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Numerous restrictions for Dennis Hastert as he starts probationDennis Hastert

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 18:57:00 GMT

Former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert's 15-month federal prison term for banking charges has officially ended.

Hastert was released from federal prison in July, but served the remainder of his sentence in either a halfway house or on home monitoring. Federal prison officials have not commented on where he served the remainder of his sentence.

Although he was sentenced to federal prison on banking charges, the charges were linked to accusations by multiple students that Hastert molested them when he was a coach and teacher at Yorkville High School in the 1960s and 1970s. In his sentencing of Hastert, federal Judge Thomas Durkin referred to the former Speaker of the House as a "serial child molester."

Hastert now faces two years of supervised release, also known as probation, which carries with it a number of requirements. Hastert also owes fines of $250,000.

According to the sentencing order filed with the U.S. District Court Northern District of Illinois in 2016, during the two years he is on probation he must not commit another federal, state or local crime; must not unlawfully possess a controlled substance; and must cooperate "in the collection of a DNA sample if the collection of such a sample is required by law."

Hastert also must refrain from "knowingly meeting or communicating with" the three anonymous individuals named in the federal indictment or with Scott Cross, the brother of former Illinois House Republican Leader Tom Cross of Oswego, who has accused Hastert publicly of sexually assaulting him as a teenager.

Hastert is also prohibited from possessing a firearm, "destructive device, or other dangerous weapon."

Hastert is required to "remain within the jurisdiction where you are being supervised, with a map of that jurisdiction being provided by the probation officer at the inception of supervised release, unless granted permission to leave by the court or a probation officer."

Hastert is required to report to his probation officer and must permit a probation officer to visit him at "any reasonable time" at home or at an "other reasonable location specified by the probation officer," and he must permit "confiscation of any contraband observed in plain view of the probation officer."

Hastert is required to notify the probation officer within 72 hours or "any change in residence, employer, or workplace" and is required to notify the probation officer within 72 hours if "arrested or questioned by a law enforcement officer."

As part of his probation, Hastert also must participate in a sex offender treatment program.

"If the probation officer determines that you pose a risk to another person (including an organization or members of the community), the probation officer may require (Hastert) to tell the person about the risk, and you must comply with that," the sentencing order also states.

Dennis Hastert


Media Files:
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Army captain surprised by Crytal Lake coworkers, veteransCurran Contracting Company employees Todd Gierke (left) and Jim Lancaster await the arrival of coworker and army reservist Capt. Josh Flury on Wednesday,. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury reacts as members of the Crystal Lake VFW Post 12014 welcome him back to work at Curran Contracting Company on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury, thanks Curran Contracting Company coworkers on Wednesday after they surprised him on his first day back to work. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury, (right) is welcomed back to work by Curran Contracting Company manager Mike Pachla on Wednesday. Coworkers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, on his first day back to work after he was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comMembers of Crystal Lake VFW post 12014 welcome army reservist Captain Josh Flury back to work at Curran Contracting Company on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 18:40:00 GMT

Crystal Lake coworkers, veterans surprise army captain returning from service in Kuwait.

Curran Contracting Company employees Todd Gierke (left) and Jim Lancaster await the arrival of coworker and army reservist Capt. Josh Flury on Wednesday,. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury reacts as members of the Crystal Lake VFW Post 12014 welcome him back to work at Curran Contracting Company on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury, thanks Curran Contracting Company coworkers on Wednesday after they surprised him on his first day back to work. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comArmy reservist Captain Josh Flury, (right) is welcomed back to work by Curran Contracting Company manager Mike Pachla on Wednesday. Coworkers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, on his first day back to work after he was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.comMembers of Crystal Lake VFW post 12014 welcome army reservist Captain Josh Flury back to work at Curran Contracting Company on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year. H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/lists/2017/08/16/34b8d0240bbe46b097fa7dad6469c5e0/4b84e8a3-83de-4513-afbb-f432976a6daa/image-pv_web.jpg




Witnesses say bicyclist might have been wearing earbuds when fatally struck in WoodstockWoodstock Fire Captain Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call of a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m. Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock, had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was instead transported to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock where he was pronounced dead around 8:45 p.m., the coroner's office said in a statement.A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was eastbound on Route 14 in the right lane when it collided in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. Preliminary police investigation also indicated the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department."Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said. Autopsy results show James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending. Parsons said it did not appear any citations would be issued at this time. He added that a multi-agency Major Crash Assistance Team had been activated to investigate the crash alongside the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 18:23:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK — A 25-year-old Woodstock man was killed after being hit by an SUV Tuesday night at Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock, police said.

Woodstock Fire Captain Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call of a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m. Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock, had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was instead transported to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock where he was pronounced dead around 8:45 p.m., the coroner's office said in a statement.A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was eastbound on Route 14 in the right lane when it collided in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. Preliminary police investigation also indicated the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department."Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said. Autopsy results show James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending. Parsons said it did not appear any citations would be issued at this time. He added that a multi-agency Major Crash Assistance Team had been activated to investigate the crash alongside the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/lists/2017/08/16/13d97c9d14a44868a939eddcda48a343/e4b72bc6-9bc7-4347-ab68-83ccb1d6d1ea/image-pv_web.jpg




Witnesses say bicyclist might have been wearing earbuds when fatally struck in WoodstockPhoto provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD Woodstock police officers investigate the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD Woodstock police investigate the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD A Woodstock police officer looks over a bike at the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 18:21:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK — A 25-year-old Woodstock man was killed after being hit by an SUV Tuesday night at Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock, police said.

Woodstock Fire Captain Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call of a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m.

Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock, had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office.

Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was instead transported to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock where he was pronounced dead around 8:45 p.m., the coroner said in a statement.

A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was eastbound on Route 14 in the right lane when it collided in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. Preliminary police investigation also indicated the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department.

"Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said.

Autopsy results show James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending.

Parsons said it did not appear any citations would be issued at this time. He added that a multi-agency Major Crash Assistance Team had been activated to investigate the crash alongside the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.

Photo provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD Woodstock police officers investigate the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD Woodstock police investigate the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha/WFRD A Woodstock police officer looks over a bike at the scene of a crash in which a person was killed after they were hit by a vehicle Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2017/08/16/e2eafe2d39b44cc6b5ed7de61c22dc0e/7997d9b3-86c8-4cf9-976c-ba980e8cc917/image-pv_web.jpg




Police investigating domestic incident in Lake in the Hills

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 17:58:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Police are investigating a domestic incident that occurred late Wednesday morning in Lake in the Hills.

The incident occurred about 10:50 a.m. in the 4500 block of Barharbor Drive, according to a Nixle alert from Lake in the Hills police.

