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Preview: Other Arts :: The New York Sun

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How Legendary Zionists Raced Through America In Bid To Outflank Hitler

Thu, 1 Feb 2018 19:06:29 EST

It was five years ago that I first met Rick Richman, who had become interested in the Zionist prophet Vladimir Jabotinsky. Mr. Richman was taken aback by the fact that though he had been educated at Harvard College and New York University Law School, he had never been taught the story of the firebrand who had tried and failed in his efforts to raise a Jewish army to fight the Nazis.In "Racing Against History, The 1940 Campaign for a Jewish Army to Fight Hitler," just out from Encounter, Mr...



Sing 'Misty' for All of Us: Whatever We May Yet Do, Hold Fast Artistic Dreams

Tue, 2 May 2017 15:24:17 EST

The following is adapted from the prepared text of remarks delivered April 22 at the annual dinner of the Signet Society at Harvard University by Seth Lipsky, editor of The New York Sun and founding editor of the Forward. * * * At the Signet's musical reception, I enjoyed Julia Beidry's fabulous rendition of "Misty." I kept thinking of Colonel Bud Day. He was a U.S. Air Force officer who was shot down over North Vietnam and became the only prisoner ever to escape. Though Day had a broken arm and was barefoot and had been tortured, he made it across the Demilitarized Zone back to Free Vietnam only to be recaptured and dragged back to the communist North. One day he was leading a group of fellow POW's in forbidden prayer, when guards burst in. One of them jammed the barrel of his rifle against Day's forehead. There was a horrifying moment as everyone waited for the guard to pull the trigger. What did Day do? He started singing "The Star Spangled Banner." Suddenly, all of the prisoners started singing our anthem. The guards backed down. America would eventually give Day the Medal of Honor. The reason I kept thinking of Colonel Day is that his trademark...



Mount Washington's Majesty On Exhibit at Currier In a Major New Show

Tue, 4 Oct 2016 14:05:32 EST

Rarely have I looked forward to a museum exhibition with quite the eagerness with which I'm anticipating a visit to "Crown of New England," the paean to Mount Washington that opened October 1 at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire. It contains 146 paintings and historical objects, including canvases by Bierstadt, Cole, Homer, Kensett, and Champney among others who felt the enormous gravity of this magnificent mountain.I've felt it myself, having been lured up Mount...



Monet's Main Man

Fri, 10 Jul 2015 10:24:45 EST

Discovering the Impressionists, now on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, tells the story of French art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel, who championed work by then-unknown painters Monet, Pissarro, Degas and Renoir. Purchases he made in the earliest days of Impressionism are on view along with later Impressionist works. Previously in Paris and London, this superb exhibition will not travel anywhere else in the United States.Durand-Ruel first met Monet and Pissarro in London, where the Frenchmen...



Audubon's Final Flight

Sat, 11 Apr 2015 00:23:45 EST

As a brilliant catalog of America's feathered wildlife and a portrait of the bold visionary who trekked a vast and wild nation, "Audubon's Aviary: The Final Flight (Part III of The Complete Flock)" at the New-York Historical Society is a knockout.This third installment is the final in a trio of exhibits of John James Audubon's watercolor illustrations. Entering the gallery, its ceilings soaring upward, is to step into an aviary as herons strut, finches flutter, and quails bob about, all with...



Realistically: Magnificent

Fri, 15 Aug 2014 07:19:37 EST

The Portland Museum of Art's retrospective of the work of Richard Estes illuminates one of the enduring questions in painting the photograph. The camera, in one form or another, has been around since before Degas and even Vermeer. Nearly every artist who has relied on the contraption has felt ambivalent about it. This astonishing exhibition suggests that Mr. Estes might be the first painter to conquer the photograph.Like many other photorealist paintings, Mr. Estes' canvases there are 50 of...



Apples Of His Eyes

Tue, 24 Jun 2014 18:38:28 EST

When the Barnes Foundation moved its art collection from Merion, Pennsylvania to a new space in downtown Philadelphia two years ago, it was careful to replicate the famously idiosyncratic galleries of its former home and added a side space for temporary exhibitions. The World Is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul C anne, displaying over twenty loaned artworks by the Postimpressionist master, is a newly opened special exhibition which Barnes Chief Curator Judith F. Dolkart says "complements and...



