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Breast cancer | Health Directory | Mail Online



Check out the latest news, articles and information about the key health issues such as allergies, cancer, obesity or stress from the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday.



Published: Mon, 17 Dec 2012 20:03:04 +0000

Last Build Date: Mon, 17 Dec 2012 20:03:04 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2012 Associated Newspapers Ltd
 



Squeezing breasts 'could stop growth of cancer cells'

Mon, 17 Dec 2012 20:03:04 +0000

A little squeeze may be all that it takes to prevent malignant breast cells triggering cancer, according to researchers at the University of California in Berkeley. Squashing breast cells encouraged them to grow in a regular way. However, scientists don't believe compressing breast tissue would have a beneficial effect


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Postponing pregnancy slashes risk of most deadly form of breast cancer

Thu, 13 Dec 2012 17:29:12 +0000

The U.S researchers also found that breast feeding has a protective affect against the drug-resistant condition, so it's not all bad news for young mothers. Waiting until you are 28 to have children could reduce your risk of developing an aggressive form of breast cancer before you're 50


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Simple blood test could save thousands of lives by accurately detecting beginning stages of breast cancer and lung cancer - and has potential for pancreatic cancer

Thu, 27 Sep 2012 17:05:10 +0100

An initial study found the test had a 95 per cent success rate in detecting breast and lung cancer in participants, including in those in the earliest stages, said Kansas State University scientists. breast scan


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Housework could reduce the risk of breast cancer

Tue, 04 Sep 2012 11:04:52 +0100

Researchers funded by Cancer Research UK, found women who spent six hours a day on household chores were 13 per cent less likely to develop breast cancer than their sedentary peers. Moderate physical activity is key to reducing the risk of breast cancer, according to a new study


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Breast cancer in young women is so aggressive it should be treated as a completely separate disease

Fri, 04 May 2012 13:33:44 +0100

Breast cancer in young women is so aggressive it should be treated as a completely separate disease, according to the Jules Bordet Institute in Brussels. Singer Kylie Minogue was diagnosed when she was 36. Kylie Minogue after recovering from breast cancer in 2006: Particular genes are significantly associated with breast cancer in pre-menopausal women


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Breast cancer treatment: British study classifies disease into 10 different types

Wed, 18 Apr 2012 18:00:00 +0100

The finding brings doctors closer to the holy grail of tailoring treatments to individual women. The rewriting of the rule book on breast cancer could also lead to new drugs and better diagnostic tests. Precise: The new findings mean therapies could be tailored to individual breast cancer patients (picture posed by model)


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Screening of breast cancer more successful at cutting deaths than drugs, study finds

Wed, 21 Mar 2012 15:21:04 +0000

Regular X-ray checks cut rates of death by almost 16 per cent, while drug therapy scores just 14 per cent, according to the study. Mammogram: In the UK all women aged between 47 and 73 are called for breast screening. Younger women are called if a close relative had breast cancer young


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The new scarless surgery for breast cancer operations

Tue, 24 Jan 2012 15:40:31 +0000

A ground-breaking technique for scarless surgery is offering hope to thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer Public interest: BBC Director-general Mark Thompson told the Leveson Inquiry today that the Corporation used private detectives


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The eight-second scan that can detect breast cancer

Thu, 01 Dec 2011 23:17:04 +0000

The pain-free radio-wave scanner, developed in Bristol, is safer than traditional mammogram X-rays, which carry a radiation risk and are used on hundreds of thousands of women every year. Clean sweep: The Maria system can detect tumours in just eight seconds


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World's deadliest spiders could hold the key to treating breast cancer

Mon, 24 Oct 2011 14:58:44 +0100

In a two-year trial, researchers from the University of Queensland will investigate if spider venom is capable of killing cancerous cells. Cure? The Funnel Web spider, one of the world's deadliest animals, may hold the key to treating breast cancer


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Breast cancer breakthrough made by Luke Piggott who juggles medical degree with hockey

Thu, 15 Sep 2011 13:41:40 +0100

A professional ice hockey player who is also studying to become a doctor at Cardiff University has uncovered a way of killing breast cancer stem cells. Medical research student & Cardiff Devils Ice Hockey player Luke Piggott


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Breast cancer: Eating flaxseeds could 'reduce risk of dying by 40 per cent'

Wed, 14 Sep 2011 11:10:05 +0100

Seed compounds may kill off cancer cells while preventing the growth of new tumours, say scientists from the German Cancer Research Centre in Heidelberg. Food for thought: Flax seeds are rich in lignans which turn into enterolactone in the bowel. Scientists found they had a protective effect against breast cancer


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Breast cancer: Having my daughter gave me cancer - but I would willingly go through it all again

Fri, 09 Sep 2011 09:45:19 +0100

Lisa Clough, 26, from Greater Manchester, was told she had developed the cancer while she was pregnant with daughter Isabelle-Lilly due to the changes in her hormones. Worth it: Lisa Clough with her daughter Isabelle. Doctors told her pregnancy may have caused her breast cancer


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Doctors winning breast cancer war as two thirds of women who have it die from other diseases

Mon, 20 Jun 2011 09:13:37 +0100

Researchers at the University of Colorado found that heart disease is now the leading cause of death in older women with the condition. A radiographer prepare a woman for a mammogram: Breast cancer accounts for a third of all cancer cases in women, however older women with the condition are more likely to die from heart disease (posed)


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Blood pressure drugs 'may improve woman's chances of surviving breast cancer'

Wed, 01 Jun 2011 09:11:00 +0100

In one study, women taking beta-blockers survived longer without seeing the tumour return than those not on the medication. Potential: The possible link between beta-blockers and breast cancer survival was described as 'very promising' by scientists


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NHS staff to be monitored to see how many older women they treat for breast cancer

Wed, 06 Apr 2011 05:34:32 +0100

Health watchdog Nice says that patients should be offered hormone therapy and surgery irrespective of their age. Hospitals will be monitored to check on breast cancer treatment of older patients


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Breast cancer patients boost survival chances if they complete their five-year course of tamoxifen

Tue, 22 Mar 2011 09:39:41 +0000

Breast cancer patients who stop taking tamoxifen before completing a full five-year course are more likely to see the disease return, British scientists have warned. Tamoxifen was the first drug to block the effects of oestrogen and reduces the chance of breast cancer returning in many patients


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Policeman Mark Cross hit by breast cancer and saved by a mastectomy

Tue, 22 Feb 2011 11:29:30 +0000

It took a minor DIY injury at home and some serious persuasion by Mark Cross's wife to change his attitude... and probably save his life. Recovered: Detective Inspector Mark Cross with his wife Kim who insisted he go to the doctor when his nipple inverted


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Breast cancer surgery to remove lymph nodes 'has no effect'

Wed, 09 Feb 2011 09:49:59 +0000

The findings may spare tens of thousands of women the pain and years of side effects related to the common but painful procedure. A woman has a mammogram to check for breast cancer. Thousands of women with the condition could be saved radical lymph node surgery, say experts


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Breast cancer: 'My breasts were like ticking time bombs' says mother with cancer gene after having them both removed

Tue, 08 Feb 2011 10:45:38 +0000

A midwife from Kettering has described her agonising decision to have her perfectly healthy breasts surgically removed in case she developed breast cancer later in life. Kara said she had been very positive about her breast removal since she made the difficult decision


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