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Last Build Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 11:22:01 -0500

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Saving Face at the Met

Tue, 10 Jan 2012 11:14:40 EST

"It has been said," according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in regards to its current special exhibition of Renaissance portraiture, "that the Renaissance witnessed the rediscovery of the individual. In keeping with this notion, early Renaissance Italy also hosted the first great age of portraiture in Europe. Portraiture assumed a new importance, whether it was to record the features of a family member for future generations, celebrate a prince or warrior, extol the beauty of a woman, or...



America the Beautiful

Thu, 5 Jan 2012 22:07:31 EST

On January 16, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will open a reinstallation of its collection of American art in "expanded, reconceived, and dramatic new galleries." "This final phase of the American Wing renovation project is comprised of twenty-six renovated and enlarged galleries on the second floor," according to the museum. "The new architectural design is a contemporary interpretation of nineteenth-century Beaux-Arts galleries, including coved ceilings and natural light flowing through new...



Head of Medusa Appears in San Francisco

Fri, 16 Dec 2011 08:44:21 EST

The Capitoline Museum has loaned a sculpture of Medusa by Gian Lorenzo Bernini to the San Francisco Legion of Honor, where the cursed beauty graces the City by the Bay through February. "Recent conservation efforts have restored the Medusa to its full glory and revealed previously hidden polish and patina," says the museum. "Believed to date from between 1638 and 1648, this extraordinary work takes its subject from classical mythology, as cited in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. It shows the beautiful...



The Spirit of Will Eisner Captured in Museum Show

Fri, 4 Mar 2011 11:01:19 EST

The Spirit couldn’t have been more infectious at the reception the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art held Thursday to mark the opening of its exhibition of “Will Eisner’s New York, From The Spirit to the Modern Graphic Novel.” The exhibition, at the museum’s space at 594 Broadway, mounts a stunning array of drawings and paintings by the iconic master of what he called sequential art. It also features a related exhibit work by creators influenced by the legendary draftsman, including such giants...



Art Deco Shows Its Roots

Fri, 26 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

"Art Deco" was not coined until 1968, when the art historian Bevis Hillier used the term in his book "Art Deco of the 20s and 30s." In those times, you might have heard such terms as "le style moderne," or "la mode 1925." The latter refers to the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes that took place in Paris in 1925. (It was also from the name of this exposition that Hillier derived "Art Deco.") Le style moderne was not entirely new in 1925. It had begun to...



The Magical From the Mundane

Thu, 25 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Metamorphosis is as central to art as it is to myth. When an artist transforms his materials, he becomes a shaman. When an artist's materials are not transformed, he remains a charlatan — and we are left with a mere field of paint, not the "Sistine Ceiling"; a chunk of marble, not the "Pietà." With the advent of collage in the 1890s, however, metamorphosis took on new meaning. Invented by the Beggarstaffs (the British poster designers and brothers-in-law James Pryde and William Nicholson)...



Monet Thief Sentenced to Five Years

Thu, 25 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

A French art thief who admitted to stealing and trying to sell paintings by Claude Monet and other famous artists will serve more than five years in American prison. A federal judge in Miami imposed a 62-month sentence Wednesday on 56-year-old Bernard Jean Ternus. He pleaded guilty in July to conspiracy to steal paintings by Monet, fellow Impressionist Alfred Sisley, and 17th-century master Jan Brueghel the Elder. The paintings were taken by masked, armed robbers in August 2007 from a museum in...



Six Centuries of Theatrical City Scenes at N-YHS

Thu, 25 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The New-York Historical Society, founded in 1804, is New York City's oldest museum. It has had its ups and downs, and in recent years has been on a dramatic upswing. While such outstanding exhibitions as "New York Divided: Slavery and the Civil War" (2006-07), "Life's Pleasures: The Ashcan Artists' Brush with Leisure, 1895-1925" (2007-08), and the Audubon series have drawn from the society's rich holdings, these shows' narrow thematic scope has meant that no one of them has by itself conveyed...



