Subscribe: YaleGlobal Online Magazine
http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/rss.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
china  global  trump  united states  united  yale  yaleglobal online  yaleglobal yale  yaleglobal  – yaleglobal     
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: YaleGlobal Online Magazine

YaleGlobal Online





 



Can Trump – or Anyone – Bring Back US Manufacturing?

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 23:49:11 +0000

US voters and politicians worry about the loss of manufacturing and assembly jobs, which carry a wage premium over most service jobs. Yet numerous economists and other analysis express doubt that such jobs can quickly be restored in the United States. “The biggest reason Trump — or anyone else — can’t bring back jobs is because there is nowhere to bring them back from,” notes an article from Knowledge@Wharton. “They have been lost in large part to the success of efficiency.” The US manufactures twice as many goods as it did in 1984 with one-third fewer workers, reports the US Federal Reserve. About 80 percent of the job loss can be attributed to technology and not offshoring. Stopping trade won’t help, and consumers seek bargains, balking at paying higher prices for products made by their fellow citizens. Societies cannot hope to restore old jobs that are no longer competitive in the global marketplace. Instead, people must adapt, pursuing useful skills and innovating. – YaleGlobal Efficiency and automation, along with offshoring, have reduced US manufacturing jobs – and few analysts expect such jobs to return Manufacturing hits all-time high in 2015, but efficiency reduced the jobs Other Knowledge@Wharton United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 8 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/can-trump-anyone-bring-back-american-manufacturing/?utm_source=kw_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2016-12-06 Rights:  All materials copyright of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. No [...]



Foreign Companies Face New Clampdown for Getting Money Out of China

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 17:46:02 +0000

China, less keen about the yuan becoming a global currency, abruptly applied a new limit for capital outflows. “China’s foreign-exchange regulator has instructed banks to sharply limit how much companies move out of the country and into their other operations around the world,” report James T. Areddy and Lingling Wei for the Wall Street Journal. “The recent moves effectively erode the yuan’s appeal as a rival to the dollar just two months after the International Monetary Fund added it among its reserve currencies on Oct. 1 – an acknowledgment the IMF trusted China to further loosen its grip on the yuan.” China recently reduced controls on companies moving funds, and that was part of the justification behind the IMF including the yuan as a global reserve currency. Such currency controls can backfire, prompting individuals and businesses to move more cash out of China and deterring foreign investment. The US dollar has continued to strengthen against the yuan. US multinationals may have already started moving cash since the US presidential election, anticipating a tax amnesty for US corporate deposits held overseas. – YaleGlobal China reduced cap for big companies withdrawing funds from $50 million to $5 million; the controls could speed up withdrawals and deter foreign investment New controls could speed up withdrawals and deter foreign investment James T. Areddy and Lingling Wei James T. Areddy and Lingling Wei Other The Wall Street Journal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 8 December 2016 SHANGHAI – Multinational companies are suddenly finding themselves in the crosshairs as China dials back its effort to turn the yuan into a global currency, alarmed that it has accelerated the flight of capital from its shores. In recent days, according to bankers and officials familiar with the situation, China’s foreign-exchange regulator has instructed banks to sharply limit how much companies move out of the country and into their other operations around the world. Until this week, it was possible for big companies to “sweep” $50 million worth of yuan or dollars in or out of China with minimal documentation. Now, these people say, the cap is the equivalent of $5 million, a pittance for the largest corporations. Beijing is fighting an increasingly vicious cycle of capital outflows that weaken the yuan. Most dramatically, the State Council, China’s cabinet, intends to tighten scrutiny of overseas acquisitions by domestic companies, The Wall Street Journal reported last week, which could result in deal delays or outright cancellations. Until now, few of China’s capital-control measures took obvious aim at foreign businesses. The recent moves effectively erode the yuan’s appeal as a rival to the dollar just two months after the International Monetary Fund added it among its reserve currencies on Oct. 1 – an acknowledgment the IMF trusted China to further loosen its grip on the yuan. Later that month, top financial officers from one of the largest U.S. pharmaceutical makers paid a visit to the Chinese agency that decides how much of its hundreds of millions of dollars deposited in the country can be taken out. The State Administration of Foreign Exchange had a message for the drugmaker, according to a participant: prepare for “increased friction.” The blunt talk marked a contrast with a year-earlier visit to the same[...]



OPEC Cobbles a Deal, But Cannot Hide Decline of Saudi Power

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 16:23:44 +0000

The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries was created by Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela in 1960. OPEC now has 13 members. During the 1970s, oil prices quadrupled, but OPEC's ability to set strict production limits and influence prices has slipped away in recent years. It took more than two years after the crash in oil prices for the oil producers, along with Russia, to finalize a deal to cut production levels, and Chris Miller, associate director of Yale University’s Grand Strategy Program, expresses doubt that the deal can hold. Saudi Arabia entered negotiations with little leverage. The country is responsible for 13 percent of global production, even as Russia and the United States are close behind with the help of advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia and other OPEC states depend on oil revenues for general operating budgets. Cheating on production limits is common. Rival Iran is trying to catch up after years of sanctions. Miller concludes that OPEC’s dominance of world oil markets has ended and that limits Saudi influence. – YaleGlobal OPEC and Russia agree to limit production, but deal may not hold – Saudi influence fades as oil cartel loses dominance OPEC and Russia agree to limit production, but deal may not hold – Saudi influence fades as oil cartel loses dominance NEW HAVEN: More than two years after the crash in oil prices, the cartel that unites several of the world’s biggest oil producers – has at last finalized a deal to cut production levels to boost prices. In decades past, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries dominated world oil markets, with Saudi Arabia in particular able to dictate prices by increasing or decreasing oil production. Over the course of the 1970s, the price quadrupled, thanks to OPEC-induced supply cuts. This time, prices jumped 10 percent on news of the deal. The main takeaway from the negotiations is that OPEC is less influential than ever before. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/miller1208-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/miller1208-75px.jpg Chris Miller Chris Miller YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 8 December 2016 Fading power: Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin, top; Iranian Oil Minister Bijan Zanganeh exercises new power NEW HAVEN: More than two years after the crash in oil prices, the cartel that unites several of the world’s biggest oil producers has at last finalized a deal to cut production levels to boost prices. In decades past, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries dominated world oil markets, with Saudi Arabia in particular able to dictate prices by increasing or decreasing oil production. Over the course of the 1970s, the price quadrupled, thanks to OPEC-induced supply cuts. This time, prices jumped 10 percent on news of the deal. The main takeaway from the negotiations is that OPEC is less influential than ever before. OPEC’s leaders first agreed in principle to reduce supply to the level of 32.5 million barrels per day – a 3.5 percent decrease from current production – with the details to be worked out. Yet some analysts suspected that OPEC would not manage to negotiate detai[...]



