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Updated: 2018-01-20T23:20:47Z

 



WordPress.comFlickr Friday – Let There Be Light

2018-01-19T22:46:02Z

Last week’s Flickr Friday challenge involved getting the Flickr community to creatively portray the theme #LetThereBeLight. Some people took this the religious route, as evident […]

Last week’s Flickr Friday challenge involved getting the Flickr community to creatively portray the theme #LetThereBeLight. Some people took this the religious route, as evident in one of the photos below, while others used this as an opportunity to highlight some of their more brightly lit images. Either way, every submission was truly a well crafted piece of work.

We always love it when photographers create their own virtual worlds in their photographs! Not only does it scream creativity, but it demonstrates knowledge far more vast than technical ability.

The framing in the shot below couldn’t have been more well executed. We love the horizontal length of the shot and how it really made this image stand out among the others. This image is just proof that you don’t need the best props, models or landscapes to make a well composed photograph.

The photo below obviously had to be included in the gallery! Although the set up probably didn’t take longer than a minute, we appreciate the religious sentiment. This photo is absolutely heavenly.

It’s important to remember that you can stray a bit away from the topic! By photographing a building that glimmers a certain way, you’re still fulfilling the theme! The theme is simply a guide to take your photos where they’ve never gone before. As long as they’re creative, they’re beautiful to us.

For more images on light, make sure to check out the “Let There Be Light” gallery! If your photo didn’t make the cut this week, feel free to try again Monday by submitting your photo in the Flickr Friday group!




Next-Level Family Photography

2018-01-18T21:57:03Z

Elizabeth Sallee Bauer was a chef turned family photographer. While succeeding with her goal of capturing her kids' personalities, she also managed to gain a hefty amount of Flickr followers along the way! Find out why in our latest feature story!Bauer’s purpose in photography was to capture the personalities of her children so their pictures could be sent to family far away. This also begun after adopting their youngest child, Willie, so her birth parents could have the opportunity to see her grow up. Every photograph was taken with the purpose of lessening the distance between families and capturing memories. Thankfully, her models have adjusted to the constant sight of the camera, and now it’s just seen as an extension of their mom. Bauer says “Every once in awhile I might call their name and ask them about something they are doing and they have no problem connecting to me and my camera.” Bauer’s photography plays a big influence on her family’s quotidian routine as she takes hundreds of photos per day! This hobby rapidly expanded into multiple part-time jobs for Offset, GalleryStock, Alamy, and Fotolia. Bauer remains in shock with the fact that she can make money doing something she would have done anyways! None of it would have been possible without her three sensational kids constantly in center focus. “Since they are so close in age – we had three under three – they are almost each other’s best friends.  They can be content playing with a pile of dirt on the top of a hillside for hours, which gives me plenty of time to experiment with images from every direction and angle.” Bauer discusses how fortunate she is to have such energetic children overflowing with charisma and curiosity. “They fully immerse themselves in whatever environment we are visiting, whether it’s hiking Mt. Rainer, climbing the majestic trees in the Olympic peninsula rainforests or here in the Midwest, wading through rivers, playing tag in green meadows or becoming best friends with the cows in their grandpa’s barn.  We love to explore so most of the images are taken on our various adventures – even if it’s just hiking through the woods in our backyard.  Both my sons and my daughter love to get dirty, love to climb trees, love to make believe they are in a forest kingdom looking for giants.” Since Bauer is a family photographer, the camera follows the kids. This means she has had to familiarize herself with every sort of lighting imaginable. Though the golden sun around 4 p.m. can be a flattering background, it can also be incredibly bright during the middle of the day when the kids are out which is why she likes the consistency of indoor light. Bauer elaborates on the harsh weather conditions and how she has managed to cope: “I am drawn to vibrant colors and they just come alive in full sun. In that kind of lighting, I try to get shots from behind the kids to avoid the harsh shadows. I also love shooting from the perspective of what they see and what they are looking at.” Giving your photos a perspective shift can add an unexpected element of interesting! “For the last several years living in the Pacific Northwest, I had to make use of the sparse light you get during the cloudy, drizzly winter days and look for the small amount of soft light coming in the window. I like the calmness it conveys. Also, because of all the overcast days, I got used to figuring out how to do the best with flat lighting situations. Because the light is not very interesting on its own, the other elements of the photo have to compensate.” When asking Bauer what advice would she give to herself if she had to begin photography all over again, she said not to be afraid to crank your ISO up in order to have a faster shutter speed (especially with the kids). “I was too afraid to embrace the grain for too long.” As demonstrated by the photograph above, if you want to capture speed, then you’re goin[...]



