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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



After 11 years of free service, Twitter considers premium subscription: Why? 

Twitter said Thursday it is considering a paid premium subscription version of its Tweetdeck, looking for a new potential avenue of income. 

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Could the Trump administration send Fethullah Gülen back to Turkey?

Turkey accuses the cleric of being the author of last summer’s failed coup. Whether or not the Trump administration sides with Turkey or European skeptics could shape the course of the war against ISIS.

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What is Earth Hour, and why are the lights out?

From Sydney's Opera House to London's Big Ben and New York's Empire State Building, icons around the world are going dark from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday night 'to help change climate change.'

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With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

The decision to grant asylum to an atheist blogger who spoke crudely of Muslims is sure to anger many, but it may also confirm that an important escape route for political dissidents is still open.

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What Cadbury chocolates reveal about Brexit

Even with Brexit on the horizon, the iconic chocolate company is committed to staying in Britain. But if Cadbury can't boost productivity, higher prices and smaller products may be coming.

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Amazon drone delivers sunscreen: Will this be the future?

The online retailer's delivery drone made its public debut in the United States on Monday.

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Airstrikes in Mosul kill civilians: Are US rules of engagement getting slacker?

Iraqi officers say they're suspending operations against ISIS in Mosul after US-led airstrikes killed as many as 137 civilians this week.

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Obamacare repeal fails: Will Mnuchin tax reforms fare better?

After an effort to 'repeal and replace' Obamacare fell through on Friday, the White House is looking ahead to tax reform. Why Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin seems optimistic.

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In break with Trump administration, California commits to cleaner cars

The sheer size of California’s car market, and a unique waiver from the Clean Air Act, give it an outsized role in determining what comes out of your car’s tailpipe.

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Health-care bill failure spotlights Republican leadership challenges

'We were a 10-year opposition party where being against things was easy to do,' House Speaker Paul Ryan said Friday. 'And now ... we have to actually get ... people to agree with each other in how we do things.'

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Readers write: Immigration path, talent at home, science knowledge

Letters to the editor for the March 27, 2017 weekly magazine.

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Unable to garner support in his own party, Trump's health care initiative fails

House Republicans failed to come to a consensus on proposed legislation to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, even after spending the past seven years attempting to repeal former-President Obama's signature piece of legislation.

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Rep. Nunes' charge of Trump team surveillance – why it's key

House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes has in recent days roiled his panel’s investigation of Russian interference in the US election. Democrats say he's put the probe's credibility in doubt.

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How Washington, D.C., is using social media to find missing children

There are 501 reported missing juvenile cases in Washington, D.C. in this year alone. What's being done?  

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Howard University West: Can Google-Howard partnership increase diversity in tech?

The Google-Howard collaboration, announced Thursday, is intended to help Google access tech talent and give top computer science students at Howard a taste of life in Silicon Valley.

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Will US workers lose jobs to robots? Mnuchin says no, report says yes

Nearly 40 percent of US jobs are at risk of being taken over by robots within about 15 years, a new report by consultancy firm PwC said on Friday. But Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin says he is not worried. 

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Little Free Library launches 'Action Book Club' to inspire community service

Like other book clubs, Little Free Library's version brings people together to read books – but it also encourages members to take positive action in their communities. When it launched in January, almost 200 groups signed up within 48 hours.

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British kid finds NASA mistake: when too many cooks don't spoil anything

Seventeen-year-old Miles thinks helping NASA fix their sensor was 'pretty cool.' Can amateurs really contribute to the advancement of science? 

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Germany's Haribo gummi bears will soon be wearing a 'Made in USA' label

Haribo, the German candymaker famous for its bow tie-wearing gold bear mascot, said on Thursday that it has acquired property in southeastern Wisconsin as its first North American facility.

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Tillerson's week: How top US diplomat’s ‘big reveal’ offered little clarity

Diplomats gathered for the anti-ISIS conference in Washington and looking for signs of Trump’s commitment to his allies were left wondering about Tillerson's priorities and the direction of US foreign policy.

