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We the People



National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen hosts "We The People," a weekly balanced conversation with leading scholars of all viewpoints on contemporary and historical topics about the United States Constitution. Please rate and review o



Copyright: Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.
 



Facebook and the Future of Democracy

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 15:01:00 -0000

Jeffrey Rosen discusses the recent Facebook hearingsand the broader impact of social media on free speech and democracy with Nate Persily of Stanford Law and Kate Klonick of Yale Law School.


Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.





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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/MC5V6F0DOog/PPY5603466443.mp3




Justice Breyer on the First Amendment

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 16:46:00 -0000

Our president and CEO, Jeffrey Rosen sits down with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute in Boston. They discuss the First Amendment, hate speech, the Citizens United decision, and other free speech cases.

Stephen G. Breyer  is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” 


Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/3ZA6ckrgVec/PPY7515132718.mp3




President Trump and the Federal Judiciary

Thu, 05 Apr 2018 18:33:11 -0000

When President Donald Trump took office last year, there were over 100 federal court vacancies, roughly twice as many as when President Barack Obama faced the same situation in 2009. Since then, President Trump has been nominating judges and having nominees confirmed at “record speed,” leading many senators from both sides of the aisle—from Senator Ted Cruz to Senator Chris Coons—to  assert that the most long-lasting and significant legacy to the Trump administration “will be the men and women appointed and confirmed to the federal bench.”  This topic and others were part of the Federal Bar Association’s annual mid-year meeting in Washington, D.C.

John Malcolm is Vice President of the Institute for Constitutional Government and Director of the Meese Center for Legal & Judicial Studies and Senior Legal Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, where he oversees the Heritage Foundation’s work to increase understanding of the Constitution and the rule of law.

Elizabeth Wydra  is President of the Constitutional Accountability Center. From 2008-2016, she served as the CAC’s Chief Counsel, representing the Center as well as constitutional scholars and historians, state and local government organizations, and groups such as the League of Women Voters and the AARP.

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” He is also a professor at The George Washington University Law School, and a contributing editor for The Atlantic. 

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/ASWS9hH9BF8/PPY1835446356.mp3




Hamilton: The Constitutional clashes that shaped a nation

Thu, 29 Mar 2018 14:55:00 -0000

This week, the National Constitution Center celebrates the March 2018 opening of its new exhibit, Hamilton: The Constitutional Clashes That Shaped a Nation. This compelling new exhibit highlights the competing ideas of Alexander Hamilton and his legendary rivals, including Madison, Jefferson, Adams, and Burr, and the personalities and constitutional debates that shaped America. The exhibit also provides an intimate look into Hamilton’s enduring role in the constitutional and political arguments that continue to create sparks to this day.

Joining us to discuss the debut of this fascinating new exhibit and the life and constitutional legacy of Alexander Hamilton are two of America’s leading scholars of Hamilton and the Founding.

Jay Cost is a political historian and journalist and a contributing editor at The Weekly Standard and a contributor to the National Review. He is the author of the new book The Price of Greatness: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and the Creation of American Oligarchy.

Nancy Isenberg is an American historian, and T. Harry Williams Professor of history at Louisiana State University. She is the author of Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr, and co-author (with Andrew Burstein) of a dual biography of Madison and Jefferson. 

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.



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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/Y2X5DjCIyuo/PPY2085284652.mp3




William Howard Taft and the Constitution

Thu, 22 Mar 2018 21:52:02 -0000

In his new book for The American Presidents Series, the National Constitution Center’s President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen argues that William Howard Taft was our most judicial president and presidential Chief Justice, and explores Taft’s crucial role in shaping how America balances populism with the rule of law. In this exclusive book launch held at the Constitution Center on March 20, Mr. Rosen was interviewed by Judge Douglas Ginsburg of the U.S Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, who calls Taft “the most under-appreciated constitutional figure since George Mason.” 

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Media Files:
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Trump, Tariffs, and Trade

Thu, 15 Mar 2018 18:46:31 -0000

Over the past few months, President Trump has announced new tariffs on imported goods from solar panels and washing machines to steel and aluminum. He has also taken swift executive action to block international mergers that he has deemed harmful to U.S. interests from occurring, and has even said he would consider withdrawing from NAFTA and related trade agreements. President Trump’s protectionist policies are a reversal of mostly free-trade orientated policies of past administrations, and his actions raise important constitutional questions about the extent of executive power over trade policy, separation of powers and the non-delegation doctrine, as well as the future of U.S. and global trade.

Timothy Meyer is a Professor of Law at Vanderbilt Law School. He is an expert in public international law, with an emphasis on international economic and energy law. He previously worked as a Legal Advisor for the Department of State, and clerked for now-Justice Neil Gorsuch while he was on the 10th Circuit.

Steve Charnovitz is Associate Professor of Law at George Washington University Law School. He is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Law Institute, and the author of many publications including The Path of World Trade Law in the 21st Century.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.





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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/ABiVRqOoKbY/PPY9594833886.mp3




Workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation

Thu, 08 Mar 2018 16:09:00 -0000

Can an employment lawsuit be based on the premise that discrimination based on sexual orientation is a Title VII violation under the Civil Rights Act of 1964? On Feb. 26, 2018, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals said in a 10-3 decision in Zarda v. Altitude Express Inc. that sexual orientation discrimination constitutes a form of discrimination “because of . . . sex,” in violation of Title VII.

Some legal experts have predicted that the case might eventually make its way to the Supreme Court. Last April, the Seventh Circuit ruled in a separate case that Title VII could be applied to a similar workplace situation. But the Supreme Court passed on a third case, out of Georgia, that dealt with the same issue.