Tiny Treasure

Tue, 10 Jun 2014 16:01:57 EST

It looks like there a few more weeks to gain a rare look at Johannes Vermeer's "Young Woman Seated at a Virginal," which the Dutch genius painted between 1670 and 1672. The exhibition of tiny masterpiece its roughly 8 by 10 inches at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been extended until September 30. Despite its small size, it has a huge allure.This motif seems familiar, and with good reason. About the same time Vermeer made two similar paintings, both of which are in the National Gallery...



Amazing Convergence

Sun, 1 Jun 2014 08:46:26 EST

History is studded with amazing convergences of individuals meeting at the right time and place, so as to make events seem predestined. In the mid-1850s, Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris traded in their theology studies for artistic ones, joining with Dante Gabriel Rossetti, a founding member of the original Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.In the previous decade, the Brotherhood reacted against the contemporary Classicism promoted by the Royal Academy and its first president, Sir Joshua...



L'Chaim, Chaim

Sat, 31 May 2014 17:47:31 EST

School of Paris Expressionist painter Chaim Soutine (1893-1943) fits the stereotype of the bohemian enfant terrible. The Lithuanian-born artist immigrated to Paris in 1913, settling in La Ruche, the low-cost artist residence in Montparnasse that housed a number of the city's avant-garde 'starving artists,' including Soutine's close friend, Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920). The duo's antics have been well chronicled in books and movies, including "Bohemian Paris: Picasso, Modigliani, Matisse, and...



Perfection in a Portrait

Thu, 22 May 2014 09:31:02 EST

There is a simple perfection in portraiture of the Renaissance that never tires. Always alive, always engaging, the best works possess a quality that seems almost otherworldly. Parmigianino's "Schiava Turca," on view for the first time in the United States at the Frick, is a single portrait of an unknown woman from almost 500 years ago which holds your attention so that, after looking at it for a while, you walk around but return to see it again.Displayed in the Oval Room with four other works...



Whistler in London

Wed, 21 May 2014 16:33:33 EST

This penetrating look at James McNeill Whistler, offered by the Sackler Gallery's "An American in London: Whistler and the Thames," gives us new insights. It is not at all about his American roots or even about his mother, but about what he saw and painted in his adopted London. In 1855 at the age of 21, Whistler went to Paris to study art. Four years later, he moved to London and settled in Chelsea on the banks of the Thames River. This show examines Whistler's work during those formative...



Dialogue Between Equals

Fri, 9 May 2014 08:35:16 EST

When Edgar Degas was presented to Mary Cassatt, he met his match. Their artistic dialogue, close and collaborative, was that of equals. Their friendship endured until Degas's death in 1917. The exhibition Degas/Cassatt, which opens Sunday at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, presents a lively picture of their working relationship over a period of some ten years.This museum is uniquely qualified to present this exhibition because they own 160 works by Degas, the third largest...



Very BIG Pictures

Sat, 22 Feb 2014 06:26:01 EST

Works of art are the result of decisions made by the artist, many of which are easy enough to notice right away. Color is one obvious example. But the scale of a work, unless it be unusually small or large, is easy to overlook. Outsized scale alerts us to an important decision made at the outset, affecting everything.In the New York Academy of Art's "The BIG Picture," the grand scale of the seven works on display is incredibly commanding, overpowering the space about them and bearing down on...



Kossoff's London

Sat, 30 Nov 2013 10:14:33 EST

When a triptych by Francis Bacon (1909-1992) fetched over $142 million at Christie's earlier this month, news outlets everywhere reported the sale, the most expensive artwork ever sold at auction. Beyond its cost, "Three Studies of Lucian Freud," 1969, Bacon's portrait of his friend and peer, is important as an icon of School of London painting. London Landscapes, now on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, presents over 60 years of drawings and paintings by Leon Kossoff, shedding light on the...



Simplicity and Imagination

Thu, 14 Nov 2013 10:33:46 EST

In nature, it is said that every action is balanced by an opposite and equal reaction. The art world is not bound to this law of physics but nonetheless displays a similar pattern in how modern art movements react to each other.Turning away from her Abstract Expressionist training in the late 1960s, Martha Erlebacher went on to become a master of representational painting and brought to it a freshness and humor that is really pretty wonderful. In over 30 works, ranging from imaginative still...



