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Grasping Reality with All Tentacles: bradford-delong.com:





Updated: 2017-06-04T20:19:19-07:00

 




2017-04-24T15:16:37-07:00

Highlighted Teaching Reading, Videos, etc. ---- ### **Plus: Must-Reads:** * **Samuel Osborne**: _Angela Merkel says Germany can no longer rely on Donald Trump's America_: "'We Europeans must really take our destiny into our own hands'... * **Gavyn Davies**: _The Fed’s Lowflation Dilemma_: "The [last] two months together have left core CPI inflation 0.4 percentage points lower than expected... ---- **Links:** * The end of the "Chets" in finance (cf.: Alameida: _The Mysteries of Chet_ ): **Justin Baer**: _Wall Street's Endangered Species: The Ivy League Jock_: "..." * **Lawrence Mishel and Josh Bivens**: _The zombie robot argument lurches on_: "There is no evidence that automation leads to joblessness or inequality Report..." * **Bay Area Book Festival**




2017-05-28T08:53:27-07:00

**Must-Read**: November 8, 2016 was indeed the end of the long twentieth century: **Samuel Osborne**: _Angela Merkel says Germany can no longer rely on Donald Trump's America_: "'We Europeans must really take our destiny into our own hands'... >...She said that "the times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over, as I have experienced in the past few days."... Trump, who has previously called global warming a hoax, came under concerted pressure from the other leaders to honour the 2015 Paris Agreement on curbing carbon emissions. Although he tweeted to say he would make a decision next week, his apparent reluctance to embrace the first legally binding global climate change deal, signed by 195 countries, clearly annoyed Ms Merkel. >"The entire discussion about climate was very difficult, if not to say very dissatisfying," she told reporters. "There are no indications whether the United States will stay in the Paris Agreement or not." G7 leaders went on to blame the US for the failure to reach an agreement on climate change, in an unusually frank statement which read: >>The United States of America is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the...




2017-05-28T08:07:30-07:00

**Must-Read**: The Federal Funds rate is currently bouncing around between 0.82 and 0.91%. When the Federal Reserve embarked on its tightening cycle in December 2015, its median expectation was that by now it would have raised the Federal Funds rate to between 2.25 and 2.50%—that it would have undertaken 9 25 basis point interest rate hikes rather than three. Its expectation was that, even after those nine hikes, PCE core inflation would be running at 1.9% per year rather than the 1.5% per year that the smart money currently sees. A policy significantly looser than they thought they were embarking on. And inflation outcomes noticeably worse, in the sense of falling below target, than they anticipated even with the tighter policies they thought they would adopt. Yet I have very little sense of how the Federal Reserve is adjusting its thinking to its forecasting overoptimism for 2016 and now for 2017. Nor do I have any great sense of how the Federal Reserve is dealing with the fact that it has now been overoptimistic in forecasting 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, and 2008: **Gavyn Davies**: _The Fed’s Lowflation Dilemma_: "The [last] two months together have left...