Happy 10th Anniversary, Flickr Commons!

2018-01-17T06:24:54Z

Ten years ago today, the Library of Congress joined the Flickr Commons with the aim of ensuring better access to their historical photo collections.Today is a very special day for us at Flickr as it marks the 10th anniversary of the Flickr Commons, one of the world’s most extensive archives of public images. Ten years ago today, the Library of Congress joined the Flickr Commons with the aim of ensuring better access to their historical photo collections. They wanted to expand their reach to more people throughout the world. The idea of a mutually beneficial relationship between web users and cultural heritage institutions seemed ambitious but started modestly. Our pilot project began in 2008 with only one partner – the Library of Congress, which quickly became one of the largest and most active Commons accounts. Increased access to photography archives deserves to be as publicly represented as possible. What better place to get historically relevant photographs seen than a photography platform with millions of people looking at images every day? Viewers have the opportunity to help enrich these collections by adding tags, comments, and making notes on the photos to enhance findability and contribute information that can potentially improve the quality of the archives. Thanks to Flickr’s user-generated content, the Library of Congress have deciphered the story behind dozens of “mystery photos” like the one below, and folded almost 9,000 updated photo captions back into their own online catalog. Just as the Library, most other participating institutions have reported seeing very large increases in page views and engagement with their digital collections. There are now over 110 participating institutions in the Flickr Commons. Some of the more popular ones are The Smithsonian, The British Library, The National Library of Medicine, the NASA, or the National Libraries of Scotland, Australia, Ireland, Sweden or Norway. Unsurprisingly, museums and local university archives are also famous among the Commons! In honor of the tremendous growth of this 10-year-old project, we’ve put together a gallery of the most popular photos from all of the Commons photographs. Check it out! If you’re interested in seeing some of the most popular images from the Library of Congress’ Flickr account, which houses over 30 thousand photographs, be sure to check out their Top Favorites album on Flickr! And to get a better idea of how they are celebrating the Flickr Commons anniversary, visit their 10th Anniversary album. They’ve done a 10-day pictorial countdown! If you are an administrator at a GLAM and you’re interested in joining the Flickr Commons, you can register and find more information at our Commons page. [...]



Martin Luther King Jr. Day

2018-01-15T17:00:25Z

Today marks the birthday of the most influential civil rights leader in America’s history. Today is celebrated because of all the work Martin Luther King […]

Today marks the birthday of the most influential civil rights leader in America’s history. Today is celebrated because of all the work Martin Luther King Jr. and his fellow activists have done. The path they paved for the civil liberties we have today was treacherous. One of the most important things we can do now is to remember that our civil liberties came at a high cost and they should never be taken for granted. If this isn’t enough for you and you want to seek further action, there are simple steps everyone can take to keep Martin Luther King’s dream alive.

Be Kind – One of King’s biggest tactic was non-violent action which was inspired by Mahatma Gandhi in India. Passivity is powerful when used correctly! Now just because you are good to others, there is no assurance they will be good to you. There are no kindness-back guarantees in life. This doesn’t mean that being good to others isn’t worth it. Resisting the immediate urge for violent action can be more effective in the long run. Kill them with kindness.

Think Globally, Act Locally – The Voting Rights Act of 1965, which granted African Americans the right to vote, was initiated after King’s Selma to Montgomery marches (featured in the photo below). This protest wasn’t an act of civil anarchy, but a portrayal of necessary change. These groups exercised their First Amendment right to assemble in a way that refined history. If you think that no good has ever come out of protesting or standing up against injustice, refer back to history for a recap. King once said “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

During rough times, one may feel hopeless or like their actions would be ignored, but our actions have the same power they did 50 years ago, if not more. If you want to keep Martin Luther King’s vision alive then be kind to others and steadfast in your beliefs.