Joining us on this podcast are two experts with different takes on this question.               

John Eastman is Henry Salvatori Professor of Law and Community Service
and Former Dean at Chapman University Law School. He is also the Director of the University’s Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence.

Suzanne Goldberg is Herbert and Doris Wechsler Clinical Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, where she also directs the Law School’s Center for Gender and Sexuality Law and its Sexuality and Gender Law Clinic.

National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen moderates the discussion.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.







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Media Files:
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The United States v. Microsoft

Thu, 01 Mar 2018 16:52:08 -0000

Can the federal government compel a U.S.-based email provider to turn over its records as part of a criminal investigation when those records are located outside of the country?

The United States v. Microsoft case pending before the Supreme Court could have big implications for law enforcement, consumer privacy and the business operations of many companies that do business overseas.

The Microsoft case deals with a specific question: If a U.S. provider of email services must comply with a probable-cause-based warrant (issued under 18 U.S.C. § 2703) by disclosing in the United States electronic communications within that provider’s control, even if the provider has decided to store that material abroad.

Joining us to discuss these important issues are two leading experts on the case.

Benjamin Battles is the solicitor general of Vermont, which filed an amicus brief with 34 other states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico in support of the federal government in United States v. Microsoft.

Vivek Krishnamurthy is a Clinical Instructor in Harvard Law School's Cyberlaw Clinic. He specializes in the international aspects of internet governance and on the human rights challenges associated with offering new internet-based services in different legal environments around the world.
Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.






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Mandatory union fees and the First Amendment

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:09:51 -0000

Alicia Hickok and Eugene Volokh join National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss a major Supreme Court case about public-union dues.

The Supreme Court is considering arguments in a case that could have a huge effect on public-section unions and their membership.

The case of Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) will be heard on February 26 at the Court. The question in front of the nine Justices is if public-sector “agency shop” arrangements -- payments that workers represented by a union must pay even if they are not dues-paying members -- should be invalidated under the First Amendment.

The Supreme Court said in Abood v. Detroit Board of Education (1977) that government employees who don’t belong to a union can be required to pay for union contract negotiating costs that benefit to all public employees, including non-union members.

The Abood decision has been challenged in court several times, and an evenly divided Court couldn’t decide a similar case, Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, in 2016.  This time, a full Court will consider the issue.

Alicia Hickok is a Partner at the law firm Drinker Biddle and a Lecturer in law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She wrote an amicus brief in the Janus case on behalf of the Rutherford Institute, siding with Janus’s position.

Eugene Volokh is Gary T. Schwartz Distinguished Professor of Law at UCLA Law School. He co-wrote an amicus brief in Janus with Will Baude siding with the union.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.




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Media Files:
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A conversation with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:40:00 -0000

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joins National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen for a wide-ranging conversation in celebration of the 25th anniversary of her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In the 75-minute interview, Justice Ginsburg talks about the #MeToo movement, confessed her affection for Millennials, discussed the Supreme Court cases she’d like to see overturned, and told some personal stories about the progress women’s rights have made—while reminding the audience of just how recently gender discrimination in American law seemed not only normal but entrenched.

The event took place in Philadelphia on February 12, 2018, in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania Law School as the Owen J. Roberts Memorial Lecture in Constitutional Law.







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Media Files:
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Jeffrey Rosen answers your constitutional questions

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 18:32:39 -0000

In this episode, we’re answering questions that you, our listeners, have been asking about the Constitution, with the National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen.

We’ve been collecting your questions over the past few months from social media, our weekly newsletter Constitution Weekly, and email.

For starters, here were some of the questions discussed in this podcast:

Why is the Ninth Amendment so important to understanding the Constitution? What are the unenumerated rights provided for in the Constitution and what were the big arguments about them in the past 100 years? What is the basis for the idea of the separation of church and state as understood by the Founders? And what are the theories of interpreting the Constitution that most apply to you?

Jeffrey Rosen is president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates the discussion.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/iD6IiOS0vTE/PPY4122871875.mp3




History of Impeachment: From Andrew Johnson to Today

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 15:24:38 -0000

In anticipation of the 150th anniversary of the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, on Feb. 24, we look at the history of presidential impeachments, the interpretation of the Impeachment Clause, and the application to current day controversies.

Joining us to discuss this important historical episode are two of America’s leading scholars on the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.

Keith Whittington is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University. He co-wrote the IC explainers on the Impeachment Clause with Neil Kinkopf.

David O Stewart is a writer, historian, and former appellate lawyer. He is the author of many books including Impeached: The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln’s Legacy.

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates the discussion.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.








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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/CASz5N4HQ78/PPY4450683722.mp3




The Constitution in Year One of the Trump administration

Thu, 25 Jan 2018 21:16:00 -0000

On January 20, 2017, President Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States. In the year since he took office, a variety of novel constitutional issues have arisen, from the interpretation of the Emoluments Clauses, to the constitutionality of Executive Orders on immigration, and even the meaning of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment.

In this episode, we look at the past year of the Trump presidency and what it means for our Constitution. Joining us to discuss the past year of constitutional debates are two of America’s leading scholars of constitutional law.

Josh Blackman is an Associate Professor of Law at the South Texas College of Law in Houston who specializes in constitutional law, the United States Supreme Court, and the intersection of law and technology. He filed an amicus brief in the CREW v. Trump and DC and Maryland v. Trump lawsuits on behalf of another legal scholar, Seth Barrett Tillman.

