," March 1990, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Bruce Dale "One hop bridges east and west at Greenwich, England, where a brass strip marks zero longitude. First used by sailors to fix their position, Greenwich mean time was adopted by railroads and, after 1884, worldwide as the standard for time of day. Time is now set not by earth's rotation, but by satellite and atomic clock."(Text and photograph from "The Enigma of Time," March 1990, National Geographic magazine)




Greenwich, England

2007-01-05T13:27:32-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Bruce Dale "One hop bridges east and west at Greenwich, England, where a brass strip marks zero longitude. First used by sailors to fix their position, Greenwich mean time was adopted by railroads and, after 1884, worldwide as the standard for time of day. Time is now set not by earth's rotation, but by satellite and atomic clock."(Text and photograph from "The Enigma of Time," March 1990, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Bruce Dale "One hop bridges east and west at Greenwich, England, where a brass strip marks zero longitude. First used by sailors to fix their position, Greenwich mean time was adopted by railroads and, after 1884, worldwide as the standard for time of day. Time is now set not by earth's rotation, but by satellite and atomic clock."(Text and photograph from "The Enigma of Time," March 1990, National Geographic magazine)




North Florida Springs

2007-01-04T02:14:03-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Wes Skiles A flexible and graceful swimmer, the West Indian manatee migrates annually to Florida's coastal waters. This balmy winter retreat unfortunately holds a palpable danger for these gentle creatures. In 2005, collisions with watercraft and other human-related accidents accounted for nearly 25 percent of all manatee deaths in Florida according to the state's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Boating speed limits and the creation of sanctuaries are just some of the protections put into place by state and federal lawmakers to help save the endangered manatee.(Photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Unlocking the Labyrinth of North Florida Springs," March 1999, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Wes Skiles A flexible and graceful swimmer, the West Indian manatee migrates annually to Florida's coastal waters. This balmy winter retreat unfortunately holds a palpable danger for these gentle creatures. In 2005, collisions with watercraft and other human-related accidents accounted for nearly 25 percent of all manatee deaths in Florida according to the state's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Boating speed limits and the creation of sanctuaries are just some of the protections put into place by state and federal lawmakers to help save the endangered manatee.(Photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Unlocking the Labyrinth of North Florida Springs," March 1999, National Geographic magazine)




Minab, Iran

2007-01-03T02:10:25-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Alexandra Avakian A Baluchi woman wears a traditional red mask to conceal her features from public view. Iranian women are, in fact, among the most educated and accomplished in the Muslim world. Before the 1979 revolution 35 percent of women were literate; now the rate stands at 74 percent. In 1999, one in three Iranian physicians was a woman.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Iran: Testing the Waters of Reform," July 1999, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Alexandra Avakian A Baluchi woman wears a traditional red mask to conceal her features from public view. Iranian women are, in fact, among the most educated and accomplished in the Muslim world. Before the 1979 revolution 35 percent of women were literate; now the rate stands at 74 percent. In 1999, one in three Iranian physicians was a woman.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Iran: Testing the Waters of Reform," July 1999, National Geographic magazine)




North Rustico, Prince Edward Island, Canada

2007-01-02T02:40:50-08:00

(image)

Photograph by George F. Mobley A partial solar eclipse is visible through the clouds that cover North Rustico beach on Prince Edward Island, Canada's smallest province. Sheltered from the sometimes harsh North Atlantic storms, Prince Edward Island stretches 140 miles (225 kilometers) into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and enjoys a warm climate and sandy soil—good for both farming and tourism.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in the National Geographic book Traveling the Trans-Canada From Newfoundland to British Columbia, 1987)

(image)

Photograph by George F. Mobley A partial solar eclipse is visible through the clouds that cover North Rustico beach on Prince Edward Island, Canada's smallest province. Sheltered from the sometimes harsh North Atlantic storms, Prince Edward Island stretches 140 miles (225 kilometers) into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and enjoys a warm climate and sandy soil—good for both farming and tourism.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in the National Geographic book Traveling the Trans-Canada From Newfoundland to British Columbia, 1987)




