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Preview: Johns Hopkins Medicine News

Johns Hopkins Medicine News



News about Johns Hopkins Medicine activities in patient care, research, and education.



Copyright: Johns Hopkins Copyright 2015
 



Study Documents Extent of Unexpected Sexual Consequences for Young Women Who Drink Alcohol - 8/20/15

Thu 20 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In-depth interviews conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine of 20 young women attending an urban sexually transmitted disease clinic have documented a variety of unexpected, unintended sexual encounters linked to their alcohol use before sex occurs.



Clamshell-Shaped Protein Puts the 'Jump' in 'Jumping Genes' - 8/19/15

Wed 19 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have deciphered the structure and unusual shape of a bacterial protein that prepares segments of DNA for the insertion of so-called jumping genes.



Scientists Report Success Using Zebrafish Embryos to Identify Potential New Diabetes Drugs - 8/18/15

Tue 18 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.



'Jumping Genes' Unusually Active in Many Gastrointestinal Cancers, Studies Find - 8/18/15

Tue 18 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Results of a trio of studies done on human cancer tissue biopsies have added to growing evidence that a so-called jumping gene called LINE-1 is active during the development of many gastrointestinal cancers.



Johns Hopkins Researchers Sound Off on the Dangers of Hospital Consolidation - 8/17/15

Mon 17 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a commentary published in the Aug. 13 issue of JAMA, Johns Hopkins experts say consolidation of hospitals into massive chains threatens healthy competition, reduces patient choice and could drive up medical expenses.



Alert to Biologists: Ribosomes Can Translate the 'Untranslated Region' of Messenger RNA - 8/17/15

Mon 17 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In what appears to be an unexpected challenge to a long-accepted fact of biology, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found that ribosomes — the molecular machines in all cells that build proteins — can sometimes do so even within the so-called untranslated regions of the ribbons of genetic material known as messenger RNA (mRNA).



Medical Student Tiffany Ho Elected to the American Academy of Family Physicians Board of Directors - 8/14/15

Fri 14 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Tiffany Ho, M.P.H., a member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s class of 2016, has been elected to serve as a student member on the American Academy of Family Physicians board of directors for the next year.



Richard S. Ross, Longtime Johns Hopkins Medical School Dean, Dies - 8/13/15

Thu 13 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Richard S. Ross, M.D., former dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, vice president for medicine of The Johns Hopkins University and a renowned cardiologist who served as president of the American Heart Association, died Aug. 11, 2015.



Pulmonary Hypertension: A Growing Problem in U.S. Children - 8/12/15

Wed 12 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease.



Research Advances Potential for a Globally Accurate Diagnostic Test and Vaccine for Genital and Oral Herpes - 8/11/15

Tue 11 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses (HSV), according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).



Hepatitis C Infection May Fuel Heart Risk - 8/11/15

Tue 11 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble.



Johns Hopkins, Mayo Experts Suggest Upgrades to Current Heart Disease Prevention Guidelines - 8/11/15

Tue 11 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Acknowledging key strengths and “lessons learned,” preventive cardiologists from Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic have developed a short list of suggested upgrades to the controversial heart disease prevention guidelines issued jointly in 2013 by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.



Survey Reveals Best Practices That Lead to High Patient Ratings of Hospital Care - 8/10/15

Mon 10 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Based on responses to questionnaires and letters sent to CEOs and medical personnel from a nationwide sample of 53 hospitals, Johns Hopkins investigators have identified a handful of best practices they say are most likely to give patients a positive hospital experience, a sense of satisfaction and the feeling they come first.



Researchers Identify Drug Candidate for Skin, Hair Regeneration Among Scarred Victims of Burns and Trauma - 8/6/15

Thu 6 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a novel cell signaling pathway in mice through which mammals — presumably including people — can regenerate hair follicles and skin while healing from wounds.



