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Preview: Journal of Pediatric Psychology - current issue

Journal of Pediatric Psychology Current Issue





Published: Fri, 27 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2018 16:50:32 GMT

 



Editorial: Initiatives and Goals for the Next 5 Years of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology

Fri, 27 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

It is with enthusiasm that I step into the role as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology (JPP). Having served JPP as an Associate Editor under the editorships of Denny Drotar and Grayson Holmbeck, I had the benefit of learning from two amazing editors how to lead JPP to success. As a first step, I recruited an outstanding team composed of Associate Editors Melissa Alderfer, Dean Beebe, Marisa Hilliard, David Janicke, Bryan Karazsia, and Avani Modi; Student Editorial Liaison Aimee Hildenbrand; and JPP Editorial Assistant Susan Wood. I am particularly delighted to be able to continue working with the highly dedicated Susan Wood who I have known since 1996 from my days at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital. In this editorial, I describe my inspiration for leading JPP and my own goals and ideas for keeping JPP impactful over the next 5 years.



Editorial: Enhancing Transparent Reporting of Pediatric Psychology Intervention Research: Introducing the Role of the Student Editorial Liaison

Thu, 26 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Complete and transparent reporting of intervention trials is essential for accurately assessing the validity, reliability, and utility of findings (Simera et al., 2010). Unfortunately, inadequate reporting of intervention studies continues to be a pervasive concern across biomedical and psychosocial health research (Altman & Moher, 2014). In particular, systematic reviews highlight that peer-reviewed journal articles frequently lack detailed information regarding eligibility criteria, intervention delivery and service environment, participant flow, measurement of primary and secondary outcomes, sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, sample size calculations, adverse events, and data analytic methods (Azar, Riehm, McKay, & Thombs, 2015; Crocetti, Amin, & Scherer, 2010; de Vries & van Roon, 2010; Grant, Mayo-Wilson, Melendez-Torres, & Montgomery, 2013). In addition, selective reporting of outcomes and misrepresentation of findings are common occurrences in published reports of clinical trials (Boutron, Dutton, Ravaud, & Altman, 2010; Chan, Hróbjartsson, Haahr, Gøtzsche, & Altman, 2004; Dwan et al., 2008; Dwan et al., 2011). In turn, these shortcomings significantly limit stakeholders’ ability to assess risk of bias in clinical trials and hinder subsequent replication efforts and meta-analyses, thereby reducing the quality of the broader evidence base and impeding advancements in clinical practice and public health policy (Clyburne-Sherin et al., 2015; Simera et al., 2010).



JPP Student Journal Club Commentary: The Value of Assessing Patterns of Psychosocial Risk and Resilience in Glycemic Control Trajectory Models

Wed, 25 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Maintaining optimal glycemic control is particularly challenging for adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), as up to 80% of them fail to meet recommended hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values (Wood et al., 2013). The developmental and social changes of adolescence and the transition of T1D management responsibilities from caregiver to youth highlight the need for a comprehensive understanding of variables that affect glycemic control. However, most previous studies focus on cross-sectional data. Helgeson and colleagues (Helgeson et al., 2017) describe an underused approach to studying long-term health-care outcomes in adolescents with T1D. They followed 132 youth with T1D for 11 years, beginning in early adolescence. At the start of the study, youth completed measures of parent relationship quality; friend support and conflict; unmitigated communion; symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger; and self-care behaviors. Parent responses on a broadband measure of youth functioning yielded internalizing and externalizing composite scores.



Rebellious Behaviors in Adolescents With Epilepsy

Tue, 30 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objectives
The study aims are to (1) examine the prevalence of risk-taking (i.e., behaviors that can be categorized as rebellious or reckless) and (2) determine the influence of risk-taking on adherence, seizures, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents with epilepsy. An exploratory aim was to identify predictors of risk-taking.
Methods
Fifty-four adolescents with epilepsy (M = 15.33 ± 1.46 years) and caregivers completed questionnaires on demographics, risk-taking, parent–child relations, adolescent inattention/hyperactivity, and HRQOL at four time points across 1 year. Seizure occurrence and electronically monitored adherence were also collected.
Results
Rebellious behaviors were normative and stable over 1 year in adolescents with epilepsy. Higher rebelliousness was related to poorer adolescent-reported memory HRQOL. The only significant positive predictor of rebellious behaviors was adolescent age.
Conclusions
Adolescents with epilepsy endorsed normative levels of rebelliousness, which is negatively related to HRQOL. Older adolescents may warrant clinical attention.