Lisa Manheim is an associate professor of law at the University of Washington School of Law and co-author of a recently published book, intended for lawyers and non-lawyers alike, called The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen’s Guide to the Law.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/FNAzPRwIb6Q/PPY5740479275.mp3




Federalism under President Trump

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 23:32:37 -0000

The relationship between the federal  government and the states is currently at the center of controversies about sports gambling, marijuana use and sanctuary cities policies.

In the past year, these and related issues have come before federal courts, including the Supreme Court.
In December 2017, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Christie v. NCAA, a case that examines whether a federal law that prohibits the modification or repeal of state gambling laws violates the Tenth Amendment and the anti-commandeering doctrine that bars the federal government from imposing certain costs on local government.

The anti-commandeering doctrine is also at the heart of several federal lawsuits about the legal status of sanctuary cities.

And Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ decision to reverse marijuana prosecution guidelines for federal attorneys in states with legal recreational marijuana has broad potential constitutional implications.

Joining Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, to discuss these questions are two leading national constitutional experts.

Michael Dorf is Robert S. Stevens Professor of Law at Cornell Law School.

Ilya Shapiro is a senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute and editor-in-chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/RCYWzd4akTQ/PPY7772644155.mp3




Undocumented teens and abortion

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 16:28:31 -0000

This week, we look at the case Hargan v. Garza, a lawsuit filed by the ACLU on behalf of undocumented immigrantthat asks if the federal government can deny access to an abortion for pregnant undocumented teens.

As of January 11, 2018, the Supreme Court was considering the case in private conference.

Joining us to discuss this important question are two of America’s leading experts on constitutional and family law.

Catherine Glenn Foster
is President and CEO of Americans United for Life. She served as Counsel of Record for amicus curiae Alliance Defending Freedom’s Amicus Brief in Planned Parenthood v. Abbott, which defended Texas’ healthcare regulations around abortion clinics.

Leah Litman
is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of California, Irvine School of Law. She co-authored Petitioner’s Brief in Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt case, which successfully challenged Texas’ healthcare regulations around abortion clinics.

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” He is also a professor at The George Washington University Law School, and a contributing editor for The Atlantic. 

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

And don't forget to take our new podcast survey at
constitutioncenter.org/survey

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/MtI_tlx6E7I/PPY1739334231.mp3




Gerrymandering and American democracy

Thu, 04 Jan 2018 11:29:15 -0000

In the Gill case this year, the Supreme Court might determine the constitutional future of partisan gerrymandering.

Scholars and advocates have been discussing the arguments at the heart of the case – as well as those involved in related cases heading toward the Supreme Court.

At a December event at the National Constitution Center, Caroline Fredrickson, president of the American Constitution Society, Nolan McCarty, professor of politics and public affairs at Princeton University, and David Wasserman, house editor for The Cook Political Report, explored the practical effects of gerrymandering, including its impact on polarization and competitive elections.

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates this discussion.

To learn more about this week's topic, visit our podcast resources page to explore show notes, guest bios, related Interactive Constitution essays, and more.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org









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Media Files:
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The existential threat of big tech

Wed, 27 Dec 2017 14:31:20 -0000

Franklin Foer, national correspondent for The Atlantic, explores how tech platforms like Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google have transformed the way we think and produced a new culture of misinformation that is trampling values such as privacy, autonomy, and individuality. 

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates this discussion, hosted at the Center in November 2017.

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Media Files:
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Sexual Harassment Law Under the Constitution

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 16:41:05 -0000

Gail Heriot and Diane Rosenfeld join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss how several federal laws may work to address sexual harassment and assault claims.

Gail Heriot is Professor of Law at the University of San Diego Law School and a Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She is also a contributor to our Interactive Constitution on the 19th Amendment.

Diane Rosenfeld  is a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School and Director, Gender Violence Program, Harvard Law School. She previously served as the served as the Senior Counsel to the Office of Violence Against Women Office of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” He is also a professor at The George Washington University Law School, and a contributing editor for The Atlantic. 

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

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Media Files:
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The Constitution and the Mueller investigation

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 20:51:51 -0000

In May, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI director Robert Mueller as special counsel to investigate allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

Since Mueller’s appointment, the probe has raised a number of constitutional questions, ranging from whether the president can legally fire Mueller and end the investigation to what remedies exist should Mueller find evidence of collusion. Specifically, the investigation has led to debates about the nature of potential obstruction of justice charges against a President; if a President can actually be charged with obstruction; and the role of Congress in the investigative process.

National Constitution Center Jeffrey Rosen moderates a discussion about these issues two leading experts on these topics: Laura Donohue and Sai Prakash.

Donohue is Professor of Law at Georgetown Law, Director of Georgetown’s Center on National Security and the Law, and Director of the Center on Privacy and Technology.

Prakash is James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Paul G. Mahoney Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org








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Media Files:
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Net neutrality at a legal crossroads

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 18:13:09 -0000

Gus Hurwitz and Travis LeBlanc join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen for an engaging debate about the potential repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules.

To learn more about this week’s topic, visit our podcast resources page at constitutioncenter.org/debate/podcasts. Visit the resources page to explore show notes, guest bios, related Interactive Constitution essays, and more.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app. We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. 





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The Masterpiece Cakeshop case

Thu, 30 Nov 2017 19:28:31 -0000

Vanita Gupta and Michael Moreland join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to preview next week’s Supreme Court arguments about a dispute over a cake shop owner’s right to not create a cake for a same-sex marriage event.

Gupta is the president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. The Leadership Conference joined an amicus brief in this case with other civil rights groups (NAACP, Southern Poverty Law Center), siding with the Civil Rights Division.  Moreland is University Professor of Law and Religion and Director of the Eleanor H. McCullen Center for Law, Religion and Public Policy at Villanova Law School. He joined an amicus brief along with 34 other legal scholars supporting the cake shop owner.