Scientists Report Explanation for Protein Clumps in Autopsy Brain Cells of ALS Patients - 8/6/15

Thu 6 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Autopsies of nearly every patient with the lethal neurodegenerative disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and many with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), show pathologists telltale clumps of a protein called TDP-43.



Nanoparticles Used to Breach Mucus Barrier in Lungs - 8/3/15

Mon 3 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil have designed a DNA-loaded nanoparticle that can pass through the mucus barrier covering conducting airways of lung tissue — proving the concept, they say, that therapeutic genes may one day be delivered directly to the lungs to the levels sufficient to treat cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other life-threatening lung diseases.



Nanoparticles Used to Breach Mucus Barrier in Lungs - 8/3/15

Mon 3 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil have designed a DNA-loaded nanoparticle that can pass through the mucus barrier covering conducting airways of lung tissue — proving the concept, they say, that therapeutic genes may one day be delivered directly to the lungs to the levels sufficient to treat cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other life-threatening lung diseases.



Howard W. Jones Jr., Pioneer in Reproductive Medicine, Dies at 104 - 8/1/15

Sat 1 Aug 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Howard W. Jones Jr., a pioneer in reproductive medicine who oversaw the 1965 Johns Hopkins research that resulted in the world’s first successful fertilization of a human egg outside the body, then collaborated with his wife, gynecologic endocrinologist Georgeanna Seegar Jones, to oversee the 1981 birth of the first “test tube” baby in the United States, died July 31 at Sentara Heart Hospital in Virginia.



Blood Test Predicts Prognosis for Traumatic Brain Injuries - 7/30/15

Thu 30 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity.



New Computer-Based Technology May Lead to Improvements in Facial Transplantation - 7/29/15

Wed 29 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient.



Proof-of-Concept Study Shows Successful Transport of Blood Samples with Small Drones - 7/29/15

Wed 29 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a proof-of-concept study at Johns Hopkins, researchers have shown that results of common and routine blood tests are not affected by up to 40 minutes of travel on hobby-sized drones.



Small Study Affirms Accuracy of Free Mobile App That Screens for Liver Disease in Newborns - 7/29/15

Wed 29 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a small study, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center report they have verified the ability of a free smartphone app to accurately read, interpret and record the color of a newborn’s poop as a possible early symptom of biliary atresia (BA) — a rare disorder that accounts for nearly half of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States.



Hospital Penalties Based on Total Number of Blood Clots May Be Unfairly Imposed, Study Shows - 7/29/15

Wed 29 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins researchers say their review of 128 medical case histories suggests that financial penalties imposed on Maryland hospitals based solely on the total number of patients who suffer blood clots in the lung or leg fail to account for clots that occur despite the consistent and proper use of the best preventive therapies.



One in Four Patients with Defibrillators Experiences Boost in Heart Function over Time - 7/27/15

Mon 27 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A Johns Hopkins-led study of outcomes among 1,200 people with implanted defibrillators — devices intended to prevent sudden cardiac death from abnormal heart rhythms — shows that within a few years of implantation, one in four experienced improvements in heart function substantial enough to put them over the clinical threshold that qualified them to get a defibrillator in the first place.



The Johns Hopkins hospital ranked among the top U.S. hospitals by U.S. News & World Report - 7/21/15

Tue 21 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked in the top five in nine specialties and #3 overall in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals list, sharing the spot with UCLA Medical Center, in this year’s ranking of 4,716 hospitals. In the magazine’s ranking of hospitals in the state, The Johns Hopkins Hospital was again ranked #1 in all specialties. It also ranked #1 in all specialties in Baltimore.



Cellphones Seen as Change Agents for Health Among Young, Poor, Urban Women in Need of Care - 7/21/15

Tue 21 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a survey of a diverse group of almost 250 young, low-income, inner-city pregnant and postpartum women, Johns Hopkins researchers have learned that more than 90 percent use smartphones or regular cellphones to give and get information.



