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Updated: 2018-04-24T15:02:25Z

 



WordPress.comFlickr agrees to be acquired by SmugMug – Q&A

2018-04-23T22:13:01Z

As we have announced in this blog post, Flickr has agreed to be acquired by SmugMug. We are very excited by the news and look […]   As we have announced in this blog post, Flickr has agreed to be acquired by SmugMug. We are very excited by the news and look forward to detailing more specifics as we have them. After nearly 14 years at Yahoo and Oath, we’re moving to a smaller, more photography-focused family, which we think will be great for Flickr and for you. SmugMug is dedicated to photography and to photographers, and has been since 2002. Please see below for a Q&A we’ve put together with more specifics on the deal. And feel free to join the discussion on the Flickr Help Forum. Thanks, The Flickr Team What’s going to happen to my Flickr account? At present, nothing. You will continue to log in with your current credentials and you will have the same Flickr experience you are used to. If things do change in the future, we’ll be as transparent as possible about the process and give you as much notice as we can about the issues that will matter to you. Will anything happen to my photos or will they be moved? You’ll still be able to access your photos as you do currently and they’ll retain the same flickr.com URL as always. Wait, what exactly is SmugMug? SmugMug is a photography platform dedicated to visual storytellers. SmugMug has a long history of empowering people who love photography and who want to improve their craft, making them a perfect fit for Flickr and our creative community. With SmugMug, photographers can create beautiful portfolios, use a powerful e-commerce platform to sell their photos, preserve their memories, and stand out with great options for showcasing their work. I got an email saying I have until May 25, 2018 to opt out of SmugMug’s Terms of Service and then my Flickr account will be governed by them. Explain please? As part of the acquisition, all Flickr accounts will move to SmugMug’s Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. You have until May 25, 2018 to either accept SmugMug’s Terms and Privacy Policy or opt out. If you do nothing in that time, your account will simply transition from the current Yahoo Terms of Service and Privacy Policy to SmugMug’s Terms. If you don’t want to make this change, you can delete your Flickr account through your Account Settings page. If you want to preserve a copy of your photos, be sure to download them from your Camera Roll first! We encourage you to read SmugMug’s Terms in detail, as you would with any site where you host your photos. It is worth noting that SmugMug has prided itself on having very photographer-friendly terms without some of the standard verbiage and licenses that many platforms grant themselves to use your data in a way that best suits them. This is one of the reasons we’re thrilled to have found a new home at SmugMug. What are SmugMug’s plans for Flickr? Will the products be merged? SmugMug loves Flickr and they want us to keep on being Flickr. There is no plan to merge the products. As we spend more time with the SmugMug team, we hope to find ways to coordinate our development work and provide two great destinations dedicated to visual storytellers and creatives. Will my Flickr Pro subscription change? You’ll remain a Flickr Pro member and continue to enjoy all the benefits of a Pro membership. We’ve just started offering a 45-day free trial for new Pros who sign up for a yearly subscription. We’re also extending this offer to folks who may have been Pro in the past and want to come back to give it a try. Learn more on our Pro page. Will Flickr continue to have free accounts? Yes. When Flickr joins SmugMug on May 25th, we will continue to offer free Flickr accounts. Do I still have to log in to Flickr with my Yahoo login? Yes. During our transition process, you will continue to sign in using your existing login credentials. Over time, Flickr’s sign-in will be separated from Yahoo’s and when that happens, you’ll have the ability to choose how you log in. I actually can’t remember what my[...]



Together is where photographers belong!

2018-04-20T21:46:45Z

We’re thrilled to announce that Flickr will be joining SmugMug to create the world’s best home for photography.   Flickr has always been defined by the strength of our community. We are visual storytellers. We are creators. We inspire each other and the world by showcasing the beauty around us. We share our passions and our perspectives. We transcend boundaries with our art. We find affinity with strangers and create bonds that last the length of our lives. We aspire to greatness and we teach each other what we know. Over the past 14 years, we’ve embraced our Flickr family and we’ve made Flickr our home. Now, we are excited to expand our family and our home. We’re thrilled to announce that Flickr will be joining SmugMug to create the world’s best home for photography.     SmugMug is one of the most dynamic platforms for visual storytelling in the world and we share their passionate dedication to photography and photographers. As we unite with them, we are returning to the focus that made us the world’s trailblazing online photography community. We are reinforcing our commitment to creators and making sure Flickr remains the best place for them to connect, to share, and to develop their passion. Over the course of the next month, we look forward to providing more details and we’ll keep you informed of developments that will matter to you. In the meantime, please read our extended Q&A and join the discussion on the Help Forum. ~The Flickr Team [...]



