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The Heroic Age



This is the blog of The Heroic Age, http://www.heroicage.org, an online journal dedicated to the study of European Northwest from 400-1100 AD. This space will be used to make announcements about news items, books, and other related medieval news of inter



Updated: 2018-04-20T22:41:50.404-07:00

 



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2018-04-20T10:10:41.536-07:00

SAVE THE DATEInternationale Konferenz am Institut für Kunstgeschichte der Universität LeipzigGefördert durch die DFG, die Freunde und Förderer der Universität Leipzig und die Research Academy LeipzigPicturing the Present: Gegenwart im Bild und Bild in der Gegenwart (ca. 200–1500 CE)14 Juni 2018 9–19 Uhr, Universitätsbibliothek Albertina, Vortragssaal15 Juni 2018 9–16 Uhr, Universitätsbibliothek Albertina, VortragssaalWhen an image is made to depict the present moment, how do people engage with it? And, once that present moment is past, can that image ever again regain its claim to depicting the present or reclaim the immediacy it once held? Or will it then forever become merely a gateway to the past, only accessible through analogy, the imagination, or historical inquiry? This conference investigates how images originally made to depict the present function as they transition from contemporary depictions to historical ones, asking how the present remains ‘present’ over time.TeilnehmerInnen: Benjamin Anderson (Ithaca), Hans Belting (Berlin), Roland Betancourt (Los Angeles), Armin Bergmeier (Leipzig), Rika Burnham (New York), Matthew Champion (London), Ivan Foletti (Brno), Beate Fricke (Bern), Andrew Griebeler (Berkeley), Sarah Griffin (Oxford), Stefan Hanß (Cambridge), Nadja Horsch (Leipzig), Heba Mostafa (Toronto), Keith Moxey (New York), Nathaniel Prottas (Wien), Katharina Schüppel (Dortmund), Stefanie Seeberg (Leipzig), Johannes Tripps (Leipzig), Simone Westermann (Zürich)http://www.gko.uni-leipzig.de/fileadmin/user_upload/kunstgeschichte/pdf/aktuelles/Veranstaltungen_2018/Posterankuendigung-Bergmeier.pdfANKÜNDIGUNGVortragsreihe: Byzanz und der Westen: Kolloquium zur materiellen Kultur im MittelalterLecture Series: Material Culture in Byzantium and the Medieval WestInstitut für Kunstgeschichte der Universität Leipzig in Kooperation mit dem GWZO, der HTWK und dem Handschriftenzentrum29 Mai, 19 Uhr, Department of Art History, Dittrichring 18–20, Raum 5.15Branka Vranesević (Belgrad), Reflections on Late Antique Visual Culture on the Territories of Present-Day Serbia and Macedonia: Continuity and Change14 Juni, 17 Uhr, Universitätsbibliothek Albertina, VortragssaalHans Belting (Berlin), Iconic Presence and Real Presence: A Neglected Aspect From the History of Religious Images26 Juni, 19 Uhr, GWZO, Reichsstr. 4-6, Conference RoomOlga Karagiorgou (Athen), The Dumbarton Oaks and the Venice Tondi: Products of a Cultural Osmosis?https://www.gko.uni-leipzig.de/fileadmin/user_upload/kunstgeschichte/pdf/aktuelles/Veranstaltungen_2018/Byzanz_und_Westen-Kolloquium.pdf[...]



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2018-04-17T10:31:08.045-07:00

We are inviting papers for our panels at the Christianity and Politics Conference (University of Turku, 22–23 November 2018):3. Heresy and Politics (more information below)7. Schisms, Saints, and Power in the Middle Ages (more information below)To propose a paper:Follow the instructions found at:http://christianityconf.utu.fi/?page_id=97Deadline30 April 2018We look forward to receiving your paper proposals!Best wishes,Marika Räsänen & Reima Välimäki3. Heresy and PoliticsPanel Convenor:Dr. Reima Välimäki, University of Turku, FinlandPanel AbstractIf the study of pre-modern heresy once was a theological and doctrinal question, since the twentieth century it has primarily belonged to the field of history. After the seminal work, ‘The Formation of a Persecuting Society’ by R.I. Moore (1987), the intimate connection of persecution of dissidents and contemporary politics has been a point of departure for the vast majority of scholars. More recently, the view has been balanced by scholars who have pointed out that to the inquisitors the persecution was very much a question of piety, faith and devotion (e.g. Ames 2009). The entanglement of politics and faith, power and heresy, is a thus a very complicated question, and its instances range from mock trials perceived entirely political by contemporaries to extreme expressions of piety and faith defying all political calculation.The panel “Heresy and politics” calls for papers treating different aspects of heresy, its persecution and politics from the ancient world to the eighteenth century. The possible topics can include but are not limited to– role of secular rulers and lords in the persecution of dissidents– misuse of power by inquisitors and other persecutors, and critique against them– heresy in papal or imperial politics– heresy, inquisition and colonial politics (e.g. in medieval Languedoc or early modern South America)– heresy accusations as a tool against political opponents– ancient, medieval and early-modern judicial, theological and philosophical discussions about the Church’s right to persecute dissidents7. Schisms, Saints, and Power in the Middle AgesPanel Convenor:Dr. Marika Räsänen, University of Turku, FinlandPanel AbstractPre-modern people lived in a world in which the presence of saints and their relics intertwined with society at many levels. Saints and relics were involved and used both in devotional practices and secular tasks. It is commonly recognized that the functions of saints’ relics were ideologically loaded: popes, bishops, kings, barons, monks and friars drew on the sacral power of these objects and used them to transmit political values and agendas.In times of ecclesiastic and political crisis, the demand for such heavenly intercessors and political legitimators increased. But at the same time, the construction and control of sacred authority became glaringly problematic, as the apparent unity of the Catholic Church was shattered by schism and secular rulers, lords, and cities rallied to the support of competing popes.Despite the central position of saints in premodern societies and the recent flourishing of studies devoted to saints and society, relics themselves — the tangible remains that carried the physical presence of the saint — have been relatively neglected by cultural historians. Likewise, the role of the relics in medieval schisms is an understudied area. For a scholar, studying relics can make visible the effects of schisms not only at the courts of ecclesiastical and secular lords, but among lower levels of the social hierarchy. Relics, saints, and their cults open avenues to explore how divisions between religious and political elites were manifested and understood in local communities.This panel calls for papers in which the influence of cults of saints and relics, and their relationship to schisms, are approached from new perspectives. We encourage papers that discuss the political strategies of popes, the ways that ecclesiastical schisms played out in individ[...]