Links for the Week of May 28, 2017

2017-05-28T08:04:51-07:00

**Must-Reads:** * **Kavya Vaghul**: _Trump administration 2018 budget swaps heavy cuts to education for focus on school choice_: "The more fundamental problem is that there isn’t much evidence that school choice programs, specifically vouchers, have substantial positive effects... * **Kevin Drum**: _Trump: I'll Put a Stop to Germany Selling Cars in the US_: "This from Der Spiegel... * **Ben Bernanke**: _Some reflections on Japanese monetary policy_: "The BOJ shouldn’t stop its determined pursuit of its inflation target... * **Haley Byrd**: _CBO on Health Care Bill: Sick People Could Face Higher Premiums and Even Be Priced Out of the Market_: "Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.)... hadn't read the full report... said he saw it as “good news”... * **Martin Wolf**: _Conservatism Buries Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher_: "Trump... has ended up with “pluto-populism”—policies that benefit plutocrats, justified by populist rhetoric... * **Larry Summers**: _A warning on Trump’s budget_: "You cannot use the growth benefits of tax cuts once to justify an optimistic baseline and then again to claim that the tax cuts do not cost revenue... * **Nicholas Bagley**: _Taking the Nuclear Option Off the Table_: "Last Thursday, fifteen states and the District of Columbia moved to intervene in House... Must-Reads: Kavya Vaghul: Trump administration 2018 budget swaps heavy cuts to education for focus on school choice: "The more fundamental problem is that there isn’t much evidence that school choice programs, specifically vouchers, have substantial positive effects... http://equitablegrowth.org/equitablog/trump-administration-2018-budget-swaps-heavy-cuts-to-education-for-focus-on-school-choice/ Kevin Drum: Trump: I'll Put a Stop to Germany Selling Cars in the US: "This from Der Spiegel... http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2017/05/trump-ill-put-stop-germany-selling-cars-us Ben Bernanke: Some reflections on Japanese monetary policy: "The BOJ shouldn’t stop its determined pursuit of its inflation target... https://www.brookings.edu/blog/ben-bernanke/2017/05/23/some-reflections-on-japanese-monetary-policy/ Haley Byrd: CBO on Health Care Bill: Sick People Could Face Higher Premiums and Even Be Priced Out of the Market: "Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.)... hadn't read the full report... said he saw it as “good news”... http://ijr.com/2017/05/881482-cbo-health-care-bill-sick-people-face-higher-premiums-even-priced-market/ Martin Wolf: Conservatism Buries Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher: "Trump... has ended up with “pluto-populism”—policies that benefit plutocrats, justified by populist rhetoric... https://www.ft.com/content/970bbdcc-3f1e-11e7-82b6-896b95f30f58 Larry Summers: A warning on Trump’s budget: "You cannot use the growth benefits of tax cuts once to justify an optimistic baseline and then again to claim that the tax cuts do not cost revenue... https://www.ft.com/content/2ae4722a-f82f-3bbe-aba1-5b89dd8ac314 Nicholas Bagley: Taking the Nuclear Option Off the Table: "Last Thursday, fifteen states and the District of Columbia moved to intervene in House v. Price... http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/taking-the-nuclear-option-off-the-table/ Matthew Yglesias: The Case for Impeaching Trump—and Fast: "Andrew Johnson... the move... to remove him... reeked... of...resolv[ing] a policy dispute by ginning up a legal one... https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/5/22/15655296/impeach-trump Dara Lind: It’s becoming increasingly clear that Jared Kushner is part of Trump’s Russia problem: "Jared Kushner: the young, pragmatic, hardheaded businessman out to modernize the US government and moderate the worst tendencies of his father-in-law—Donald Trump... https://www.vox.com/2017/5/20/15668162/kushner-trump-russia-corruption Chang-Tai Hsieh and Enrico Moretti: Housing Constraints and Spatial Misallocation: "We quantify the amount of spatial misallocation of labor across US cities and its[...]



For the Weekend...: Tina Turner: Don't Turn Around

2017-05-27T20:50:30-07:00

width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YPJgQlUiZPE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>




DeLong: The Future of Work: Automation and Labor: Inclusive AI: Technology and Policy for a Diverse Human Future