Caesarean Births “Affecting Human Evolution”

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 19:04:25 +0000

Recent studies have suggested that rapid changes in the environment can speed evolutionary responses. Increasing reliance on Caesarean sections contributed to more mothers requiring surgery to deliver infants, suggests theoretical biologist Philipp Mitteröcker at the University of Vienna. Helen Briggs wrote about the study for BBC News: “The researchers devised a mathematical model using data from the World Health Organization and other large birth studies. They found opposing evolutionary forces in their theoretical study. One is a trend towards larger newborns, which are more healthy. However, if they grow too large, they get stuck during labour, which historically would have proved disastrous for mother and baby, and their genes would not be passed on.” The study notes that women's height, weight and age can also influence how infants are delivered. Mitteröcker does not recommend curtailing Caesareans and anticipates that the trend gained speed during the 20th century and will slow. – YaleGlobal The regular use of Caesarean sections is having an impact on human evolution by favoring larger heads, suggests researcher in theoretical evolution Caesarean deliveries favor large heads in humans and increase need for the procedure Helen Briggs Helen Briggs Other BBC News United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 7 December 2016 Read the article. Read about the “Cliff-Edge Model of Obstetric Selection in Humans" from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.  Source url:  http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38210837 Rights:  Copyright © 2016 BBC. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/surrogacy-human-right-or-reproductive-exploitation http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/childless-choice No [...]



Trade Week Africa and the Continental Free Trade Area

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 12:55:50 +0000

Africa is not rejecting trade agreements. All 54 countries on the continent are projected to be in the Continental Free Trade Area, or CFTA, which “is shaping up to be the largest free trade area in the world in terms of the population it covers,” notes Amy Copley for the Brookings Institution. The African Union and UN groups continue negotiations, and analysts suggest that CFTA could increase intra-African trade by $80 billion. Such intra-African trade now represents about one-10th of trade in Africa, and Copley points out that “It is often cheaper for African countries to export to a foreign market than to an African counterpart.” The disparity is in large part caused by disproportionately high tariffs among different African regions compared to those levied against the rest of the world. Progress in the CFTA’s encouragement of “free movement of labor and capital for over a billion people” stands in contrast to the struggles and controversies of American trade agreements with Asia and Europe. – YaleGlobal Potential free trade deal CFTA, in an age where they are increasingly unpopular, could boost low intra-African trade and improve the flow of labor and capital Tariff reductions could keep $80 billion in the continent and boost economies Amy Copley Amy Copley Other Brookings United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 7 December 2016 Read the article. The author is a research analyst and project coordinator at the Africa Growth Initiative. Junaid Belo-Osagie contributed to this post. Source url:  https://www.brookings.edu/blog/africa-in-focus/2016/11/30/figures-of-the-week-trade-week-africa-and-the-continental-free-trade-area/ Rights:  Copyright 2016 The Brookings Institution http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/promise-africa http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/seizing-opportunity-post-tpp-world http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/losers-deglobalization No [...]



Taiwan, Thorn in China’s Side, Gets New Attention

Tue, 06 Dec 2016 18:43:59 +0000

Disagreements set aside for too long can calcify, and Taiwan is such an example. The fact that a phone call between US President-elect Donald Trump and Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen kicked up a storm highlights how frozen the differences have become. Mark Harrison, who lectures in Chinese Studies at the University of Tasmania, provides background on the relationship between Taiwan and China. After World War II, other nations took sides about whether Taipei or Beijing was capital for all of China. Governance for the two Asian tigers evolved in separate ways. For the past decade, Taiwan and China have abided by “a policy of economic integration backed by a military threat and the formula known as the 1992 Consensus: “each side agrees that there is one China and that Taiwan is part of China while setting aside respective definitions of the meaning of China.” No serious plan is in place for unification. Referring to the phone call that disrupted status quo, Harrison concludes that Trump was correct in accepting “appropriate acknowledgement of a democratically elected leader” and illustrated "the calcification of international policymaking.” The Trump administration and international community must work on meaningful understanding of the Taiwan issue while emphasizing peace for the region. – YaleGlobal Taiwan issue underscores limits of power for the US and China – and the calcification of international policymaking Taiwan issue underscores limits of power for the US and China – and the calcification of international policymaking HOBART: Since the 1940s, after Chairman Mao Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People’s Republic of China and the defeated Kuomintang retreated to Taipei, the Taiwan Strait has remained among the most intractable issues in international relations and a potential site for conflict in Asia. A 10-minute phone call between US President-elect Donald Trump and Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen was a startling intervention in what’s become a warily balanced array of power relations sustained by arcane diplomatic formalisms. The response from China, which maintains territorial claim to the island as sovereign territory, was relatively muted with more annoyance directed toward Taiwan. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/harrison1206-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/harrison1206-75px.jpg Mark Harrison Mark Harrison YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 6 December 2016 Phone call crisis: Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen’s congratulatory call to US President-elect Donald Trump stirred a hornet’s nest, complicating China’s relations with Taiwan; below, a Taiwan guard on duty HOBART: Since the 1940s, after Chairman Mao Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People’s Republic of China and the defeated Kuomintang retreated to Taipei, the Taiwan Strait has remained among the most intractable issues in international relations and a potential site for conflict in Asia. A brief phone call between the US President- elect Donald Trump and Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen was a startling intervention in what’s become a warily balanced array [...]