A male suspect is in custody and charges are pending, said Amanda Schmitt, public information officer for the Lake in the Hills Police Department.

Schmitt wouldn’t comment on the nature of the incident or say if anyone was injured.

She said the occurrence was isolated and there is no threat to the public.

This is a developing story, check back at nwherald.com for updates.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2017/08/16/d310b098ac4e4f0ab8a7bd0d04966c5e/f5b94ccc-06d4-4010-8a7f-da5dd1836c06/image-pv_web.jpg




In-ground pool, hot tub and fire pit: What $589,900 can get you in LakewoodLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.The home has a three-car garage with heated floorsEntrancewayGreat roomwith two-story fireplaceThe great room also has a web barGreat room leading to kitchen and sun roomKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantrySun room that leads out to patio and poolDining roomPrivate officeMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteThis bedroom suite has its own bathroom attached.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.Laundry roomIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 17:56:00 GMT

Ever drive by a house and wonder what it looks like inside? Or how much does it cost? Check out this Lakewood home, listed for sale on Zillow.

Lakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.The home has a three-car garage with heated floorsEntrancewayGreat roomwith two-story fireplaceThe great room also has a web barGreat room leading to kitchen and sun roomKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantrySun room that leads out to patio and poolDining roomPrivate officeMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteThis bedroom suite has its own bathroom attached.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.Laundry roomIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.


Media Files:
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Spring Grove woman charged with drug-related DUI after crashing into tree

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:46:00 GMT

MCHENRY – A Spring Grove woman was charged with driving under the influence of drugs after she was found unresponsive in her car that had crashed into a tree Tuesday night, police said.

McHenry firefighters and police responded to the crash about 9:45 p.m. Tuesday in the 2600 block of Arbor Drive, McHenry Fire Battalion Chief Kevin Sears said. The driver experienced a medical emergency and was unresponsive when crews arrived, Sears said. He would not say what that medical emergency was.

Eugenia D. Frofolone, 24, of Spring Grove, was transported to Centegra Hospital – McHenry and released, McHenry Police Cmdr. Paul Funk said. Frofolone was later arrested and charged with DUI of drugs. Funk said he did not know how the woman crashed into the tree.

Frofolone posted bail and was released. She is next due in court Sept. 20.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2017/08/16/c1d4dfb441c74bf7bffd25acf931b130/91449fad-9fda-49a5-8522-4f04c713ca47/image-pv_web.jpg




AP Fact Check: What Trump said about Charlottesville protestersIn this Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, photo, white nationalist demonstrators clash with counter demonstrators at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. President Donald Trump on Aug. 15, defended his response to Saturday’s racially-charged protests in Charlottesville in a winding, combative exchange with reporters that at times mischaracterized the message and purpose of event. In his remarks, Trump described the rally as largely a debate over removal of a Confederate monument, although organizers billed the rally as push back against the “anti-white climate.” Trump also misstated his levels of political support in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:24:00 GMT

NEW YORK – President Donald Trump has defended his response to Saturday's racially charged protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, in a winding, combative exchange with reporters that at times mischaracterized the message and purpose of the event. Trump described the rally as largely over the removal of a Confederate monument, although an organizer billed it as pushback against the "anti-white climate." Trump also misstated his levels of political support in the 2016 election. A look at Trump's claims and the facts: TRUMP: "But not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists, by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue, Robert E. Lee." THE FACTS: The organizer of the rally, a local right-wing blogger and activist, has said he initially was spurred because of the city's decision to remove the statue. But he has also said the event, dubbed "Unite the Right," came to represent much more than that. Jason Kessler told The Associated Press last week before the event that it was "about an anti-white climate within the Western world and the need for white people to have advocacy like other groups do." Those in the crowd included Ku Klux Klan members, skinheads and members of various white nationalist factions. Many were heavily armed. Some flew Nazi flags. They hurled racial slurs at counter-demonstrators and gave Nazi salutes. White nationalist Richard Spencer — who popularized the term "alt-right" to describe the fringe movement mixing white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-Semitism and anti-immigration populism — told the AP on Tuesday that the event was more than "just a Southern heritage festival." He said Confederate monuments are "a metaphor for something much bigger, and that is white dispossession and the de-legitimization of white people in this country and around the world." __ TRUMP: "In fact, the young woman, who I hear is a fantastic young woman and it was on NBC, her mother wrote me and said through, I guess Twitter, social media, the nicest things and I very much appreciated that. I hear she was a fine, really actually an incredible young woman. But her mother on Twitter thanked me for what I said." THE FACTS: Trump is correct. On Monday, NBC News tweeted that Susan Bro, the mother of the counter-protester killed on Saturday, had thanked Trump for "denouncing those who promote violence and hatred." When asked in an AP interview Tuesday about her comments, Bro did not repeat the praise for the president. "I was so tired I don't remember saying something nice or derogatory about him," Bro said, adding she did not want to criticize the president. Kim Bro, her husband, said he didn't think it was fair for the president to use a grieving mother for his own personal gain. He added that he thinks the focus should be on his stepdaughter, "what she stood for and what will come out of it." ___ TRUMP: "I went through 17 senators, governors, and I won all the primaries." THE FACTS: Trump won most of the Republican presidential primary contests. He lost the Ohio GOP primary to John Kasich, the Ohio governor. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz bested Trump in primaries in Cruz's home state and in Wisconsin. Trump also lost Puerto Rico's primary to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. Primary elections were also held on the Democratic side, none of which Trump would have [...]


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Dowe & Wagner sees savings with digital thermostats

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 14:24:32 GMT

Are digital programmable thermostats worth the time to learn how to use them, and the expense to buy and install them?   Yes because they save energy, plus some energy suppliers are offering rebates to customers, says Tom Eppers, co-owner, Dowe & Wagner, a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning company serving residential and commercial customers in Illinois and Wisconsin.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) says digital thermostats can save consumers as much as 10 percent on their energy bill each year.  These smart thermostats can be programmed to adjust the temperature for maximum comfort when people are home, and maximum savings when the house is empty.

Although digital thermostats are more expensive than traditional dial ones, the cost difference is made up in energy savings, often after one season.  They may also save on the wear and tear of the air conditioner and furnace, which can be programmed to run at variable temperatures, and not at an expensive constant rate. 

DOE says air conditioners consume about five percent of all electricity produced in the U.S.  Using less energy is also environmentally savvy by reducing waste. 

Many newer thermostats can be programmed for multiple settings throughout the day and week.  Have a change in plans?  A manual override feature is available, according to DOE.  Accessing your thermostat from a smart phone or tablet allows for more convenience and customized comfort.

Are they complicated to program?  Some thermostats are preprogrammed to help customers get started.  Like learning to use a smart phone, the process can get easier with use.  For professional thermostat installations, the service technician can walk customers through the programming process, and suggest other resources for maximizing this energy efficient device.         