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2018-04-06T09:52:21.553-07:00

The 94th Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy will be held in Philadelphia on the University of Pennsylvania campus from March 7-9, 2019. The overall theme of the conference is “The Global Turn in Medieval Studies.” As a co-chair of the organizing committee, I would especially like to invite members of the dm- list to propose papers or sessions relating to the thread “Digitizing the Global Middle Ages: Practices, Sustainability, and Ethics.” While this thread can be broadly interpreted, our aim is to further conversations on the role and value of digitization in the preservation of our shared cultural heritage and on the practices and ethics of digitizing across cultural and geographic boundaries.If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please consult the CFP, available here: www.medievalacademy.org/page/2019Meeting.Individuals or groups may propose a poster, paper, full session, roundtable or workshop. Membership in the Medieval Academy is required to present at the conference, but special consideration will be given to individuals whose fields would not traditionally involve membership in the Medieval Academy. Proposals are due June 15, 2018.Please feel free to distribute this announcement to other lists that may have interested members.And please don’t hesitate to contact me or any member of the organizing committee (names appear on CFP) if you have questions.Best,Lynn******************Lynn Ransom, Ph.D.Curator of Programs, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studiesschoenberginstitute.orgProject Director, The New Schoenberg Database of Manuscriptshttps://sdbm.library.upenn.edu/Co-Editor, Manuscript Studies: A Journal of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studiesmss.pennpress.orgThe University of Pennsylvania Libraries3420 Walnut StreetPhiladelphia, PA 19104-6206215.898.7851[...]



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2018-03-28T07:07:15.878-07:00

Summer School in Scandinavian Manuscript StudiesFIFTEENTH INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL1—10 August 2018University of IcelandReykjavíkA 10-day intensive course in medieval and early-modern Scandinavian manuscript studies.The course, which will comprise both lectures and practical sessions, is intended chiefly for graduate students (MA/PhD-level) but may also be of interest to more established scholars hoping to improve their manuscript reading and editorial skills. A sound background in Old Norse-Icelandic and/or Old Danish is essential. Familiarity with one or more of the modern Scandinavian languages, while a distinct advantage, is not required, as all teaching will be in English.As in previous years there will be both a basic group, focusing on palaeography, codicology, manuscript description and transcription, and an advanced group, focusing on editorial technique and the theory and practice of textual criticism; to qualify for the latter one must normally have successfully completed the former.There will also be a Master class for those who have completed the basic and advanced groups and want to try their hand at preparing an edition of a previously unedited text.Students enrolled at the University of Iceland pay 120 EUR. Other students pay 200 EUR. The tuition fee covers one-time participation in classes and lectures. A one-day excursion is included (bus ride and a light meal).The deadline for registration for this year's summer school is 15 April 2018.See: http://www.arnastofnun.is/page/handritaskoli_enFor further information please contact Margrét Eggertsdóttir (megg@hi.is) or Haraldur Bernharðsson (haraldr@hi.is).---------------------Haraldur Bernharðsson, Ph.D.Associate Professor of Medieval StudiesUniversity of Iceland -- The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic StudiesÁrnagarði við SuðurgötuIS-101 ReykjavíkI C E L A N D+ 354 525-4023 / +354 891-7511- haraldr@hi.is- https://uni.hi.is/haraldr/en/- Skype: haraldur_bernhardsson[...]



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2018-03-28T06:51:15.800-07:00

It’s taken more than 700 years, but the medieval villagers of Houghton in Cambridgeshire have had the last laugh: the foundations of their houses and workshops have been exposed again, as roadworks carve up the landscape they were forced to abandon when their woodlands were walled off into a royal hunting forest.Their lost village has been rediscovered in an epic excavation employing more than 200 archaeologists, working across scores of sites on a 21-mile stretch of flat Cambridgeshire countryside, the route of the upgraded A14 and the Huntingdon bypass.Much of it is now flat and rather featureless farmland, but the excavations have revealed how densely populated it was in the past, with scores of village sites, burial mounds, henges, trackways, industrial sites including pottery kilns and a Roman distribution centre. The archaeologists also found an Anglo-Saxon tribal boundary site with huge ditches, a gated entrance and a beacon on a hill that still overlooks the whole region. Site of the Huntington bypass excavation. Photograph: Guardian Design TeamFinds include prehistoric flint tools, seven tonnes of pottery, and more than 7,000 small personal objects including a Roman jet pendant carved with the head of Medusa, a brooch in the shape of a chicken, a beautifully carved Anglo-Saxon bone flute – and a startlingly well preserved timber ladder, radio carbon dated to about 500 BC, found with a wooden paddle in a pit several metres deep.“There is not one key site but a whole expanse – the excavation has given us the whole of the English landscape over the past 6,000 years,” said Steve Sherlock, head archaeologist for Highways England. “The Anglo-Saxon village sites alone are all absolute bobby dazzlers. The larger monuments such as the henges and barrows show up in crop marks and geophysics, but you can only really see things like the post marks of timber buildings by getting down into the ground and digging.”Among the finds: An Anglo-Saxon flute carved from bone. Photograph: Mola Headland Infrastructure“The workshops and animal enclosures give you an impression of the hard grind of everyday life, but when you get something like the bone flute you suddenly see into a world that also had art and music, dancing and entertainment.”At Houghton the archaeologists have been walking along alleyways first used centuries before the Norman Conquest. The deserted medieval village, with remains of 12 buildings, had even earlier – and completely unsuspected – origins. The buildings overlay remains of up to 40 Anglo-Saxon timber structures including houses, workshops and agricultural buildings.Facebook Twitter PinterestAmong the finds: A Roman broach shaped like a chicken. Photograph: Highways England/MOLA Headland Infrastructure“The medieval village was occupied between the 12th and early 14th centuries, and the most likely explanation for its abandonment was that they lost the use of their woods when they were enclosed as a royal forest,” said Emma Jeffery, senior archaeologist from Mola Headland Infrastructure, who has been working on the site. “At a stroke they lost their grazing, foraging and bark for uses such as tanning leather, so the economic justification for the village was gone.”The distribution of sites suggests that many were aligned along a lost stretch of Roman road now under the A1. Others are clustered around the ancient barrows and henges, suggesting they remained significant features in the landscape long after their original use as gathering and burial places ended. Major centres of Roman and later pottery production were found around Brampton and on the banks of the Great Ouse.The excavation of around 350 hectares has been one of the largest archaeology projects in the UK. Work continued through one of the coldest winters in decades, with the diggers pulled off the sites only when the recent blizzards and sub-zero temperatures hit. Work will continue into the su[...]