Korea Unveils Road Map to Curb Carbon Emissions

Tue, 06 Dec 2016 16:15:18 +0000

South Korea has released a detailed action plan to reduce carbon emissions and “boost incentives for renewable energy and cleaner power plant projects,” reports Shin Hyon-hee for the Investor. “It intends to raise the share of renewable sources in its portfolio to 7 percent from the existing 6 percent by 2020.” The country anticipates global discussions on international mechanisms including carbon-credit trading and funding sources – and the plan calls a cape-and-trade system as key to spurring innovations and meeting the 2030 goal. The plan expanded funding for 10 climate technologies including solar and fuel cells as well as conversion of waste gas. The government transferred responsibility for oversight and inspections to the prime minister’s office from the environmental minister, and is prepared to revise plans based on economic conditions as well as global climate policy trends. – YaleGlobal South Korea releases detailed plan on reducing carbon emissions and boosting investment in clean-energy research including solar and fuel cells South Korea plans to double investment in clean energy research before 2030 Shin Hyon-hee Shin Hyon-hee Other The Investor South Korea (KR) YaleGlobal Online 6 December 2016 Read the article. Shin Hyon-hee also reports for the Korean Herald. Source url:  http://www.theinvestor.co.kr/view.php?ud=20161206000944 Rights:  All materials contained on this website are protected by South Korean Copyright Law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Herald Corporation, or in the case of third party materials, the owner of that content. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/climate-change-and-risks-denying-inconvenient-truths http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/global-consensus-climate-change-good-start http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/climate-change-and-new-tech-revolution No [...]



A Europe of Merkel and Fillon?

Tue, 06 Dec 2016 15:03:22 +0000

François Fillon and Angela Merkel lead in the polls to become the respective leaders of France and Germany. Both cater to the center-right and embrace free-trade, the EU and globalization. Their similar platforms as well as past tenure together could shore up “the French-German dynamic [that] has been so central to the construction of Europe since the 1950s,” writes Camille Pecastaing for Foreign Affairs. President François Hollande declared that he would not seek a second term, marking the first time since 1958 that the incumbent in France has not run for reelection. Conversely, Merkel is looking to serve her fourth term as chancellor. The leaders of France and Germany confront troublesome issues including an influx of Muslim refugees, a far-right backlash to globalization, rising Russia, and the results of populist British and American elections. – YaleGlobal German and French candidates’ similar center-right and pro-globalization platforms could usher in new era of cooperation with 2017 elections Elections could further strengthen ties between two neighboring powerhouses Camille Pecastaing Camille Pecastaing Other Foreign Affairs United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 6 December 2016 Read the article. The author is senior associate professor of Middle East Studies at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Source url:  https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2016-11-30/europe-merkel-and-fillon Rights:  Copyright © 2016 by the Council on Foreign Relations, Inc. All rights reserved. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/rapprochement-or-penalties-germany-struggles-find-united-stance-russia http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/razing-calais-%E2%80%98jungle%E2%80%99-camp-relocates-migrant-crisis No [...]



How Important Is NASA's Earth Science Program That Trump Wants to Abolish?

Mon, 05 Dec 2016 15:28:09 +0000

US President-elect Donald Trump campaigned to reduce debt and the size of US government and also dismissed concerns about climate change. Analysts anticipate he will eliminate NASA climate programs including the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite, GRACE, and funding for university earth science research. Such programs are multi-functional and ultimately apply science for the greater good, argues Brenda Ekwurzel for EcoWatch. Data produced by NASA programs are “critical for rebuilding or investing in 21st century American infrastructure,” she reports. “Surveyors, mapping professionals and others use the NSRS to ensure their positional coordinates are compatible and accurate in the creation of maps and charts; marking property boundaries; and planning, designing, and building roads, bridges, and other structures.” The GRACE system also assists the agriculture industry by providing detailed data on water supplies and irrigation systems. Coastal communities around the world also rely on the satellite data to plan for their futures. – YaleGlobal US NASA satellites have direct impact on everyday life through infrastructure, agriculture, and understanding the changing global climate Satellite data support infrastructure planning, agriculture and other industries Brenda Ekwurzel Brenda Ekwurzel Other EcoWatch United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 5 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.ecowatch.com/nasa-earth-science-climate-change-2110496412.html Rights:  © EcoWatch 2016 http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/nasa-accidentally-found-way-make-buildings-safer-during-earthquakes http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/nasa-study-projects-warming-driven-changes-global-rainfall http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/climate-change-forcing-people-migrate-and-world-doesn%E2%80%99t-have-plan http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/climate-change-and-new-tech-revolution No [...]



Italy Sinks Into Political Limbo as Defeat Sweeps Renzi Away

Mon, 05 Dec 2016 14:33:32 +0000

Italy is Europe’s fourth largest economy and the country is falling “into political limbo after Prime Minister Matteo Renzi announced his resignation, with rival parties jockeying to fill the power vacuum following his crushing defeat in a constitutional referendum,” reports Bloomberg. The constitutional reforms were intended to reduce the size of parliament, putting limits on the Senate, and reduce overlapping processes between the central and regional governments. Global markets registered momentary alarm and then stabilized around the notion that the vote reflected more opposition to Renzi than the European Union and that the country will likely endure political gridlock rather than a rush to exit the European Union – though some analysts worry about the populist Five Star Party gaining more power. Bloomberg notes that Italian banks are vulnerable to government instability as some struggle to meet new capital holding requirements. In Austria, environmentalist Alexander Van der Bellen defeated Norbert Hofer, a populist, in a presidential runoff. – YaleGlobal Constitutional referendum on reforms for Italy fails by almost 60 percent, and country is in political limbo with resignation of Prime Minister Renzi But Austria election shows support for the EU John Follain and Chiara Albanese John Follain and Chiara Albanese Other Bloomberg United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 5 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-05/italy-sinks-into-political-limbo-as-renzi-swept-away-by-defeat Rights:  ©2016 Bloomberg L.P. All Rights Reserved No [...]



Syrian Rebels in Secret Talks With Moscow to End Aleppo Fighting

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:24:07 +0000

The Financial Times reports that Turkey has arranged secret talks between Syrian rebels and Russia to stop the fighting in Aleppo. The rebel-held portion of Aleppo is surrounded, and occupants are desperate for food, water and other supplies. The US, which has “provided limited training and weaponry for the rebels but had been hesitant to give forceful backing,” was not included in the talks, the report notes. “Regional actors now seem more willing to bypass Washington to seek out pacts with Russia, which is keen to develop the image of a rising power that can help broker such deals.” Officials from Libya, Egypt and other countries in the Middle East have been meeting with Russia as well. One observer suggests that Russia holding talks just before Aleppo falls is a deliberate move to marginalize the United States. – YaleGlobal Turkey-facilitated negotiations without US show how Washington could become sidelined in Syria and the Middle East Such talks, if underway, sideline the United States Erika Solomon and Geoff Dyer Erika Solomon and Geoff Dyer Other Financial Times United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 2 December 2016 Read the article. Additional reporting was provided by Max Seddon in Moscow and Nazih Osseiran in Beirut. Source url:  https://www.ft.com/content/bc167c3a-b71d-11e6-961e-a1acd97f622d Rights:  The Financial Times Limited 2016. All rights reserved. No [...]