For more information, contact Dowe & Wagner, a full-service heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning company based in Richmond at (815) 678-3000, or visit

http://doweandwagner.com/

 


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Jogger alerts resident to McHenry house fire; home left uninhabitableFirefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 12:13:00 GMT

MCHENRY — A Wednesday morning fire left a McHenry home uninhabitable, according to a news release from McHenry Township Fire Protection District.

Firefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry, according to the release. Flames were coming from second floor windows when crews arrived.

The fire was confined to two rooms on the second floor, and other areas of the house sustained smoke, heat and water damage, according to the release.

A jogger alerted the resident of the home that the house was on fire. No operational smoke detectors were found inside the residence, according to the release.

No one was injured in the fire. The cause of the fire is under investigation, and a damage estimate has not yet been determined, according to the release.

Police asked drivers to avoid a portion of Route 31 near the home for about two hours during rush hour due to the fire.

Firefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry.


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Crystal Lake police talk heroin, opioid trends at 'Coffee with the Chief' eventThe Crystal Lake Police Department hosted its monthly “Coffee with the Chief” event Tuesday with a focus on the opioid epidemic that is sweeping both the nation and McHenry County. Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams spoke at the meeting, which aimed to educate the public on the crisis.“There is no typical addict,” Williams said. “Many times it will start out if someone sustains a back injury. … They get a prescription and get addicted to the opioid.” At a certain point, the patient can’t get the prescription anymore, and so they turn to street drugs, Williams said. The danger in this is that prescription medication is regulated, whereas with heroin, you don’t know what you’re getting, he said.Six percent of patients prescribed a one-day supply of an opioid still were taking the drug a year later, according to a 2017 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number doubled to 12 percent if the patient was prescribed a six-day supply, and quadrupled if the patient was prescribed a 12-day supply, according to the study. In McHenry County, 56 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, up from 43 drug overdose deaths in 2015. In 2014, 32 people died of drug overdose deaths, and Crystal Lake police officers began carrying Narcan, the brand name for naloxone, which counteracts the effects of heroin and other opioid drugs. Since the program’s inception, officers have saved 25 people’s lives, Deputy Police Chief Tom Kotlowski said.Williams said that law enforcement can't “arrest its way out” of the crisis. He said working with doctors, parents, schools and treatment centers is more effective. “It’s about education,” he said. “The enforcement side, we already have that.”He said that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with doctors prescribing opioids to patients who need them, but the education piece needs to be in place. “If you have pain, opioids are a good option, but it's not a long-term option,” he said.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:51:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – With opioid use and death on the rise, communication and collaboration are key to get the crisis under control, drug enforcement officials said at a community forum Tuesday.

The Crystal Lake Police Department hosted its monthly “Coffee with the Chief” event Tuesday with a focus on the opioid epidemic that is sweeping both the nation and McHenry County. Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams spoke at the meeting, which aimed to educate the public on the crisis.“There is no typical addict,” Williams said. “Many times it will start out if someone sustains a back injury. … They get a prescription and get addicted to the opioid.” At a certain point, the patient can’t get the prescription anymore, and so they turn to street drugs, Williams said. The danger in this is that prescription medication is regulated, whereas with heroin, you don’t know what you’re getting, he said.Six percent of patients prescribed a one-day supply of an opioid still were taking the drug a year later, according to a 2017 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number doubled to 12 percent if the patient was prescribed a six-day supply, and quadrupled if the patient was prescribed a 12-day supply, according to the study. In McHenry County, 56 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, up from 43 drug overdose deaths in 2015. In 2014, 32 people died of drug overdose deaths, and Crystal Lake police officers began carrying Narcan, the brand name for naloxone, which counteracts the effects of heroin and other opioid drugs. Since the program’s inception, officers have saved 25 people’s lives, Deputy Police Chief Tom Kotlowski said.Williams said that law enforcement can't “arrest its way out” of the crisis. He said working with doctors, parents, schools and treatment centers is more effective. “It’s about education,” he said. “The enforcement side, we already have that.”He said that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with doctors prescribing opioids to patients who need them, but the education piece needs to be in place. “If you have pain, opioids are a good option, but it's not a long-term option,” he said.


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Algonquin looks to fill vacancies on advisory commissions

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:49:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – The village of Algonquin is looking for volunteers to fill vacancies on some of its advisory commissions.

There are open seats on the economic development, electrical, historic and public arts commissions, according to a news release from the village.

Applications are submitted to the village online, and appointments are made for the commission by the Village Board annually, or whenever vacancies occur, according to the release.

Applications and information on each commission, as well as when meetings are held, can be found at www.algonquin.org/volunteer.

– Northwest Herald


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Chicago's O'Hare airport to get $7.4 million simulator

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:49:00 GMT

CHICAGO – A $7.4 million simulator at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport will prepare first responders for rescues aboard superjumbo jets.

The city is taking precautionary measures to prepare firefighters after an engine fire took down an American Airlines plane at an O’Hare runway last year, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

Fire and smoke forced 170 passengers and crew members to exit the plane. More than 20 people were injured.

The contract, funded by airline revenues, calls for Simulation Live Fire Training Solutions Inc. to build a new “triple-deck, large-frame aircraft simulator.” The simulator and accompanying software will include a rotating cabin engineered to simulate a broken jet.

Assistant Deputy Fire Commissioner Tim Sampey oversees the fire rescue operations at O’Hare and Midway International Airport. He said the cabin was made to replicate a 1989 United Airlines jet crash in Sioux City, Iowa, that killed 111 people.

“The plane was broken into several pieces. People who would normally be seated in the upright position were actually seated on an angle, which made rescue difficult,” Sampey said.

Sampey said smoke generators and sound equipment that can simulate burning material and people screaming also are being added to the simulator.

“We can put smoke where we’d like to put smoke, fire where we’d like to put fire. Different levels. It gives us variables from the smallest scenario to the largest,” Sampey said.

Sampey said first responder simulators at O’Hare have only one aisle and are “based off a narrow-body aircraft.”