To learn more about this week’s topic, visit our podcast resources page at constitutioncenter.org/debate/podcasts. Visit the resources page to explore show notes, guest bios, related Interactive Constitution essays, and more.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app. We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. 







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The future of digital privacy

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 15:33:35 -0000

Alex Abdo of the Knight First Amendment Institute and Orin Kerr of George Washington Law debate whether warrantless searches and seizures of cellphone records violate the Fourth Amendment in a special podcast hosted at the National Press Club.

In late November, the Supreme Court will tackle a very modern question about the venerable Fourth Amendment: Does it allow police to see where you’ve been for the past four months by looking at your cellphone data without a warrant?

In Carpenter v. United States, which will be argued on November 29, cell number data placed a robbery suspect, Timothy Ivory Carpenter, near the scenes of several crimes, and at about the same time as those crimes happened.  The phone information was used as evidence leading to Carpenter’s conviction on robbery charges and he is serving a long prison sentence.

The Carpenter case has spurred a flurry of activity among Fourth Amendment scholars. Carpenter’s lawyers believe modern cellphone records are fundamentally different than traditional phone records cited in a 1979 Supreme Court decision at permits such searches without warrants. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled against Carpenter and said the Fourth Amendment’s search warrant requirement only protects what was actually said in phone conversations. And it upheld a third-party doctrine that the phone records belong to the phone company, they aren’t private information.

Note: Audio for this podcast was recorded at an October 26, 2017 live event at the National Press Club sponsored by the American Constitution Society and The Federalist Society and presented with the generous support of the Bernstein Family Foundation.









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Media Files:
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Tax reform and the Constitution

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 15:30:00 -0000

Joseph Fiskin from the University of Texas at Austin Law School and Steven Willis from the University of Florida, Levin College of Law join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to look at potential constitutional issues related to tax reform measures under debate at Congress.

Please rate and review our podcasts on iTunes. And visit our Resources page at constitutioncenter.org/podcasts to comment on this podcast, and get extra information about this important debate.












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Is the fight against ISIS legal?

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 14:12:00 -0000

Bruce Ackerman and Chris Fonzone join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss a lawsuit challenging several congressional actions used to authorize United States military actions against ISIS and other terror groups.








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Deconstructing the administrative state

Thu, 02 Nov 2017 17:20:00 -0000

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump ran on a platform of rolling back the “administrative state.” Since taking office, President Trump has followed through on some of his campaign promises, signing various Executive Orders aimed at undoing previous Executive Orders issued by President Obama. What will be the impact of the president’s regulatory agenda? Is Trump restoring constitutional order and checks and balances through his executive orders?

Joining us to discuss these important questions and more are two of America’s leading scholars of administrative law.

Dan Hemel is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. His research focuses on taxation, risk regulation, and innovation law. His current projects examine the effect of tax expenditures on inequality; the role of cost-benefit analysis in tax administration; and the use of tax incentives to encourage knowledge production. He has served as visiting counsel at the Joint Committee on Taxation. He blogs at Take Care.

Karen Harned is Executive Director of the National Federation of Independent Business Small Business Legal Center, a post she has held since April 2002.  Prior to joining the Legal Center, Ms. Harned was an attorney at a Washington, D.C. law firm specializing in food and drug law, where she represented several small and large businesses and their respective trade associations before Congress and federal agencies.  Her organization, NFIB, was involved in litigation against the Affordable Care Act, in NFIB v. Sebelius, and is currently involved as an amicus in the NAM case before the Court.

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Media Files:
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The Emoluments Clause in court

Thu, 26 Oct 2017 17:39:00 -0000

Josh Blackman and Jed Shugerman join the National Constitution Center’s Jeffrey Rosen to discuss President Trump’s alleged violation of the Foreign and Domestic Emoluments Clauses.

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Media Files:
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The evolution of voting rights

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:29:00 -0000

Debo Adegbile and Will Consovoy join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss constitutional challenges to the Voting Rights Act and election law.

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Media Files:
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The state of the Second Amendment

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 18:40:00 -0000

In the aftermath of the Las Vegas tragedy, renewed attention has come to controversy over the constitutional status of guns in the United States and the role of the Second Amendment.

Joining National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss this central question are two of the leading scholars on this subject.

Saul Cornell is the Paul and Diane Guenther Chair in American History at Fordham University.

Nelson Lund is University Professor at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School.

Note to listeners: Take the Panoply user survey at survey.panoply.fm.






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The future of gerrymandering

Sat, 07 Oct 2017 00:29:03 -0000

Michael Morley and Daniel Tokaji join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss Supreme Court arguments in a potential landmark case about gerrymandering.

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Media Files:
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The First Amendment and hate speech

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 23:58:00 -0000

Shannon Gilreath and Keith Whittington join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss if the courts can regulate hate speech.












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The Supreme Court’s next term

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 18:13:17 -0000

Michael Dorf and Ilya Shapiro join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to preview a potentially blockbuster Supreme Court term starting in early October.







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What would Madison think today?

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 16:08:00 -0000

In commemoration of Constitution Day 2017, we will explore what James Madison would think of today’s presidency, Congress, courts, and media and how we can resurrect Madisonian values today.

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Presidential pardons and the rule of law

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 14:44:16 -0000

Brian Kalt and Margaret Love join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen in a broad-ranging discussion about the President’s constitutional powers to issue pardons.