Obama's Dirty Secret: US Fossil Fuel Projects Littered Around the World

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:15:34 +0000

The United States claims to lead on climate change yet fossil fuels make up the bulk of the country’s energy consumption. The country also supports fossil-fuel use around the globe: “Through the US Export-Import Bank, Barack Obama’s administration has spent nearly $34bn supporting 70 fossil fuel projects around the world, work by Columbia Journalism School’s Energy and Environment Reporting Project and the Guardian has revealed,” reports the Guardian. The article describes coal ash, contaminated water supplies, illnesses, water shortages, deforestation and fracking associated with US-funded projects in India, South Africa and Australia. One attorney suggests that “A federal agency of the United States of America should hold their financed projects to better and more neutral standards. Development is good, but not at the cost of the environment and the people who give away their everything to make way for such projects.” – YaleGlobal The US Export-Import Bank, during the Obama administration, spent nearly $34 billion supporting 70 fossil fuel projects around the world The US Export-Import Bank spent more than $30 billion on fossil-fuel projects since 2008 Sonali Prasad, Jason Burke, Michael Slezak and Oliver Milman Sonali Prasad, Jason Burke, Michael Slezak and Oliver Milman Other The Guardian United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 2 December 2016 Read the article. The Energy and Environmental Reporting Project is supported by the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund, Energy Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Rockefeller Family Fund, Lorana Sullivan Foundation and the Tellus Mater Foundation. The funders have no involvement in or influence over the articles produced by project fellows in collaboration with The Guardian. Source url:  https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/dec/01/obama-fossil-fuels-us-export-import-bank-energy-projects Rights:  © 2016 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. No [...]



UN: Aleppo Risks Becoming Giant Graveyard

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 15:49:08 +0000

Rebel forces and civilians in Aleppo are surrounded and under siege from Syrian government troops, Russian airstrikes and Iranian-backed militias. Aleppo, once Syria’s largest city, is now at risk to become a “giant graveyard,” UN envoy Stephen O’Brien advised the UN Security Council during an emergency meeting. The civil war began with protests, associated with the Arab Spring, followed by a harsh crackdown by the autocratic government. Russia had promised to assist the West in combatting extremists like the Islamic State, but instead has targeted the rebels describing them as “terrorists.” The UN Refugee Agency is providing winter assistance to 4.6 million in the region. More than 6.5 million Syrians have been displaced since the fighting began in March 2011. I Am Syria estimates that the death toll from the civil war is at 450,000 including 50,000 children. The UN Security Council has held emergency meetings on the war, but vetos from Russia stymie response. – YaleGlobal UN Security Council cannot help as rebel-held sections of Aleppo are pounded by Russian airstrikes, Iranian-backed militias, and Syrian government troops UN Security Council holds emergency meeting, but threat of Russian veto prevents action Other BBC News United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 1 December 2016 Read the article. Read about Syria from the UN Refugee Agency. Read about I Am Syria, a non-profit group that reports on the war. Source url:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-38155936 http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/war-western-failures-hopes-syria-fall-aleppo http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/us-russia-stop-aleppo-assault-or-syria-talks-end http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/battle-aleppo-how-syria-became-new-global-war No [...]



Divisions Within Afghanistan’s Government Reach New Crisis Point

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 15:30:38 +0000

Impeachment of seven Afghan cabinet ministers demonstrates the fragility of Afghanistan’s new democratic institutions. President Ashraf Ghani confronts public criticism, and lawmakers accuse each other of abusing power and accomplishing little. Afghanistan’s ethnic divisions complicate the debate over governance. This instability follows more than a decade of US involvement in the country, and 10,000 American troops are still stationed there. Tensions are emerging amid fears that the United States may no longer prioritize stability in the Middle East. Uncertainty permeates Kabul over fear that the next US president may withdraw military and economic support, which could prompt extremists to try and take control. The Afghan government and other leaders struggle to develop a unified vision – and can’t be sure whether such tensions are part of a maturing democracy or signal greater trouble. – YaleGlobal Political tensions rock Kabul as Afghanistan struggles to build its democratic institutions amid a fear about loss of US interest and aid The government confronts instability and US leadership transition Pamela Constable Pamela Constable Other The Washington Post United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 1 December 2016 Read the article. Pamela Constable is The Post’s bureau chief in Afghanistan and Pakistan. She previously served as a South Asia bureau chief and most recently covered immigration in the Washington area for several years. Source url:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/divisions-within-afghanistans-government-reach-a-new-crisis-point/2016/11/15/4b18bc70-aa87-11e6-8f19-21a1c65d2043_story.html Rights:  washingtonpost.com © 1996-2016 The Washington Post http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/defying-taliban-afghans-head-polls No [...]