Maria Ridulph Memorial Fund makes Walcamp experience possible for Sycamore brothersCharles Ridulph stands with this year's recipients of the Maria Ridulph Memorial Fund, brothers Guicho Martinez, 10, and Eli Martinez, 6, on July 27 at Walcamp Outdoor Ministries and Retreat Center. The fund was established to honor Ridulph's late sister, Maria Ridulph, who was kidnapped and killed at age 7 in 1957.Guicho Martinez, 10, of Sycamore puts his shoes on while his brother Eli, 6, looks on before joining fellow campers in a game of capture the flag July 27 at Walcamp Outdoor Ministries and Retreat Center. The brothers were selected for a week of camp through the Maria Ridulph Memorial Fund.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:48:00 GMT

Playing with paintball guns for the first time was 10-year-old Guicho Martinez’s favorite part of Walcamp, and he seemed to take to the activity quite well. In his last match, he was only hit twice. “That’s the least I’ve ever been shot,” Guicho said. His brother, 6-year-old Eli Martinez, was more interested in playing at camp than talking about it. He gushed about games such as ga-ga ball and swimming in the lake, then was quick to give his fellow campers the slip in a game of capture the flag Thursday morning. The Martinez brothers, who both attend West Elementary School in Sycamore, spent a week at Walcamp Outdoor Ministries and Retreat Center in Kingston through the Maria Ridulph Memorial Fund. They are the second pair of siblings to be selected by the fund, which was established in 2015 to honor 7-year-old Maria Ridulph, who was kidnapped and killed in 1957. Maria was a second-grader at West Elementary at the time. The fund receives a portion of the proceeds from Charles Lachman’s book, “Footsteps in the Snow,” which chronicles Maria’s disappearance and the subsequent investigation, as well as all proceeds from “The Impact,” written by Maria’s older brother, Charles. The book includes reflections and prayers about loss through homicide. The Ridulph family also contributes to the fund, and individual and corporate donations are welcomed. Charles Ridulph, 71, said the school principal recommends students who normally would not have the opportunity to attend camp. “I remember as a kid going to summer camp, and it was one of my greatest experiences,” he said. “And so far, it’s been a real blessing.” Ridulph said he wanted to make the connection with his sister’s school as well as Christianity, but the fund is flexible in how it can be used. He said that although scholarships are important, he wanted this fund to provide children with memories of activities that his late sister would have loved. “Some of the kids [at Walcamp] are hearing about Jesus for the first time, and that’s the connection that I want,” he said. Along with outdoor activities such as canoeing and exploring the creek, campers also study the Bible and sing faith-based songs during their stay. “We learned that [Jesus] loves us a lot, and he risked himself for us,” Guicho said. “We learned about friendship.” Camp leader Lindsay “Ducky” Konrad teared up while reflecting on the change in personality and outlook she sees in children who come to Walcamp. She said at first, they often are scared and glued to their phone screens. “They don’t want to give up their phones when they’re dropped off by their parents,” Konrad said. “And then by Friday, they don’t want to leave here.” Charles Ridulph stands with this year's recipients of the Maria Ridulph Memorial Fund, brothers Guicho Martinez, 10, and Eli Martinez, 6, on July 27 at Walcamp Outdoor Ministries and Retreat Center. The fund was established to honor Ridulph's late sister, Maria Ridulph, who was kidnapped and killed at age 7 in 1957.Guicho Martinez, 10, of Sycamore puts his shoes on while his brother Eli, 6, looks on before joining fellow campers in a game of capture the flag July 27 at Walcamp Outdoor Ministries and Retreat Center. The brothers were selected for a week of camp through the Ma[...]


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McHenry County Conservation District to host craft beer tasting event in Cary

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:48:00 GMT

CARY – Participants at The Great Outdoors Beer Trail will be able to sample craft beer while spending time outdoors.

The inaugural event, sponsored by the McHenry County Conservation District and the McHenry County Conservation Foundation, will be from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday at Fel-Pro RRR Conservation Area, 1520 Crystal Lake Road, Cary.

Eighteen craft beers will be available at stations along a mile-long partially wooded and paved path, according to a news release from the district. Local breweries participating include Chain O’ Lakes Brewing Co., Crystal Lake Brewing Co., Scorched Earth Brewing Co. and Wild Onion Brewery.

The event also will include games of bags, sand volleyball and basketball, and live music from the bluegrass band River Valley Rangers. Toasty Cheese and The Crave Bar food trucks will be on-site, according to the release.

The event was set up to introduce new audiences to the county’s conservation areas and open spaces in McHenry County, according to the release.

Tickets cost $45 and include a souvenir glass and 4-ounce tastes from each brewer. A designated driver ticket – which includes a souvenir glass, free water and soda – costs $15. Participants must be 21 years and older.

Tickets can be bought at bit.ly/GOBTTickets. For information, call 815-479-5779 or visit www.mccdistrict.org or find The Great Outdoors Beer Trail on Facebook.




Backlash ensues over GOP bills to shield drivers who hit protestersAP file photo Anti-Donald Trump protesters block traffic as they march in the middle of Guadalupe Street next to the University of Texas at Austin on Jan. 20. In 2017, Republican legislators in at least six states, including Texas, have introduced bills that would shield drivers from civil liability if they unintentionally injure or kill protesters obstructing traffic.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:46:00 GMT

Republican lawmakers in six states have pushed this year for legal protections for motorists who hit protesters blocking traffic. Fairly or not, they’re facing an intense backlash now that violent images of a car ramming into a crowd protesting a white supremacist rally have been seen around the world. The lawmakers say their goal has never been to incite violence, but to shield drivers from costly lawsuits for accidents they blame on illegal street protests. Bills in Texas and North Carolina to protect drivers from civil liability if they unintentionally injure or kill protesters remain pending, but their chances of passage appear dim after Saturday’s attack in Charlottesville, Virginia, which killed a woman and injured at least 19 people. The four other bills were voted down or failed without advancing. The bills are part of a backlash to large, disruptive protests over the last year against police shootings of black men, the Dakota Access pipeline and policies of the Trump administration. Some shut down major freeways, angering motorists and drawing concern from public safety officials. Lawmakers responded with new laws across the country, passing a $200 fine in Tennessee for blocking emergency vehicles, a South Dakota measure that criminalizes highway protests, and tougher trespassing laws in North Dakota and Oklahoma. The driver immunity proposals have been particularly contentious. Critics, including the American Civil Liberties Union, labeled them “hit and kill” bills that undermine free assembly and embolden extremists by suggesting they have a free pass to drive through protesters. Bill sponsors have been inundated with criticism on social media following the arrest of James A. Fields Jr. for allegedly ramming his Dodge Challenger through a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville. The attack killed 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injured others who had gathered in the streets to oppose white nationalists, who were protesting the removal of a confederate monument. Scores of critics have bluntly told the lawmakers on Twitter and Facebook that they are complicit in Heyer’s death. Bill supporters have rejected that claim and denounced the Charlottesville attack. They note that the wording of their bills would not protect drivers who deliberately target protesters, and any intentional attackers would still face criminal and civil liability. “It is intellectually dishonest and a gross mischaracterization to portray North Carolina House Bill 330 as a protection measure for the act of violence that occurred in Charlottesville this past weekend,” that bill’s sponsors, Reps. Justin Burr and Chris Millis, said in a joint statement. Burr explained the intent in April as the House voted 67-48 to pass the bill: “You shouldn’t run out in front of cars on the interstate or the highway and attempt to illegally protest. If you do, it should be at your risk, not at the risk of the liability of those individuals driving down the road.” A North Carolina state senator said Monday there are no plans to advance the measure in that chamber. In Florida, Sen. George Gainer said the intent of his now-failed bill was to protect only those motorists who unintentionally strike protesters blocking traffic. He denounced “the reprehensible actions of the evil person in Virginia.” Texas Rep. Pat Fallon wrote that he had received “outrageous hate[...]