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Media Files:
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Charlottesville and free assembly

Thu, 31 Aug 2017 18:48:56 -0000

Protests in Charlottesville, Baltimore, and Ferguson have prompted many questions about the right to protest in our country. What restrictions can governments place on assemblies? What responsibilities do governments have to protect protestors? How should we think about the right to protest in a free society?

John Inazu and Burt Neuborne join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss Charlottesville and the right to free assembly.

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War powers and national security

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:17:44 -0000

Article I of the Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war, raise armies, and regulate forces. Yet Article II names the President the Commander-in-Chief and vests him with the executive power. Who should be in charge of the nation’s security? What does the Constitution say about the relationship between Congress and the President in wartime?With rising tensions with North Korea, Afghanistan, and the global war on terror, these questions are as important as ever.Joining National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss these important questions are two leading scholars of national security law.Sai Prakash is the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Imperial from the Beginning: The Constitution of the Original Executive.  He has written extensively on the domestic war powers of Congress, the powers of the presidency, and the Constitution.Deborah Pearlstein is an associate professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Her work on national security and the separation of powers has appeared widely in law journals and the popular press. Today, she serves on the editorial board of the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy.CREDITSToday’s show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Ugonna Eze and Lana Ulrich. Research was provided by Lana and Tom Donnelly.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.And finally, despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Trump, Twitter and the First Amendment

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 23:21:30 -0000

Can President Trump block citizens from following his own Twitter feed?

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University has filed suit on behalf of several Twitter users who were denied the ability to follow the President’s Twitter feed after they made comments critical of him. The Institute claims that the ban is a violation of a First Amendment right to free speech and free assembly, and that a public official’s social media page is a designated public forum.

The Justice Department, defending President Trump, says the courts are powerless to tell President Trump how he can manage his private Twitter handle and the Institute’s requests would “send the First Amendment deep into uncharted waters.”

Joining our We The People podcast to discuss these arguments are Alex Abdo, a senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute and Eugene Volokh, the Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law.


CREDITS

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Ugonna Eze and Lana Ulrich. Research was provided by Lana and Tom Donnelly.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

And finally, despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.




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Media Files:
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Civil Rights And Constitutional Change

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 09:00:00 -0000

National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen moderates a special discussion about the 1963 Birmingham Church bombing and how it impacted the meaning of equality in America.

In this event, held on June 16 in Philadelphia, bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, Washington Post editor and author of Kennedy and King Steven Levingston, and Philadelphia Orchestra composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe spoke with Rosen about the bombing’s legacy could also bring about constitutional change.






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Media Files:
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George Washington’s warning to future generations

Thu, 03 Aug 2017 14:21:13 -0000

John Avlon, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, discusses the first president’s momentous and prescient farewell address to the nation and how the address could help reunite America through the lessons rooted in Washington’s experience as described in his new book, Washington’s Farewell: The Founding Father’s Warning to Future Generations.

Michael Gerhardt, scholar-in-residence at the National Constitution Center, moderates. the discussion.









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Media Files:
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Jeffrey Rosen at the Chautauqua Institution

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 17:06:00 -0000

In a special We The People podcast event, National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen talks about the importance of the Supreme Court’s future at the famed Chautauqua Institution. Rosen spoke to an enthusiastic crowd on July 26, 2017 at the Institution in the southwestern part of New York State, which was founded in 1874. Among the upcoming cases Rosen discussed were free speech and privacy issues in front of the Supreme Court during its next term, which starts in October. In particular, the case of Carpenter v. United States is expected to be one of the biggest decisions of the upcoming term, Rosen said. The Carpenter case involves the ability of police to seize a cellphone using a statute, and not probable cause under the Fourth Amendment, to see information about its user’s locations over a several-month period. Also, Rosen previewed an important religious freedom case before the Court in its next term, Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, about compelled free speech. Today’s show was edited by David Stotz. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at [email protected].Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The debate over President Trump's election commission

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:20:47 -0000

Deborah Archer of New York Law School and Derek Muller of Pepperdine University discuss the agenda and challenges of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.

Read about the 24th Amendment on the National Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Jackie McDermott. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for serving as host.

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Media Files:
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Should the 17th Amendment be repealed?

Thu, 13 Jul 2017 09:00:00 -0000

David Schleicher of Yale University and Todd Zywicki of George Mason University discuss the text, history, and future of this contested amendment.New essays are now available on the Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution. Read about the 17th Amendment, the 20th Amendment, the 24th Amendment, and the 25th Amendment.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Today’s show was edited by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The future of digital free speech

Thu, 06 Jul 2017 17:58:38 -0000

At a live event in Los Angeles, CA, Cindy Cohn of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Judge Alex Kozinski of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and Eugene Volokh of UCLA discuss current debates about speech online.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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What just happened at the Supreme Court?

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 20:22:06 -0000

Brianne Gorod of the Constitutional Accountability Center and Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute break down the busy final days of the Court's 2016-2017 term.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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EXTRA: A celebration of Lyle Denniston

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 20:38:00 -0000

Legendary Supreme Court reporter Lyle Denniston reflects on the Court, the Constitution, and his long career.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitterusing @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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Government leaks and the Espionage Act at 100

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 15:03:40 -0000

Cybersecurity expert Paul Rosenzweig and Stephen Vladeck of the University of Texas explore the constitutional debate over leaks and their publication.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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Loving v. Virginia at 50

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 15:47:27 -0000

Steve Calabresi of Northwestern University and Sheryll Cashin of Georgetown University discuss the landmark case and its constitutional legacy.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/o5qcuJ2M-v0/PP9147917508.mp3




The soul of the First Amendment

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 17:55:14 -0000

Celebrated First Amendment attorney Floyd Abrams examines the degree to which American law protects free speech more often, more intensely, and more controversially than anywhere else in the world.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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EXTRA: Trump, Comey and obstruction of justice

Mon, 05 Jun 2017 15:25:00 -0000

Alan Dershowitz and Laura Donohue join our Jeffrey Rosen to discuss the legal and constitutional issues surrounding President Donald Trump’s handling of the Russia probe.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacciand Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Continue today’s conversation onFacebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.