Armstong Officially Elevated by Guggenheim Foundation

Tue, 23 Sep 2008 22:50:38 EST

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has named a new director. After a worldwide search, the foundation's trustees today unanimously appointed 59-year-old Richard Armstrong to run the foundation and its flagship Guggenheim museum in Manhattan. The announcement comes about seven months after Thomas Krens resigned. Armstrong has been the director of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh since 1996. His new job starts November 4...



Titian Showcased in Athens

Tue, 23 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

More than 20 paintings by Renaissance master Titian and his contemporaries go on display in Athens this week on the occasion of an official visit to Greece by Italy's president. The three-month exhibition at the Museum of Cycladic Art opens Thursday, a day after its formal inauguration by Italian President Giorgio Napolitano and Greek President Karolos Papoulias. "From Titian to Pietro da Cortona: Myth, Poetry and the Sacred" includes seven works by the 16th-century master, as well as canvases...



Pompeii Transported to Washington, D.C.

Mon, 22 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

This fall, the National Gallery of Art will host the first major exhibition of ancient Roman art in the nation's capital. "Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture Around the Bay of Naples," which runs between October 19 and March 22, re-creates the world of the ancient citizens. "It's often been said that Washington is a city based on the French Enlightenment, but it's actually a Roman-style city," the National Gallery of Art's chief of exhibitions, Dodge Thompson, said. "Our...



What Treasures Hide in Dusty Piles

Fri, 19 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

New York has reinvented itself throughout its history, adapting to meet the diverse needs of its inhabitants. It is fitting that the city's oldest museum, the New-York Historical Society, is also full of surprises, many of which can be found in its new catalog of works on paper, entitled "Drawn by New York: Six Centuries of Watercolors and Drawings at the New-York Historical Society." The release of the catalog coincides with an exhibit at the Society, which opens today. Both are the fruits of...



Van Gogh in a New Light

Thu, 18 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Vincent van Gogh was such a good painter that it is worth putting on a show of his work even when there is no particular reason to do so. A case in point: "Van Gogh and the Colors of the Night," which is set to open on Sunday at the Museum of Modern Art, with 23 paintings, 10 works on paper, and sundry illustrated letters in the artist's own hand. The show's stated subject, van Gogh's interest in nocturnal scenes, is a little less compelling than the curators at MoMA and at the Van Gogh Museum...



Morandi's Subtle Spectacle

Thu, 18 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The Italian artist Giorgio Morandi (1890-1964), the subject of a long-awaited and absolutely out-of-this-world retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a painter who, especially in his small flower paintings and still lifes — façade-like clusters of crockery, tins, bowls, bottles, boxes, and vases — synthesized an array of disparate approaches, creating pictures mysterious, unique, and wholly modern. Morandi was influenced by the rich, close range of browns, creams, and grays, as...



The Little Elephant That Could: 'Drawing Babar'

Thu, 18 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The miraculous moment when line and color quicken into art occurs as gladly in children's picture books as in medieval Psalters. A Francophone elephant in a green suit belongs to the natural history of make-believe no less than the griffins and unicorns of ancient bestiaries or manuscript marginalia. So, the Morgan Library is a fitting repository for the surviving drafts of text and illustrations for the creation of Babar, the paterfamilias of a classic modern bedtime story. "Drawing Babar...



Note to Museumgoers: Beware Spectacular Sensory Overload

Wed, 17 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Every season, for every art lover, an exhibition or two stands out. This fall, among a long list of almost-certain-to-be-spectacular offerings at museums, the promise of two shows at the Metropolitan Museum of Art really gets my heart going: "Giorgio Morandi, 1890-1964" (opened yesterday, through December 14) and "Calder Jewelry" (December 9-March 1). Last fall, one of the most stunning New York gallery shows was "Simplicity of Means: Calder and the Devised Object," an exhibit of Alexander...



Wall Street Woes Endanger Funding for the Arts

Tue, 16 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The turmoil on Wall Street will affect a wide swath of New York City's cultural institutions, hurting corporate and individual donations at a time when these organizations are facing what one philanthropist called a "perfect storm" of economic pressures. "It's a very challenging time for not-for-profits," the chief executive officer of CIT and a trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York City Ballet, Jeffrey Peek, said. "It's a little bit of a perfect storm." Among the other...