Flickr Heroes of the Week

2018-04-16T22:38:07Z

The time has come! I know many of you were waiting on this to get you through your Monday. Let’s make this week a good […]

The time has come! I know many of you were waiting on this to get you through your Monday. Let’s make this week a good one, folks!

The Flickr Heroes of the week are ‘Panoramic View of Upper Joffre Lake’ by Pierre Leclerc on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Baby’s first swim’ by helloandyhihi on Facebook and Google+.

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+




Flickr Friday – Hanging Out Clothes

2018-04-16T17:47:54Z

And what a lovely Flickr Friday it is! Thank you for the #HangingOutClothes submissions from the challenge last week! The real question is how many […]

And what a lovely Flickr Friday it is! Thank you for the #HangingOutClothes submissions from the challenge last week! The real question is how many of you guys actually used this as an excuse to be productive and get laundry done? Yeah we didn’t think so.

As for the picture above, who knew laundry could be an art? Thanks for showing us the beauty in everything.

We may have a recurring theme with these clothes pins… I guess that’s to be expected though!

Interesting perspective to take! It looks like a laundry tree! Nature and domesticity intertwine at last. Can’t get enough #HangingOutClothes themed photos, then check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every Friday!




Abandoned Architecture

2018-04-13T17:20:48Z

Matthew Hampshire focuses on abandoned architecture photography. From barren seasides and deserted homes to plane wrecks and chapels that have forgotten to be cherished, Matthew captures what it would be like to live in an empty world.Matthew also enjoys shooting at old industrial sites. The longer it’s been abandoned, the better. He has always been captivated by the idea of a world without people, and shooting at these abandoned locations truly brings that thought to life. “What the elements and time can do to a building is extraordinary! The textures and colors of peeling paint and rusting objects can be quite stunning, and when plants and nature start to reclaim a building, it’s amazing to see how they transform a seemingly solid structure given enough time.” The photo above, titled “Start your engines,” is Matthew’s all-time favorite. Shot at the Pyestock National Gas Turbine Establishment, the size of the location left him on a high for weeks. Something else that gets his adrenaline going is trying to photograph these places without getting into police custody. Shooting at abandoned locations is always dangerous, as he has been “chased by dogs, fallen through floors, been shot at, climbed down rock faces in a pitch black cave and spent hours hiding in a multitude of places from security.” He elaborates on one particular experience: “At one industrial site in Italy, we spent about an hour getting into the site by climbing a large wall with the aid of some trees, then edged our way down the side of a river, climbed another wall, got into the building only to set an alarm off after being in there for about 5 minutes! We then had to do everything in reverse with a lot more haste with alarms ringing and sirens wailing. When we got out, the police were looking for us through the woods, so we had to trek about a mile through the trees and try and find another way back to our car without being seen.” Matt is self-taught and only got a camera because it came for free with his first PC. Little did he know it would turn into such a passion. After watching a ton of youtube tutorials, reading many photographer features and swapping tips and tricks with other photographers, his skills rapidly improved. Soon enough, he was spending hours driving to these places, sometimes over 1,300 miles in a three-day weekend plus a ferry or Eurotunnel crossing. The locations are a prime element in his work, so they’re worth the search. Staircases have always been central in his photography due to their naturally photogenic form. “From the simplest stairs to the grandest of staircases, they all seem to have a real beauty. I think because they are the focal point of so many buildings, the architects always seem to try and make the most of them, making them great to photograph.” This deteriorated Welsh chapel is the merging of 3 different shots, manually stitched together in Photoshop. Matt elaborates on the technical process in explaining: “I took the highlights from the darkest exposure for the windows. Then used the mid tones and shadows from the other lighter exposures. When I first started with this type of photography, I did a lot of HDR with various programs, but much prefer to get a more natural looking image by doing things manually now.” If Matt could change a few things, he would have shot much less with his fisheye lens. When he first acquired it, he was just starting to explore abandoned buildings and looking back he wishes he would have had more “straight shots.” The photo above is of an old slate mine that is no longer in use. “The local council got rid of cars that had been involved in accidents by dumping them there, and it slowly got filled up over the years, and was then forgotten about until a good friend discovered it many years later.” Although it remains in the UK, Matt would discou[...]



Flickr Heroes of the Week

2018-04-09T22:01:32Z

Another Monday, another fun day! The Flickr Heroes of the week are ‘San Manuel’ by john vermette on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Whale Shark’ by […]

Another Monday, another fun day!  

The Flickr Heroes of the week are ‘San Manuel’ by john vermette on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Whale Shark’ by Elyssa Drivas on Facebook and Google+.

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+




Flickr Friday – Dream

2018-04-06T20:28:59Z

Flickr Friday has arrived. Thank you for your fabulous #Dream themed submissions from the past week’s challenge! Shout out to the people who just submitted […]

Flickr Friday has arrived. Thank you for your fabulous #Dream themed submissions from the past week’s challenge! Shout out to the people who just submitted photos of their loved ones asleep on the couch. You’re the real MVPs.