Happy Martin Luther King Day, folks.

 




Flickr Friday – Get Out of my Picture

2018-01-12T19:20:53Z

Everyone knows that feeling. The shot is perfectly framed. The light couldn’t be any better. The subject is on point. Then something or someone decides […]

Everyone knows that feeling.

The shot is perfectly framed. The light couldn’t be any better. The subject is on point. Then something or someone decides their need to stroll right into the middle of your shot is more important than that million dollar photograph you were about to take.

This blog is a tribute to all the photographers who never had the courage to say #GetOutOfMyPicture and all those fabulous pictures that never got taken because life physically got in the way.

Wall-E got an entire movie to himself. He doesn’t need this photo too. You’re cute but get out of here. This isn’t your time.

We’re pretty sure this fierce feline knew exactly what he was doing when his leisurely decided to saunter through. Notice the avoidance of eye contact!

The photo below is the ultimate tragedy. That is too stunning of a building for it to be out of focus. Minions truly do cause destruction… and they have no remorse for it.

The “misty landscape” below would have been a classic to put in the scrapbook, but Mr. Water Bottle has tarnished it! The image was still captured, but it certainly isn’t the same with that extra visitor in the back. Now you have 6684 feet to drive down and think about the shot that could have been :(

Can’t get enough? Check out our gallery full of photos that had unwelcome guests. If you took a photo where you felt you couldn’t say #GetOutOfMyPicture, then share it on the comment section of the gallery with the format: [FLICKR LINK] If your photo didn’t make it into the blog or gallery this week, try again for next week’s theme!

 




Bridging the Gap

2018-01-11T17:56:08Z

As a dedication to victims of universal queer hate crimes, Woodcox uses his photographs as a solidarity stance to symbolize his belief in love and […]As a dedication to victims of universal queer hate crimes, Woodcox uses his photographs as a solidarity stance to symbolize his belief in love and equality. These photographs were intended to encourage people to recognize the interconnectivity between one another. His fine art images have been featured on dozens of magazines and media sites, but what makes Woodcox’s work unique is his ability to make viewers question where the subjects come from by incorporating “strange or interesting elements.” These elements are inspired by real-life experiences and dreams. There will be more inspired photographs to come as Woodcox is currently on a 3-month tour around the 5 continents. When discussing why photography stood out to him among other various forms of art, he says “Photography feels either like a fluke or destiny. I had no idea why I was so determined to try it when I entered college- I had never even handled a DSLR camera. Perhaps it was my love for art without talent for painting or drawing. I wanted to try something that would allow me to express myself more readily than those art forms.” If you noticed he prefers to shoot portraits, there is a reason for that too. He believes that portraiture takes photography to the next level because it allows for a more captivating story to be told. With the title “What Are We Becoming?” photos like the one above truly speak to Woodcox’s sole purpose of photography. “My purpose in photographing is to share my deepest truths, my most authentic self with the world. Being an artist is like a political act against common culture and doing what is expected; I have grown tired of our corrupt society and politics and I think sharing a brighter version of how life could be through my art is the best way to respond without contributing to the negative culture.” While society may be overrun with electronic devices and the age of technology has caused us all to collect and connect online, it’s important to give our eyes a break from the screen and our mind a rest from overused unhelpful social media. Building upon creating a brighter future, Woodcox shares his ideals about social justice issues around the globe, how it’s affecting us, and what he’s doing about it. “I believe we are all connected and share similar experiences, no matter what our backgrounds. Everyone needs resources to survive or thrive, and we all want love in some form. I’ve been so fortunate to experience the beauty of humanity in 48 US states and 18 countries thus far, and everywhere I am greeted in different ways, yet with the same longing for inclusion and recognition. Social justice is common sense – everyone deserves to be treated equally and with respect.  The fact that people are segregated based on race, religion, gender, sexual preference, nationality, is a crime heavily thanks to corrupt governments and societies not supporting their diverse communities.” Woodcox doesn’t beat around the bush when talking about subjects that are relevant, and most importantly need to be discussed in order to be changed! “I think if most people were asked to directly hurt someone, they wouldn’t, but being disconnected through distance, voting systems, and the internet makes it easier for people to harm others with their words and political actions. My photos are a small way for me to share my ideas and try to bridge the gap between different communities; I’ve built such a large and diverse community behind my work, and perhaps sharing aspects of one community will help a different community understand better their differences and similarities, and will hopefully inspire others to accept each other regardless.” If[...]