Picasso Show To Highlight Influences

Tue, 16 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Pablo Picasso dreamed of hanging his paintings next to those of Velazquez, Goya, Manet, and the many other masters he admired. Thirty-five years after his death, that dream is coming true. In a three-part Paris exhibition, Picasso's paintings will be placed alongside those of the artists he emulated, drew inspiration from, and paid tribute to throughout his life, including El Greco, Titian, Rembrandt, van Gogh, and Gauguin. "Picasso et les Maîtres," or "Picasso and the Masters" (October 8...



Germans, Russians in Art Stalemate

Fri, 12 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

German efforts to recover about 1 million artworks looted by the Soviet Union after World War II demand a long-term strategy, the director of the Prussian Cultural Property Foundation, Hermann Parzinger, said. In the 1990s, the lost art was regularly discussed at German-Russian government meetings. Now, it has slipped off the agenda as more pressing issues — such as oil and gas supplies, human rights, and Russia's invasion of Georgia — have cooled relations. Mr. Parzinger, who took on his post...



Taking It From the Streets

Thu, 11 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

As we enter the last days of summer, life in the big city begins its seasonal retreat from the sidewalk to the interior spaces. That the Bronx Museum of the Arts should choose this moment to open a new exhibition, "Street Art, Street Life From the 1950s to Now," is, then, perhaps fitting. Curated by Lydia Yee, from London's Barbican Art Gallery, this exhibition casts a wide net, aspiring as it does to account for a variety of practices that differently engage the life of the street, often but...



Landscapes as Labors of Love: Wang Hui at the Met

Thu, 11 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Drawing from the art of the past is a necessary and nurturing process for an artist, a labor of love that enables him to learn his craft and to reinvent his influences. The medieval painter and theorist Cennino Cennini instructed that an artist should copy only from the best masters he can find, so that he will learn to gather "roses," not "thorns." Picasso, who could paint like Raphael, Ingres, Corot, an ancient cave painter, and an ancient Greek, advocated that an artist must not "borrow"...



Versailles 'Welcomes' Koons

Thu, 11 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Jeff Koons, whose sculptures sell for up to $25.8 million, baffled visitors to the Palace of Versailles as he displayed his steel rabbit, balloon dog, and hanging lobster in the chateau's grandest rooms. "Jeff Koons Versailles," which opened Wednesday and runs through December 14, presents 16 monumental sculptures inside the ornate palace, and one in the gardens. A few dozen French protesters demonstrated outside the gates, calling the show disrespectful to French heritage. "It would never be...



Park Avenue Gets a Mao

Mon, 8 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The final piece of the Asia Society's exhibition "Art and China's Revolution" was installed over the weekend: a 10-foot-tall sculpture of a Mao jacket, by the artist Sui Jianguo, which will stand on a median in the middle of Park Avenue at 70th Street until mid-November. The sculpture, called "Mao Suit," is made of corroded steel and weighs 5-and-a-half tons. It is part of a series of Mao jackets — shown without the head or hands of their famous wearer — that the artist, who is in his 50s...



A Gray Area From a Red Revolution

Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

If history is indeed the great teacher — if, as I once read in a fortune cookie, "The past is the book of the future" — then what are we to make of "Art and China's Revolution," an exhibition centered on Mao Zedong (1893-1976), the Cult of Mao, and the artistic legacy of Mao's catastrophic Cultural Revolution, that opens tomorrow at the Asia Society Museum? Few shows have inspired in me such mixed feelings. On the one hand, "Art and China's Revolution," which focuses on images, objects, and...



Commanding the Romantic Century: 'Liszt in Paris'

Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

When the 12-year-old prodigy Franz Liszt gave his first public performance in Paris in February 1824, two months after his arrival in the city, the audience hailed him as "Mozart incarnate." Not since Mozart, who had died 33 years earlier, had Europe seen such a prodigious talent. From earliest days, Liszt — pianist, composer, superstar — was marked out to command the Romantic century. He lived and worked with a fire the equal of any of his peers, then went many of them one better by living to...