'The Dutch Mona Lisa'

Tue, 12 Nov 2013 10:54:11 EST

Nicknamed the Dutch Mona Lisa, Johannes Vermeer's (1632 1675) "Girl with a Pearl Earring" is touted as the crown jewel of the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis. As the 17th Century residence-turned-museum in The Hague undergoes an extensive renovation, Vermeer's famous portrait of a moonfaced young lady in three-quarter view is on a world tour, with stops in Tokyo, Kobe, San Francisco, Atlanta and now New York before continuing to Italy.Vermeer, Rembrandt and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch...



Painting Against the Grain

Wed, 30 Oct 2013 09:02:32 EST

In the decades after World War II, artists argued the relative merits of abstract and figurative painting over drinks at the Cedar Tavern in Greenwich Village. The history books have muted that once lively debate, dubbing Abstract Expressionism an art movement of paramount importance. And today's marketplace, too, values New York School abstractions above artworks by New York School figurative painters. But Henry Justin, a passionate art collector, is not ready to concede the argument.See it...



Perfection of Forms

Fri, 18 Oct 2013 16:51:30 EST

For several centuries, the Academic tradition of representational art achieved the seemingly contradictory goals of both the imitation of nature and the perfection of forms. "Sacred Visions," which opened Friday at the Museum of Biblical Art, brings together over 30 works by Gustave Dor Jean-L n G e and their contemporaries, from The Dahesh Museum of Art and will go far to rekindle the public's interest in, and understanding of, their achievements in the 19th and early 20th century.The...



A Romantic in Exile

Wed, 16 Oct 2013 10:08:36 EST

Painting in Paris during modernism's heyday, Marc Chagall used the stylistic innovations of Cubism, Surrealism and Fauvism to create soulful pictures. Snowscapes of fiddlers set in his native shtetl, romantic scenes of lovers nestled in bouquets of flowers and symbolist canvases of goats, fish and roosters floating through ultramarine nightscapes are some of the iconic images Chagall created in France between the wars.But the painter's romantic worldview would be challenged by the rise of...



Modern Art Turns 100

Sat, 12 Oct 2013 16:53:50 EST

In 1913, The International Exhibition of Modern Art landed at New York's 69th Regiment Armory and caused such a scene that we are still talking about it a century later. In "The Armory Show at 100," which opened Friday, The New-York Historical Society assesses the impact on American culture when modern art arrived full-force and roaring, whether we were ready for it or not.The Armory Show, as it came to be known, displayed American paintings by William Glackens, George Bellows, Robert Henri and...



King of Cats

Mon, 30 Sep 2013 19:22:15 EST

The recently opened exhibition of works by Balthus (1908-2001) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, focusing on early paintings of girls, presents over thirty canvases from the first 25 years of the artist's career the most Balthus works under one roof here since the artist's retrospective at the Met in 1984.Sabine Rewald curated the Met's exhibition thirty years ago and also organized this show, Balthus: Cats and Girls Paintings and Provocations. This narrowly focused exhibition was inspired...



Hildesheim's Medieval Splendor

Thu, 19 Sep 2013 10:03:29 EST

Twelfth-century Europe was a complex and varied culture of often overlapping religion, politics, and private life. This is reflected in the arts of the period, a high-water mark of imagination and craftsmanship. Like other cultures of deep and widely held faith, Medieval Europe - Christendom - created precious objects that, born of such high sentiments, were like prayers rendered in gold, silver, and precious stones.Works of art delivered the Christian message by glorifying the Holy. Just as in...



Flesh and Shadow

Wed, 18 Sep 2013 10:50:20 EST

Two paintings currently on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art provide a glimpse of the achievements and the variety of subjects in seventeenth-century Italian painting. A fertile and creative artistic environment gave birth to some of the greatest talents in Western art that, like constellations of bright stars, cause us to stop and stare nearly four hundred years later.Alongside scenes from the Bible and saints' lives were those from ancient mythology, such as Dana Confined to a tower as...