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2018-03-19T10:12:16.208-07:00

Call for papersXXV Finnish Symposium on Late Antiquity:SEAFARING, MOBILITY AND THE MEDITERRANEAN IN LATE ANTIQUITY (CA. 150-700 CE)Tvärminne, Finland, 26.-27.10.2018The 25th multidisciplinary Finnish Symposium on Late Antiquity will be organized on 26-27 October 2018. The symposium will bring together scholars and postgraduate students with an interest in Late Antiquity from a variety of universities and disciplines (philology, archaeology, history, theology, religious studies, art history etc.). The theme of this year’s symposium is Seafaring, Mobility, and the Mediterranean in Late Antiquity (ca. 150-700 CE), which will be approached from a wide perspective, including social, economic, cultural, religious, ideological, and literary aspects; the symposium will be divided into thematic sessions broadly structured around archaeological, literary, and historical frames of inquiry.We welcome papers discussing Late Antique seafaring, mobility, and the Mediterranean from any viewpoints, but encourage especially the following themes:1.      Networks of Communication and Commodification in the Late Antique Mediterranean2.      Sea as a Metaphor in Late Ancient Literature3.      The Mediterranean as ‘Mare Nostrum’Please send a short abstract of 250–300 words words, with your name, affiliation, e-mail and paper title, by 7th of May 2018 to Dr Ville Vuolanto: ville.vuolanto(at)uta.fi. Applicants will be informed by the beginning of June 2018 at the latest whether they have been accepted. We have reserved 20 minutes for each presentation, plus 10 minutes for discussion.The symposium will be organized at the zoological research station of the University of Helsinki at Tvärminne, on the southern coast of Finland (http://luoto.tvarminne.helsinki.fi/english) – a suitably maritime venue. The symposium will have a participation fee (20€ from students, 60€ from others), which will include accommodation (one night) at the symposium venue, as well as meals for two days. We offer also the transportation from Helsinki to Tvärminne and the return journey. Registration for the symposium will start on 20 August and will close on 28 September 2018.There are three invited keynote lectures in the symposium:Professor Greg Woolf, director of the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London:Changes in Traffic Volume across Mediterranean Maritime Networks in the first millennium CE.Professor Rebecca Sweetman, University of St AndrewsSailing the Wine Dark Sea: Communication, Complexity and Christianization in the AegeanProfessor Arja Karivieri, director of the Institutum Romanum Finlandiae, RomeThe Ways to Control Mobility in Ostia and PortusThe symposium is organized by Raimo Hakola (raimo.hakola@helsinki.fi), Antti Lampinen (antti.lampinen@helsinki.fi) and Ville Vuolanto (ville.vuolanto@staff.uta.fi) and funded by the following research projects: Reason and Religious Recognition (The Academy of Finland's Centre of Excellence, Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki; headed by Risto Saarinen); Segregated or Integrated? – Living and Dying in the Harbour City of Ostia, 300 BCE – 700 CE (The Academy of Finland research project, University of Tampere; headed by Arja Karivieri); Law, Governance and Space: Questioning the Foundations of the Republican Tradition (European Research Council, Consolidator Grant, Kaius Tuori).**Please distribute further to potentially interested people. Follow also our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/417708365336719/On behalf of the organizing committee,Ville Vuolantov-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-v-vVille VuolantoPhD, Lecturer in HistoryFaculty of Social SciencesUniversity of Tampere, Finlandhttp://www.uta.fi/yky/en/contact/personnel/villevuolanto/index.html[...]



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2018-03-05T09:52:44.524-08:00

The Sacral and the Secular: Early Medieval Political Theology
Churchill College, Cambridge, UK
28 June 2018
The study of early medieval political theology has seen a resurgence in recent years, with scholars overturning the assumptions of previous generations about sacral kingship and turning to new sources such as biblical exegesis. This one-day conference will explore the latest thinking on the subject, with particular attention to the idea of the secular during the early Middle Ages.
Robert Markus influentially argued that the beginning of the Middle Ages in Europe witnessed a progressive ‘de-secularization’ but recent work has questioned this analysis. As confidence in the progressive secularization of the contemporary world has faltered in the past generation, now seems an appropriate time to explore how concepts of the secular and de-secularization can shed light on the early Middle Ages.
This conference brings together scholars working on different aspects of early medieval political theology to examine the question of the secular in law, administration, historiography and gender, among other areas. The aim is to stimulate further research and collaboration in a fruitful field of early medieval history.
For more information, including the programme and registration details, visit: https://earlymedievalpoliticaltheology.wordpress.com.




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2018-03-01T13:43:02.873-08:00