We’re not sure where this photo came from, but it really blew everything out of the water. It superseded every other photo in this week’s challenge by almost 20x the amount of faves. Its color is absolutely stunning, and it definitely has that dream-like quality.

The title of this piece is called “Portal,” supposably because dreaming can feel like a sort of transportation. This was so creative, abstract, literal, all simultaneously. The Flickr team is astounded by the effort of the composition.

How could we resist a puppy shot? Do we really need a reason for this? Just look at that pupper go.

If you’re interested in more #Dream themed photos, then check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every Friday!




Why Not Now?

2018-04-05T20:28:40Z

Hayden Korr is a yearbook photographer turned photojournalist. As a student survivor at one of the most horrific school shootings in history, she has turned her grief into inspirational political art.On February 14th, 2018 one of the world’s most deadliest school shootings occurred in Parkland, Florida. Seventeen individuals were killed, and seventeen were wounded. This massacre sparked the March For Our Lives movement which in turn has created hundreds of rallies and marches across the country. Student-led efforts are dominating this political warfare in attempts to raise awareness of gun violence issues. “I thought that this rally was one of the most emotional experiences I have ever witnessed, so I had to express that.” Two of Hayden Korr’s biggest fears are “not documenting the right things and not documenting enough.” This has propelled her deep into the work of a true artist with wholesome intentions and daunting challenges. Hayden has only been taking pictures for two years, but her talent is obvious. Influenced by her father, also an artist, she has been creating art in the form of photography and creative prose since she was as young as five. She received her first DSLR when she turned 16, in 2016. Soon after an online photography course and a teacher who recognized her talent, she started shooting. Flickr may not be the newest or the hippest platform for youth, yet Hayden has been a dedicated Flickr member since the beginning of her photography journey. “Flickr is the best way for me to share my photos with my clients at their best quality, where they can save them. I put pictures from their photoshoots in respective albums and send it to them so they can have them forever. I find Flickr the easiest to use for this function. My photography teacher suggested it as a place to share my photos, and I’ve been using it ever since.” The appeal of Flickr also comes in fairly physical form, as its interface and sharing features do what other mainstream social media platforms cannot. “The way I see photographers of my generation using Flickr is to share their completed photos on an easy to use interface with their clients. I would recommend it to my photographer friends for this very reason.” Hayden elaborates on her experiences photographing the youth-led March For Our Lives rally: “It was moving to see so many people congregate from all over the world not just for my school, but for other places that have been ruined by gun violence. It is amazing to see what a group of teenagers like me and my friends can really do. I think photography is the way that we will immortalize these kinds of events forever, in history books and archives for ages to come. When you look back on the Civil Rights Movement of the 60’s, you can see the story told by just one photograph of the freedom riders. Photography tells a story that writing can’t, it gives the narrative a more emotional twist.” She believes one of the benefits of more Flickr members with the same demographic as she joining the community is that it allows people from different generations to get a new perspective on political events- essentially a furthering of understanding through art and photography. Part of the problem, she thinks, is this inability to perceive other opinions as respectable or intelligent, especially when these thoughts are voiced from youth. The final answer to her interview was simply a statement, “The saying goes ‘I believe the children are our future.’ We were going to change the world some time or another, so why not now?” For more of Hayden’s personal photos, check out her Photostream and be sure to follow her on Twitter! [...]



#ThroughHerLens – A Selection Gallery

2018-03-30T19:03:30Z

Flickr’s #ThroughHerLens social media campaign was designed to showcase female photographers and to celebrate Women’s History Month. Now that March is coming to a close, […]

Flickr’s #ThroughHerLens social media campaign was designed to showcase female photographers and to celebrate Women’s History Month. Now that March is coming to a close, so is the campaign, along with all submissions using the hashtag. This may be the end of this project, but this is not the end of the purpose.

Allow the photographs representing your experiences, outlooks, and thoughts to be seen and dispersed. This project has never been a competition. It’s about women helping other women become visible. It’s about highlighting our own work while simultaneously encouraging the creativity in others.

We have created a gallery featuring some of the most noteworthy photographs. If you’re interested in seeing where it all began, photos with the hashtag #ThroughHerLens were posted to the Flickr Social group. From there, many were shared on our social media channels in order to increase visibility and share the true talent of these photographers.

It has been a privilege circulating such incredible work through our social platforms and we hope to see you again next March!




