Subscribe: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories
http://www.csmonitor.com/rss/top.rss
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
china  christian science  global  government  korea  love  new  pope francis  pope  president  south korea  south  women  year   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



How can China grow?

Sitting on a park bench in Beijing, moved to tears by the memories that came flooding back to her as she watched an amateur opera, our reporter saw other core values expressed by a gentleman who sat next to her: harmony, civility, friendship.

(image)



Return to China: One reporter finds a nation that has gone from bicycles to bullet trains

For a visiting journalist, the country of today feel worlds away from the China she first encountered decades earlier.

(image)



US government shuts down amid standoff over immigration

A last-ditch Republican funding bill fell well short of the 60 Senate votes needed Friday night to prevent the country's first shutdown since 2013.

(image)



Cutting off communication, no more street protests, improving Parliament, projections for India

 A roundup of global commentary for the Jan. 22, 2018 weekly magazine.

(image)






Russia investigation: An eventful week, and what happens next

New details emerged this week in the broadening investigation into alleged efforts by Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

(image)



Battle over legal marijuana: a monumental moment for states’ rights

The Department of Justice's crackdown comes as 64 percent of Americans, including for the first time more than half of Republicans, support legalization, Gallup found this month. So far, 29 states have legalized the medical use of the drug, while eight have legalized recreational use.

(image)



With forgiveness, a need for economic justice

In Liberia and Colombia, civil conflict has been halted by programs that aid former rebels. South Africa has avoided civil war but it also needs to help those who don’t share in its wealth.

(image)



A year after the March, women are sprinting forward

The Women's March on Jan. 21, 2017 sparked new levels of activism and engagement for many, with record numbers of women running for office, donating to campaigns, and finding new ways to get involved.

(image)



California keeps girls in school by providing feminine products

Low-income students often stay home when menstruating due to the cost of pads and tampons. California's new law requiring products be available to young women in all Title I public schools joins similar legislation around the US addressing the issue.  

(image)



A year into 'America First,' the world eyes US – and Trump – with less trust

President Trump's mistrust and rejection of international agreements and institutions have transformed America's status. And the lack of global leadership shown in the first year of his administration may have a lasting effect.

(image)



The movie's ambitions far exceed its grasp in 'All the Money in the World'

At 88, Christopher Plummer, who portrays John Paul Getty, is at the top of his game.

(image)



They didn't make Amazon's final cut, but these cities still hope to welcome big business

Cities that didn't make Amazon's shortlist for a second headquarters say failed bids to attract Amazon could be used as material to appeal to other businesses with planned tax breaks, land proposals, and grants.

(image)



Mexico looks abroad for examples of peace processes to end drug violence

In attempts to curb drug violence and rampant murder rates, Mexican politicians are seeking new paths to peace. Countries with violent histories, such as Colombia and South Africa, are being viewed as models to learn from.

(image)



In upcoming Mexican election, migrants living in the US could tip tight presidential race

New rules allowing Mexican citizens to register to vote from abroad could reshape the country's electoral landscape. 

(image)



Minnesota sisters used to sharing the ice will play hockey for separate Olympic teams

Hannah and Marissa Brandt, who grew up playing on the same ice hockey teams, will now play for different countries in the upcoming Olympic Games. Marissa will represent South Korea, from which she was adopted as a child, and Hannah will play for the United States.

(image)



Chilean protests, threats 'unprecedented' for papal visit

Pope Francis faced an unusually high level of hostility on his visit to Chile with protestors burning at least 11 churches and leaving threatening pamphlets directed at the pope.

(image)



Rohingya refugees find their voice in demands to Myanmar

Citizenship, return of land, and justice are just some of the things being petitioned by Rohingya refugee leaders in a Bangladesh refugee camp. Representing 40 villages, Rohingya elders are heading the effort to have their demands met by Myanmar ahead of the repatriation process. 

(image)



What makes immigration deals so hard

Increased partisanship and decreased trust among lawmakers have made reforming immigration harder than ever – even as pressure to fix the problems in the system has grown.

(image)



Abundance and the global economy

A Christian Science perspective: God is constantly communicating the ideas we need to express His intelligence, love, and goodness in serving others and seeing our own needs met.

(image)



Top Picks: 'Last Flag Flying,' 'David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef,' and more

PBS gives you a look behind the scenes with the new program 'Queen Elizabeth’s Secret Agents,' the AccuWeather app has all the up-to-date information you need, and more top picks.