Historical Analysis: The Journal of Pediatric Psychology From 1976 to 2015

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
To provide a historical analysis through the examination of trends in type of articles, content areas, and population groups across all issues of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology (JPP).
Method
All articles published in JPP between the years 1976–2015 were coded based on article type (e.g., original research, meta-analysis), content code (e.g., adherence, primary care), and population code (e.g., oncology, chronic and recurrent pain). Descriptive statistics were calculated.
Results
The overall top article types, content codes, and population codes are described as well as top codes for each decade. Overall, the majority of articles were classified as original research. Although some population and content codes varied over time, there were some areas that were consistently present throughout issues, including family systems, cognitive/intellectual functioning, pediatric oncology, and type 1 diabetes. Many topics selected for special issues and topics were consistent with top population and content codes.
Conclusions
Findings indicate that most top areas have consistently been present in JPP over the 39-year period. The current historical analysis highlights these patterns as well as serves as a historical record for JPP.



Shared Responsibility for Type 1 Diabetes Care Is Associated With Glycemic Variability and Risk of Glycemic Excursions in Youth

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
We examined how parent and youth responsibility for type 1 diabetes (T1D) care is related to adherence and glycemic outcomes, namely, glycemic variability and risk of glycemic excursions.
Methods
One hundred thirty-five parent–youth dyads (10–16 years old; diagnosed with T1D for at least 6 months) participated in this study. Percent responsibility of T1D care attributed to the youth, parent, or shared was measured using the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire. We collected youth’s hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glucometer downloads to examine relationships between responsibility and HbA1c, frequency of blood glucose monitoring (self-monitoring blood glucose, SMBG), risk of glycemic excursions, and actual glycemic variability using bivariate correlations and path analysis.
Results
Participants reported shared responsibility for almost half of T1D self-care tasks. Bivariate correlations showed shared responsibility was associated with less variability, whereas parent responsibility was associated with greater glycemic variability and risk for glycemic excursions. Youth responsibility was associated with lower frequency of SMBG. The path analyses confirmed our correlational findings (ps<.05) and better characterized interactions with age for youth-reported responsibility.
Conclusions
Our results support the hypothesis that shared T1D responsibility is associated with better diabetes outcomes in youth.



Maladaptive Coping and Depressive Symptoms Partially Explain the Association Between Family Stress and Pain-Related Distress in Youth With IBD

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
To extend existing research on the pain burden experienced by youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by examining the complexity of psychosocial factors involved in pain-related distress.
Methods
Parents completed measures of family stress and their child’s pain-related expressions of distress and coping. Youth with IBD rated their depressive symptoms (n = 183 dyads). Mediation analyses were performed using regression-based techniques and bootstrapping.
Results
Greater family stress was positively related to children’s pain-related expressions of distress and passive coping. Significant indirect effects were found in the relationship between family stress and expressed pain-related distress through parent-reported passive coping, depressive symptoms, and both passive coping and depressive symptoms sequentially.
Conclusions
Results suggest that family stress can place children at risk for greater expressed pain-related distress through effects on coping and depressive symptoms. Addressing psychosocial difficulties is important for closing the gap between disability and health in youth with IBD.



Examination of Psychosocial and Physiological Risk for Bulimic Symptoms in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes Transitioning to an Insulin Pump: A Pilot Study

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objectives
This study tested hypotheses drawn from a risk model positing that psychosocial risk plus disease-related and treatment factors contribute to bulimic symptoms in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) transitioning to an insulin pump. The goal of this study was to examine whether disease-related factors, particularly disease- and treatment-based disruption in hunger and satiety, contribute to report of bulimic symptoms in youth with T1D after accounting for psychosocial risk factors.
Methods
43 youth (ages 10–17, 54% female) with established T1D were recruited before transition from multiple daily injections to insulin-pump therapy from three tertiary pediatric diabetes centers. Participants completed measures of bulimic symptoms, depressive symptoms dietary restraint, and the Diabetes Treatment and Satiety Scale, a diabetes-specific questionnaire assessing hunger and satiety cues and eating behavior in response to blood glucose levels and treatment.
Results
Hierarchical multiple regression was used to assess contributions of psychosocial and disease-based risk to report of bulimic symptoms. After assessing the contributions of body mass index, body image dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint, a significant 2-way interaction emerged between depression and diabetes-related uncontrollable hunger related to bulimic symptoms (β = 1.82, p < .01).
Conclusions
In addition to psychosocial risk, disease- and treatment-based hunger and satiety dysregulation appear to be important factors contributing to report of bulimic symptoms in youth with T1D. These preliminary findings have significant treatment implications for bulimic symptoms in youth with T1D.