The Metaphor of the MonsterFriday, September 21 - Saturday, September 22, 2018Deadline for abstract submission: Tuesday, July 1st, 2018Mermaids, giants, gorgons, harpies, dragons, cyclopes, hermaphrodites, cannibals, amazons, crackens, were-wolves, barbarians, savages, zombies, vampires, angels, demons… all of them inhabit and represent our deepest fears of attack and hybridization, but also our deepest desires of transgression. Frequently described in antithetical terms, monsters were frequently read in the past as holy inscriptions and proofs of the variety and beauty of the world created by God, or as threats to civilization and order. These opposing views on the monster show the radically different values that have been assigned to monsters since they started to permeate the human imagination in manuscripts, maps, and books.Their hybridity challenges natural order and escapes taxonomy, thus problematizing our epistemological certainties. Inhabiting the margins of society, monsters also police social laws and show the consequences of transgressions on their own deformed bodies. Moreover, they are pervasive in nature and metamorphose into something else in different historical periods in order to embody the fears of that age, never to disappear from our imagination.The 2018 Classical & Modern Languages and Literatures Symposium focuses on the concept of monstrosity as a cultural construct in literature, science, and art, and the ways in which the monster has been shaped, used, and interpreted as metaphor by scientists, writers, and artists in order to depict otherness, hybridization, threat to hegemonic order, and transgression.We accept submissions in English that explore monstrosity from various disciplinary or interdisciplinary angles. Topics might include, but are not limited to:Representation in literature/art of different forms of monstrosityGendered- or queer-focused studies of monstrosityThe depiction of the Other as monster, and the depiction of marginalized communitiesHybridity, miscegenation, and the problem of categorizingCartography, margins of civilizationBooks as monstersTransgressive subjects as monstersThe medicalization of the monster: monstrosity in medical discourse; monsters within: parasites, viruses, and illnessEcocritical approaches to the topic: humans as "parasites" and "predators"Dystopian depictions of the urban space as a monstrosityThe monster as spectacle, freak showsDeconstructing monstrosity through inclusionTeaching monstrosityTo submit an Individual Proposal, fill an application through our website: https://www.cmll.msstate.edu/symposium/proposal/index.phpAll proposals are due on July 1st, 2018.Paper titleName, institutional affiliation, position or title and contact information of the presenter including e-mail address and phone number.Abstract for an individual paper: up to 300 words for a single paperBrief (2-4 sentence) scholarly or professional biography of the presenter.Indication of any audiovisual needs or special accommodations.To submit a Panel Proposal, each presenter must submit an Individual Proposal, and note the name of the Panel Chair on the appropriate box of the application.Publication of Peer-Reviewed Selected ProceedingsAfter the conference, all presenters will be eligible to submit their papers for publication consideration.Registration feesEarly registration by July 1st:$100.00 U.S. academics (faculty)$75.00 foreign academics and U.S. graduate studentsLate registration fee (after July 1st):$125.00 U.S. academics (faculty)$100.00 foreign academics and U.S. graduate studentsIf you have any questions please contact Silvia Arroyo at SArroyo@cmll.msstate.edu.Ana Grinberg, Ph.D.Secretary-Bibliographer, Bulletin Bibliographique de la Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch[...]



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2018-03-01T13:42:09.942-08:00

CfA: Summer School Books and Culture: Religious Manuscripts, Hand Press Books and Prints (15th-19th centuries): Ephemerby Ana Laura Inclán VelázquezWhatIntensive 5-day programme on book production, dissemination and consumption from the 15th to the 19th centuries.WhereStadscampus, University of Antwerp, Belgium. The summer school will take place in the Ruusbroec Institute Library, some sessions will take place at the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library and the Plantin-Moretus Museum.When2 - 6 July 2018WhoMaster students, PhD students and postdocs intending to integrate book historical approaches into their research (history, literary history, art history, religious and church history...).External PartnersPlantin-Moretus Museum (Antwerp) and Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library (Antwerp)Course descriptionIn this summer school, expert speakers will explain the traditional techniques of manuscript, book and print production (printing, lay-out, illustration). This year special attention will be devoted to the production and function of ephemera in all its manifestations. Introductory presentations will familiarise the students with the crucial role Antwerp played as a printing center. Most lectures are conceived as workshops and hands-on sessions zooming in on different kinds of text media and the place of ephemera within them. Lecturers will use the holdings of the Ruusbroec Institute Library and select materials that can be handled by the students. In line with this setup, admission to the Summer School will be limited to 14 Master students, PhD students and postdocs. The presence of staff and lecturers during the course should stimulate the interaction and spark questions and discussions.Most sessions will take place at the Ruusbroec Institute’s library of the University of Antwerp. Guided tours will take participants to the Plantin-Moretus Museum for a presentation of sixteenth-century printing techniques, to the stylish Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library, and to the Special Collections Department of the University Library.An unforgettable experience for every researcher who wants to learn more about manuscripts, hand-press books, and prints, and the role they played in Western European culture.CreditsParticipants who want to acquire official ECTS credits can be awarded 3 ECTS credits upon writing an academic paper related to one of the summer school’s topics.Registration fee€ 500The fee includes course material, coffee breaks, lunches and the summer school dinner and a farewell reception. It does not include accommodation.Application detailsOnline through Mobility Online. The application deadline is 19 April 2018. Selection will depend upon the applicants’ research profile and the date of their application. All applicants will be notified about their selection before 1 May 2018.More Informationhttps://www.uantwerpen.be/en/summer-schools/summer-school-books-culture/[...]



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2018-03-01T13:41:45.800-08:00

CfA: Summer School Europe: Diversity and Migrationby Ana Laura Inclán VelázquezWhatAn intersciplinary programme studying Europe related diversity and migration issues through a mixture of theoretical, practical and empirical insights.WhereStadscampus, University of Antwerp, BelgiumWhen25 June – 6 July 2018WhoMaster students and final year Bachelor students who are interested in deepening their knowledge about Europe related diversity and migration issues. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.External partnersChair in European Values and Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence ACTORECourse descriptionEurope’s demography in terms of ethno-cultural composition is rapidly diversifying in an unprecedented way. The majority group in urban areas is morphing into a minority amidst other minorities. This topic has become a priority issue for policymakers at the national and EU-level. There is a great concern at all walks of life and from different ideological perspectives on how to deal adequately with superdiversity as it affects all realms of society. The second edition of the Summer School ‘Europe: Diversity and Migration’ addresses these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective and in doing so, provides participants with insights, practices and skills to understand the current transformation of Europe.The summer school provides participants with concrete insights, information and tools based on theoretical perspectives, empirical case studies and field visits. In doing so it reveals the interrelations between the micro-, meso- and macro-level processes concerned allowing for fine-grained and in-depth understandings of the complex relationships between migration and integration processes.Credits4-6 ECTS credits can be awarded upon successful completion of the programme.Registration fee€400Fee includes course material, coffee breaks, farewell dinner, several excursion and social activities. Does not include lunch or accommodation.Application detailsOnline through Mobility Online before 16 April 2018.More Informationwww.uantwerp.be/europe-diversity-migration[...]