Flickr Heroes of the Week

2018-01-09T02:04:40Z

Our new Flickr Heroes of the Week are: ‘Sunrise at Alabama Hills’ by Paul Smith on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Magenta Seaweed’ by Justine Shachar […]

Our new Flickr Heroes of the Week are: ‘Sunrise at Alabama Hills’ by Paul Smith on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Magenta Seaweed’ by Justine Shachar on Facebook and Google+

Want your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

These are the runners-up (meaning we liked your photo but you are not the winner):

If you want your photo to be considered for a Flickr Hero (aka Cover Photo) feature next week, submit your best image(s) to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. If you haven’t already, follow @Flickr where you share your photos!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+




The Authentic Sci-Fi Characters

2018-01-09T01:48:09Z

Some people scream, some people squirm, some people are like John Hallmén and run right up close to take a photograph. Interested in invertebrates? Check out Hallmén's photographs. Son of a botanist, Hallmén retained a fascination with nature since youth so when asked why bugs of all things has kept his attention, he responded: “I grew up during the first Star Wars hype. When I discovered that you could find these fantastic looking creatures just by peeking underneath rocks in the backyard I was hooked. Up close they all looked like something out of a sci-fi movie! Of course I wanted to know what they were called and by deciphering field guides I learned how to read as a bonus. Ever since then, the more I learn about bugs – about their behavior and the different roles they play in the ecosystem – the more they appear as the main characters of this world.” But in short my answer is the same today as it would’ve been 35 years ago: because they look cool little monsters!” This self taught photographer is fortunate enough to live beside a natural reserve in Stockholm, Sweden where the majority of his subjects are found in a small space approximately 25×25 meters. Within this space he uses two very different approaches. (Feel free to grab a pen and take some notes. This is free photography instruction!) 1. Handheld – Subjects are pursued on foot with a handheld camera during the day. Blur occurring with motion is avoided by using the camera’s flash. 2. Tripod – Using a tripod is best when the subject is still, but bugs always look like they keep moving. So how do you get them to pose? Hallmén uses his interests in biology to get the best photographs: “Since bugs are cold blooded animals their activity decreases with temperature and after a cold night you’re able to find subjects that will remain perfectly still, even if you’re just centimeters away from them with your camera. So, when conditions are right (no wind, relatively cold conditions), I always set my alarm early (in June this means ≈ 3am) so that I can be on site just before sunrise. This gives me the opportunity to capture my subjects in their natural environment without the need for a flash or fast shutter speed to freeze the action. These conditions also allow me to use focus stacking in order to increase depth of field and detail resolution.” The third approach to Hallmén’s insect photography actually occurs indoors. The original purpose for this makeshift studio was to keep active during the severe bug abstinence caused by the long Swedish winters. 3. Studio – “I have converted my closet into a micro/macro studio where I shoot dead/prepared subjects at high magnifications. Using microscope objectives and techniques developed for scientific purposes I can zoom in on details that are impossible to see with the naked eye. Also, studio photography has taught me a lot about lighting.” With every post Hallmén makes on his Flickr he adds a bit of informative dialogue on the specifics of the insect, such as the scientific name, its previously found location and an unusual fact. Though these descriptions are a minor piece in his publishing, being able to correctly identify the subject has taken years of practice. “Since I’ve been trying my best to identify every bug I’ve found since I was a little kid I have a pretty good idea where to begin my research. By now I usually know which taxonomic family my subject is (as long as I’m in familiar territory geographically), and this makes further research much easier. I know which book to open, which expert to contact or which forum to visit. But, like always – the more you learn the more you realize how little we actually know about the world. In biology, and entomology in particular, the [...]