The Courage of Her Convictions

Tue, 17 Sep 2013 17:03:19 EST

Biala: Vision and Memory, a recently opened retrospective exhibition at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College, showcases the work of an independent-minded artist whose subtly colored figurative compositions have the courage of her convictions.Janice Tworkov (1903-2000) changed her name to Biala to differentiate herself from her older brother, Abstract Expressionist Jack Tworkov. The artist-siblings, Jewish immigrants from Poland raised on the Lower East Side, lived divergent lives.An...



Light of Iberia

Tue, 23 Jul 2013 19:37:24 EST

A painting of the patron saint of Lisbon has returned to Portugal. Organized around a loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, O Frei Carlos da Am ica, a small exhibition now on view at Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, is acquainting museumgoers here in Lisbon with the artwork of a Renaissance monk-painter.Born in Flanders, Frei Carlos joined a convent outside ora, Portugal, where he ran a painting workshop making delicately colored scenes for the Hieronymites, a hermetic Christian order that...



Brave New Bauhaus

Fri, 5 Jul 2013 21:39:05 EST

Solomon R. Guggenheim bought artworks from Europe's avant-garde abstractionists during the 1930s, building a collection that now forms the heart of the Guggenheim Museum's holdings. Two current exhibitions culled from the Guggenheim's permanent collection disclose a creative exchange between artists in Europe during some of the most difficult years in that continent's history.New Harmony: Abstraction between the Wars, 1919 1939 complements the 2010-11 Guggenheim exhibit Chaos and Classicism...



Painting the Civil War

Fri, 28 Jun 2013 10:28:05 EST

As the country prepares to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg next week, an exhibition now on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, featuring a number of major loans, purports to showcase artistic responses to the Civil War.With 60 paintings and 18 photographs made between 1852 and 1877, The Civil War and American Art, organized by Smithsonian American Art Museum's Eleanor Harvey, has gathered many historically relevant artworks. Small panels by Confederate soldier...



Picasso Takes Portland

Fri, 28 Jun 2013 16:03:44 EST

Several years ago I began a review of Paul Johnson's magisterial tome "Art: A New History" by telling of a walk I took with the author in Kensington Gardens. Johnson stopped to do some sketching and at one point burst into a denunciation of Picasso. I made the mistake of expressing admiration for "Boy Leading a Horse." That precipitated The Great Johnson into a lecture on how sloppy, even cartoonish, was the boy's left foot. "Just take another look at it," Johnson commanded. "You'll see."So I...



Le Corbusier: Au Naturel

Thu, 27 Jun 2013 10:08:19 EST

Le: Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes, a new exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, begins with a reconstruction of the Cabanon, a small house the architect designed in 1951 in the south of France overlooking Monte Carlo. The cabin is a jigsaw puzzle of built-in cabinets based on the system of measured proportions Le Corbusier called Le Modulor. It was his hideaway in nature, and it was where he died in August of 1965.The front-and-center placement of the Cabanon introduces the show's...



Eye of the Collector

Fri, 31 May 2013 15:18:29 EST

Old Masters, Newly Acquired, opening today at the Morgan Library and Museum, allows visitors to compare the eye of connoisseur collectors side by side. Jennifer Tonkovich, exhibition curator, said she "wanted to let people know the collectors behind the collections," organizing works into groups of donations by former Morgan Director Charles Ryskamp, Brooke Astor, Joseph McCrindle and Eugene Thaw as well as gifts of individual drawings and recent museum purchases.Out of the one-hundred-plus...



War at the Met

Sun, 26 May 2013 19:13:44 EST

One hundred fifty years ago the nation was in the midst of a war against itself. Memorial Day provides a particularly suitable occasion to consider the imagery of the Civil War and its extensive death toll, as depicted in the photography of that era.Photography and the American Civil War is an encyclopedic exhibit of images created during this wartime period from 1861 to 1865. The exhibit, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, documents the camera's extensive role in capturing the Civil War, just...



Abstraction in Bloom

Thu, 9 May 2013 14:12:49 EST

Among the trendy bars and shops of the Lower East Side, two galleries on Orchard Street are holding their own, exhibiting stylish, innovative abstract works exploring subtle relationships of shape and color.McKenzie Fine Art is presenting new works by Don Voisine, hard-edged, geometric shapes painted with modulated tones of blacks and off-whites sandwiched between bars of vivid color. The oil-on-wood abstractions here have fastidious surfaces, harmoniously combining glossy, matte and...