Featured Article: Trajectories of Glycemic Control Over Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: An 11-Year Longitudinal Study of Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

Tue, 16 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
To identify trajectories of glycemic control over adolescence and emerging adulthood and to test whether demographic and psychosocial variables distinguished these trajectories.
Methods
We enrolled 132 youth with type 1 diabetes when they were average age 12 and followed them for 11 years. We used group-based trajectory modeling to identify distinct patterns of glycemic control, and examined whether age 12 demographic and psychosocial variables distinguished the subsequent trajectories.
Results
We identified 5 trajectories of glycemic control: stable on target, stable above target, volatile late peak, stable high, and inverted U. Parent social status and household structure distinguished the more problematic trajectories from the stable on target group. Friend conflict, psychological distress, unmitigated communion, and self-care behavior at age 12 distinguished problematic glycemic control trajectories from the stable on target group.
Conclusions
These results can be used to identify youth who are at risk for deteriorating glycemic control over adolescence.



Attention Problems as a Predictor of Type 1 Diabetes Adherence and Metabolic Control Across Adolescence

Sat, 13 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
Management of type 1 diabetes is a difficult self-regulatory process requiring continued attention to complex regimen tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine whether youths’ attention problems were associated with poorer adherence and HbA1c across time, and whether higher parental involvement reduced these associations.
Methods
Adolescents with type 1 diabetes (N = 199, M age  = 12.43 years, SD = 1.50) and their mothers rated youths’ attention problems and adherence at three time points. Adolescents rated parents’ diabetes-specific monitoring and behavioral involvement. HbA1c was collected from medical records.
Results
Adolescents’ (but not mothers’) greater reports of attention problems compared with their average related to lower adherence across time. Adolescents' (but not mothers') reports of greater attention problems compared with their average related to lower adherence across time.
Conclusions
Youth attention problems may help us understand poor adherence, and interventions to promote parental involvement may buffer this risk.



The Weight Bias Internalization Scale for Youth: Validation of a Specific Tool for Assessing Internalized Weight Bias Among Treatment-Seeking German Adolescents With Overweight

Mon, 08 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
The study aimed to assess the psychometric properties of a partly adapted, German version of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS-Y) in a sample of treatment-seeking adolescents with overweight.
Methods
A survey (N = 191), including measures of weight bias internalization (WBI), self-esteem, self-efficacy, health-related quality of life, and body-related locus of control, was followed by semistructured interviews (N = 10). Cronbach’s α, correlation, and factor analyses were performed. Interview data were subjected to inductive content analysis.
Results
The WBIS-Y displayed good reliability and construct validity. WBI correlated negatively with self-esteem, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life, and positively with body mass index and external body-related locus of control. Interviewees found the scale to be comprehensive, linguistically accessible, and acceptable despite its sensitive nature.
Conclusions
The WBIS-Y is recommended for use both in research with adolescents and as a guide for mitigating the negative consequences of weight stigmatization in the treatment of pediatric obesity.



Behavioral and Pharmacological Adherence in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: Parent–Child Agreement and Family Factors Associated With Adherence

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Objective
This study aimed to evaluate agreement between children and parents on a measure of behavioral and pharmacological adherence in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), and the associations among family factors (i.e., problem-solving skills, routines, communication) and adherence behaviors.
Methods
In all, 85 children (aged 8–18 years) with SCD and their parents completed questionnaires assessing individual and family factors.
Results
Overall parent–child agreement on an adherence measure was poor, particularly for boys and older children. Greater use of child routines was associated with better overall child-reported adherence. Open family communication was associated with higher overall parent-reported adherence.
Conclusions
While further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, results suggest the need to assess child adherence behaviors via both child and parent reports. Findings also suggest that more daily family routines and open family communication may be protective factors for better disease management.