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Pawar selects Cairo mayor as running mate in Illinois governor's raceFILE - In this Feb. 11, 2015, file photo, Cairo, Ill., Mayor Tyrone Coleman talks about his vision for the city from his office in the city building in Cairo, Ill. Democratic candidate for Illinois governor Ameya Pawar has selected Coleman as his 2018 running mate. Pawar, who is a Chicago alderman, says in a statement Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, that Coleman "embodies the struggle that every Illinois family and town is experiencing." (AP Photo/The Southern Illinoisan via AP, File)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:46:00 GMT

CHICAGO – Democratic candidate for Illinois governor Ameya Pawar has selected Cairo Mayor Tyrone Coleman as his 2018 running mate.

Pawar, who is a Chicago alderman, said in a statement Tuesday that Coleman "embodies the struggle that every Illinois family and town is experiencing."

Coleman spent 10 years in the U.S. Marine Corps. He founded Faith Incorporated, an organization that serves youth, and says he's seen the effects of disinvestment on Cairo, calling it "a microcosm of what's happening around Illinois and around this country."

Coleman is a pastor and was also a former talk and gospel radio show host. He's serving his second term as mayor.

Candidates for governor and lieutenant governor must run on the same ticket in Illinois under a state law that took effect in the 2014 election.

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2015, file photo, Cairo, Ill., Mayor Tyrone Coleman talks about his vision for the city from his office in the city building in Cairo, Ill. Democratic candidate for Illinois governor Ameya Pawar has selected Coleman as his 2018 running mate. Pawar, who is a Chicago alderman, says in a statement Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, that Coleman "embodies the struggle that every Illinois family and town is experiencing." (AP Photo/The Southern Illinoisan via AP, File)


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Business leaders quitting President Donald Trump's panelAP file photo Intel CEO Brian Krzanich is interviewed March 13 on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Fallout from President Donald Trump's reaction to violent, racial clashes in Virginia over the weekend continued in the business community. Krzanich resigned from a federal panel created years ago to advise the U.S. president.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:45:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump on Tuesday ripped into business leaders who resigned from his White House jobs panel – the latest sign that corporate America’s romance with Trump is faltering – after his equivocal response to violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia. “They’re not taking their job seriously as it pertains to this country,” the president said at an impromptu news conference at Trump Tower in New York City. After his remarks, a fifth member of his manufacturing panel resigned: AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, who said in a statement, “We cannot sit on a council for a president who tolerates bigotry and domestic terrorism.” The president denied that his original statement about the violence in Virginia on Saturday – saying “many” sides were to blame, rather than hate groups – was the cause of the departures. “Some of the folks that will leave, they’re leaving out of embarrassment because they make their products outside” the U.S., he said as he seemed to double down on his earlier comments. Trump also assailed the CEOs who left on Twitter as “grandstanders” and said he had plenty of executives available to take their place. The president added that he believes economic growth in the U.S. will heal its racial divide. But the parade of departing leaders from the informal panel seems closely linked to how the president responded to events that led to the death of a counter-protester that opposed the white supremacists. Among those who’ve left are the chief executives for Merck, Under Armour and Intel and the president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing. Alliance president Scott Paul, in a tweet, said simply, “I’m resigning from the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative because it’s the right thing for me to do.” Within minutes of the tweet on Tuesday, calls to Paul’s phone were being sent to voicemail. Walmart CEO Doug McMillon joined the chorus, saying in a note Monday to employees, “[We] too felt that he missed a critical opportunity to help bring our country together by unequivocally rejecting the appalling actions of white supremacists.” But McMillon, whose business has customers on all sides of the political spectrum, plans to stay on a separate Trump advisory panel and said that the president’s follow-up remarks on Monday that named white supremacists were a step in the right direction. Corporate leaders have been willing to work with Trump on taxes, trade and reducing regulations, but they’ve increasingly found themselves grappling with cultural and social tensions amid his lightning rod-style of leadership. The CEOs who left the council quickly faced his wrath, while those who have stayed have said it’s important to speak with the president on economic issues. Like several other corporate leaders, Alex Gorsky, chairman and CEO of Johnson & Johnson, said that intolerance and racism have no place in U.S. society but that he intended to stay on the manufacturing council. “We must engage if we hope to change the world and those who lead it,” he said in a statement. A White House official downplayed the importance of the manufacturing council and a separate policy and strategy forum featuring corp[...]


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Former Alabama Chief Justice vs. Sen. Luther Strange in GOP runoff in Alabama Senate raceFormer Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore smiles after he votes at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Gallant, Ala. Alabama's Republicans and Democrats were casting ballots Tuesday to select party nominees in the closely watched race for the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The GOP race is testing the reach of both Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)Senator Luther Strange and his wife, Melissa, walk back to their car after voting, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Homewood, Ala. Alabama voters are casting ballots Tuesday to select party nominees in the closely watched Senate race for the seat that belonged to Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:45:00 GMT

MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was twice removed from his judicial duties, forced a primary runoff Tuesday against Trump-backed incumbent Sen. Luther Strange in a race likely to be closely watched for clues about Republicans' prospects in 2018 midterm elections. Despite being buoyed by millions of dollars in advertising by a super political action committee tied to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Strange was unable to defeat the firebrand jurist who took losing stands for the public display of the Ten Commandments and against gay marriage. Moore told cheering supporters that they had sent a great message to Washington, D.C., in a race where Moore presented himself as the better carrier of Trump's outsider appeal. "This is a great victory. The attempt by the silk stocking Washington elitist to control the vote of the people of Alabama has failed," Moore said at his victory party in downtown Montgomery, with a copy of the Ten Commandments among the decorations. Strange's struggles have already raised concerns among sitting GOP members of Congress, even if he ultimately survives. "There are a probably a number of incumbents on both sides of the aisle who should take notice of another demonstration that voters still want change," said Greg Strimple, a Republican pollster for a political action committee aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan. "The takeaway is that Washington is very unpopular," Strimple said, and that overrides even President Donald Trump's endorsement, because he cannot simply "transfer his brand" to candidates, like the lobbyist-turned-politician Strange, who fail to establish their own outsider credentials. Trump's approval rating has hit a new low of 34 percent, according to Gallup, but strong currents of support still flow through the Republican electorate in Alabama, where the GOP candidates went all-out to attract Trump voters and throw shade on the Washington, D.C. "swamp." Strange had emphasized his Trump endorsement – delivered first via Twitter and then in recorded phone calls to voters – in the closing days of the race but had acknowledged all along that a runoff was likely because of the crowded GOP field in a low-turnout special election. "He knows that I'm the person in the race who is going to help him make this country great again," Strange said of Trump's support. "It all boils down to who's best suited to stand with the people of this country – with our president – to make America great again," Strange said. The senator, a former college basketball player sometimes called "Big Luther" because of his 6-foot-9 frame, said he liked his chances in a "one-on-one" matchup with Moore. The two will meet in a Sept. 26 runoff. The winner will face Democratic nominee Doug Jones in a December election. Moore harnessed his strong support among evangelical voters to lead the first round of primary voting despite a shoestring budget. His critics have sometimes derided him as the "Ayatollah of Alabama," accusing him of intertwining his personal religious beliefs and judicial responsibilities. Alabama's judicial discipline panel removed Moore as chief justice in 2003 for disobeying a federal judge's order to remove a boulder-sized Ten Commandments monument fr[...]


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Longmeadow Parkway construction to close part of White Chapel Road intersectionH. Rick Bamman file photo – hbamman@shawmedia.com Construction on Longmeadow Parkway in Algonquin will close part of the White Chapel Road intersection for two to three weeks. Plans for the controversial project call for a four-lane, 5.6-mile east-west corridor connecting Randall Road with Route 62, although it starts west of Randall Road at the intersection of Huntley and Boyer roads.H. Rick Bamman file photo - hbamman@shawmedia.com Longmeadow Parkway looks northeast from Randall Road on June 11 in Algonquin.H. Rick Bamman file photo – hbamman@shawmedia.com Longmeadow Parkway looks east June 11 from Randall Road in Algonquin.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:41:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – The north part of White Chapel Road at Longmeadow Parkway will be closed for two to three weeks starting Friday to allow for construction crews to place new pavement.

Drivers should find alternative routes during the construction and avoid the intersection when possible, according to a news release from the Kane County Division of Transportation.

Access will be allowed to the south part of the intersection.

The Longmeadow Parkway project is a proposed four-lane, 5.6-mile toll road and a four-lane Fox River bridge crossing that runs from Huntley Road to Route 62. The project is meant to relieve traffic congestion and to encourage economic development in portions of Algonquin, Carpentersville and Barrington Hills, according to the release.

The section of the controversial $115 million road project being worked on now stretches from Randall Road to Karen Drive and is expected to cost about $13 million.

Algonquin trustees approved extending the hours Aug. 1 for contractors to work on Longmeadow Parkway for two weeks, which officials said would help with completing the project faster and lessening the effect on residents.

Additional information can be found on the Longmeadow Parkway page of the Kane County Division of Transportation website.

H. Rick Bamman file photo – hbamman@shawmedia.com Construction on Longmeadow Parkway in Algonquin will close part of the White Chapel Road intersection for two to three weeks. Plans for the controversial project call for a four-lane, 5.6-mile east-west corridor connecting Randall Road with Route 62, although it starts west of Randall Road at the intersection of Huntley and Boyer roads.H. Rick Bamman file photo - hbamman@shawmedia.com Longmeadow Parkway looks northeast from Randall Road on June 11 in Algonquin.H. Rick Bamman file photo – hbamman@shawmedia.com Longmeadow Parkway looks east June 11 from Randall Road in Algonquin.


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McHenry man on McHenry County's top 10 fugitive list turns himself inCortez V. Simpson, 25, was charged in February after authorities said he conspired and sold more than 1 gram but less than 15 grams of cocaine with three co-defendants.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:36:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – One of McHenry County’s top 10 fugitives, who is facing felony drug charges, turned himself in Monday, authorities said.

Cortez V. Simpson, 25, of McHenry was charged in February after authorities said he conspired and sold more than 1 gram but less than 15 grams of cocaine with three co-defendants.

He faces charges of criminal drug conspiracy, delivery of a controlled substance within a public housing complex, delivery of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance, according to court records. He could be sentenced up 30 years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge.

One of Simpson’s co-defendants, Kenneth L. Price, 28, of Crystal Lake, also has a warrant out for his arrest. Co-defendant Tonya Krich, 33, of Woodstock, who faces similar charges, will appear in court Monday, and Michelle A. Lopez, 26, of Crystal Lake will appear in court Sept. 1, according to court records.

McHenry County Sheriff’s Lt. James Wagner said factors considered when deciding who makes the top 10 list include:

• The defendant must have an outstanding warrant for a felony crime.

• The crime usually involves some sort of violence, drugs, guns or a sex offense.

• The apprehension unit or other law enforcement agencies tried to serve a warrant and were unsuccessful.

• The individual has a McHenry County connection.

• He or she might be a suspect in an ongoing investigation.

• The individual usually is a repeat offender or has multiple warrants out for his or her arrest.

• Authorities believe the public can help them find that person.

This is the third McHenry County fugitive apprehended in the past two months. Justin E. Dean, 25, of Wonder Lake was arrested July 27 after being wanted on a charge of possession of a controlled substance after police said he had less than 15 grams of oxycodone.

James Buttacavoli Jr., 43, turned himself in Thursday after being wanted on 2016 charges after authorities said he possessed more than 2,000 grams of marijuana and more than 50 marijuana plants.

Bryan J. Stoltenberg, 31, recently was added to the top 10 list. He is wanted on charges of aggravated possession of a stolen firearm and possession of marijuana. Stoltenberg’s last known address is 824 Shawnee Trail, Lake in the Hills.

Simpson remained in McHenry County Jail custody as of Tuesday on $250,000 bond, according to jail records.

He is expected to appear in court Thursday.

Cortez V. Simpson, 25, was charged in February after authorities said he conspired and sold more than 1 gram but less than 15 grams of cocaine with three co-defendants.