South Africa

2007-01-01T02:14:32-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Chris Johns "Homo sapiens flood the beach on New Year's Day at Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park, where, thanks to the Natal Parks Board's good neighbor policy, admission is free for local residents. South Africa's torrid zone, northern KwaZulu-Natal teems with tropical life. Along its normally empty beaches sea turtles are making a comeback."(Text and photograph from "A Place for Parks in the New South Africa," July 1996, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Chris Johns "Homo sapiens flood the beach on New Year's Day at Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park, where, thanks to the Natal Parks Board's good neighbor policy, admission is free for local residents. South Africa's torrid zone, northern KwaZulu-Natal teems with tropical life. Along its normally empty beaches sea turtles are making a comeback."(Text and photograph from "A Place for Parks in the New South Africa," July 1996, National Geographic magazine)




New York, New York

2006-12-31T02:36:11-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Jodi Cobb In the symbolic heart of New York City, the remnants of a past New Year�s Eve celebration decorate the street. Celebrated in Times Square since 1904, New Year�s Eve is marked first with exploding fireworks, then with the famous �dropping of the ball� starting 10 seconds before midnight. Positioned at the top of a flag pole at One Times Square, the original ball was 700 pounds (318 kilograms) of iron, wood, and 100 25-watt light bulbs. After several reincarnations, today the ball is a 6-foot (2-meter) geodesic sphere, weighing 1,070 pounds (485 kilograms), covered with 504 Waterford crystal triangles, and illuminated by 432 light bulbs and 96 high intensity strobes.(Photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Broadway: Street of Dreams," September 1990, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Jodi Cobb In the symbolic heart of New York City, the remnants of a past New Year�s Eve celebration decorate the street. Celebrated in Times Square since 1904, New Year�s Eve is marked first with exploding fireworks, then with the famous �dropping of the ball� starting 10 seconds before midnight. Positioned at the top of a flag pole at One Times Square, the original ball was 700 pounds (318 kilograms) of iron, wood, and 100 25-watt light bulbs. After several reincarnations, today the ball is a 6-foot (2-meter) geodesic sphere, weighing 1,070 pounds (485 kilograms), covered with 504 Waterford crystal triangles, and illuminated by 432 light bulbs and 96 high intensity strobes.(Photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Broadway: Street of Dreams," September 1990, National Geographic magazine)




Loango National Park, Gabon

2006-12-30T02:15:53-08:00

(image)

Photograph by Michael Nichols Sunlight radiates through the clouds, illuminating the pristine beaches of Loango National Park. The wide, sandy beaches are a haven for many species of wildlife, including the enormous leatherback turtles, who lay their eggs by moonlight every three years between October and March. (Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Gabon's Loango National Park: In the Land of the Surfing Hippos," August 2004, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by Michael Nichols Sunlight radiates through the clouds, illuminating the pristine beaches of Loango National Park. The wide, sandy beaches are a haven for many species of wildlife, including the enormous leatherback turtles, who lay their eggs by moonlight every three years between October and March. (Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for, but not published in, "Gabon's Loango National Park: In the Land of the Surfing Hippos," August 2004, National Geographic magazine)




Old Havana, Cuba

2006-12-29T02:00:40-08:00

(image)

Photograph by David Alan Harvey A dog wanders down a sidewalk near Castillo de la Real Fuerza in Old Havana. Named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982, long before neglected walls and roofs started crashing down, Havana's historic quarter is starting to show the benefits of recent renovations which radiate along its mostly cobbled streets.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for "Old Havana," June 1999, National Geographic magazine)

(image)

Photograph by David Alan Harvey A dog wanders down a sidewalk near Castillo de la Real Fuerza in Old Havana. Named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982, long before neglected walls and roofs started crashing down, Havana's historic quarter is starting to show the benefits of recent renovations which radiate along its mostly cobbled streets.(Text adapted from and photograph shot on assignment for "Old Havana," June 1999, National Geographic magazine)