Seizing Opportunity in a Post-TPP World

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:47:54 +0000

Trade is the glue for globalization and without it other connections can subside. But US voters rejected a US leadership role in global trade deals and elected billionaire Donald Trump who has already signaled intent to have the United States to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership with 11 other nations. Analysts suggest that China could step into the US role, but “The baton of global leadership rarely passes in such a seamless fashion,” cautions Yale professor Stephen S. Roach. The United States has global responsibilities not easily dismissed, and China confronts multiple risks including high debt and other economic imbalances. Roach proposes that Trump could pursue another huge opportunity by concluding the US-China Bilateral Investment Treaty, under negotiation since 2008. China is the third biggest US export market. Roach concludes, “For a growth-starved US economy, there could be no better way of tapping into what promises to be the world’s greatest market expansion in the years ahead.” – YaleGlobal Trump dismisses TPP, but could pursue another big opportunity – the US-China Bilateral Investment Treaty Trump dismisses TPP, but could pursue another big opportunity – the US-China Bilateral Investment Treaty NEW HAVEN: The demise of the Trans-Pacific Partnership is the final nail in the coffin of global trade liberalization.... now that US President-elect Donald Trump has signaled his intent to have the United States withdraw from TPP – signed, but not ratified, after eight years of tortuous negotiations among 12 nations – there can be little doubt of the seismic cracks in the postwar global order. The kneejerk reaction is to presume that China will quickly fill the void. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/roach1201-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/12/roach1201-75px.jpg Stephen S. Roach Stephen S. Roach YaleGlobal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 1 December 2016 America and Asia: Will US President-elect Donald Trump, top, sway the United States towards Asia? China President Xi Jinping's ambitious leadership in Asia could provide incentive NEW HAVEN: The demise of the Trans-Pacific Partnership is the final nail in the coffin of global trade liberalization. The handwriting was on the wall with failure of the Doha Round, which floundered immediately after its initiation in 2001. But now that US President-elect Donald Trump has signaled his intent to have the United States withdraw from TPP – signed, but not ratified, after eight years of tortuous negotiations among 12 nations – there can be little doubt of the seismic cracks in the postwar global order. The kneejerk reaction is to presume that China will quickly fill the void. After all, it is the driver of an alternative 16-nation trade agreement – the Regional Comprehensive Economic P[...]



The Problem with Abandoning the Paris Agreement

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 22:38:55 +0000

If the United States unilaterally withdraws from the Paris climate agreement, the nation can expect immediate diplomatic consequences. Foreign policy experts warn that such a move could create an opening for China to take leadership on climate-related issues and perhaps even profit from development of alternative energies. Observers cannot anticipate the Trump administration’s foreign policy, but the US president-elect has described climate change as a “hoax.” More than 300 companies wrote a letter urging Trump not to abandon the agreement. The possibility depicts a key dilemma of the globalized world: Globalization works best if all countries agree on solutions that require sacrifices. In a year dominated by populist, nationalist victories, dissension over globalization has been strong. – YaleGlobal Future US foreign policy is a big unknown, and experts expect global backlash if the US withdraws from the Paris climate agreement Withdrawal could invite international backlash Robinson Meyer Robinson Meyer Other The Atlantic United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 30 November 2016 Read the article. Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology. Source url:  https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/11/the-problem-with-abandoning-the-paris-agreement/508085/ Rights:  Copyright © 2016 by The Atlantic Monthly Group http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/global-consensus-climate-change-good-start http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/profit-driven-pollution-emission-controls-infrastructure-investment http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/ghost-kyoto-still-lurks http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/our-common-home-climate-change-brings-moral-change No [...]



President Erdogan: I Will Open Gates for Migrants to Enter Europe if EU Blocks Membership Talks

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:00:49 +0000

Members of the European Parliament voted for a temporary pause in negotiations on Turkey’s efforts to join the European Union due to worries about President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's heavy-handed response to July’s coup. Specific concerns include treatment of political dissidents and potential restoration of the death penalty, which is banned by the EU. “The talks were part of a wide-ranging deal agreed with Mr Erdogan's government which meant Turkey would shelter the thousands of refugees fleeing violence in Iraq and Syria in exchange for aid, membership talks and visa-free travel for its citizens,” reports Caroline Mortimer for the Independent. Although the vote is non-binding and most EU foreign ministers continue to support the negotiations, Erdogan responded with anger. Turkey did reduce the number of refugees fleeing to Europe by about a half million from the previous year and complains that EU promises of aid have not been fulfilled. One Turkish representative suggested that linking Turkey’s accession with control of refugees was wrong from the start. Ultimately, the role of government is to provide services and security. The refugees are being excluded from that equation. – YaleGlobal Threats are escalating between the European Union and Turkey as both question deal on alleviating Syrian refugee crisis Refugees have become a pawn for governments Caroline Mortimer Caroline Mortimer Other The Independent YaleGlobal Online 30 November 2016 Read the article. Caroline Mortimer is a reporter working for the Independent Online. Source url:  : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/president-erdogan-turkey-eu-membership-migrants-refugees-europe-warning-a7438316.html Rights:  All intellectual property rights belong to the Independent. No [...]



Wanted: Equal Opportunity Globalization

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 14:41:53 +0000

Populist stances are resonating with dissatisfied voters in the wealthiest places including Europe and the United States. The West has posted low growth rates for its middle class over the past 25 years while the average income growth of a median household in Asia during the same period was about four times as high – Asia still has some catching up to do as income levels and gross domestic product per capita for much of the continent are still a fraction of those in the United States or Europe. The problem for wealthy democracies is that most benefits of technological advancement, globalization and economic policy went to the wealthiest and highly skilled, often described as the top 1 percent. “A basic contradiction of the age of globalization is that economic outcomes for increasing numbers of people are determined at the global level, while political action takes place within nation-states,” notes economist Branko Milanovic. Nations can be more adept with policies tackling trade and globalization, but that requires political consensus and more balanced distribution of opportunities. – YaleGlobal Populists blame Asia’s high growth rates for economic woes rather than policies that reinforce inequality at home Populists blame Asia’s high growth rates for economic woes rather than policies that reinforce inequality at home NEW YORK: The rise and electoral success of populist politicians in the West have reopened questions on the effects of globalization – in simplest terms, whether uneven distributional effects of globalization are to blame for widespread dissatisfaction in wealthy countries or does the fault lie with domestic policies or other factors. The responses will shape globalization of this century and could offer remedies for popular discontent. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/11/milanovic1129-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/11/milanovic1129-75px.jpg Branko Milanovic Branko Milanovic YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 29 November 2016 Downside of productivity growth: Developed countries increase productivity by replacing workers with machines, top; Asians gain with Western investments like iPhone assembly in China NEW YORK: The rise and electoral success of populist politicians in the West have reopened questions on the effects of globalization – in simplest terms, whether uneven distributional effects of globalization are to blame for widespread dissatisfaction in wealthy countries or does the fault lie with domestic policies or other factors. The responses will shape globalization of this century and could offer remedies for popular discontent. First, the facts. There is no doubt that the growth rates of the bottom halves of income distributions for rich countries have been low over the past 25 years. This stands in contrast[...]