Tearing Down the Walls of Their World: MoMA's 'Looking at Music'

Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Robert Rauschenberg's goal of operating "in the gap between life and art," famously uttered in 1959, anticipates the less polite mantra of the '60s: Tear down the walls. For artists, the walls in question were the divisions between aesthetic conventions and empirical experience, between the museum space and the world at large, and, not least, the barriers among the various media. In the mid-'60s, new electronic-music technologies and the invention of the Portapak (a handheld video camera)...



Tate Unveils Acquisitions, Exhibition Schedule

Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Tate, the U.K. museum network, said it acquired $112 million worth of art in the year ended March 31, including four works by Damien Hirst, and Louise Bourgeois's 30-foot-high spider, "Maman" (1999). At a news conference held for the release of its annual report, Tate said it acquired 494 works, 320 of which were given or bequeathed by collectors and artists, making the year a record one for acquisitions. Tate now owns two more Francis Bacon pictures and a 1939 Stanley Spencer oil, "The Wool...



When the Virtual Trumps Reality: 'The Prayer Book of Claude de France'

Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

Without meaning to do so, the Morgan Library has created a triumph of conceptual art: the smallest art exhibition in the world. "The Prayer Book of Claude de France," as the exhibition is called, consists of nothing other than "The Prayer Book of Claude de France." At 2 3/4 by 2 inches, the exhibition and the book are both so small that they can fit in the palm of your hand. That may not sound like much until you realize that this illuminated miniature contains 132 scenes from the lives of...



Guggenheim Eyes Armstrong as Its Director

Wed, 3 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is expected to name as its next director the outgoing director of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Richard Armstrong, sources have told The New York Sun. Through a spokeswoman at the Carnegie, Mr. Armstrong confirmed last evening that he is in final negotiations with the Guggenheim. He would replace Thomas Krens, who stepped down in February to become a senior adviser to the foundation on international affairs, with leadership over the creation of a...



Museum of Arts & Design Thinks Outside the Box

Tue, 2 Sep 2008 00:00:00 EST

When the Museum of Arts and Design opens in its new home on September 27, it will be the end of one journey for the institution and the beginning of another. It's the end of a period of institutional soul-searching, and of a years-long battle over the site, at 2 Columbus Circle, and the museum's construction plans. Today, only the exterior shape and a few of the so-called lollipops of the windowless Edward Durell Stone building, which was constructed there in 1964, are still visible. Brad...



Rubin Museum Finds a New Focus

Fri, 29 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

The new chief curator of the Rubin Museum of Art, Martin Brauen, arrived at the museum this past June, at an important moment for the institution. The museum, founded by Donald and Shelley Rubin and dedicated to art of the Himalayas, has been open for four years. It has been praised for its exhibitions, focusing on such subjects as Sikh art and images of siddhas, or holy madmen, in India and Tibet. But the museum has taken a while to find a management structure that works. It started out with a...



Political Ephemera Through the Ages

Thu, 28 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Sometime when I was in grade school, I heard the phrase "Tippecanoe and Tyler, too." Years would pass before I knew what it meant. I knew it was a presidential campaign slogan from way back, but did not learn until later that it was a phrase from an 1840 campaign song for William Henry Harrison (who led the troops who defeated Chief Tecumseh at the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe in Indiana) and John Tyler. What's remarkable is that the phrase has lived on, that its cadence has made it the sort of...



The Art World Embraces the Wow Factor

Thu, 28 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Recently, on a windy, early August afternoon, under an active sky that threatened autumn cool and summer storm, I saw Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson's site-specific work "The New York City Waterfalls." I took a Circle Line tour that lasts half an hour and gets you, if the wind is right, within spritzing distance. The East River loop takes you as far north as the waterfall at Manhattan's Pier 35, just above the Manhattan Bridge; past the Brooklyn Bridge's waterfall, as well as the...