2017-05-27T14:52:09-07:00

Thank you very much. Let me follow the example of our Lord and Master Alpha-Go as it takes the high ground first. Let me, therefore, take the hyper-Olympian and very long run historical point of view. The human brain is a massively parallel supercomputer that fits inside half a shoebox. It draws 50 watts of power. It is an amazing innovation, analysis, assessment and creation machine. 600 million years of proto-mammalian and mammalian evolution coupled with the genetic algorithm means that almost every single human can solve AI problems far beyond our current engineering reach—so much so that much of what our machines find impossible our brains find so trivially easy that we call such capabilities "unskilled". When combined with our brains, human fingers are amazingly fine manipulation devices. Human back and leg muscles—especially when testosterone soaked—are quite good at moving heavy objects. Thus back in the environment of evolutionary adaptation, we used our brains, our big muscles, and our fingers to lead cognitively interesting if stressful and short lives. But history has rolled forward since the hunter-gatherer age. And as history has rolled forward, we have figured out other things to do to add economic and sociological value than... Thank you very much. Let me follow the example of our Lord and Master Alpha-Go as it takes the high ground first. Let me, therefore, take the hyper-Olympian and very long run historical point of view. The human brain is a massively parallel supercomputer that fits inside half a shoebox. It draws 50 watts of power. It is an amazing innovation, analysis, assessment and creation machine. 600 million years of proto-mammalian and mammalian evolution coupled with the genetic algorithm means that almost every single human can solve AI problems far beyond our current engineering reach—so much so that much of what our machines find impossible our brains find so trivially easy that we call such capabilities "unskilled". When combined with our brains, human fingers are amazingly fine manipulation devices. Human back and leg muscles—especially when testosterone soaked—are quite good at moving heavy objects. Thus back in the environment of evolutionary adaptation, we used our brains, our big muscles, and our fingers to lead cognitively interesting if stressful and short lives. But history has rolled forward since the hunter-gatherer age. And as history has rolled forward, we have figured out other things to do to add economic and sociological value than their uses in the hunger-gathers paradigm. Over the long historical sweep, the ability to add value using our backs to move heavy objects and our fingers to perform fine manipulations in cognitively-interesting ways has, relatively, declined. We have, so far: turned many of us into robots ourselves, performing simple routinized repetitive and vastly boring tasks to fill in the gaps in value chains between the robots that we know how to build. found jobs as microcontrollers for domesticated animals and machines—the horse does not know what plowing the furrow is. found jobs as relatively simple accounting and software bots, keeping track of stuff, what it is useful for, and how its use is to be decided. become personal servitors. become social engineers—trying to keep all those things and all those people—especially, perhaps, trying to keep those brains soaked in testosterone—somehow working in harmony, somehow pulling together, although admittedly with limited success. remained innovators, analyzers, assessors, and creators as well. Backs started to go out with the domestication of the horse. Fingers began to go out with the invention of the spinning jenny. But humans-as-microcontrollers, humans-as-accounting-'bots—paper shufflers—and humans-as-the-robots we cannot yet build—took up all the job slack. Every horse needs a microcontroller. And a human brain was the only possi[...]



Weekend Reading: The Deleted Passage of the Declaration of Independence (1776)

2017-05-26T15:42:39-07:00

**The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed**: _The Deleted Passage of the Declaration of Independence (1776) _: "When Thomas Jefferson included a passage attacking slavery in his draft of the Declaration of Independence it initiated the most intense debate... >...among the delegates gathered at Philadelphia in the spring and early summer of 1776. Jefferson's passage on slavery was the most important section removed from the final document. It was replaced with a more ambiguous passage about King George's incitement of "domestic insurrections among us." Decades later Jefferson blamed the removal of the passage on delegates from South Carolina and Georgia and Northern delegates who represented merchants who were at the time actively involved in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Jefferson's original passage on slavery appears below: >>He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither. This piratical warfare, the opprobrium of infidel powers, is the warfare of the Christian King of Great Britain. Determined to keep open a market where Men should be bought...



Weekend Reading: RIch Landrieu: Address on Confederate Monuments

2017-05-26T15:40:36-07:00

**Mitch Landrieu**: _Transcript of Address on Confederate Monuments_: "Thank you for coming... >...The soul of our beloved City is deeply rooted in a history that has evolved over thousands of years; rooted in a diverse people who have been here together every step of the way–for both good and for ill. >It is a history that holds in its heart the stories of Native Americans: the Choctaw, Houma Nation, the Chitimacha. Of Hernando de Soto, Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, the Acadians, the Islenos, the enslaved people from Senegambia, Free People of Color, the Haitians, the Germans, both the empires of Francexii and Spain. The Italians, the Irish, the Cubans, the south and central Americans, the Vietnamese and so many more. >You see: New Orleans is truly a city of many nations, a melting pot, a bubbling cauldron of many cultures. >There is no other place quite like it in the world that so eloquently exemplifies the uniquely American motto: e pluribus unum — out of many we are one. >But there are also other truths about our city that we must confront. New Orleans was America’s largest slave market: a port where hundreds of thousands of souls were...




2017-05-26T15:29:01-07:00

**Should-Read: Chad Stone**: _Donald Trump's Indefensible Economic Growth Forecasts_: "The 1.1 percentage point gap between the Trump annual growth forecast over the next decade and CBO's is the largest on record and much larger than any since the Reagan-Bush era...