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2018-03-01T13:41:14.832-08:00

CALL FOR PAPERS 2018Rocky Mountain Modern Language AssociationConference Dates: October 4-6Little AmericaCheyenne, WyomingThis is call for papers for 2018Deadline for Abstracts: Extended to March 15, 2018I am looking for paper on topics in Old English language or literature. Please send me your abstracts by March 1, 2018 at the email below.Thanks,Elizabeth HowardProfessorDepartment of EnglishFellowInstitute for Bibliography and EditingKent State UniversityKent, OH 44242ehoward@kent.edu[...]



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2018-02-26T09:41:48.800-08:00

The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions CFP for 2019 SCS Meeting in San Diego
Epic Gods, Imperial City: Religion and Ritual in Latin Epic from Beginnings to Late Antiquity
How did Roman writers of epic reflect on the ritual realities of the imperial city? In this panel we invite scholars working on Latin epic in all its instantiations to explore how the genre in its Italian setting offers frameworks for approaching ritual practice, including prophecy, ruler cult and conceptions of the gods; the relationship between religion and philosophy; insights offered through material culture, including iconography and sanctuaries; the forging of memory and the tools of persuasion; and epic reflections on the establishment and expansion of the sacralized landscape. We encourage submissions connected with epic authors from the earliest to the latest examples, Livius through Lucretius, Vergil to Valerius; papers which offer interdisciplinary and comparative approaches are especially welcome.
Abstracts should be submitted by email attachment as .doc or .docx files to socamr@gmail.com and should be from 500-600 words in length for a paper to last between 15 to 20 minutes. Abstracts should contain a title and a word count, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. For further information about abstract format, please see the SCS Program Guide. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Thursday, March 1, 2018, and all abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. Please direct all queries to SAMR at socamr@gmail.com



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2018-02-23T06:50:45.064-08:00

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2018-02-23T06:50:01.812-08:00

Spiegel Summer Institute Seminar on Medieval Hebrew Literature: Immanuel of Romeby Dana FishkinThe Shalom Spiegel Institute Summer Seminar in Medieval Hebrew PoetryWeeklong Seminar on Immanuel of RomeThe Shalom Spiegel Institute of Medieval Hebrew Poetry at the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York, is pleased to announce that it will hold a one-week intensive seminar in medieval Hebrew poetry dedicated to the work of Immanuel of Rome (c. 1265-1335) from June 25-29, 2018 at the Seminary. The week will include daily seminars with leading scholars on various aspects of Immanuel’s work (Hebrew and Italian poetry and prose, biblical exegesis) as well as opportunities for developing skills in the close reading of medieval Hebrew texts. The seminar will meet for morning and afternoon sessions Monday through Friday.The program is intended to supplement academic programs that offer medieval Jewish studies or Hebrew literature but do not provide courses in which medieval Hebrew poetry and belles lettres are read in the original. It is also expected to benefit students and faculty who have had access to such courses, but whose academic work would benefit from more intensive training in this area.  In addition to its pedagogic goals, the seminar is intended to advance the field of “Immanuel Studies.”Organizers:Raymond Scheindlin, Director Emeritus, Shalom Spiegel Institute, Jewish Theological SeminaryJonathan Decter, Brandeis UniversityDana Fishkin, Touro College Featured Presenters: Tovi Bibring (Bar Ilan University), Dvora Bregman (Ben Gurion University), Yehuda Halper (Bar Ilan University), Isabelle Levy (Columbia University), Revital Rafael-Vivante (Bar ilan University), James Robinson (University of Chicago).How to Apply:To apply, write a letter of no more than two pages covering the following points:Describe your academic program and interests, explaining how some study of medieval Hebrew poetry might relate to your work.Describe your knowledge of Hebrew, particularly a. your ability to read academic prose; b. your familiarity with such classical texts as the Bible, Talmud, or medieval literature.Provide the name and e-mail address of an academic mentor who is familiar with your program of study and your language skills and who can evaluate your academic performance. Recommendations will only be requested on an individual basis if deemed necessary.Letters should be received by March 15, 2018 and should be addressed to Professor Dana Fishkin (danafishkin5@gmail.com).  Applicants who are accepted to the program will be notified by March 25, 2018.For further questions, please write Jonathan Decter (decter@brandeis.edu) or Dana Fishkin (danafishkin5@gmail.com).   [...]



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2018-02-22T06:56:33.786-08:00

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2018-02-21T06:53:21.951-08:00

Dear Friends of LAA, I am writing to cordially invite you to the next LAA meeting. It will be on the subject of burial and memorial in Late Antiquity, and is a thematic analysis of the topic, following on from  our fieldwork meeting on the subject last November. The conference will be held in Birkbeck, University of London on the 17 March 2018. Details are below. Please register via Eventbrite if you wish to attend: https://laaburial2018.eventbrite.co.uk. If  this is too difficult please reserve directly with me: michaelmulryan@gmail.com. An initial invitation via Eventbrite itself was sent out a week ago, so apologies if you are receiving this again.  Please feel free to distribute the attached poster (in three formats) for publicity within your institutions. Kind regards  Michael Mulryan and Luke Lavan*******************This conference reviews the state of late antique funerary practices, on a thematic basis, from scientific examinations of skeletons and their DNA, to treatments of the deceased body, to the nature of memorial structures and how they were treated over  time.(A) DEMOGRAPHY(i) OSTEOLOGY: LATE ANTIQUE LIVES FROM BONES09.45-10.45 Flavio de Angelis (Sop. Arch. Di Roma) and Andrea Battistini (Sop. Arch. Di Roma) Lives from Bones: Anthropological Evaluation in the City of Rome(ii) BIOMOLECULES IN LATE ANTIQUITY (ISOTOPES, DIET, MIGRATION, EPIDEMIC, ENDEMIC DISEASE)11.00-11.30 Alexandra Chavarria (Padova) Northern Italy11.30-12.00 Mathew Emery (McMaster) Southern Italy (Skype)(B) RITUALS AND IDENTITIES: DEATH RITUALS AND TREATMENT OF THE BODY12.15-12.45 Rhea Brettell (Bradford) Organic residues from mortuary contexts (Britain).12.45-13.15 Thibaut Devièse (Oxford) Colourants and dyesRespondent: Béatrice Caseau (Paris IV) Treatment of the body: Ointments and perfumes(C) COMMEMORATION, MONUMENTS, FUNERARY TOPOGRAPHY(i) MEMORIALS - LATE ANTIQUE COMMEMORATION,14.00-14.30 Zsolt Magyar (Budapest) Mausolea in Pannonia14.30-15.00 Chris Sparey-Green (Kent) Mausolea in NW Europe(ii) SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF DEAD TO LIVING15.15-15.45 Judit Ciurana Prast (Barcelona) Funerary Landscapes of Catalonia15.45-16.15 Efthymios Rizos (Oxford) Christian elite burials in Anatolia / Constantinople & the cult of relics(iii) MEMORIAL AND OBLIVION: SPOLIA AND ATTITUDES TO TOMBS16.30-16.45 Luke Lavan (Kent) Spolia and the archaeology of memory16.45-17.15 Douglas Underwood (Kent) City walls and tomb destruction  (Skype)17.15-17.45 Nick Mishkovsky (Kent) City walls and tomb preservation  (Skype)17.45-18.00 Conclusion.All are welcome. Admission 25 GBP, 10 GBP Students. Registration is via Eventbrite:  https://laaburial2018.eventbrite.co.ukVenue: Room 421 inside Birkbeck College, Malet Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HX. Metro: Russell Square.Conveners: L.Lavan/M.Mulryan (Kent) T.Penn (Edin.) R,Darley (Birkbeck).Sponsors: University of Kent, Birkbeck (University of London), J.Beale, Brill.We hope you can make it.Best,Luke Lavan, Rebecca Darley, Michael Mulryan, Tim PennDr Michael MulryanEditor - Late Antique ArchaeologyHonorary Research FellowCentre for Late Antique ArchaeologyUniversity of Kent------------------------------------------------------------------[...]