Following Two Year Absence, Levine Poised to Raise Baton

Tue, 7 May 2013 15:35:09 EST

All ears will be cocked to Carnegie Hall on May 19, when James Levine returns to the podium after a two year absence from conducting.Levine, who has been recuperating from a series of medical debacles, will conduct the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the ensemble he has been synonymous with for decades, in a symphonic program of pieces from the core 19th-century Germanic repertoire. The performance will include the prelude to the first act of Wagner's Lohengrin, Beethoven's 4th piano concerto...



Inside Hopper's Head

Fri, 3 May 2013 06:57:38 EST

The Whitney Museum of American Art is about to put up a show of the drawings of Edward Hopper that it is billing as "the first in-depth study of the artist's working process." Hopper Drawing will pair some of the painter's most iconic canvases, desolate scenes of American life, including "Early Sunday Morning" (1930), "New York Movie" (1939), and "Nighthawks" (1942), with multiple sheets of preparatory designs. The likely blockbuster will give museum-goers the opportunity to see the creator of...



Photography Among the Ruins

Mon, 29 Apr 2013 14:09:34 EST

A parrot behind a fence. The white caged bird draws the eye to the center of the image. Children cling to the outer side of the metal barrier. They are captivated by the animal, staring at it, motionless. The title reveals why the children are so taken with the caged bird. Its name is Adolf and the parrot says "Heil Hitler" in the Munich zoo. The year is 1949.The image is one of the highlights of "We Went Back," an exhibit of photographs from Europe of 1933-1956 by Chim at the International...



Freilicher and Friends

Sun, 28 Apr 2013 15:29:33 EST

In the 1950s and 60s, painter Jane Freilicher (b.1924) and her circle of artist and writer friends made breezy works about life in New York and about each other. Cross-pollination and collaboration were part of a creative process where artists wrote poetry and criticism and poets wrote about art and posed for portraits. The work produced by the painters in this group is often overshadowed by the radical developments of Abstract Expressionism and Pop happening at the same time. But a new...



Eva and the Duke

Sun, 21 Apr 2013 23:07:29 EST

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is exhibiting two individual canvases by a couple of Spain's greatest artists, one a temporary loan, the other piece a prelude of things to come.Upstairs in the galleries of European Painting hangs Diego Vel quez's 1638 portrait of Francesco I d'Este, Duke of Modena. Displayed in an otherwise empty gallery and lit with a combination of natural and artificial light, the Duke's life-sized bust in three-quarter view stares back at museumgoers with a determined gaze...



Soul of a Renaissance Master

Sun, 7 Apr 2013 10:12:54 EST

Though often grouped with esteemed sixteenth-century contemporaries Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo, German Renaissance artist Albrecht D er created works more distinct and personally revealing than any of his Italian colleagues.Albrecht D er: Master Drawings, Watercolors, and Prints from the Albertina, an exhibition now on view at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. featuring 118 pieces from the Albertina Museum in Vienna, complemented by 27 artworks from the National...



Welcome Back, 'Brandt

Tue, 2 Apr 2013 12:07:44 EST

After a renovation that lasted five years longer than estimated and came in at millions over budget, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam is set to reopen on April 13th.Housing a world-class collection of art and decorative objects from The Dutch Golden Age, including Rembrandt's The Night Watch, 1652, and Vermeer's The Milkmaid, 1658-60, the structure, designed by Pierre Cuypers and opened in 1885, has been brought back to its original glory. After years of neglect and poorly conceived alterations to...



Basquiat's Gritty Urban Splendor

Fri, 29 Mar 2013 08:47:10 EST

Unlike most rock stars, painters and sculptors tend to live outside the public eye, spend much of the day alone, and get better as they get older. But Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), a graffitist turned painter who ascended to fame and acclaim as young man, was a "vision of cool," according to Gagosian Gallery, who "spurred the Neo-Expressionist art boom" of the 1980s before dying of a drug overdose at 27. With his premature passing, this handsome "denizen of the explosive and decadent New...



Pledge of Allegiance

Sun, 24 Mar 2013 23:57:50 EST

Two shows up now in Chelsea feature pared-down, hard-edged, abstract paintings that address formal modernist concerns through simple, geometric shapes. But despite these superficial similarities, the works on display reflect the strikingly different temperaments and intentions of two ambitious abstract artists: Thornton Willis and Al Held.Thornton Willis (b. 1936), showing recent paintings at Elizabeth Harris Gallery, fills his canvases with rectangles parallel or perpendicular to the picture...