Magnetic Nanoparticles Could Be Key To Effective Immunotherapy - 7/15/15

Wed 15 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection.



Scientists 'Watch' Rats String Memories Together - 7/15/15

Wed 15 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

By using electrode implants to track nerve cells firing in the brains of rats as they plan where to go next, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have learned that the mammalian brain likely reconstructs memories in a way more like jumping across stepping stones than walking across a bridge.



Pairing Urban Farmers with Local Stores Improves Access to Healthy Food, Small Case Study Finds - 7/15/15

Wed 15 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Buying fresh fruits and vegetables can be hard for families living in low-income urban neighborhoods, many of which are known as “food deserts” for their lack of full-service grocery stores that stock healthy food.



Sounds Familiar: Lessons Learned from Infection Control Can Help Solve Inpatient Glucose Problems - 7/14/15

Tue 14 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Borrowing a page from a winning team's playbook, Johns Hopkins endocrinologist Nestoras Mathioudakis, M.D., and his colleagues are taking on the topic of managing hospital patients' diabetes.



Found: A Likely New Contributor to Age-Related Hearing Loss - 7/13/15

Mon 13 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but research from neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise.



Aggressive Cancer Treatment Near End of Life Persists Despite Rise in Advance Planning Efforts - 7/9/15

Thu 9 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a review of nearly 2,000 surveys with people whose loved ones died of cancer, researchers led by Johns Hopkins experts say they found a 40 percent increase over a 12-year period in the number of patients with cancer who participated in one form of advance care planning — designating durable power of attorney privileges to a loved one — but no corresponding impact on their rates of aggressive medical care received in the last weeks of life.



Study Advances Potential of Tumor Genome Sequencing and DNA-Based Blood Tests in Precision Treatment and Detection of Pancreatic Cancer - 7/9/15

Thu 9 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a genome-sequencing study of pancreatic cancers and blood in 101 patients, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists say they found at least one-third of the patients' tumors have genetic mutations that may someday help guide precision therapy of their disease. Results of blood tests to detect DNA shed from tumors, they say, also predicted cancer recurrence more than half a year earlier than standard imaging methods.



New Evidence That Genetic Differences May Help Explain Inconsistent Effectiveness Of Anti-Hiv Drug - 7/9/15

Thu 9 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Research with human tissue and cells suggests that genetic variations, in addition to failure to comply with treatment regimens, may account for some failures of an anti-HIV drug to treat and prevent HIV infection.



Faster Weight Gain Can Be Safe For Hospitalized Anorexia Patients - 7/8/15

Wed 8 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A new study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of patients hospitalized with anorexia nervosa shows that a faster weight gain during inpatient treatment — well beyond what national standards recommend — is safe and effective.



Stress-Coping Strategy and Mom’s Stress Levels During Pregnancy May Determine Anorexia Susceptibility in Rats - 7/7/15

Tue 7 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins researchers have found that offspring born to mother rats stressed during pregnancy lost weight faster and failed to turn on appropriate brain hunger signals in response to exercise and food restriction, compared to offspring from non-stressed mothers.



Johns Hopkins and the Queen’s Health Systems Collaborate to Advance Patient Safety and Quality in Hawaii - 7/7/15

Tue 7 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and The Queen’s Health Systems in Honolulu have entered into a collaboration agreement to improve patient safety and quality of care initiatives at hospitals in the state of Hawaii.



The Johns Hopkins University and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Enter into Extended Drug Discovery Collaboration - 7/7/15

Tue 7 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders.



Sculpting a Cell's Backside - 7/7/15

Tue 7 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

When Greek mythology and cell biology meet, you get the protein Callipygian, recently discovered and named by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University for its role in determining which area of a cell becomes the back as it begins to move.



Heart Attack Treatment Hypothesis 'Busted' - 7/6/15

Mon 6 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Researchers have long had reason to hope that blocking the flow of calcium into the mitochondria of heart and brain cells could be one way to prevent damage caused by heart attacks and strokes.