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2018-02-16T10:16:41.932-08:00

Symposium—Early CodicesProduction, Destruction, and Modern ConservationDate: February 23, 2018, 1:00 – 5:00 pmLocation: 38 West 86th Street, Lecture HallContact: academicevents@bgc.bard.eduCost: FreeThis symposium, organized in conjunction with the exhibition The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity, aims to give an overview of the scholarship around the innovation of the codex in late antiquity and its gradual establishment as the standard form of the book until today. Speakers will focus on two distinct but complementary aspects—the historical, which derives primarily from the study of codices as texts, and the material, which derives from the study of codices as physical objects. The purpose of both the exhibition and the symposium is to merge different disciplines, points of view, and approaches in order to gain a better understanding of the early history and evolution of one of the most fascinating and culturally significant objects, the book.Throughout history the number of books produced must have been huge, but the number of books lost is also substantial. Subtracting those destroyed from those created leaves us the number of books preserved today, which, especially for those produced in the earliest stages of the evolution of the book is frustratingly small. This scarcity of physical evidence is partly what makes the surviving codices from the early centuries extremely important, not just for their texts but also for their technical and material culture aspects. Conserving these precious relics is a challenge that poses both physical and theoretical problems, but at the same time grants a privileged access which enables a closer study and understanding of the technical history of codices.1 pmPeter N. MillerDean and Professor, Bard Graduate CenterIvan GaskellProfessor, Curator and Head of the Focus Gallery Project, Bard Graduate CenterWelcomeGeorgios BoudalisHead of the Book and Paper Conservation Laboratory, Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki, GreeceIntroduction1:20 pmBrent NongbriIndependent ScholarThe Emergence of the Codex in the Roman Empire2 pmDirk RohmannLecturer, University of WuppertalCanon Formation: Book-Burning and the Christian Codex in Late Antiquity2:40 pmCoffee Break3 pmFrancisco H. TrujilloAssociate Book Conservator, Morgan Library and MuseumIncipient Forms: Codicology of the Coptic Bindings Collection at the Morgan Library & Museum3:40 pmMaria FredericksDrue Heinz Book Conservator, Thaw Conservation Center, Morgan Library and MuseumThe Coptic Manuscripts at the Morgan Library & Museum: Conservation Then and Now4:20 pmGeorgios BoudalisHead of the Book and Paper Conservation Laboratory, Museum of Byzantine CultureCodex as Craft: Can a Book be Compared to a Sock?5 pmReceptionThis event will be livestreamed. Please check back the day of the event for a link to the video. To watch videos of past events please visit our YouTube page.[...]



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2018-02-09T09:58:44.441-08:00

CALL FOR PAPERS 2018Rocky Mountain Modern Language AssociationConference Dates: October 4-6Little AmericaCheyenne, WyomingThis is call for papers for 2018Deadline for Abstracts: March 1, 2018I am looking for paper on topics in Old English language or literature. Please send me your abstracts by March 1, 2018 at the email below.Elizabeth HowardProfessorDepartment of EnglishFellowInstitute for Bibliography and EditingKent State UniversityKent, OH 44242ehoward@kent.edu[...]



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2018-02-05T10:38:47.391-08:00

CFP: "Where does it end?": Limits on imperial authority in Late AntiquityOrganizer: Jacqueline Long, Loyola University ChicagoSponsored by the Society for Late AntiquityAt the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in San Diego, California, JANUARY 3–6, 2019, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on limits to imperial authority in Late Antiquity.No other mortal man commanded more authority in empire. The late-Roman emperor was source of law, head of government, victor of his armies' wars (whether or not he led in battle), exemplar and enforcer of orthodoxy even after repudiating his ancient presidency over state cults, because public order relied on him. How was such a man to “remember [he was] mortal”? If the famous triumphal counterpoint was no more than a Christian interjection to the tradition of ceremony (Beard, Roman Triumph [2007] 85-92), nevertheless it had currency amid the ideological and historical changes of the later Empire. Its question generalizes: what limits on imperial power were recognized, after Roman imperialism proved its geographical limit? The Society for Late Antiquity seeks to compose a panel of papers addressing this multifarious question. Both events and ideas are welcome for consideration. How were usurpers able to reject rivals' rule and claim imperial title for themselves? What failed when they fell short? In what ways could laws rein in rulers? Could criticism or consent regulate their actions, or only opposed force? What cultural values shaped judgment of reigning and past emperors; did such judgments matter? How did alternative organs of empire-wide power, such as bureaucracy or armies or Church, or local constituencies seeking accommodation, work with emperors so as to achieve ends of their own?Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of twenty minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 16, 2018 by email attachment to Mark Masterson at Mark.Masterson@vuw.ac.nz (Note: please don't mail abstracts to the organizer of this panel). All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panellists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2019 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to San Diego.[...]