Your Best Shot 2017 group closing soon!

2018-01-04T18:55:42Z

Hey Flickr Fam, Just a reminder to submit your most inspiring photo of the year to the Your Best Shot 2017 group before the end […]

Hey Flickr Fam,

Just a reminder to submit your most inspiring photo of the year to the Your Best Shot 2017 group before the end of the day on January 5th.

We’ll leave the pool open until the night of January 5th, Pacific time, for those of you who are still undecided or have second thoughts about the photo you initially uploaded. We’ve already started curating selections of our favorite images across various themes, and we’ll continue to do so throughout January. In the meantime, here are a few beautiful submissions from the group pool.




Your Best Shot 2017 – Black and White

2017-12-27T22:28:00Z

The Your Best Shot 2017 Flickr group has more than 5,000 members who have uploaded nearly 4,000 photos to the pool and created dozens of […]

The Your Best Shot 2017 Flickr group has more than 5,000 members who have uploaded nearly 4,000 photos to the pool and created dozens of beautiful galleries curated in this discussion thread.

If you haven’t already joined the group, we encourage you to upload your single best photo taken this year before you miss your chance on January 5th, 2018!

Here is a selection of our favorite black and white images below, but you can see the complete gallery here.




Happy Holidays! Love, Flickr

2017-12-24T01:18:58Z

Who are we kidding? We’ve been waiting for this season all year. More calories, less co-worker face time, and gifts galore. Hello Holidays. Let’s be […]Who are we kidding? We’ve been waiting for this season all year. More calories, less co-worker face time, and gifts galore. Hello Holidays. Let’s be real though, this is Flickr. We can’t just send you off to enjoy this holiday season with the typical farewell. This [insert festive holiday here], we encourage you to step out of the box and break a few outdated traditions. We’re encouraging all things quirky this season! You deserve more than forced outings in the freezing cold and overplayed holiday songs. If not for you, then for the kids! …Do it for the children. Remember being young enough to wonder why your parents never changed anything up? Don’t make the same mistakes. The holiday season doesn’t always have to mean the same thing every year. Tradition gets tiring! Instead of spending hours putting lights up on your roof and risking the possibility of a potential visit to the emergency room, just visit someone else’s for a few hours, then go home and put on some pajamas like you really want. Baking is traditionally something everyone does during the holidays, but it often gets to the point where we feel like we’re slaving away! We spend days making all these baked goods for family and friends, but by the end of it we either don’t get any cookies ourselves or end up secretly loathing everyone who get’s them. It ends up becoming more of a social obligation than a family affair. Don’t even get us started on this so called “Santa.” We just have one question for you- WHY? Why doesn’t he value his health? Why isn’t he aware that heart disease is the #1 killer in America. Why do we hold him in such high regard if he obviously likes cookies more than he likes us? If you aren’t particularly fond of praising a suited obese man, then perhaps you could make your own mascot like the genius below. Nice cup. No matter where you’re celebrating Christmas, or your Christmas like events, Flickr wishes you a quirky world of happiness. You deserve more than outdated conventional customs for making it through this year. Congratulations, we did it fam. [...]



Your Best Shot 2017 – Landscapes

2017-12-20T00:45:47Z

There’s been so much phenomenal work on Flickr this year, and it’s time to celebrate the best of Flickr, regardless of follower numbers. We are […]

There’s been so much phenomenal work on Flickr this year, and it’s time to celebrate the best of Flickr, regardless of follower numbers. We are highlighting our favorite photos from the Your Best Shot group across various themes, and these are some of our favorite Landscape photos posted to Flickr and the Your Best Shot Group.

Submissions are still open! If you haven’t already, join the group and submit your best shot of 2017! If you follow an amazing landscape photographer, tell them to add one of their top shots!!!

 

VIEW THE FULL #YBS2017 LANDSCAPE GALLERY

 

We’ll finish the gallery with other great landscape and nature shots by January 5th, so get your top photo in the running ASAP and join the conversation online with the hashtag #YBS2017.