Where US Manufacturing Jobs Really Went: No Longer So Fresh at Project Syndicate

2017-05-26T15:22:18-07:00

**[Project Syndicate][]: J. Bradford DeLong**: _[Where US Manufacturing Jobs Really Went][1]_: In the two decades from 1979 to 1999, the number of manufacturing jobs in the United States drifted downward, from 19 million to 17 million. But over the next decade, between 1999 and 2009, the number plummeted to 12 million. That more dramatic decline has given rise to the idea that the US economy suddenly stopped working–at least for blue-collar males–at the turn of the century... [1]: https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/manufacturing-jobs-share-of-us-economy-by-j--bradford-delong-2017-05> [Project Syndicate]: https://www.project-syndicate.org/ But that thought-nugget way of putting it—that manufacturing was fine, with no massive destruction of manufacturing jobs until 2000—is wrong. There was enormous destruction of manufacturing jobs: but destroyed jobs in one region and sector were more-or-less matched in absolute numbers—but not in shares of the labor force—by rising jobs in another sector and region. A little family history: Consider the career of my grandfather William Walcott Lord, born early in the twentieth century in New England. The Lord Bros. Shoe Company in Brockton, MA, facing imminent bankruptcy in 1933 at the nadir of the Great Depression, had to close up shop. They moved to and reopened in a place where wages were even lower: South Paris, ME....



Procrastinating on May 26, 2017

2017-05-26T14:13:03-07:00

**Over at [Equitable Growth](http://EquitableGrowth.org): Must- and Should-Reads:** * **The Future of Education and Lifelong Learning: DeLong Opening DRAFT | Equitable Growth** * **The Benefits of Free Trade: Time to Fly My Neoliberal Freak Flag High!: Hoisted from March 2016 | Equitable Growth** * **Kavya Vaghul**: _Weekend reading: the “fantasy budget” edition_: "Greg Leiserson discusses... fantasy budgeting around policies and plans that have yet to be developed... * **Kavya Vaghul**: _Trump administration 2018 budget swaps heavy cuts to education for focus on school choice_: "The more fundamental problem is that there isn’t much evidence that school choice programs, specifically vouchers, have substantial positive effects... * **Kevin Drum**: _Trump: I'll Put a Stop to Germany Selling Cars in the US_: "This from Der Spiegel... * **Ben Bernanke**: _Some reflections on Japanese monetary policy_: "The BOJ shouldn’t stop its determined pursuit of its inflation target... * **Nicholas MacPherson**: _Joseph Chamberlain sets the Tories a bad example_: "On the big national issues of his day, he was on the wrong side of history... * **Nick Bunker**: _U.S. over-education and underemployment over the course of a lifetime | Equitable Growth_: "Ammar Farooq also finds that almost half of the moves into underemployment—defined as having a...



Monday Smackdown: Physics Professor Phil Price the NIMBYist

2017-05-22T09:49:39-07:00

**Must-Read** I disagree with Noah Smith: reading Phil Price convinced me that Phil Price *is* an idiot, that for many, many people NIMBYism is not a "flawed but serious package of ideas" but rather "simple ignorance"—or, perhaps, rather, very hard work to remain ignorant, in a way that is supportive of the "selfishness of incumbent homeowners trying to feather their own nests... [and] white people trying to exclude poor minorities from their communities while still appearing liberal..." What was Andrew Gelman thinking in giving him his microphone? **Noah Smith**: _The NIMBY Challenge_: "NIMBY theorists like [Phil] Price... should do the following thought experiment... >...Imagine destroying a bunch of luxury apartments in SF. Just find the most expensive apartment buildings you can and demolish them. What would happen to rents in SF if you did this? Would rents fall? Would rich people decide that SF hates them, and head for Seattle or the East Bay or Austin? Maybe. But maybe they would stay in SF, and go bid high prices for apartments currently occupied by the beleaguered working class. The landlords of those apartments, smelling profit, would find a way around anti-eviction laws, kick out the working-class people, and rent to...