Weird for Weird's Sake: MoMA's 'Wunderkammer'

Thu, 28 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

By reshuffling the extensive deck of its permanent collection, the Museum of Modern Art has come up with "Wunderkammer: A Century of Curiosities." The title of this show invokes those princely cabinets whose collections of corals, pearls, and two-headed calves were the original seedlings of the museum as we know it today. Curated by Sarah Suzuki, an assistant curator in the Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, MoMA's new show contains 130 drawings, sculptures, multiples, photographs, and...



Hirst's Skull To Open World Tour in Amsterdam

Wed, 27 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Damien Hirst has chosen the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam to start a world tour of his $100 million diamond skull. "The theme of the skull is the aversion of death in art," a Rijksmuseum spokeswoman, Elles Kamphuis, said in a telephone interview today. "That is also a popular theme in paintings from the Dutch Golden Age." The Dutch museum, which houses Rembrandt's "The Night Watch," pledged to clear an entire hall for the exhibition. Mr. Hirst, 43, is also making a selection of the Rijksmuseum's...



New-York Historical Society Clears the Stage to Tell the American Story

Fri, 22 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

In order to be able to welcome more visitors and to offer them a compelling narrative of American history, the New-York Historical Society is embarking on a three-year, $55-million renovation of its galleries, entrance, and façade. The renovation will allow for easier traffic flow into and out of the building and will create space for a new ground-floor permanent installation related to New York City and the Founders. The renovation will also create a restaurant, an updated auditorium, and a...



Hercules Hits the Metropolitan

Thu, 21 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Pure fortuity has brought two artists named Cornelis into the same gallery of the Metropolitan Museum and into the same column of The New York Sun. They are Cornelis Cornelisz van Haarlem (Haarlem, 1562-1638) and Cornelis van Poelenburch (Utrecht, 1594-1667). "Hercules and Achelous" (1590), by the former, and "A Rocky Landscape with Nymphs and Satyrs near Ruins" (1630-35), by the latter, are now up at the Met on short-term loan. As such, these two works underscore a delightful, if unsung...



A Met Installation Heavy on Provocation, Light on Vision

Thu, 21 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

One of the essential aspects of art is that it transcends its subject matter and culture. In an artwork it is not really important what or who is depicted — or if, as in some works of art, no thing is depicted at all. No matter what it is, where it came from, or who made it, art engages us on many levels across cultures and through millennia. One does not have to believe in Christ, or even in God, to be mystified by Duccio's "Madonna and Child" (c. 1300), a recently acquired masterwork in the...



Lifting the Veil: J.M.W. Turner and John Ruskin

Tue, 19 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

If the spirit of Joseph Mallord William Turner is looking down on New York these days — possibly from somewhere in the vicinity of the sun, which in his dying days he declared to be God — he must have very mixed feelings. He would be satisfied to see that the show of the season is the Metropolitan Museum's giant exhibition of his work — satisfied, but not surprised. During his immensely productive lifetime (1775-1851), Turner was confident that he would be remembered as one of the greatest...



Wisconsin Museum Showcases Lennon Drawings

Fri, 15 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono and Lennon's admirers are so protective of Lennon's legacy they don't want any of his original drawings photographed in full. Some are fragile and worth hundreds of thousands of dollars or more, and they don't want them to hit the Internet, where they can be counterfeited. So for the first time the public will get to see 27 pencil and pen drawings along with five lithographs and serigraphs — all authenticated — at the Waukesha County Historical Society Museum...



Qatar Pursues De Montebello

Fri, 15 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

The outgoing director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Philippe de Montebello, may get more deeply involved in museum development projects in the Middle East. Mr. de Montebello, who will retire at the end of this year or when a successor is named, has already been appointed as a special adviser on NYU Abu Dhabi. He will be involved in visual arts programming and structuring an arts curriculum. But the new executive director of the Qatar Museums Authority, Roger Mandle, acknowledged in an...