(image)



In shutdown showdown, a crucial question: Who will get the blame?

With Friday’s deadline looming to avert a government shutdown, some observers see a twist to what is typically a party-line battle. Some Republicans and Democrats say they are tired of short-term funding of government – with its patches, unpredictability, and the toll that takes.

(image)



Reducing drunken-driving tragedies

A new study suggests tougher laws will work and a new task force points to higher taxes that change behavior.

(image)



#MeTooK12: New campaign raises awareness about rights at school

Launched this month, #MeTooK12 aims to broaden the discussion about sexual harassment and violence to include elementary, middle, and high schools. Enforcement of Title IX at that level needs a major boost, students and advocates say.

(image)



Italy's migrants teach themselves to stand up for themselves

Migrants and refugees living in the region around Caserta are vulnerable to being exploited, including by the mafia. But they’re growing increasingly aware of their rights and their power to help each other fight for fair treatment.

(image)



Why fixing US infrastructure matters: $9 per household per day

The average household would save $9.31 a day by 2025, by one estimate, if the federal government fixed deteriorating roads, public transit, and other infrastructure. But as President Trump prepares a $1 trillion package to address the need, there are big divisions over how to fund it.

(image)



Some of Broadway's best picks focus on love, inclusiveness

Some new and recent musicals have become modern Broadway icons. They are holding a mirror up to the America of today with a promise of inclusiveness and brotherly love. 

(image)



An optimistic bear returns in transcendentally cheerful 'Paddington 2'

The dream cast includes Sally Hawkins, Hugh Bonneville, and Julie Walters, with Ben Whishaw voicing the title character with just the right note of prim wistfulness.

(image)



Missile attack false alarm in Hawaii raises question: Who is in charge?

State legislators are asking the House Armed Services Committee to rethink how emergency alerts are sent, and who has the authority to send them.

(image)



Apple to build new campus with tax break funds

Apple will construct a new campus using cash the company plans to bring back from overseas, taking advantage of a provision included in the recent overhaul of the US tax code. 

(image)



Indigenous Peruvians seek help from Pope Francis to regain access to Incan temple

The most sacred temple in the Incan Empire came under Catholic control in the 16th century. The groups are appealing to Pope Francis, seen by many as sympathetic to the plight of indigenous people, for increased access the temple's ruins in Cuzco, Peru. 

(image)



Haitians in limbo as renewal of protection status uncertain

Tens of thousands of Haitians are facing unemployment as the result of a delay in renewal guidelines. Although Haitians with temporary protected status are allowed to stay in the US until July 2019, their ability to work is hindered by a paperwork logjam.

(image)



Zimbabwe plans first election without Mugabe

President Mnangagwa unveiled plans on Thursday to hold open elections in Zimbabwe in four to five months – the first elections since the ouster of former President Robert Mugabe. 

(image)



South Koreans chafe against North-South unified Olympics team

An agreement to have North Korea and South Korea march under one flag and field a joint hockey team in the Winter Olympics has triggered a backlash in South Korea from young and old alike who feel the move is nothing more than political propaganda.

(image)



'Tears of Salt' is a deeply moving, first-hand response to Italy's refugee crisis

As a doctor on Italy's southernmost island, Pietro Bartolo has a front-row seat to one of the world's most horrifying spectacles.

(image)



Toward consistent cooperation

A Christian Science perspective: An honest desire to love and obey God, divine Love, opens the way for harmonious collaboration with others.

(image)



Meanwhile... in Iraq, a former US college basketball player has put his troubled career back on track

And in St. John’s, Newfoundland, serious birdwatchers are braving the cold and snow and arriving by the dozens, while in Monrovia, Liberia, African movie star Van Vicker opened the country’s first postwar performing arts school.

(image)



Spy suspect's arrest: What motivates turncoats?

The FBI has charged Jerry Chun Shing Lee, a former CIA officer, with illegally retaining documents. That may have helped Beijing brutally dismantle US espionage operations in China. 

(image)



5 new titles to check out in the New Year

Among the flood of 2018 book releases, here are five particularly fine new titles.

(image)



Coarse words and new thinking

The use of foul language to describe immigrants from certain regions provides an opportunity to examine our own preconceptions – and to seek the facts.

(image)