2017-05-22T09:46:47-07:00

**Live from the Orange-Haired Baboon Page**: No, Marcolito. 66 million of us voted against Trump. 63 million of you voted for him. We-the-people did not get what we voted for: we got what you voted for. Man up, for a change: **Marco Rubio**: _‘People Got What They Voted For’_: "People got what they voted for. They elected him... >...I don’t understand why people are that shocked.... [It's] not much different from his very unconventional campaign. And that’s what the American people voted for..."




2017-05-22T09:33:08-07:00

**Live from the Orange-Haired Baboon Cage** Shame on you, General McMaster! If you are going to work for a liar, you need to have a very good memory: **Esme Cribb**: _McMaster Says He Doesn’t Remember If Trump Told Russians Comey Was ‘Nut Job’_: "“I don’t remember exactly what the President said,” McMaster said...




2017-05-22T09:30:13-07:00

**Must-Read**: Endorse. **Matthew Yglesias**: _The Case for Impeaching Trump—and Fast_: "Andrew Johnson... the move... to remove him... reeked... of...resolv[ing] a policy dispute by ginning up a legal one... >...Clinton’s impeachment... the opposite problem. The charges... ha[d] too little to do with the duties and responsibilities of his high office. Republicans had hoped a sex scandal would damage Clinton’s approval ratings, it didn’t really, and then they went berserk. The exception that proves the rule is Richard Nixon, whose misdeeds were legitimately “high crimes.”... His downfall represents a kind of founding myth of modern American civic culture, complete with a Robert Redford movie that reserves a key heroic role for conservative icon Barry Goldwater. The question that faces Congress today is whether the Trump case is more like Nixon or closer to Clinton or Johnson. And the answer is that it’s... highly Nixonian.... >Donald Trump is charged with misconduct that is serious and directly relevant to his public office but that isn’t simply a reiteration of longstanding ideological disagreements in American life.... Impeachment... is... clumsy and rare... not so much [because] presidential misconduct is rare as that replacing the incumbent president of the United States with his hand-picked vice president is...




2017-05-22T09:30:08-07:00

**Should-Read: Larry Summers**: _5 Suggestions for Avoiding Another Banking Collapse_: "First, it is essential to take a dynamic view of capital... >...Second, a crucial challenge... is assuring prompt responses to deteriorating conditions that do not set off vicious cycles. Markets were sending clear signals of major problems in the financial sector well in advance of the events of the fall of 2008 but the regulatory community did not even limit bank dividend payouts, even after the experience at Bear Stearns, which had been deemed "very well capitalized" even as it was failing. Current experiences in Europe where some institutions have a price-to-book ratio of barely 0.35 and have not yet been forced to raise capital are not encouraging about lessons learned.... >Third, regulators need to be attentive to franchise value.... Regulatory costs are an especially large issue for smaller banks.... Fourth, bankers may be more right in their concerns about increased costs of capital and its effect on lending than economists usually suggest.... Fifth, it is high time we move beyond a sterile debate between more and less regulation. No one who is reasonable can doubt that inadequate regulation contributed to what happened in 2008 or suppose that market discipline...




2017-05-22T04:24:44-07:00

**Live from the Orange-Haired Baboon Cage: Matt Taibbi**: _Roger Ailes Was One of the Worst Americans Ever_: "Ailes was the Christopher Columbus of hate... >...He saw money laying around in giant piles... all that was needed to pick it up was a) the total abandonment of any sense of decency or civic duty in the news business, and b) the factory-like production of news stories that spoke to Americans' worst fantasies about each other. Like many con artists, he reflexively targeted the elderly–"I created a TV network for people from 55 to dead," he told Joan Walsh–where he saw billions could be made mining terrifying storylines about the collapse of the simpler America such viewers remembered, correctly or (more often) incorrectly, from their childhoods...




