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Preview: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education - current issue

Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education - current issue



Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education - RSS feed of current issue



 



Cover

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00




Editorial_Board

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00




Subscription

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00




Table_of_Contents

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00




The Self-Concept of Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing and Hearing Students

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

The present study investigated the self-concept of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in different educational settings compared with those of hearing students in Ethiopia. The research involved a sample of 103 Grade 4 students selected from 7 towns in Ethiopia. They were selected from a special school for the deaf, a special class for the deaf, and a regular school. The Self-Description Questionnaire I (Marsh, 1990) was used to measure the children’s self-concept. The study results indicated that, in comparison with their hearing peers, DHH students had a lower self-concept in the areas of general self, general school, reading, and parental relations. The DHH students in the special school showed a higher self-concept in regard to their physical appearance than the hearing and DHH students in the special class. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the self-concept dimensions of peer relations, mathematics, and physical abilities.




Structured Instruction With Modified Storybooks to Teach Morphosyntax and Vocabulary to Preschoolers Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

Children who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) are at risk for diminished morphosyntactical and vocabulary development. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of repeated reading combined with structured instruction. Targets were a morphosyntactical form and novel vocabulary words. Participants were 3 preschoolers who are D/HH who were receiving instruction with an oral approach. Data from a multiple baseline design indicated that all children acquired the targeted skills and demonstrated high levels of generalization of these skills to untrained context. Implications for teaching young children who are D/HH using repeated storybook reading are discussed.




Articulatory Suppression Effects on Short-term Memory of Signed Digits and Lexical Items in Hearing Bimodal-Bilingual Adults

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

We can gain a better understanding of short-term memory processes by studying different language codes and modalities. Three experiments were conducted to investigate: (a) Taiwanese Sign Language (TSL) digit spans in Chinese/TSL hearing bilinguals (n = 32); (b) American Sign Language (ASL) digit spans in English/ASL hearing bilinguals (n = 15); and (c) TSL lexical sign spans in Chinese/TSL hearing bilinguals (n = 22). Articulatory suppression conditions were manipulated to determine if participants would use a speech- or sign-based code to rehearse lists of signed items. Results from all 3 experiments showed that oral suppression significantly reduced spans while manual suppression had no effect, revealing that participants were using speech-based rehearsal to retain lists of signed items in short-term memory. In addition, sub-vocal rehearsal using Chinese facilitated higher digit spans than English even though stimuli were perceived and recalled using signs. This difference was not found for lexical sign spans.




Cued Speech Transliteration: Effects of Speaking Rate and Lag Time on Production Accuracy

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

Many deaf and hard-of-hearing children rely on interpreters to access classroom communication. Although the exact level of access provided by interpreters in these settings is unknown, it is likely to depend heavily on interpreter accuracy (portion of message correctly produced by the interpreter) and the factors that govern interpreter accuracy. In this study, the accuracy of 12 Cued Speech (CS) transliterators with varying degrees of experience was examined at three different speaking rates (slow, normal, fast). Accuracy was measured with a high-resolution, objective metric in order to facilitate quantitative analyses of the effect of each factor on accuracy. Results showed that speaking rate had a large negative effect on accuracy, caused primarily by an increase in omitted cues, whereas the effect of lag time on accuracy, also negative, was quite small and explained just 3% of the variance. Increased experience level was generally associated with increased accuracy; however, high levels of experience did not guarantee high levels of accuracy. Finally, the overall accuracy of the 12 transliterators, 54% on average across all three factors, was low enough to raise serious concerns about the quality of CS transliteration services that (at least some) children receive in educational settings.




Development of American Sign Language Guidelines for K-12 Academic Assessments

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

The U.S. federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was enacted with goals of closing achievement gaps and providing all students with access to equitable and high-quality instruction. One requirement of ESSA is annual statewide testing of students in grades 3–8 and once in high school. Some students, including many deaf or hard-of-hearing (D/HH) students, are eligible to use test supports, in the form of accommodations and accessibility tools, during state testing. Although technology allows accommodations and accessibility tools to be embedded within a digital assessment system, the success of this approach depends on the ability of test developers to appropriately represent content in accommodated forms. The Guidelines for Accessible Assessment Project (GAAP) sought to develop evidence- and consensus-based guidelines for representing test content in American Sign Language. In this article, we present an overview of GAAP, review of the literature, rationale, qualitative and quantitative research findings, and lessons learned.




Level of Educational Attainment Among Deaf Adults Who Attended Bilingual-Bicultural Programs

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

In Scandinavia and some other countries, a bilingual–bicultural approach to deaf education was celebrated in national programs from the mid-1980s until the broad popularity of cochlear implantation in middle 2000s created a shift back to an emphasis on spoken language for many deaf children. At the same time, only a few studies evaluated the long-term outcomes of bilingual–bicultural education, and several of their findings have raised questions about benefits of the approach. This study examined the level of educational attainment of 408 deaf individuals who attended primary school either before or during the period of bilingual–bicultural education in Denmark, both relative to a comparable hearing cohort. Beyond group comparisons, three logistic regression models were created to evaluate the prediction of educational attainment by a number of relevant variables. Compared to the hearing population, the deaf population had a significantly lower level of educational attainment both before and after the introduction of bilingual–bicultural education. Signed language and spoken language abilities, the kind of school attended, degree of hearing loss, parental hearing loss, and gender were found significantly to explain levels of educational attainment in the deaf population.




Adapting Experiential Learning to Develop Problem-Solving Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Engineering Students

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

Individuals who are deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions, and this may be due in part to their level of preparation in the development and retention of mathematical and problem-solving skills. An approach was developed that incorporates experiential learning and best practices of STEM instruction to give first-year DHH students enrolled in a postsecondary STEM program the opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in real-world scenarios. Using an industrial engineering laboratory that provides manufacturing and warehousing environments, students were immersed in real-world scenarios in which they worked on teams to address prescribed problems encountered during the activities. The highly structured, Plan-Do-Check-Act approach commonly used in industry was adapted for the DHH student participants to document and communicate the problem-solving steps. Students who experienced the intervention realized a 14.6% improvement in problem-solving proficiency compared with a control group, and this gain was retained at 6 and 12 months, post-intervention.




Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists

2016-09-01T05:52:58-07:00

Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about medication. We used two questionnaires to compare the results from the deaf participants with those from the HH and hearing participants. We found that before the lecture, the deaf participants’ understanding of medication use was lower than that of the HH and hearing participants. The deaf participants’ knowledge increased after the lecture, but did not improve to the level exhibited by the HH participants. However, the deaf participants felt confident using medication despite their low comprehension levels. In conclusion, adjusting the medication information provided by pharmacists according to the recipient’s reading level could help improve deaf patients’ knowledge; however, such measures might not increase deaf patients’ comprehension levels sufficiently.













What Parents Need to Know

2016-09-01T05:52:59-07:00




Why Deaf Culture Matters in Deaf Education

2016-09-01T05:52:59-07:00