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2018-01-30T11:02:17.493-08:00

NEW SCHOLARS SERIES AT BATES COLLEGENEW APPROACHES TO THE ANCIENT GRECO - ROMAN MEDITERRANEANA GRADUATE SYMPOSIUMSeptember 28–30, 2017The Program in Classical and Medieval Studies at Bates College invites papers on any topicrelated to new approaches to the cultures of the ancient Greco - Roman Mediterranean, for a day - long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recen t PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups.  The symposium will showcase new work by individuals from underrepresented groups in the professoriate, specifically defined as including African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americ ans, Asian Ame ricans, Latinx , Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.We seek papers that examine how people (ancient through modern)  have maintained or deployed the power and prestige of Greek and/or Roman culture  through texts, objects,  rituals,  or other means . In the ancient world, Greeks and Romans interacted with each other, and with many other populations, and in these layered interactions they negotiated identities, cultural hierarchies, and relationships including to their own past . We will consider papers on such layered interactions as well as historical or contemporary adaptations of classicism. We are interested also in papers that expand the theoretical lens through which such cultural and linguistic interactions  -- ancient or mod ern  —  are studied. Fields may include literature, history, medicine, philosophy, religion, art, linguistics ,  or politics, among others.  Invited speakers will have their travel expenses covered and will be guests of the College fromthe evening of 9/28 through breakfast on 9/30 , with all paper presentations to occur on 9/29 .Twenty -  minute papers will be grouped into thematic panels, with additional roundtable and Q&A formats running throughout the day. We aim to create an intellectually enriching experience for all interlocutors, including the selected speakers and the faculty and students of Bates College.What to Submit:A 300- word abstract describing the paper ’s argument, critical context, and significance.  A current cv  A brief statement confirm ing self  -  identification as a member of a historically  underrepresented group  Where to Submit:  Abstract, cv, and statement should be submitted in PDF format by email to lmaurizi@bates.edu  by April 1  .Speakers will b e notified of acceptance by  the end of May .[...]



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2018-01-30T11:01:37.500-08:00

The Marco Institute at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, invites you to its 13th annual Manuscript Workshop: "Transmission." Sessions will  be held February 2-3 in the Great Room of the UT International House (1623 Melrose Ave.). The event is free and open to the public. For details and to view the program, please visit http://marco.utk.edu/ms-workshop/.Featuring Presentations By:Scott Bruce (University of Colorado, Boulder)Andrew Dunning (University of Toronto)Martin Foys (University of Wisconsin)Leslie Lockett (The Ohio State University)Kathryn A. Lowe (University of Glasgow)Julia Marvin (University of Notre Dame)Patrick Naeve (Cornell University)Sarah Sprouse (Texas Tech University)[...]



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2018-01-29T09:57:27.638-08:00

The Textual Heritage community and Vienna University are pleased to invite submissions of abstracts for the El’Manuscript-2018 international conference on the creation and development of information systems for storage, description, processing, analysis, and publication of medieval and early modern handwritten and printed texts and documentary records. Any person involved in the creation or application of these resources—including researchers; instructors; staff of libraries, museums, and archives; programmers, and undergraduate and graduate students—is welcome to participate.El’Manuscript-2018 is the seventh in a series of biennial international conferences entitled “Textual Heritage and Information Technologies” that brings together linguists, specialists in historical source criticism, IT specialists, and others involved in studying and publishing our textual heritage. Along with the lectures, a summer school will be part of the conference, which will allow practitioners to become familiar with various systems and methods for working with manuscripts and texts.The working language of the 2018 conference is English. In the philological sections talks in Russian are welcome, but should be accompanied by powerpoint slides in English. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a volume of proceedings and on the textualheritage.org website.Conference topics1. The physical document – Material and technology- Codicology- Instrumental analysis- Visual observation of documents- Recognition of relevant features of historic book binding techniques- Water mark data base- DNA analysis- Isotope analysis2. The script and writing system- Photographing- Visualization- Digitisation- Handwritten Text Recognition, Optical Character Recognition- Digital Palaeography- Digital Graphemics3. The text, Its processing and presentation- Textology and textual criticism- Digital editions- Digital publishing- Text mark-up formats- Lemmatisation and morphological mark-up4. Beyond document, script, and text – Analytics and interpretation- Digital libraries and databases- Corpora- Storage formats- Long term storage- Lexicography- Data mining- Quantitative and statistical analysis- Navigation and access- Web technologies- Open science**General Information**Conference dates: 14-18 September 2018Venue: Department of Slavonic Studies, Vienna University; European ResearchCentre for Book and Paper Conservation-Restoration, Centre for Cultural PropertyProtection, Department for Building and Environment, University for Continuing Edu-cation, KremsPostal Address: Institut für Slawistik der Universität Wien, Spitalgasse 2, Hof 3, A-1090 Vienna; Dr. Karl Dorrekstrasse 30, A-3500 KremsOrganization Committee Chair: Prof. Dr. Viktor A. Baranov, Prof. Dr. Heinz Miklas, Dr. Patricia Engel, Dr. Juergen FuchsbauerContact person: Dr. Juergen Fuchsbauer, phone +43 664 39 13 812E-mail (Organization Committee): elmanuscript2018.slawistik@univie.ac.atConference Website: http://textualheritage.org/elmanuscript2018**Abstract submission**Abstracts are limited to 200 words and should be sent in both .DOC/.DOCX/.ODT and PDF formats to elmanuscript2018.slawistik@univie.ac.at. The following information has to be included:- Paper title;- 5-10 keywords;- Author’s (authors’) first and last names;- Affiliation (institution);Deadline for abstracts: 28 February 2018.Reviewing: The abstracts submitted to the conference will be peer-reviewed.[...]