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Media Files:
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Your constitutional questions, answered

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 15:04:12 -0000

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, answers listener questions about the Preamble, judicial power, and more.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci and Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom for serving as guest inquisitor.

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Media Files:
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The life and legacy of John Marshall

Thu, 25 May 2017 17:33:00 -0000

Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina and Kevin Walsh of the University of Richmond explore the influential career of the nation's longest-serving chief justice.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci and Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for serving as guest host.

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Media Files:
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Will the President's travel ban hold up in court?

Thu, 18 May 2017 20:24:43 -0000

Leah Litman of the University of California, Irvine, and Earl Maltz of Rutgers University discuss the latest legal developments and how the ban may ultimately fare at the Supreme Court.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

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Media Files:
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Exploring the debate over 'sanctuary cities'

Thu, 11 May 2017 18:40:26 -0000

Elizabeth Price Foley of Florida International University and Cristina Rodriguez of Yale University discuss President Trump's executive order on immigration and how Congress could respond to sanctuary cities going forward.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebookand Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/lqmH7Nv8j7Y/PP5620908705.mp3




EXTRA: Is the firing of James Comey a constitutional crisis?

Thu, 11 May 2017 09:04:05 -0000

In a special bonus episode, Josh Blackman of the South Texas College of Law in Houston and David Cole of the American Civil Liberties Union discuss what President Trump's firing of the FBI director means for our constitutional system.

If you like what we did today - a shorter episode on breaking constitutional news - let us know at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/LPa2EgsECgE/PPY1335893295.mp3




James Wilson and the creation of the Constitution

Thu, 04 May 2017 15:40:09 -0000

Christopher Yoo of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Tom Donnelly of the National Constitution Center discuss the Pennsylvania Federalist and America's greatest proponent of popular sovereignty.American Treasures: Documenting the Nation's Founding is now open at the Constitution Center.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/X8GL3rKKJrQ/PP6012931029.mp3




The Madisonian Constitution and the future of freedom

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 18:32:31 -0000

In excerpts from Freedom Day 2017, Mickey Edwards and Norm Ornstein reflect on the state of Congress, and George Will offers his take on the future of freedom.Listen to the full program, including great panels on the media, presidency, and more, on our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and David Stotz. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/YnCT0qxPodM/PP6877438105.mp3




Religious liberty at the Supreme Court

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 22:42:00 -0000

Marci Hamilton of the University of Pennsylvania and Hannah Smith of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty discuss the issues and best arguments in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Comer.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/O3ZfHDMIUm4/PP5638467846.mp3




Article I and the role of Congress

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 19:13:43 -0000

In a special event at Columbia University, David Pozen of Columbia and Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz of Georgetown University discuss how to restore the separation of powers.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Zach Morrison and the Columbia chapters of the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society for their partnership in producing this event.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/rFrTTXuLNUQ/PP7127935105.mp3




The history and constitutionality of the filibuster

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 09:00:00 -0000

Richard Arenberg of Brown University and Josh Chafetzof Cornell University discuss the history of the Senate filibuster and whether or not it should be eliminated.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitterusing @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/QdH5sz_SpNY/PP3690124223.mp3




Privacy, equality, and transgender students

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 19:35:16 -0000

Alexandra Brodksy of the National Women's Law Center and Gary McCaleb of the Alliance Defending Freedom discuss whether Title IX or the Constitution bans discrimination on the basis of gender identity.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/B5cJ_JTNrxE/PP7681017958.mp3




The Gorsuch hearings and the future of the Constitution

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 20:52:00 -0000

Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego and Eric Segall of Georgia State University discuss what the hearings reveal about Neil Gorsuch's potential impact on the Supreme Court and constitutional law.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/ZVf6Xmso0bU/PP2918980668.mp3




Property rights at the Supreme Court

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 19:25:56 -0000

David Breemer of the Pacific Legal Foundation and John Echeverria of Vermont Law School discuss the issues in a big case about the Fifth Amendment's Takings Clause.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for hosting this week.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/apelC1sKBlQ/PP2139421251.mp3




The constitutional legacy of Prohibition

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 21:23:00 -0000

Historians Lisa Andersen and Josh Zeitz explore the history and politics of Prohibition, including its impact on federal power and civil liberties.

American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition is now open at the National Constitution Center through July 16. Learn more at constitutioncenter.org.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/Q5AZn1HjhFo/PP8789000827.mp3




The future of federalism

Thu, 02 Mar 2017 21:20:00 -0000

In a special live event at Georgetown University, Josh Blackman of the South Texas College of Law in Houston and Peter Edelman of Georgetown discuss the fate of federalism in the Trump era.Special thanks to Clifton Fels and the Georgetown chapters of the Federalist Society and the American Constitution Society for their partnership in designing and producing a great event.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitterusing @ConstitutionCtr.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/gc7SBtWZaZM/PP8900235979.mp3




Jeffrey Rosen answers your constitutional questions

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 21:44:30 -0000

The president and CEO of the National Constitution Center answers listener questions about sanctuary cities, presidential power, and more.Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and David Stotz. It was produced by Diana Allen and Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Dan Meyer and Lana Ulrich. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for serving as interlocutor. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/E2D9xU_63Vw/PP7589080239.mp3




Presidential succession and the 25th Amendment at 50

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 19:00:00 -0000

Akhil Reed Amar of Yale University and Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute explain how succession works and how it can be improved.It’s time for another edition of “Ask Jeff”! Submit your questions anonymously at bit.ly/askjeffpodcast or tweet them using #AskJeffNCC. Submissions close on Sunday, February 19.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Dan Meyer and Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/0zN-AByl3_s/PP3911105175.mp3




Should Neil Gorsuch be confirmed to the Supreme Court?