'Decorative' Molecule on Brain Cells Affects Motor Skills, Learning and Hyperactivity - 7/6/15

Mon 6 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found "decorating" brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure.



Cellular Sentinel Prevents Cell Division When the Right Machinery Is Not in Place - 7/6/15

Mon 6 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

For cell division to be successful, pairs of chromosomes have to line up just right before being swept into their new cells, like the opening of a theater curtain.



New Hepatitis C Treatment Needs No Antiviral Boost - 7/1/15

Wed 1 Jul 2015 12:00:00 GMT

An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations.



Brain and Spine Surgery No More Risky When Physicians-In-Training Participate, Study Finds - 6/29/15

Mon 29 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations.



Geography Is Destiny in Deaths from Kidney Failure, Study Shows - 6/24/15

Wed 24 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The notion that geography often shapes economic and political destiny has long informed the work of economists and political scholars.



Johns Hopkins Scientists Restore Normal Function in Heart Muscle Cells of Diabetic Rats - 6/24/15

Wed 24 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles.



DNA Shed from Head and Neck Tumors Detected in Blood and Saliva - 6/24/15

Wed 24 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

On the hunt for better cancer screening tests, Johns Hopkins scientists led a proof of principle study that successfully identified tumor DNA shed into the blood and saliva of 93 patients with head and neck cancer.



Medical Marijuana 'Edibles' Mostly Mislabeled, Study Shows - 6/23/15

Tue 23 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a proof-of-concept study, a team led by a Johns Hopkins researcher reports that the vast majority of edible cannabis products sold in a small sample of medical marijuana dispensaries carried labels that overstated or understated the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).



'Smarter' Ordering of Breast Biomarker Tests Could Save Millions in Health Care Dollars, Study Reveals - 6/23/15

Tue 23 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in health care spending without compromising care, according to Johns Hopkins researchers.



Nanoparticle 'Wrapper' Delivers Chemical that Stops Fatty Buildup in Rodent Arteries - 6/23/15

Tue 23 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals' ability to properly handle cholesterol.



'High-Normal' Blood Pressure in Young Adults Spells Risk of Heart Failure in Later Life - 6/22/15

Mon 22 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Mild elevations in blood pressure considered to be in the upper range of normal during young adulthood can lead to subclinical heart damage by middle age — a condition that sets the stage for full-blown heart failure, according to findings of a federally funded study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins.



Study Identifies Multiple Genetic Changes Linked to Increased Pancreatic Cancer Risk - 6/22/15

Mon 22 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In a genome-wide association study believed to be the largest of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered four regions in the human genome where changes may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer.



Johns Hopkins Accelerator Startup Selected as Best Life Sciences Company for 2015 - 6/19/15

Fri 19 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Gemstone Biotherapeutics, a participant in the Johns Hopkins startup accelerator program FastForward East, has been named Best Life Sciences Company at the Maryland Incubator Company of the Year awards.



Cosmetic Lip Surgery May Ease Facial Paralysis, Small Study Suggests - 6/18/15

Thu 18 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A cosmetic surgery that uses injections of hyaluronic acid to make lips appear fuller could also improve the lives of people with facial paralysis, according to results of a small study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities.



Scientists Identify Amino Acid that Stops Seizures in Mice - 6/18/15

Thu 18 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

An amino acid whose role in the body has been all but a mystery appears to act as a potent seizure inhibitor in mice, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins.



Scientists Identify Protein that Sustains Heart Function into Old Age - 6/17/15

Wed 17 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The human heart makes precious few new cells but manages to generate billions of life-sustaining beats as it grows old.



New Imaging Technique Could Make Brain Tumor Removal Safer, More Effective, Study Suggests - 6/17/15

Wed 17 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible.