Serra Gamble Cost Guggenheim $6.2M

Fri, 15 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

The Guggenheim Bilbao lost roughly $6.2 million in government funds when it purchased Richard Serra's monumental sculpture installation, "The Matter of Time" (2005), in dollars rather than euros, the Art Newspaper reported Thursday. The museum paid for the Serra installation in three installments, which totaled more than $20 million, in 2004 and 2005. A spokeswoman told the Art Newspaper that the museum entered into what is called a "forward exchange contract," betting that the dollar would...



Music and Folk Art Shine in Kandinsky's Munich Period

Thu, 14 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Vasily Kandinsky (1866-1944) was the beckoning priest of an aestheticized, secular spirituality that has become the fallback position for agnostics with a yen for transcendence. A display from the Guggenheim's permanent collection showcases Kandinsky's early work produced in Munich between 1903 and 1911, the year he published "Concerning the Spiritual in Art." Kandinsky came to painting late. Born into a wealthy, aristocratic Russian family, he began his studies in law at the University of...



Original Copies: 'The Art of Appropriation' at MoMA

Thu, 14 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Pipe, glass, bottle of rum: Spoken aloud, the words have the beat of a carnival barker's cry or a drummer's rim shot. Connected to Picasso, they conjure charging lines and unlikely angles that somehow coalesce as tangible objects. It's this genius for design that makes Picasso a legitimate heir to masters such as Cézanne and Goya, but his work fascinates, too, for its extraordinarily inventive use of materials. Around 1912, when Picasso and Braque pioneered the practice of incorporating into...



Changing Times, Changing Notions: 'Progress' at the Whitney

Thu, 14 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

As crowds throng the Whitney Museum of American Art to see "Buckminster Fuller: Starting with the Universe," curators Donna De Salvo and Gary Carrion-Murayari had the bright idea to pull from the museum's permanent collection a number of works that could serve as a pendant to Fuller's technological utopianism. "Progress," on view through November 30, exhibits varied artists' works that speak in some way to our changing notions of scientific, technological, political, and artistic progress. The...



British Modernism's 'Triple Threat'

Thu, 14 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

LONDON — Wyndham Lewis was the "triple threat" of British Modernism: He was accomplished — and innovative — as the writer of linguistically dazzling satires such as "The Apes of God" and "Tarr." He was as an abstract artist who led the pioneering Vorticist group just prior to World War I. And, as a bracing exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London shows, he was a portrait artist of the first degree. Whether his subjects were literary lions, patrons, lovers, or himself, he painted...



NEA Expands Indemnity Program

Tue, 12 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

The National Endowment for the Arts is expanding the 30-year-old Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program, so that in the future it will cover domestic as well as international loans, the NEA announced. The program spares museums the cost of privately insuring against loss of or damage to art that they borrow, by extending indemnity agreements backed by the U.S. Treasury. In the past, the program has only applied to international loans of art. Now, art borrowed from American collections will also...



LACMA To Acquire Photo Collection

Tue, 12 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will purchase the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, a selection of more than 3,500 photographs from the 19th and 20th centuries, the museum announced Monday. Highlights of the collection include photographs by Ansel Adams, Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, W.H. Fox Talbot, and Edward Weston. An exhibition titled "A Story of Photography: The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection," featuring works from the collection, will open October 5. The...



Memorial Honoring Black Patriots Stalls

Mon, 11 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

Most accounts of the Revolutionary War give the impression that America's independence from Britain was won by brave white men. Maurice Barboza wants to tell the rest of the story. He's trying to revive an effort to build the first monument on the National Mall honoring black Colonial soldiers — perhaps the most forgotten heroes from the nation's birth. The project would recognize such people as Crispus Attucks, the first patriot killed in the Boston Massacre, and James Lafayette, a Virginia...



Art in Revamped Berlin Bunker

Fri, 8 Aug 2008 00:00:00 EST

How does an advertising entrepreneur spend the fortune he's amassed by the age of 40? Purchase a yacht, or perhaps even a tropical island? Not Christian Boros. He bought a World War II bomb shelter in Berlin with 6-foot-thick concrete walls and clanking metal doors. He then spent five years converting it into an exhibition center for his Contemporary art collection and a home for his family. "The reason I bought it was not because I wanted a bunker, but because I wanted somewhere to put my...