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Preview: NOAA, Ocean Explorer: AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition

NOAA, Ocean Explorer: AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition



AUVfest 2008 will be held in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay from May 12 through May 23. The event is a demonstration of 13 AUV systems originally developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for mine hunting. As part of a collaborative effort to exa



 



Mission Photo and Video Gallery
View photos and videos taken during the AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition, including high-resolution photos, video and slideshows.



Mission Summary
NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research Maritime Archaeology Program Officer Frank Cantelas provides a mission summary, highlighting why AUVfest 2008 was a great success. NOAA’s collaboration with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to sponsor the demonstration grew into not just a partnership of the organizations but also between maritime archaeologists and AUV technologists, highlighting the theme, “Partnership Runs Deep.”



AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition Podcast
Watch a NOAA video podcast on the AUVfest 2008 expedition that will take place in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay from May 12 through May 23. The event is a demonstration of 13 AUV systems originally developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for mine hunting. As part of a collaborative effort to examine and evaluate the dual use of this technology, eight of these AUVs, and their associated sensors and systems, will also be sent on archaeological missions to shipwreck sites in Narragansett Bay.



AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition AUV Slideshow
View the slideshow of the AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Expedition AUV images. The event is a demonstration of 13 AUV systems originally developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for mine hunting. As part of a collaborative effort to examine and evaluate the dual use of this technology, eight of these AUVs, and their associated sensors and systems, will also be sent on archaeological missions to shipwreck sites in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay.



The Maritime Archaeology Workshop
Discover why the AUV and maritime archaeology workshop between archaeologists, technicians and Navy agencies unanimously agreed that cooperation was critical for their success.



NOAAís Knowledge of Sunken History Helps Navy Identify Mines
Many of the AUVs at AUVfest 2008 were developed for the Navy mine applications, but they can sense archaeological artifacts using the same systems, making the Navy’s investment in technology a dual benefit for the country.



AUVfest On The Water: Navy Reservists’ Perspectives
Three Navy reservists acting as the expedition safety leads provide their straightforward perspective of the daily surprises happening during the missions.



AUVfest 2008 Hazards (Rough seas, currents, and other users)
Monday and Tuesday, the first days of AUVfest 2008, we had some rough weather that spelled trouble for AUV systems.



Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) Navigation
Without a human operator, how does an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) find its way?



Rhode Island Archaeology
Rhode Island, the Ocean State, has more shipwrecks per square mile than any other state. We know of more than 2,000 ships that have sunk in its waters, and there are certainly many more.



AUVfest 2008 Expedition Education Modules (EEM)
Ocean Explorer Expedition Education Modules (EEM) are designed to reach out in new ways to teachers, students, and the general public, and share the excitement of daily at-sea discoveries and the science behind NOAA’s major ocean exploration initiatives with the people around the world.



Autonomous Underwater Vehicles: What Are AUVs, and Why Are They Used?
At their most fundamental, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are simply computer-controlled systems operating undersea. They are considered autonomous because they have no physical connection to their operator, who may be onshore or aboard a ship. They are also self-guiding and self-powered.



Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) Intelligence
AUVs are categorized as robots, much like the Mars robots involved in planetary exploration. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is designed to be an operator-free vehicle that can function without a physical connection to the surface or to an operator. Underwater robots can operate in oceans, rivers, and in the intertidal zone of the beach, and can be released for hours, days or even months before being picked up. Yet, examples of their intelligence is an ability to sense their surroundings called situational awareness and AUVs also can decide what actions to take in new situation, a characteristic called adaptation.



The History of the HMS Cerberus and HMS Lark
The British frigates HMS Cerberus and HMS Lark were among the more than 20 vessels that were burned, sunk or both in Rhode Island during the Revolutionary War. The two ships, Cerberus especially, participated in key battles in the Revolutionary War, and the Cerberus also participated in the French and Indian War. In addition to their storied histories, both ships were very early versions of an important British vessel and are therefore valuable for the insights they can provide about their architecture.



Underwater Mines
The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has invested in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and mine countermeasures technologies to address a long-standing threat that remains very real today: underwater mines. Since World War II, more U.S. Navy ships have been damaged or lost due to mines than to all other causes combined.



AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History Explorers
Read about the highly trained research and AUV teams and share the excitement of discoveries in the Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay as four shipwreck sites are documented by eight AUV systems.



Mission Plan
AUVfest 2008 will be held in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay from May 12 through May 23. The event is a demonstration of 13 AUV systems originally developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for mine hunting. As part of a collaborative effort to examine and evaluate the dual use of this technology, eight of these AUVs, and their associated sensors and systems, will also be sent on archaeological missions to shipwreck sites in Narragansett Bay.