2017-05-22T09:57:06-07:00

**Must-Watch: Heather Boushey et al.**: _"After Piketty" panel at the Graduate Center, CUNY_: "Heather Boushey, Paul Krugman, Branko Milanovic, and Salvatore Morelli discuss After Piketty at the Graduate Center of CUNY on May 11, 2017. _After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality_ ---- ---- **Janet Gornick**: Good evening. Welcome to the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. My name is Janet Gornick. I am professor of political science and sociology here at the Graduate Center, and Director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality. The Stone Center is a research center here focused on the study of income and wealth disparities. Among our many activities is housing the United States Office of LIS, the cross-national data archive located in Luxembourg. The Stone Center is co-sponsoring this evening's event. In my role as director, I have the pleasure of welcoming all of you. And to those of you watching the livestream, thanks for joining us. We convene this evening for a conversation about a new book titled _After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality_. In this volume the authors of 22 essays reflect on the enormously influential book by Thomas Piketty, _Capital in the 21st Century_,... Must-Watch: Heather Boushey et al.: "After Piketty" panel at the Graduate Center, CUNY: "Heather Boushey, Paul Krugman, Branko Milanovic, and Salvatore Morelli discuss After Piketty at the Graduate Center of CUNY on May 11, 2017. http://equitablegrowth.org/equitablog/after-piketty-panel-at-the-graduate-center-cuny/ width="650" height="366" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WPzSx9ZHRp4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality http://amzn.to/2q0TevJ Janet Gornick: Good evening. Welcome to the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. My name is Janet Gornick. I am professor of political science and sociology here at the Graduate Center, and Director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality. The Stone Center is a research center here focused on the study of income and wealth disparities. Among our many activities is housing the United States Office of LIS, the cross-national data archive located in Luxembourg. The Stone Center is co-sponsoring this evening's event. In my role as director, I have the pleasure of welcoming all of you. And to those of you watching the livestream, thanks for joining us. We convene this evening for a conversation about a new book titled After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality. In this volume the authors of 22 essays reflect on the enormously influential book by Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century, which was published in 2013 by Harvard University Press. Tonight we have on stage four of the authors in the new volume: Paul Krugman, Branko Milanovic, Salvatore Morelli, and Heather Boushey. Heather also served as one of the editors of the volume. Starting in just a few minutes the four of them are going to present and assess highlights from the new collection. Note that we were expecting Suresh Naidu, assistant professor of economics at Columbia, but he had to withdraw due to the impending arrival of a baby, who seemed to decide to want to appear this afternoon. We thought that was a reasonable excuse. As luck would have it, Salvatore Morelli, another one of the authors, was in town. At 4:30 p.m., he agreed to step in Thank you, Salvatore. That's what you call a last-minute save. Before I turn this stage over to them, I want to tell you why my colleagues and I at the Graduate Center and at the Stone Center were espec[...]



For the Weekend: "Snatch the Pebble from My Hand, Grasshopper..."

2017-05-20T15:03:01-07:00

..."

https://www.youtube.com/nHiWW96SS

width="650" height="366" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NnHiWW96SSg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>..." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnHiWW96SSg&ab_channel=penname68





2017-05-20T14:09:44-07:00

**Should-Read: Bridget Ansel**: _Weekend Reading: “Mind the Gap” Edition_: "Alana Semuels reports... a growing number of men... turning towards jobs...traditionally dominated by women, especially within... healthcare sector... >...Tanvi Misra writes about new research finding that between 1880 and 2010, black Americans had much lower rates of upward mobility compared to their white counterparts.... Conor Dougherty looks at how a steady rise in interest rates are deterring people from buying new homes.... Michael Hiltzik writes about how the growing disparities in life expectancy is making Social Security less progressive...




2017-05-20T13:57:27-07:00

**Must-Read: Dara Lind**: _It’s becoming increasingly clear that Jared Kushner is part of Trump’s Russia problem_: "Jared Kushner: the young, pragmatic, hardheaded businessman out to modernize the US government and moderate the worst tendencies of his father-in-law—Donald Trump... >...But what if... Jared is not a panacea... but one of its biggest problems? As the Trump administration’s been sent into a death spiral... Kushner hasn’t been the “adult in the room”.... He’s been urging aggression and retaliation.... Somebody in the White House is deeply worried about what might happen if Kushner were included in the [Russia] probe. As Trump deals with scandals surrounding... Flynn and... Manafort, now the family businessman could have another problem right inside his own house...