Thu, 09 Feb 2017 21:49:42 -0000

Michele Jawando of the Center for American Progress and John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation discuss the judge's record and potential to shape the Court.It's time for another edition of "Ask Jeff"! Submit your questions anonymously at bit.ly/askjeffpodcast or tweet them using #AskJeffNCC.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/Ej8pRzRQ_Bk/PP4423394387.mp3




President Trump's immigration order: Is it legal?

Thu, 02 Feb 2017 19:11:30 -0000

Peter Spiro of Temple University and Anil Kalhan of Drexel University explore the best arguments for and against the President's controversial action on refugees and international travel.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/nC3RRnavZOA/PP6084942896.mp3




Has President Trump violated the Emoluments Clause?

Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:32:39 -0000

Brianne Gorod of the Constitutional Accountability Center and Andy Grewal of the University of Iowa discuss questions about the President's business operations.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe toWe the Peopleand our companion podcast,Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/_aYuGNFbcYg/PP8959218096.mp3




Offensive speech and trademarks at the Supreme Court

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 18:48:15 -0000

Deborah Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina, Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute, and Rebecca Tushnet of Georgetown University discuss Lee v. Tam, a big First Amendment case.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/ezfFV21zJ9g/PP5352915756.mp3




The future of the regulatory state

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 19:17:57 -0000

Gillian Metzger of Columbia University and David Bernstein of George Mason University explain how President Trump, Congress, and the courts may challenge the executive agencies that govern our daily lives.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/RGCtR1oseCM/PP9884556294.mp3




A new look at America's founding

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 21:50:17 -0000

Michael Klarman of Harvard Law School and Patrick Spero of the American Philosophical Society reassess the debates that defined the Founding era.This program was presented live at the Constitution Center on November 14, 2016. You can watch the program on Constitution Daily or at constitutioncenter.org.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast,Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and David Stotz, and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/snY8BA8eTks/PP4159968910.mp3




President Obama's constitutional legacy

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 01:13:12 -0000

Journalists and scholars give their take on the Obama presidency.The speakers are Jonathan Chait of New York magazine, Michael Days of The Philadelphia Daily News, David French and Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review, and Michael Gerhardt, scholar-in-residence at the Constitution Center.This program was presented live at the Constitution Center on November 30, 2016, in partnership with the National Review Institute. You can watch the program here on Constitution Daily or at constitutioncenter.org.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and David Stotz, and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/-2Ga3LWoPVk/PP3985692418.mp3




Akhil Reed Amar on the Bill of Rights

Thu, 22 Dec 2016 20:03:04 -0000

Akhil Reed Amar of Yale University explains the history and importance of the Bill of Rights on its 225th anniversary.This program was presented live at the National Constitution Center on December 15, 2016, as part of the annual Bill of Rights Day Book Festival. You can watch all of the day's conversations on Constitution Daily or at constitutioncenter.org.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and David Stotz, and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/HcGCADEe54U/PP1322194149.mp3




The Bill of Rights at 225

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 22:21:51 -0000

Historians Carol Berkin and David O. Stewart reflect on the history and legacy of the Bill of Rights as it turns 225 years old.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/XA5CX-Wi6H8/PP3009284590.mp3




Is this the end of partisan gerrymandering?

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 21:06:02 -0000

Nicholas Stephanopoulos of the University of Chicago and Michael Morley of Barry University discuss a big Wisconsin case that could reach the Supreme Court.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Should we abolish the Electoral College?

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 20:25:42 -0000

Alex Keyssar of Harvard University and James Ceaser of the University of Virginia explore the history and purpose of the Electoral College.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People, and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The state of campus free speech

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 08:00:00 -0000

Scholars and activists explore the future of free expression at U.S. universities. The speakers are PEN America Executive Director Suzanne Nossel, First Amendment expert Floyd Abrams, University of Missouri student activist Storm Ervin, civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson, and University of Chicago scholar Geoffrey Stone. This live program was presented in partnership with PEN America on November 17, 2016.This show was engineered by David Stotz and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Go to bit.ly/wethepeoplepodcast to share your feedback. The survey closes November 30.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Donald Trump and the Supreme Court

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 22:18:23 -0000

Dahlia Lithwick of Slate and Jonathan Adler of Case Western Reserve University explain how new appointments to the Court could change constitutional law.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Go to bit.ly/wethepeoplepodcast to share your feedback.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Looking ahead to the Trump presidency

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 22:04:35 -0000

Michael Dorf of Cornell University and Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute discuss how the Constitution will restrain or empower the new President.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Go to bit.ly/wethepeoplepodcastto share your feedback.Please subscribe toWe the Peopleand our companion podcast,Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The Fourteenth Amendment and equality under the law

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 21:09:47 -0000

Elizabeth Wydra of the Constitutional Accountability Center and Earl Maltz of Rutgers University discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump approach abortion, same-sex marriage, affirmative action, and more.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe toWe the PeopleandLive at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The Fourth Amendment and civil liberties

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 20:54:33 -0000

Tracey Meares of Yale University and John Stinneford of the University of Florida explore how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump approach policing and privacy.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for hosting this week.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The Second Amendment and gun rights