Flickr Friday – 100 Percent

2018-03-30T18:24:54Z

Happy finally-it’s-Flickr-Friday day. Hhere’s the selection of our favorite submissions from the past week’s challenge! Doesn’t not having a spring break make going back to […]

Happy finally-it’s-Flickr-Friday day. Hhere’s the selection of our favorite submissions from the past week’s challenge! Doesn’t not having a spring break make going back to school seem doable? Back to the old days when you could go out any day other than Friday and still feel almost #100Percent in the morning. Just kidding. Nobody feels close to 100 percent in the morning. IT’S MORNING.

Why was this the first photo selected? We’re not sure.. there’s just something about it. And no… we’re not biased at all! Not at all…

If you ever need a visual breath of fresh air, this is the picture for you. Nothing quite says clean, simple, and spacious like …what is this, the bristles of a brush? A head massager? Inedible metal lollipops? Small baby Earths on sticks with no land and excessive oceans?

With the title of “100% Super,” this was a mandatory addition of cuteness to this post. We avoid run-ins with the cute police, so it’s better to be safe than sorry.

If you’re interested in more representations of 100%, then check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every …yup you guessed it, Friday.




Flickr Friday – Hand Tools

2018-03-29T19:59:49Z

What an incredible amount of stellar submissions this week! This Flickr Friday theme was an obvious success. People did a truly phenomenal job expressing their […]

What an incredible amount of stellar submissions this week! This Flickr Friday theme was an obvious success. People did a truly phenomenal job expressing their creativity in the tools they utilize to craft their passions. Thank you for showing us your personal #HandTools of choice!

A pencil sharpener definitely wasn’t the first thing to come to mind, but it worked out well. Great framing of the shot always highlights the subject.

There is a strong sense of grandpa/handyman in this photo and we’re loving it. This type of lighting doesn’t work with everything.

And the rule of thirds remains the rule of the great. Though these aren’t the friendliest hand tools, they’re certainly great models! If you’re interested in seeing more interesting #Handtools, then check out our gallery. Feel free to add your photo in the comments section of the gallery using this format: [FLICKR LINK]. Happy Friday :)




Finding and Keeping Purpose

2018-04-04T00:07:30Z

Her 365-day challenge began six weeks after the passing of her boyfriend, Tim, who was devastatingly taken after battling melanoma.Her 365-day challenge began six weeks after the passing of her boyfriend, Tim, who was devastatingly taken too soon after battling melanoma. “It was my first big grief, and it’s only looking back that I can understand the magnitude the loss held. A few weeks in, I was struggling to get out of bed, find direction or purpose, and having started a 365 when I first picked up a camera at 17, reattempting the project seemed a fitting way to make sure I didn’t let photography slip away from me, too.” Rosie explains how this challenge helped convey more than she expected. “It gave me something to think about other than his death, it gave me a way to channel my emotional state into something productive, it gave me connection and support from the people who’d followed my work and journey, and for that, I am so grateful.” Rosie believes that art should be a reflection of the artist. She feels encouraged to take bigger emotional risks because she is confident in her photography’s ability to help her recover from even the greatest loss. In the same respect, her work is also based on intent. Her photography has never been, and will never be, about being “gallery worthy” or aesthetically neat, it’s about feeling good during the creation process – especially during the 365 project. Her creation process goes above and beyond the typical, as it’s layered in her own passions. Although Rosie describes poetry as something she “dabbles” in, the captions of her photos are almost always beautiful enough to be considered poetry. Her exceedingly candid and forthright descriptions regularly give her followers a bitter taste of reality, layered in sweet sorrow and thoughtful, compelling prose. Rosie has refused to sit in the passenger’s seat of life and has instead decided to utilize the good in life to create, to listen to cinematic classical music, take her kayaks onto the nearby lake and daydream up ideas for shoots. The sincerity in her online presence has earned her a whopping 137.6 thousand followers. Her ability to be frank with her thoughts came from the fact that being a virtual public figure, she was going to be scrutinized at every angle anyway, so she might as well be judged for being her authentic self. Furthermore, this honesty has taken her to new heights the more she has studied behavioral psychology. Being able to express fear, grief, or other like issues is integral in a healthy process of moving forward. For her, this ingenuous sharing of her personal life has become “cathartic, artistic and integral to the structure” of her life. If she could give one piece of advice to her younger self, it would be to put less pressure on herself to create photos with the perfect outcome. “I’d have more patience with the learning process, and also maintain that it’s more important to be passionate about what it is you want to get out of your system by creating the piece, than the piece itself!” The photo above was chosen by the band Maroon 5 to use as their album cover art. Being chosen was not only an incredible accomplishment, but quite the relief as projects like these are what eases one of Rosie’s biggest fears- becoming a photographer who she doesn’t recognise. Only a small portion of her income comes from her personal work featured on Flickr, instagram, portfolio & Facebook. The majority of her income is derived from weddings, musician shoots and workshops. Although large brands are constantly requesting her talent, she remains highly selective of whom[...]