Forget Fake News on Facebook – The Real Filter Bubble Is You

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:38:17 +0000

Banning false news on popular social media sites amounts to censorship. Will Self, writing for New Statesman, questions any manipulation of news on such sites – curating news for positive or negative stories, writing algorithms that match stories to readers or selecting specific articles for trending news. “Back in the days when everyone read the print edition of the New York Times this sort of manipulation was, it is argued, quite impossible; after all, the US media historically made a fetish of fact-checking, an editorial process that is pretty much unknown in our own press,” Self writes from the United Kingdom. He then goes on to describe the tendency toward “confirmation bias,” people creating their own filter bubbles by selecting reading materials, trusting and sharing opinions that reinforce values and beliefs. People fundamentally disagree about any set of facts – religious, historical, financial, scientific – that guide society. Bans and curations can’t overcome the uncomfortable observation that the world’s education systems are producing people who prefer entertainment over critical thinking and society’s values are self-centered, biased and mean. Self concludes by noting that the internet remains a lead resource for truth-telling and fact-checking. – YaleGlobal If people want to receive all their news from a single feed that reinforces their beliefs, there is little that can be done Banning fake news is censorship, and the internet remains a resource for fact-checking Will Self Will Self Other New Statesman United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 29 November 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.newstatesman.com/science-tech/social-media/2016/11/forget-fake-news-facebook-real-filter-bubble-you Rights:  © New Statesman 1913 - 2016 No [...]



Promises Trump Can’t Keep

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:32:26 +0000

US President-elect Donald Trump made big promises on trade and jobs that will be tough to keep without wrecking key industries along with the global economy. Essentially, he suggested that he could restore US manufacturing jobs by blocking new trade deals like the Tans-Pacific Partnership and walking back on old deals like the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement. The plan has problems. Such trade deals, economists suggest, created more jobs than they destroyed. Companies organized around supply chains; US wages are high, and disruptions in supply chains would increase costs of consumer goods. Many US firms have more foreign than domestic sales. During the campaign Trump targeted a relocation plan of Carrier, the world’s largest manufacturer of air conditioners, now owned by defense contractor United Technologies, but failed to mention that 40 percent of the company’s revenues are from foreign sales. Job losses are increasingly linked with automation and increased productivity; stories abound of one employee improving skills and doing the work of two or three. As a businessman, Trump was proud of taking advantage of all legal and financial opportunities, but wants to deny US corporations the same. Chanda concludes, “even the US president cannot alter the trajectory of business and technology.” – YaleGlobal US President-elect will struggle to come good on rhetoric against offshoring and free trade agreements and can't do much about automation and productivity To fulfill job promises, Trump must curtail automation and productivity Nayan Chanda Nayan Chanda Other Businessworld INDIA(IN) YaleGlobal Online 28 November 2016 Bombastic billionaire Donald Trump did not infuse his presidential campaign with the sunny style of Ronald Reagan, who promised voters “morning in America”. But large segments of the American electorate clearly believed that Trump could bring back the achche din [slogan of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) for the 2014 Indian general election], with traditionally Democratic voters in the depressed Rust Belt gravitating to his message of industrial job creation. He promised to achieve this by shredding free trade agreements and punishing US companies that moved their factories abroad. The first tests of his credibility on this pledge are coming soon. During the poll campaign Trump repeatedly criticised the likes of Carrier, the air conditioner manufacturer, which is shuttering its Indiana factory and shifting production to Mexico. While its workers cheered his combative stance, there is no indication that United Technologies, Carrier’s parent company, intends to revisit its decision to relocate the company. On the contrary, they could justifiably tell the President-elect that the decision to shift operations to low-cost Mexico was no different from then businessman Trump employing immigrant workers on his construction projects. Both are commercially driven decisions[...]



The Stakes of Italy’s Referendum

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:43:08 +0000

Italy votes December 4 on a referendum on constitutional reforms –including reducing the size of the upper house of parliament and reinforcing separation of powers. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has promised to step down if voters reject the referendum. “A defeat for Renzi will be read as a victory for Italy’s two major populist parties: the Lega Nord and the larger Five Star Movement, led by the comedian Beppe Grillo,” explains Mario Margiocco for Project Syndicate. He notes that leaders of the two parties lack political experience and blame Europe for Italy’s mistakes in amassing so much debt, more than 132 percent of gross domestic product, whole offering big promises that would only add more strain to budgets. “The two parties are not allied, but both are nurtured by anti-establishment sentiment and favor “national solutions” to Italy’s problems – beginning with a return to the Italian lira.” By rejecting reforms, voters would dismiss central government efficiency and join a wave of euroskepticism. – YaleGlobal Italians head to polls on December 4 to vote on reforms for parliament – as well as the future for Prime Minister Renzi and the European Union The election could determine the fate of the European Union Mario Margiocco Mario Margiocco Other Project Syndicate United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 28 November 2016 Read the article. Mario Margiocco’s most recent book is  Il disastro americano. Riuscirà Obama a cambiare Wall Street e Washington?  (The American Disaster: Will Obama Change Wall Street and Washington?) Source url:  https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/italy-referendum-constitutional-reforms-by-mario-margiocco-2016-11 Rights:  © 1995 – 2016 Project Syndicate No [...]



League of Nationalists

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 14:10:21 +0000

Despite living in a world that shares numerous global challenges, voters increasingly place their trust in a new nationalism. Some are unnerved by lost jobs and blame an increasing number of foreign-born living in their midst. Others long for self-reliance. “All societies draw on nationalism of one sort or another to define relations between the state, the citizen and the outside world,” notes the Economist, reviewing nationalistic trends and observing that “countries are shifting from the universal, civic nationalism towards the blood-and-soil, ethnic sort.” Proponents of nationalsim support one another's extreme platforms that warn of an invasion of outsiders and offer quick fixes. Many fearful of change support strong personalities who talk tough and display protectionist and authoritarian tendencies. Citizens expect such leaders to control the outsiders even though history suggests the controlling ways eventually expand to new targets: “nationalism is a cheap and easy way to generate enthusiasm for the state, and to deflect blame for what is wrong.” Such leaders are competitive and bound to turn on one another. Many view cooperation and compromise as weakness and reject the desire to be a good global citizen as unpatriotic. Still, the youth of many countries embrace globalization, offering a distant promise of a more realistic global outlook. – YaleGlobal Around the world, nationalists are gaining ground by talking tough about outsiders and promising quick fixes – while the young still embrace globalization Leaders talk tough about outsiders, but the controls could spread throughout society Other The Economist United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 25 November 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.economist.com/news/international/21710276-all-around-world-nationalists-are-gaining-ground-why-league-nationalists Rights:  Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2015. All rights reserved. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/global-security-and-democratic-governance-falter http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/global-obama-versus-nationalist-europe No [...]