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 20:42:39 -0000

Joseph Blocher of Duke University and attorney Alan Gura discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump may enforce or undermine the right to bear arms.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for hosting this week.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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The First Amendment and the freedom of expression

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 20:54:00 -0000

Erwin Chemerinsky of the University of California, Irvine, and Bradley Smith of Capital University explore how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump may protect or threaten the freedoms of speech and press.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Article III and the future of the Supreme Court

Thu, 06 Oct 2016 15:48:00 -0000

Daniel Farber of the University of California, Berkeley, and Barry McDonald of Pepperdine University discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump would appoint judges and change constitutional law.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Matt Stanford and Joe Spence at the University of California, Berkeley, for arranging this event.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/6j8TXfJ9I4E/PP7529474363.mp3




What to expect at the Supreme Court this year

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 21:12:34 -0000

John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation and Michele Jawando of the Center for American Progress discuss recent news from the high court and cases to watch in the new term.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/-e2Bj1k5XJs/PP1607841058.mp3




Article V and constitutional change

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 20:37:09 -0000

Michael Rappaport of the University of San Diego and David Strauss of the University of Chicago discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump could change the Constitution.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/ZRTmwp0BZnU/PP2501508698.mp3




Article II and the powers of the President

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 19:33:31 -0000

Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego and Christopher Schroeder of Duke University discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump understand the powers and duties of the nation's chief executive.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/pzpJELLloKc/PP4312301190.mp3




The Constitution at Guantánamo Bay

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 17:17:26 -0000

John Yoo of the University of California, Berkeley, and Karen Greenberg of Fordham University discuss the legal status of detainees and prospects for the prison's closure in the final months of the Obama administration.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/YvbuQZ2AZbE/PP5703149793.mp3




America's biggest constitutional crises

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 20:21:40 -0000

Annette Gordon-Reed of Harvard University, Sean Wilentz of Princeton University, and political journalist Sidney Blumenthal explore how Presidents have confronted the nation's gravest constitutional crises.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Jeffrey Rosen answers your questions about constitutional interpretation

Thu, 25 Aug 2016 19:56:09 -0000

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, answers your questions about progressive originalism, Justice Clarence Thomas, the Civil War, and more.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and David Stotz. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/UWqD0f6rx7k/PP2902759173.mp3




The history and meaning of the 19th Amendment

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 20:04:49 -0000

Gretchen Ritter of Cornell University and Susan Ware explore the history of women's rights and the fight to extend voting rights to all women.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Many thanks and best wishes to Josh Waimberg, who leaves the Center this month.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/Zz_zSxDe-RQ/PP1604959925.mp3




Voting rights in the courts

Thu, 11 Aug 2016 19:09:34 -0000

Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation and Wendy Weiser of the Brennan Center for Justice explore recent court rulings about the right to vote in America.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Many thanks and best wishes to Danieli Evans, who leaves the Center this month.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/k49WqeDu-MQ/PP7450778027.mp3




The presidency of George Washington

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 20:34:28 -0000

Akhil Reed Amar of Yale University, Edward Larson of Pepperdine University, and Douglas Bradburn of George Washington's Mount Vernon explore the constitutional legacy of our nation’s first President.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/li1NR-dIg8Q/PP1059553993.mp3




A constitutional history of the Democratic Party

Thu, 28 Jul 2016 19:44:39 -0000

Political journalist Sidney Blumenthal, Sean Wilentz of Princeton University, and William Forbath of the University of Texas explore the history of the Democrats through a constitutional lens.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/16Stp0zLbFQ/PP3747170610.mp3




A constitutional history of the Republican Party

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 21:02:52 -0000

David French of the National Review and Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina explore the history of the GOP through a constitutional lens.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes or your favorite podcast app.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
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Political parties and the Constitution

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 20:31:58 -0000

James Ceaser of the University of Virginia and Luis Fuentes-Rohwer of Indiana University discuss the role of parties in the American constitutional system.This episode is the first part of a three-part series on political parties and the Constitution.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and [...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/xDsHXLoAoZU/PP6151125631.mp3




A 'deep dive' on the Supreme Court

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 20:38:22 -0000

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, is joined by leading Supreme Court watchers to review the recent term and look ahead to the future.The participants are Neal Katyal of Georgetown University and Hogan Lovells; Judge Nancy Gertner of Harvard University; Nina Totenberg of NPR; Geoffrey Stone of the University of Chicago; and Lawrence Lessig of Harvard University.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this p[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/hU0nbVIuwXM/PP3177223737.mp3




Making sense of an unpredictable year at the Supreme Court

Thu, 30 Jun 2016 20:18:36 -0000

Carrie Severino of the Judicial Crisis Network and Michael Dorf of Cornell Law School explore the biggest cases and trends at the Supreme Court this year.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Danieli Evans. The host of We the Peopl[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/d7pbD2w5bu4/PP6013069627.mp3




The Orlando shooting and the Constitution

Thu, 23 Jun 2016 10:00:00 -0000

Adam Winkler of the University of California, Los Angeles and Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute explore the constitutional debates over gun control and immigration policy.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at Panoply.fm.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Dani[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/uDa2gva0hzc/PP9744438621.mp3




Gawker, Hulk Hogan, and the First Amendment

Thu, 16 Jun 2016 20:07:00 -0000

Jane Kirtley of the University of Minnesota and Amy Gajda of Tulane University examine the Gawker-Hulk Hogan dispute and the tension between press freedom and privacy.Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NCCPrograms/~5/C3Geb92vTMU/PP5236875863.mp3