Johns Hopkins University and Bayer HealthCare Collaborate to Develop New Ophthalmic Therapies - 6/16/15

Tue 16 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The Johns Hopkins University and Bayer HealthCare have entered into a five-year collaboration agreement to jointly develop new ophthalmic therapies targeting retinal diseases.



Vulnerabilities in Genome's 'Dimmer Switches' Should Shed Light on Hundreds of Complex Diseases - 6/15/15

Mon 15 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Up to one-fifth of human DNA act as dimmer switches for nearby genes, but scientists have long been unable to identify precisely which mutations in these genetic control regions really matter in causing common diseases.



Twenty Johns Hopkins Researchers Awarded Stem Cell Research Funds from Maryland - 6/15/15

Mon 15 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

This year, the Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission awarded 21 of its 29 grants to Johns Hopkins researchers.



Medicare Records Study Affirms Link Between Disjointed Care and Unnecessary Medical Procedures - 6/11/15

Thu 11 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A "look back" study of Medicare fee-for-service claims for more than 1.2 million patients over age 65 has directly affirmed and quantified a long-suspected link between lower rates of coordinated health care services and higher rates of unnecessary medical tests and procedures.



Johns Hopkins Infection Expert Tapped by White House to Participate in Antibiotic Stewardship Initiative - 6/10/15

Wed 10 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins infectious disease researcher Sara Cosgrove, M.D., M.S., has been tapped by the White House to help address solutions to the ever-growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.



For Safer Care, Simple Steps, Consistently Applied, Yield Substantial Improvements in Colorectal Surgery - 6/8/15

Mon 8 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Simple steps that include the consistent use of experienced medical teams for a single type of surgery, preemptive antibiotics before the procedure, less reliance on potent opioids during recovery and urging patients to get out of bed and move around sooner can not only prevent infections, blood clots and other serious complications in people undergoing colorectal operations, but can also accelerate recovery and reduce cost of care, according to results of an ongoing program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.



Johns Hopkins Patient Safety Experts Call for Changes in Policy to Reduce Serious, Preventable Safety Harms to Hospitalized Patients - 6/8/15

Mon 8 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Reflecting on more than a decade of efforts by hospitals to reduce the rate of so-called never events that kill and injure patients, two leaders in patient safety research at Johns Hopkins conclude that such harms continue at a “troubling frequency.”



Johns Hopkins’ Geetha Jayaram Honored with Rotary Foundation Global Alumni Service to Humanity Award - 6/8/15

Mon 8 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Geetha Jayaram, M.D., an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, is the 2014–15 recipient of the Rotary Foundation Global Alumni Service to Humanity Award.



Developing Delirium in the ICU Linked to Fatal Outcomes - 6/4/15

Thu 4 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

About one-third of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) will develop delirium, a condition that lengthens hospital stays and substantially increases one’s risk of dying in the hospital, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers appearing in the British Medical Journal.



Re-Inflating Balloon after Carotid Stenting Appears to Double Risk of Stroke and Death - 6/4/15

Thu 4 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

After reviewing outcomes from thousands of cases, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that patients with blocked neck arteries who undergo carotid stenting to prop open the narrowed blood vessels fare decidedly worse if their surgeons re-inflate a tiny balloon in the vessel after the mesh stent is in place.



Johns Hopkins Medicine Recognized for Environmental Sustainability - 6/4/15

Thu 4 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins Medicine was recognized for its efforts to reduce its environmental footprint, winning several sustainability awards during the recent CleanMed 2015 Conference in Portland, Oregon, and at the Maryland Hospital Association’s annual meeting in Baltimore.



Bruce Perler to Begin Term as President of Society for Vascular Surgery - 6/1/15

Mon 1 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Bruce A. Perler, M.D., M.B.A., a Johns Hopkins vascular surgeon; the Julius H. Jacobson II, M.D., Professor of Vascular Surgery; vice chair for clinical operations and financial affairs for the Department of Surgery; and chief emeritus of the Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, will become president of the Society for Vascular Surgery on June 20.



Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department to Receive 2015 Haim Ring Award - 6/1/15

Mon 1 Jun 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The Johns Hopkins Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation has been selected to receive the 2015 Haim Ring Award in the institutional category.



Small Study Shows Genetic Biomarker May Predict Cancer Patients' Response to Immunotherapy Drug - 5/29/15

Fri 29 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Lightly stimulating the brain with electricity may improve short-term memory in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.



Weak Electric Current to the Brain May Improve Thinking in People with Schizophrenia - 5/27/15

Wed 27 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Lightly stimulating the brain with electricity may improve short-term memory in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.



Johns Hopkins Employees Raise More Than $50,000 with United Way Charity Event, 'Dancing with the Hopkins Stars' - 5/27/15

Wed 27 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

On Wednesday, May 27, Johns Hopkins Medicine announced that the United Way Charity Event, “Dancing with the Hopkins Stars,” held the previous night, raised more than $50,000 to support Maryland Unites, a United Way program that provides humanitarian relief and emergency support to nonprofits in Baltimore neighborhoods.



News Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Hosts United Way Charity Event, 'Dancing with the Hopkins Stars' - 5/26/15

Tue 26 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins faculty and staff members show off their dance moves by competing in Dancing with the Hopkins Stars in support of United Way.



Study Suggests New Way of Preventing Diabetes-Associated Blindness - 5/25/15

Mon 25 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabetes.



Physicians Julie Lange and John Fetting Inducted into Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence - 5/20/15

Wed 20 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Julie Lange, M.D., an associate professor of surgery, oncology and dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and John Fetting, M.D., an associate professor of oncology and medicine, have been inducted into the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence.



Novel Drug Combo Improves Function of Cystic Fibrosis Protein - 5/20/15

Wed 20 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A novel two-drug combination has the potential to target and restore a defective protein underlying cystic fibrosis (CF), according to two phase III clinical trials conducted at 187 medical centers around the world, including Johns Hopkins.



A Celebration of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Graduates - 5/19/15

Tue 19 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A distinguished group of 268 graduates will embark on their future careers as physicians and scientists at the convocation ceremony of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.



Molecule Designed to Treat Lung Cancer Shows Promising Results in Mice - 5/19/15

Tue 19 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A multidisciplinary team led by Johns Hopkins researcher Venu Raman, Ph.D., with notable contributions from Guus Bol, Farhad Vesuna and Phuoc Tran of Johns Hopkins, has identified a new therapy for lung cancer, the most common cancer worldwide.



Xinzhong Dong Named Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator - 5/19/15

Tue 19 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Xinzhong Dong, Ph.D., a professor of neuroscience and neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator.



Text Messages Can Help Boost Teen Birth Control Compliance - 5/19/15

Tue 19 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Sending teen girls periodic text messages reminding them to follow through on their clinic appointments for periodic birth control injections can go a long way toward improving timing and adherence to contraception in an age group that is notoriously noncompliant, according to a small study from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.



Agriculture, Declining Mobility Drove Humans' Shift To Lighter Bones - 5/18/15

Mon 18 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Modern lifestyles have famously made humans heavier, but, in one particular way, noticeably lighter weight than our hunter-gatherer ancestors: in the bones.



New Web Resource to Help Patients and Families Understand Johns Hopkins Medicine Quality and Safety Data - 5/18/15

Mon 18 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins Medicine released a user-friendly website for consumers that provides information and education surrounding its health system's quality of care.



Johns Hopkins Innovation Hub, FastForward East, Expanding - 5/15/15

Fri 15 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

In just three months, demand for lab and office space at the Johns Hopkins innovation hub, FastForward East, has exceeded supply.



News Media Advisory: Groundbreaking Ceremony - 5/14/15

Thu 14 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Building to house Johns Hopkins offices, including FastForward East, a program designed to move academic findings and translational research into the commercial marketplace.