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Hopeful combo: World economy grows, carbon emissions stay flat

For three years running, global carbon dioxide emissions have been essentially flat, a survey finds. It hints at the potential for 'decoupling' economic growth from burning fossil fuels.

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'Snooki' inspired bill could cap N.J. college speaker fees: How much is too much?

The former reality star received $32,000 for a comedy appearance at Rutgers University in 2011, more than the school paid Nobel-prize winning author Toni Morrison was paid to deliver the school's commencement address in the same year.

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Trump says Keystone XL will bring 28,000 jobs. A pipe dream?

TransCanada has a clearer path for the pipeline, after Trump reversed Obama's block of cross-border construction. But local opposition remains formidable.

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Deeper down, are coral reefs surviving climate change?

Greater depth and colder temperatures could buffer the so-called mesophotic zone against climate change and other well-known threats facing reefs. 

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Samantha Ponder to host 'Sunday NFL Countdown,' despite backlash from internet trolls

ESPN has announced that Ponder will become the new host of their football program. Ponder says her career progress in a field notoriously hostile to women has been the result of co-workers who saw her as an equal.

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What can NASA do to save Curiosity's wheels?

Surprises on Mars have led to unexpectedly severe damage to Curiosity's wheels, once again forcing NASA to do more with less. 

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Could a Moore's Law for carbon emissions halt climate change?

By halving global carbon emissions each decade, humanity could attain nearly net-zero emissions by 2050, according to new research 

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'Life' is glumly earnest

'Life' stars Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal as members of a crew of astronauts and scientists who get picked off by a space creature. 

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'Wilson' should be sharper and funnier

'Wilson' stars Woody Harrelson, who is ingratiatingly hangdog as a man who discovers he has a 17-year-old daughter. The movie is directed by Craig Johnson and based on Daniel Clowes's graphic novel.

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Can judiciary recover from political battles over Supreme Court seat?

While Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer has called for a filibuster, most expect that Judge Neil Gorsuch will eventually fill the vacancy left after Antonin Scalia's death. But, many ask, at what cost?

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What Benjamin Franklin can teach us about cybersecurity

Advances in communication like Franklin’s postal service and today’s Internet can help topple regimes — and also erode privacy. Tools like WhoIsGuard offer the anonymity of a Post Office Box.

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Evacuation orders lifted, but Oroville dam saga may have just begun

An unusually wet rainy season in California is in its final month, and officials are breathing slightly easier. But a new assessment of the dam's spillways has reached some alarming conclusions.

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Want to fix cybersecurity? Think about worst-case scenarios first

Scenario thinking sketches out future cybersecurity problems and helps policymakers begin addressing tomorrow's digital dilemmas.

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Industrial control systems: The holy grail of cyberwar

Regulators and utility industry leaders need to wake up to the risks that could let malicious hackers cause widespread physical damage to the grid and other critical infrastructure.

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How to reform the outdated federal anti-hacking law

The more than 30-year-old Computer Fraud and Abuse Act carries overly harsh penalties for trivial digital transgressions – and it needs to be completely overhauled (or abolished altogether). 

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'The Last Laugh' doesn't provide penetrating answers

The documentary asks how far out comedy can go and still be funny, with interviews with personalities including Mel Brooks, Sarah Silverman, and Rob Reiner. The film is directed by Ferne Pearlstein.

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Austerely compelling 'Frantz' explores persistence of love

'Frantz' stars Paula Beer as Anna, whose fiancé, Frantz, was killed in the trenches of World War I. She soon meets a young man, Adrien (Pierre Niney), who claims he befriended Frantz in Frantz's prewar days in Paris.

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Estonia's lessons for fighting Russian disinformation

The Baltic nation has long had an adversarial relationship with its Russian neighbor. As a result, its press and public have become adept at recognizing and debunking Kremlin propaganda.

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What does ‘multispeed’ Europe really mean?

The idea has gotten traction ahead of Saturday's EU summit as a way to allow the union's members to integrate at paces they are comfortable with. But it's a contentious issue.

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