Guston at 100

Tue, 19 Mar 2013 11:35:31 EST

Generations of artists admire Philip Guston (1913-1980) for forgoing the elegant, well-received abstract expressionist works he made during the 1950s and 60s in favor of clunky, cartoonishly figurative, autobiographical paintings, cooked up in a frenzy of creativity during the last twelve years of his life. An exhibition at McKee Gallery, calling itself a "spontaneous celebration" to commemorate Guston's one-hundredth birthday, focuses on this late figurative period.Though he died over thirty...



Long Looking in Lancaster

Thu, 14 Mar 2013 10:19:12 EST

New-York-City-based artist John Dubrow's work amounts to a full-throated argument for the continued vitality of painting today a point made clear at the recently opened mid-career retrospective of his work at Lancaster, Pennsylvania's Demuth Museum.A Formal Realist: The Works of John Dubrow fills the museum, in an eighteenth-century townhouse, with thirty-five works, many of them large-scale. Dubrow's paintings would benefit from better lighting and larger, less tightly packed rooms. However...



Refashioning Art History

Tue, 5 Mar 2013 03:37:54 EST

Followers of contemporary art are surely aware of the fashion world's influence on a number of today's leading artists. With Andy Warhol's illustrations for fashion magazines as a precedent, Vanessa Beecroft's and Yayoi Kusama's collaboration with Louis Vuitton, Cindy Sherman's work with Balenciaga and Karen Kliminick's portrait of Kate Moss are examples of the intertwined relationship between fashion and art now.But a newly opened exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Impressionism...



Karen of Arabia

Wed, 26 Sep 2012 19:41:17 EST

My favorite story about Karen Elliott House is how she handled the Hashemite king, Hussein of Jordan, when he stopped returning her phone calls. She'd been in Amman working on a series for the Wall Street Journal about how the king made his decision on President Reagan's Middle East plan. She had gotten the little king, as he was known, to let her ride in the co-pilot's seat as he himself flew a royal stretch DC-8 to India and back. But then he had fallen silent, and the question was what to do...



Barry Moser, Abstract Bookwright

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 00:00:00 EST

Barry Moser holds a place among the top tier of the top tier of illustrators. He is one of the foremost living practitioners of wood engraving, an unforgiving medium in which he has developed a style characterized by studied realism and fine attention to detail. But he began his mid-August class at Zea Mays Printmaking in Florence, Massachusetts, on quite another topic.On a piece of newsprint, he made a line drawing of an apple, four times life-size. "What is this?" he asked the class. Someone...



Ying Li: No Middle Way

Fri, 24 Aug 2012 06:41:21 EST

The scene is Ying Li's office at Haverford College. Bookshelves fill a whole wall, with tomes covering everything from ancient seal carving to the most recent documenta. After several hours, the conversation has turned to the great masters of the Yuan Dynasty. Soon I have a sticky note upon which Ying has written:Huang Gong Wang 黃公望Wang Meng 王蒙Zhao Meng Fu 趙孟頫Although I'm officially here as a writer, it's impossible to defy Ying's...



Vuillard: Denial or Realization?

Tue, 17 Jul 2012 13:56:00 EST

After my return to the Upper West Side, I bristled when friends assumed my family and I were on the run from anti-Semitism. I admitted to being in the grips of an indefinable longing to return to my native land. True enough, even after 22-years, France had never quite felt like home. But I insisted that my longing had nothing to do with how we were treated as Jews in my adopted land. It is only now, years later, that I reconsider my state of denial.This is reawakened by the Jewish Museum show...



Painting Was His Lifeblood

Tue, 29 May 2012 13:14:33 EST

"John Heliker: A Tribute" at Davis & Langdale Company features 28 paintings spanning four decades of the artist's career. "The canvases represent the many aspects of Heliker's life: views of the Maine coast with clam diggers and male bathers; still lifes of flowers and kitchen motifs; Spanish landscapes; a portrait of his friend, the painter Edwin Dickinson; self-portraits in the studio as well as other young artists at work in the studio."Heliker was a founding faculty member of the New York...