Russia Wants to Remake Globalization in Its Own Image

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 14:31:43 +0000

Globalization and global institutions are in crisis, confronting varying levels of mistrust around the world. The Valdai Discussion Club, a group of Russian and foreign international affairs experts, assessed the global order. “Russians described Western-led neoliberal globalization as universally destructive economically, culturally, and politically and responsible for sparking a worldwide revolt,” explains Richard Weitz, senior fellow and director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute. The Valdai group did not anticipate that billionaire Donald Trump might win the US presidential election. During the campaign, Trump railed against globalization and cross-border trade while extending hope for improving relations with Russia. Economic partnerships and security cooperation are tough to envision from competitive leaders who do not hesitate to embrace authoritarian tactics. Besides, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, determined to rebalance a Western-dominated world order, offers a rescue plan on his terms. That pits him against Trump with his campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.” – YaleGlobal Globalization is under assault, claims Russia, from a Western-dominated world order with benefits limited to a few Globalization is under assault, claims Russia, from a Western-dominated world order with benefits limited to a few MOSCOW: Russians see globalization and international institutions in crisis. They offer to rescue this failing project, but on their own terms, with a readjustment of world order more to their liking. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/11/weitz1124-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2016/11/weitz1124-75px.jpg Richard Weitz Richard Weitz YaleGlobal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 24 November 2016 Eastern-led globalization: Russian President Vladimir Putin, top, and Fu Ying, chairperson of the Foreign Affairs Committee of China’s National People’s Congress explain the kind of global integration they prefer at Valdai meeting in Moscow MOSCOW: Russians see globalization and international institutions in crisis. They offer to rescue this failing project, but on their terms, with a readjustment of world order more to their liking. At the October meeting of the Valdai Discussion Club – a group of Russian and foreign international affairs specialists – the attendees assessed the processes of globalization under the rubric “global revolt and the global order.” Russians described Western-led neoliberal globalization as universally destructive economically, culturally, and politically and responsible for[...]



Is A Trump Presidency Really a Big Win for Putin?

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 13:37:01 +0000

Among Donald Trump’s consistent positions during the US presidential campaign was a respect for Russian President Vladimir Putin and a desire to restore US ties with a Cold War adversary. Reid Standish writes in Foreign Policy that Putin celebrated Trump’s win because it represents a chance for him to “restore Russia’s global status and reopen ties with the West.” Trump has not laid out clear plans to support Putin’s endeavors – a push for global prominence, support of Assad in Syria or encroachment into Ukraine – but Standish argues that Putin will capitalize on the political turmoil and instability. Trump has been wildly unpredictable and, if Putin pushes too hard, may turn against Russia. Regardless, Putin must appreciate a new face in Washington after Obama’s criticism of Russia’s actions in Syria and Russia. – YaleGlobal Putin may expect big gains from a Trump presidency, but the United States could still cause trouble for Moscow Unpredictability could pose problems for Russia Reid Standish Reid Standish Other Foreign Policy United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 24 November 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/11/09/is-a-trump-presidency-really-a-big-win-for-putin-ukraine-syria-clinton/ Rights:  Copyright 2016 Foreign Policy No [...]



How Can We Tackle Abuse in the Global Garment Industry?

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 11:05:55 +0000

In the face of rampant labor exploitation in the clothing industry, many unions in countries like Vietnam, Indonesia, and Bangladesh are trying to increase the minimum wage and improve working conditions. In the mutual pursuit of financial gain by countries and corporations, the “mobility of capital (and immobility of labour) creates a global race to the bottom,” notes Alice Evans for the Conversation. Such union efforts are falling short for women. When fired for becoming pregnant, they frequently receive little union support. Developed countries like the United Kingdom that purchase much of their clothing from Southeast Asia could support women-friendly efforts like funding training programs that are conditional on gender quotas. Brexit may prove to be a bureaucratic hassle in necessitating a renegotiation of scores of trade deals, though Evans sees a slim hope for a silver lining. The United Kingdom has opportunity to revamp trade policies with Southeast Asia in ways that improve working conditions, particularly for women. – YaleGlobal Unions are beginning to unravel the underbelly of the enormous clothing business, but consumers worldwide could do more to encourage improved working conditions Unions strive to increase minimum wage and improve working conditions Alice Evans Alice Evans Other The Conversation YaleGlobal Online 24 November 2016 Read the article. Alice Evans is a lecturer in human geography at the University of Cambridge. Source url:  http://theconversation.com/how-can-we-tackle-abuse-in-the-global-garment-industry-68019 No [...]



China's Shrinking Workforce Affects Economic Transition, Expert Says

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 21:22:26 +0000

The size of China’s labor force, including people between the ages of 16 and 59, has declined for three years since 2012. The total is 906 million workers, down from just over 910 million. The government anticipates the workforce shrinking to 700 million by 2050. The decline is especially sharp for semi-skilled blue-collar workers as more youth pursue college studies and prefer work in the service sector. A Chinese expert on labor economics reports that almost half of new entrants in China’s job market hold a college degree. Another challenge is low fertility rates. China only recently loosened restrictions on its strict one-child policy, but families have learned that limiting the number of children increases personal wealth. In a report for Caixin, Coco Feng interviews the head of the China Institute for Employment Research at Renmin University, who notes that such labor shortages could delay China’s transition from manufacturing economy to a service- and consumption-driven one. – YaleGlobal Dwindling pool of blue-collar workers is hurting manufacturing, but more college graduates lack skills to support move to service economy Size of China’s workforce declines for three straight years, and could delay shift to service economy Coco Feng Coco Feng Other Caixin CHINA(CN) YaleGlobal Online 23 November 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://english.caixin.com/2016-11-21/101009772.html Rights:  All copyrights for material posted and published on Caixin.com are the property of Caixin Media Company Ltd. or its licensors. No [...]