Medical Student Sahar Soleimanifard Wins Soros Fellowship - 5/14/15

Thu 14 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Sahar Soleimanifard, a first-year medical student at The Johns Hopkins University, is among 30 graduate students receiving 2015 Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans.



Robert A. Kasdin Named Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine - 5/13/15

Wed 13 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins Medicine announced today the appointment of Robert A. Kasdin to the newly created role of senior vice president and chief operating officer.



'Extreme' Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke Causes Mild Intoxication - 5/13/15

Wed 13 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under "extreme conditions," such as an unventilated room or enclosed vehicle, can cause nonsmokers to feel the effects of the drug, have minor problems with memory and coordination, and in some cases test positive for the drug in a urinalysis.



Health IT Entrepreneurs Showcase Startups at Capstone Event, DreamIt Health Demo Day, Co-Sponsored by Johns Hopkins - 5/13/15

Wed 13 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

The culmination of the DreamIt Health Baltimore accelerator program, a four-month intensive boot camp for health information technology entrepreneurs co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins, concludes on Wednesday, May 13, at DreamIt Health Demo Day.



First U.S. Center to Study Lyme Disease Launched at Johns Hopkins Medicine - 5/13/15

Wed 13 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Fundamental research into the causes and cures of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome now has its first home base at a major U.S. medical research center with the launch of the Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center.



Managing Cancer at Work: Johns Hopkins Launches New Service for All Employees - 5/12/15

Tue 12 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Johns Hopkins Medicine has created and launched Managing Cancer at Work, a new and novel health benefit program offered free of charge for its more than 42,000 combined full-time equivalent employees.



Media Advisory: Health IT Entrepreneurs Showcase Startups at DreamIt Health Demo Day, Co-Sponsored by Johns Hopkins - 5/11/15

Mon 11 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Brief presentations about innovative ideas that offer solutions to several health care challenges; among them is a startup from Baltimore that has developed a mobile app designed to improve transition of patient care and avoid preventable medical errors.



Metaphors of the Heart: Two Physicians Examine Heart Disease Through a Literary Lens - 5/11/15

Mon 11 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Heart disease has topped mortality charts as the No. 1 killer of men and women for many decades, but a novel analysis of American literary fiction by two physicians finds the disorder’s presence in great novels has remained relatively modest.



Plugging In Your Vision's Autostabilization Feature - 5/7/15

Thu 7 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Just as most cameras now have an autostabilization feature to compensate for movement during picture taking, our eyes execute an imperceptible reflex that prevents our vision from blurring when we, or our field of vision, are in motion.



Ophthalmology Professor Bob Massof Receives Helen Keller Prize - 5/6/15

Wed 6 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Bob Massof, Ph.D., of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins received the 2015 Helen Keller Prize for Vision Research on May 5.



Strategy Found for Safely Prescribing Antidepressants to Children and Adolescents - 5/5/15

Tue 5 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers have developed two new strategies to treat depression in young people using the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of medications.



Molecular Link Between High Glucose, Metabolic Disease May Offer New Strategies To Control Diabetes - 5/5/15

Tue 5 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Scientists at Johns Hopkins say they’ve discovered a cause-and-effect link between chronic high blood sugar and disruption of mitochondria, the powerhouses that create the metabolic energy that runs living cells.



How Oxidizing a Heart 'Brake' Causes Heart Damage - 5/4/15

Mon 4 May 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D., and Donald Geman, Ph.D., have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.



Two Johns Hopkins Scientists Elected to National Academy of Sciences - 4/30/15

Thu 30 Apr 2015 12:00:00 GMT

Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D., and Donald Geman, Ph.D., have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.



Study Questions Quality of U.S. Health Data - 4/30/15

Thu 30 Apr 2015 12:00:00 GMT

A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers concludes that most U.S. clinical registries that collect data on patient outcomes are substandard and lack critical features necessary to render the information they collect useful for patients, physicians and policy makers.