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President Donald Trump comments please, anger, then please hate group leadersAP photo Former Louisiana state Rep. David Duke arrives to give remarks after a white nationalist protest was declared an unlawful assembly Saturday in Charlottesville, Va. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:31:00 GMT

White nationalists have been parsing President Donald Trump’s words since a deadly attack at a Virginia rally over the weekend. A day after the president called them “criminals and thugs,” some seemed quite pleased Tuesday when Trump angrily pivoted back to his initial response and spread out the blame. Members of the Ku Klux Klan, white supremacists and neo-Nazis who supported Trump’s campaign and have felt emboldened by his presidency praised Trump’s initial reaction on Saturday, which blamed “many sides” for the violence. They were disheartened two days later, when Trump, facing immense bipartisan pressure, belatedly criticized their hate groups by name and called them “repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.” But by Tuesday evening, Trump flipped again. Taking questions that had to be shouted in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Trump praised his initial statement that had caused so much criticism, and angrily laid blame on liberal groups advocating for the removal of Confederate statues. Before this latest news conference, it had become clear that the man who rammed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman and injuring dozens of people, had idolized Adolf Hitler long before he joined the white nationalist rally. But when asked repeatedly whether this was an act of terror, Trump wouldn’t clearly condemn it as such, saying: “You can call it terrorism. You can call it murder. You can call it whatever you want.” Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke seemed thrilled, tweeting a link to Trump’s latest comments Tuesday and saying: “Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,” referring to the Black Lives Matter movement and an anti-fascist group. A day earlier, Duke had posted a video mildly criticizing Trump’s prepared statement, saying “President Trump, please, for God’s sakes, don’t feel like you’ve got to say these things. It’s not going to do you any good.” Also on Monday, white nationalist Richard Spencer – who popularized the term “alt-right” to describe the fringe movement mixing white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-Semitism and anti-immigration populism – told reporters that Trump’s prepared statement “sounds like we might want to all bring out an acoustic guitar and sing ‘Kum ba yah.’ It’s just vapid nonsense.” Occidental Dissent, a white nationalist website, posted a statement Monday saying whites had been “deserted by their president.” “He has sided with a group of people who attack us on sight and attempt to kill us and for that the Alt-Right can no longer support him. What Donald Trump has done today is an unforgivable betrayal of his supporters,” the message said. Andrew Anglin, the publisher of The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website, had praised Trump’s initial reaction to the violence Saturday as “no condemnation at all ... really really good. God bless him.” Anglin dismissed Trump’s Monday statement as “childish nonsense.” In an email to The Associated Press before Trump’s latest [...]


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Korean leaders, U.S. open door to diplomacy in nuclear crisisThis image made from video of an Aug. 14, 2017, still image broadcast in a news bulletin on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, by North Korea's KRT shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un receiving a briefing in Pyongyang. North Korea said leader Kim Jong Un was briefed on his military's plans to launch missiles in waters near Guam days after the Korean People's Army announced its preparing to create "enveloping fire" near the U.S. military hub in the Pacific. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this photo. (KRT via AP Video)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:31:00 GMT

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea's military on Tuesday presented leader Kim Jong Un with plans to launch missiles into waters near Guam and "wring the windpipes of the Yankees," even as both Koreas and the U.S. signaled their willingness to avert a deepening crisis, with each suggesting a path toward negotiations. The tentative interest in diplomacy follows unusually combative threats between President Donald Trump and North Korea amid worries Pyongyang is nearing its long-sought goal of being able to send a nuclear missile to the U.S. mainland. Next week's start of U.S.-South Korean military exercises that enrage the North each year could make diplomacy even more difficult. During an inspection of the North Korean army's Strategic Forces, which handles the missile program, Kim praised the military for drawing up a "close and careful plan" and said he would watch the "foolish and stupid conduct of the Yankees" a little more before deciding whether to order the missile test, the state-run Korean Central News Agency said. Kim appeared in photos sitting at a table with a large map marked by a straight line between what appeared to be northeastern North Korea and Guam, and passing over Japan – apparently showing the missiles' flight route. The missile plans were previously announced. Kim said North Korea would conduct the launches if the "Yankees persist in their extremely dangerous reckless actions on the Korean Peninsula and its vicinity," warning the United States to "think reasonably and judge properly" to avoid shaming itself, the news agency said. The Trump administration had no immediate comments on Kim's declaration. "We continue to be interested in trying to find a way to get to dialogue, but that's up to him," U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters in Washington on Tuesday. Lobbing missiles toward Guam, a major U.S. military hub in the Pacific, would be deeply provocative from the U.S. perspective. A miscalculation on either side could lead to military confrontation. On Monday, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said Washington would take out any such missile seen to be heading for American soil, warning that such a North Korean attack could mean war. Kim's conditional tone, however, hinted the friction could ease if the U.S. offered a gesture that Pyongyang sees as a step back from "extremely dangerous reckless actions." That could refer to the U.S.-South Korean military drills set to begin Aug. 21, which the North claims are rehearsals for invasion. It also could mean the B-1B bombers that the U.S. occasionally flies over the Korean Peninsula as a show of force. South Korean President Moon Jae-in, meanwhile, a liberal who favors diplomacy, urged North Korea to stop provocations and to commit to talks over its nuclear weapons program. Moon, in a televised speech Tuesday on the anniversary of World War II's end and the Korean Peninsula's liberation from Japanese colonial rule, said Seoul and Washington agree that the nuclear standoff should "absolutely be solved peacefully." He said no U.S. military action on the Korean Peninsula could be taken without Seoul's consent. Moon said the North could spur talks by stoppin[...]


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Former Miss America running for Illinois attorney generalIn this March 18, 2014, file photo, Erika Harold, Republican primary candidate for the 13th Congressional District of Illinois, talks to supporters in Champaign, Ill. Harold, a lawyer who is a former Miss America, on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, announced plans for a Republican bid to challenge four-term Democratic Attorney General Lisa Madigan in 2018. (John Dixon/The News-Gazette via AP)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:30:00 GMT

URBANA – A lawyer and former Miss America is running for Illinois attorney general.

Republican Erika Harold of Urbana announced on Tuesday a challenge to four-term Democratic Attorney General Lisa Madigan in 2018.

Harold is an attorney with the Meyer Capel law firm. The 37-year-old says in a statement that career politicians have "made it a nightmare for too many families in our state" and that Illinois needs a government that "works for them, not the powerful."

The 51-year-old Madigan has a reputation as a sound administrator and popular vote-getter. She won her first term by just 115,000 votes, but has since won with at least 60 percent of the vote.

Harold serves on two Illinois Supreme Court committees. She was the 2003 Miss America. In 2014, she lost a Republican primary for a U.S. House seat.

