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Preview: About.com Grammar & Composition: What's Hot Now

About.com Grammar & Composition: What's Hot Now



These articles that had the largest increase in popularity over the last week



 



Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others, by...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

The following essay is an excerpt from Chapter Three of Du Bois's revolutionary collection of essays,



A Classic Essay on Observation and Analysis:...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Scudder recalls his first encounter with Professor Agassiz, who subjected his research students to a rigorous exercise in observation and analysis.






Dave Barry's Underpants Rule: End-Focus

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

End-focus is the principle that the most important information in a clause or sentence is placed at the end.



What Are Conduit Metaphors?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A conduit metaphor is a type of conceptual metaphor (or figurative comparison) commonly used in English to talk about the process of communication.



What Are Pro-Forms in English Grammar?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A pro-form is a word or phrase that can take the place of another word or word group in a sentence.



symbolic action

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A term used by 20th-century rhetorician Kenneth Burke to refer in general to systems of communication that rely on symbols.



What Is the Figure of Speech Known as...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In rhetoric, antimetabole is a verbal pattern in which the second half of an expression is balanced against the first but with the words reversed.



Ambrose Bierce's Classic Satirical Essay on...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

class="no-js" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article" > (also called The Cynic's Word Book ),



101 Terms to Know Before Taking the AP English...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

On these two pages you'll find brief definitions of 101 grammatical, literary, and rhetorical terms that have appeared on the multiple-choice and essay portions of the AP English Language and Composition exam. For examples and more detailed explanations of the terms, follow the links to the expanded entries in our Glossary of Grammatical and Rhetorical Terms.



Read Daniel Defoe's Essay 'The Education of...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In an essay that first appeared in 1719, the author of Robinson Crusoe argues that women should be allowed full and ready access to education.



Robert Louis Stevenson's Classic Essay on...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

class="no-js" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article" > itemprop="description" >In this affectionate



Why Are 'Devilish,' 'Observe,' and 'Plagiarist'...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Kangaroo word is a playful term for a word that carries within it a synonym of itself.



Spin: Language That Has Designs on Us

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Spin is a contemporary term for a form of propaganda that relies on deceptive methods of persuasion.



Practice in Paragraphing: Identifying Paragraph...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

This exercise will give you practice in paragraphing--organizing sentences into unified paragraphs in a coherent essay.



What Is Sarcasm?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Sarcasm is a mocking, often ironic or satirical remark, usually intended to wound as well as amuse.



Rhetorical Repetition: Epanalepsis

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Epanalepsis is (a) a rhetorical term for the regular repetition of a word, and (b) repetition at the end of a clause of the word with which it began.



Mood in Essays and Other Literary Forms

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In essays and other literary works, mood is the dominant impression or emotional atmosphere evoked by the text.



The Most Famous Satirical Essay in English:...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

class="no-js" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article" > itemprop="description" >Best known for



What Are Rhetorical Schemes?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Scheme is a term in classical rhetoric for any one of the figures of speech: a deviation from conventional word order.



What Is Neurolinguistics?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Neurolinguistics is the interdisciplinary study of language processing in the brain.



"what"-clause

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A type of noun clause (or a free relative clause) that begins with the word what.



Examples of Neologisms in English

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A neologism is a newly coined word, expression, or usage.



Definition and Examples of Active and Passive...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In grammar, voice is the quality of a verb that indicates whether its subject acts or is acted upon.



Perspectives on Prose Style

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Style is narrowly interpreted as those figures that ornament discourse; broadly, as representing a manifestation of the person speaking or writing.



Writing Effective Leads (Ledes): Tips, Types,...

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

A lead (also spelled lede) is the opening sentences of a brief composition, or the first paragraph or two of a longer article or essay.



What Is Associative Meaning?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Associative meaning refers to the qualities or characteristics beyond denotative meaning that people commonly think of in relation to a word or phrase.



Troubled Definitions of 'Native Speaker'

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In linguistics, a native speaker is a person who speaks and writes using a native language or mother tongue.



What Is Ethos in Rhetoric?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

In rhetoric, ethos is the persuasive appeal based on the character or projected character of the speaker or narrator.



What Is a Word Salad in Speech or Writing?

2017-01-24T11:04:24Z

Word salad is the practice of stringing together words that have no apparent connection to one another—a form of incomprehensible speech or writing.