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2018-01-10T10:28:52.550-08:00

39th Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum:Image and Visual Experience in the Middle Ages and RenaissanceKeene State CollegeKeene, NH, USAFriday and Saturday April 13-14, 2018 Call for Papers and SessionsWe are delighted to announce that the 39th Medieval and Renaissance Forum: Image and Visual Experience in the Middle Ages and Renaissance will take place on April 13 and 14, 2018 at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire.  We welcome abstracts (one page or less) or panel proposals that discuss images and visual experience in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Papers and sessions, however, need not be confined to this theme but may cover other aspects of medieval and Renaissance life, literature, languages, art, philosophy, theology, history, and music.  This year’s keynote speaker is Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Kuno Francke Professor of German Art and Culture at Harvard University who will speak on “The Diagram Paradigm in the Middle Ages—and Beyond.” Professor Hamburger's teaching and research focus on the art of the High and later Middle Ages. Among his areas of special interest are medieval manuscript illumination, text-image issues, the history of attitudes towards imagery and visual experience, German vernacular religious writing of the Middle Ages, especially in the context of mysticism, and, most recently, diagrams, the topic of his forthcoming book: From Cross to Crucifix: Typology, Diagrams and Devotion in Berthold of Nuremberg's Commentary on Hrabanus Maurus' In honorem sanctae crucis.  Dr. Hamburger is also the author of several other books, including St. John the Divine: The Deified Evangelist in Medieval Art and Theology (Berkeley-Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002), The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany(New York: Zone Books, 1998), Nuns as Artists: The Visual Culture of a Medieval Convent (Berkeley-Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1996), and The Rothschild Canticles: Art and Mysticism in Flanders and the Rhineland circa 1300 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990). All papers presented at this year’s Forum are eligible for inclusion in Selected Proceedings of the 39th Medieval and Renaissance Forum, to be published by Cambridge Scholars Press.  Contributors interested in publishing their work in this volume should submit their revised essays by May 15, 2018. Students, faculty, and independent scholars are welcome. Please indicate your status (undergraduate, graduate, or faculty), affiliation (if relevant), and full contact information, including email address on your proposal. We welcome undergraduate sessions, but require faculty sponsorship.   Please submit abstracts, audio/visual needs, and full contact information to Dr. Robert G. Sullivan, Assistant Forum Director atsullivan@german.umass.edu. Abstract deadline: January 15, 2018 Presenters and early registration: March 15, 2018 We look forward to greeting returning and first-time participants to Keene in April![...]



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2018-01-10T10:27:52.680-08:00

Canadian Society for Italian Studies 2018 Annual Conference - General Call for Sessionsby Maria Laura MoscoDear Colleagues,Please consider submitting a Session Proposal for the Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for Italian Studies, May 11-13, 2018, The University of Ottawa - Ottawa, OntarioClick here to download the session/paper submission forms in PDF format:http://canadiansocietyforitalianstudies.camp7.org/Conference-2018We invite session and paper proposals for the 2018 CSIS conference that will be held at the University of Ottawa on May 11-13, 2018. The deadline for session proposals is January 31, 2018. In order to propose a session, please fill out the session proposal form and submit it to the conference organizers Cristina Perissinotto (University of Ottawa) and Cristina Caracchini (University of Western Ontario) at the official CSIS email address: italian.studies.canada@gmail.com. Session proposals will be made public on the CSIS website in the order they are received.Proposals for individual papers should be sent directly to the session organizers using the paper proposal form. If you would like to propose a paper that cannot be housed in any of the planned panels, please submit the form directly to the conference organizers at this email address: italian.studies.canada@gmail.com.Session organizers must consider all the proposals received up to the deadline of February 15, 2018. The announcement that a panel is closed can only be made after that date. Once the deadline has passed, all session organizers will send the paper proposal forms for their session to the conference organizers to this address: italian.studies.canada@gmail.com.The Society’s rules allow members to present only one paper at the annual conference. Normally, members will not present a paper in the sessions they also chair. However, members are allowed to chair more than one session.Please be reminded that if you submit a paper proposal to more than one session, you should notify all the organizers to whom you have made a submission. If you fail to notify the session organizers, they will have the right to decide between themselves in which session the paper will be presented or if the paper will be excluded.All participants must be members in good standing of CSIS. Membership must be current by April 15, 2018, in order for the member’s name to appear in the program and for the member to be allowed to present his/her work at the 2018 CSIS conference.The Conference Registration will open in February 2018. The cost will be: CAN$ 45 for graduate students, retired members, and PhDs without full time employment. Registration will be CAN$ 90 for all other delegates.For the Organizing TeamCristina Perissinotto (cperissi@uottawa.ca) and Cristina Caracchini (ccaracch@uwo.ca).[...]



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2017-12-26T10:34:29.240-08:00

Call for papers:"The Micropolitics of Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages"2nd Research Forum of the Tübingen Center of Advanced Studies“Migration and Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages”Tübingen, Germany, 19-20 July 2018organized byMischa Meier, Steffen Patzold and Sebastian Schmidt-Hofnerhttp://www.uni-tuebingen.de/de/115759Narratives of the age of migrations tend to privilege the large-scale mobility of ethnically denominated groups. Recent research has questioned this focus from many angles and has led to a growing consensus that new approaches are needed which put the large-scale migrations into perspective, integrate other forms of mobility into the picture, and develop a clearer understanding of the social processes involved, both among the mobile groups and individuals as well as within the societies where they arrive. This conference proposes to explore an approach to the age of migrations that takes account of these redirections in scholarship by focusing on the micropolitics of mobility in late antique and early medieval local societies in a broad timeframe from ca. 250 to 900 CE.By exploring the micropolitics of mobility on a broad basis of case studies we hope to achieve a clearer understanding of a number of key problems in the social history of migration and mobility in the period. Questions we wish to address include:How did local societies accommodate and integrate immigrants of different kinds?What were fields of ensuing social conflict (e.g. in the areas of religion, economy, political participation) and how were these conflicts settled?How did local societies transform in reaction to immigrant groups?Which differences can we observe between individual and group immigrations?How did geographical mobility translate into social mobility?We invite papers from younger as well as established scholars working in all relevant fields (history, archaeology, literature) which discuss these or other related aspects of the micropolitics of mobility. Applicants are requested to submit a short abstract for a paper of 25 minutes, a title, and a short CV by 22 January 2018 to luisa.luiz@altegeschichte.uni-tuebingen.de. We will cover travel and accommodation costs for the speakers.For organizational questions, please contact luisa.luiz@altegeschichte.uni-tuebingen.de, for all other issues write to mischa.meier@uni-tuebingen.de, steffen.patzold@uni-tuebingen.de or sebastian.schmidt-hofner@uni-tuebingen.de.[...]