Globalization’s Last Gasp

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 20:31:38 +0000

World trade was slowing and protectionist tendencies were apparent years before the British vote to leave the European Union and Donald Trump’s winning the US presidential election. “It means that the benefits of openness and specialization are being squandered,” suggests Barry Eichengreen, a professor of economics, for Project Syndicate. “So far, slower trade growth has been the result of slower GDP growth, not the other way around.” The slowdown reflects reduced investment spending, growth in China and cross-border financial capital flows along with diminishing returns on efficiency of global supply chains. Foreign direct investment continues to be strong. One good sign is that regulations, including the Dodd-Frank Act, have deterred the riskiest kinds of international finance, concludes Eichengreen, without disruptions to more productive types of foreign investment. Reducing financial regulations could add risk, uncertainty and threats for global markets. – YaleGlobal Financial regulations, including the Dodd-Frank Act, deterred riskiest kinds of international finance – pullback on regulations could threaten global markets Trade has slowed, but financial regulations have deterred riskiest forms of international finance Barry Eichengreen Barry Eichengreen Other Project Syndicate United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 23 November 2016 Read the article. Barry Eichengreen is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley; Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge; and a former senior policy adviser at the International Monetary Fund. His latest book is Hall of Mirrors:The Great Depression, the Great Recession, and the Uses – and Misuses – of History. Source url:  https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/growth-before-globalization-by-barry-eichengreen-2016-11 Rights:  © 1995 – 2016 Project Syndicate No [...]



The Losers of Deglobalization

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 16:11:08 +0000

Brexit and Donald Trump’s presidency both rode to success on a wave of nationalistic fervor, based on the view that globalization on balance harms the UK and the US. Yet the histories of those countries demonstrate that economic protectionism can lead to political instability and worse, total war. In the 1930s, devaluation of British and American currencies, in the aim of making their own goods more competitive, led to currency wars and tensions that eventually contributed to World War II, notes Pierpaolo Barbieri for Foreign Affairs. Indeed, currency devaluation and protective tariffs not only harm developing nations, as they are “deprived of trade as a way to improve their lot,” but also decreases efficiency for the world at large. In fact, deglobalization “can leave everyone worse off and ultimately damage the states that made them.” Trade and alliances provide a strong base for international security, and without such security, economic devastation and conflicts are more likely. – YaleGlobal Isolationism and protectionism contributed to World War II in the mid-20th century, yet US and UK leaders pursue similar policies for the 21st century US and UK leaders fail to heed history’s lessons on the benefits of globalization Pierpaolo Barbieri Pierpaolo Barbieri Other Foreign Affairs United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 22 November 2016 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/2016-11-13/losers-deglobalization Rights:  Copyright © 2016 by the Council on Foreign Relations, Inc No [...]



US Walks Away From TPP, Leaving China Free to Dominate Asia

Sun, 20 Nov 2016 12:14:49 +0000

The Obama administration has suspended efforts to win approval from the US Congress for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, reports suggest, and it’s up to the Trump administration to kill or shape the 12-nation deal. With TPP on life support, China promotes two other trade agreements for the region, either of which could exclude the United States and reduce its competitiveness in the Asia Pacific region. “In threatening to sabotage the Trans-Pacific Partnership by opposing US ratification of the 12-nation pact, Trump is, in effect, stepping aside to allow China to control trade and investment in the Asia Pacific region,” explains journalist and author Anthony Rowley. Japan, the world’s third largest economy and a close US ally, is not so ready to give up on TPP and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with the US president-elect. Rowley cautions that the US president-elect's promises to upend foreign policy commitments already influence decisions being made throughout East Asia and other countries will step into the void. – YaleGlobal At the APEC meeting, China hustles to replace the TPP free-trade agreement with its own versions At the APEC meeting, China hustles to replace the TPP free-trade agreement with its own versions TOKYO: US President-elect Donald Trump has been disparaged as a fan of Russian President Vladimir Putin. But when it comes to "giving away the farm," he appears more intent, perhaps by inattention, on conferring favors upon China by handing Chinese president Xi Jinping leadership of Asian trade diplomacy. In threatening to sabotage the Trans-Pacific Partnership by opposing US ratification of the 12-nation pact, Trump is, in effect, stepping aside to allow China to control trade and investment in the Asia Pacific region. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/TPPChinaRowleyNov22_2016_140.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/TPPChinaRowleyNov22_2016_thumbn.jpg Anthony Rowley Anthony Rowley YaleGlobal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 22 November 2016 Interrupted journey: Obama with Japanese Premier Shinzo Abe, architects who helped shape the TPP – the demise of which will likely be cheered by Chinese President Xi Jinping TOKYO: US President-elect Donald Trump has been disparaged as a fan of Russian President Vladimir Putin. But when it comes to "giving away the farm," he appears more intent, perhaps by inattention, on conferring favors upon China by handing Chinese President Xi Jinping leadersh[...]



Donald Trump and the Coming Test of International Order

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 20:55:02 +0000

Foreign policy experts suggest that Trump may pose a test to the post-WWII international order, led by the United States and shaped by alliances, an open economy and support for liberal institutions. For seven decades, Republican and Democratic administrations argued in favor such an order and assumed that the consequences of collapse would be enormous. Uri Friedman interviews several experts for the Atlantic: Thomas Wright of the Brookings Institution argues that if Trump pulls out of alliances and the global economy, conflict will arise. Peter van Ham, an expert of transatlantic relations at the Clingendael Institute in the Netherlands, suggests that the order will be destroyed no matter what. A Trump presidency, he says, will force European nations to confront that decline and focus on securing their borders and investing in defense, at the expense of social programs. Until Trump begins to govern, no one can know for sure how the international order might change. – YaleGlobal Trump presidency presents a threat to international order rooted in US alliances, open economy, and liberal institutions International order rests on alliances, an open global economy, and liberal institutions Uri Friedman Uri Friedman Other The Atlantic United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 21 November 2016 Read the article. Uri Friedman is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers global affairs. He was previously the deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Source url:  https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/11/trump-world-order/507083/ Rights:  Copyright © 2016 by The Atlantic Monthly Group http://google.yale.edu/search?output=xml_no_dtd&client=yaleglobal_frontend_test&site=Yale_Global&proxystylesheet=yaleglobal_frontend_test&filter=0&q=global+order&x=0&y=0 http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/about/paradox2.jsp http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/end-american-world-order No [...]