In this March 18, 2014, file photo, Erika Harold, Republican primary candidate for the 13th Congressional District of Illinois, talks to supporters in Champaign, Ill. Harold, a lawyer who is a former Miss America, on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, announced plans for a Republican bid to challenge four-term Democratic Attorney General Lisa Madigan in 2018. (John Dixon/The News-Gazette via AP)


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Illinois House takes up school funding, but not overrideAP file photo State Senate Republic Leader Bill Brady listens as Gov. Bruce Rauner discusses school funding in the state during a news conference July 24 in Chicago. A landmark Illinois school-funding revamp, which Rauner rejected in an amendatory veto this month, lands in the Illinois House on Wednesday.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:30:00 GMT

SPRINGFIELD – While Illinois schoolchildren romp in the neighborhood grasping at summer vacation’s final hours, political leaders in Springfield are locked in a showdown over paying for their education. A landmark school-funding revamp that Gov. Bruce Rauner rejected with an amendatory veto this month lands in the Illinois House on Wednesday. There, Democrats who control the chamber will put the Republican governor’s changes into a new piece of legislation and call it for a vote – sending it to almost certain defeat. The action would allow Democrats to showcase a lack of support for Rauner’s expansive edits and give them time to gather votes necessary to follow the Senate’s lead in overriding the veto, making the original plan law over the governor’s opposition. Here’s a look at how the matter reached this point: Fair funding The Democratic-controlled Legislature this year revamped the long-derided formula Illinois uses to pay for its public schools. The former model aimed state money at schools with the least local property wealth, but opponents said it was outdated and underfunded. The new “evidence-based” model generally aims to funnel new school funding to the neediest districts first, based on statistical factors such as local property wealth and the number of students in poverty or with limited English proficiency. A key to the new plan was ensuring that no district would receive less money than it did last school year. Dubbed the “hold harmless” provision, the change would allow Chicago Public Schools to keep a $250 million-a-year grant that legislators put into law two decades ago to cover extra-educational expenses, such as bus transportation and special education. Another provision in the legislation would require the state to pick up the employer’s portion of Chicago teacher pensions, like it does for every other school district. Chicago Public Schools is the nation’s third-largest school district. No ‘bailout’ Rauner calls the legislation, known as Senate Bill 1, a Chicago schools “bailout.” He insists the annual grant was intended to make up for Chicago schools paying their own pension portion. Rauner used his amendatory veto power, available to only seven governors in the U.S., to rewrite the legislation. He stripped more than $450 million in funding for Chicago schools and redistributed it to other districts. He touted the changes as providing millions of dollars more for schools outside Chicago, which he claimed this week has been a patronage-hiring haven for decades. His rewrite ventured far into other areas as well. Rauner’s action would limit the district-based “hold harmless” guarantee to three years, applying it thereafter to individual students – meaning the money would follow students if they leave one school district for another. The governor also factored in the calculations of an individual school district’s potential wealth. One example involves school districts in counties that imposed property tax caps, which limit the amount of tax dollars that can be collect[...]


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Former Crystal Lake-based School District 155 superintendent likely faces no penalties for breaking contractKayla Wolf for Shaw Media Regional Superintendent of Schools Leslie Schermerhorn congratulates Steve Olson on being appointed interim superintendent after a School District 155 Board meeting Aug. 9 at the Center for Education in Crystal Lake. The selection came after former District 155 Superintendent Johnnie Thomas resigned Aug. 8.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:27:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Former Crystal Lake-based School District 155 Superintendent Johnnie Thomas will be paid for his unused vacation days and likely faces no repercussions after leaving his post for another job only a week before classes began at the district’s four high schools. The District 155 board discussed contract details in executive session Tuesday night for its two recently appointed interim superintendents after Thomas’ sudden resignation Aug. 8, for which details were not available. Tony Loizzi, the district board’s attorney, could not confirm whether Thomas’ departure warranted penalties or included a liquidated damages clause because he had not yet fully examined the contract, but Loizzi said such a clause was unlikely. He said that even when contracts include clauses that punish administrators for failing to perform under a contract, they often do not prevent them from leaving anyway. “In my opinion, just generally speaking, I would say that does not happen very often, but it does [happen],” Loizzi said. “In our experience as attorneys, though, even when those clauses are in there, it does not prevent this from happening because what happens is the other school district that wants the individuals to come will pay the liquidated damages.” However, District 155 board President Adam Guss said penalties were not negotiated into Thomas’ contract extension when he and the district agreed to terms more than a year ago in which Thomas would have been kept on as superintendent through the 2019-20 school year. “It just wasn’t there,” Guss said. “I don’t know how common that is with long-term contracts; some do and some don’t. Is it on the table now? All of it is on the table. The fact that this has happened and we’re all dealing with this, I think it’s something the board will definitely consider for our next multiyear contract.” The board approved adding two years onto Thomas’ contract with a 4-3 vote in May 2016 along with a number of contract changes, including eliminating the contract’s performance bonus package, 2 percent annual increases starting in 2016-17 and upping his reimbursable vacation days from five to 12.5. Director of communications Shannon Podzimek said Thomas’ contract requires that the district pay him for his unused vacation days, but the number of days left unused and how much it will cost the district were not available Tuesday night. The district also was unable to provide Thomas’ salary details before his resignation, but the district’s salary and benefits report showed that Thomas made a base salary of more than $187,000 during the 2016-17 school year. Podzimek said there was no severance or buyout included in his contract. Thomas resigned abruptly on Aug. 8 to accept the superintendent position in Rich Township School District 227 in Matteson, forcing the District 155 board to call an emergency meeting the next night to determine who would fill the leadership vacancy less than a week before classes began. The board accepted Thomas’ resignation and promoted t[...]


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Judge gives Crystal Lake man accused in double homicide a chance to post $5 million bondCrystal Lake police responded Aug. 3 to 185 Marian Parkway after a report of a woman armed with a knife. Before they arrived, they also learned that a man with a handgun, later identified as Yarber, also was at the house, authorities have said. Once they arrived, police found 31-year-old Allania Yarber and her 15-year-old sister dying of multiple gunshot wounds inside the home, authorities have said. Officers tried to save their lives, but both died at the scene. The 15-year-old girl has not been named because of her age and a "request by family," according to the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Assistant State's Attorney Robert Zalud said in his motion that Yarber shot the two multiple times with a firearm while other children were present in the home, according to court documents.One of the man’s sons was upstairs watching Netflix with a neighbor when the shooting occurred. Yarber could spend the rest of his natural life in prison if he is convicted of killing both women. Charges and/or punishments could be enhanced once he is indicted, Zalud said, based on the fact that he is accused of using a gun during the crime. Yarber and his wife moved to their Crystal Lake home in October 2016. Zalud said Yarber has "significant ties" to both Oregon and California and because of his limited time in Illinois, Yarber should be considered a flight risk.Cowlin denied the state's request to increase or revoke bond, but he agreed that additional conditions must be met if Yarber posts bond, including that he would need to be on electronic monitoring; he would have to live in McHenry County and must not leave the country; he could not have contact with family members of the victims or any witnesses; and he would have to surrender his passport. Yarber next appears in court Sept. 1.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:22:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A McHenry County judge denied a request from prosecutors to increase or revoke a $5 million bond set for a Crystal Lake man charged with first-degree murder in connection with the shooting death of his wife and her sister.

Prosecutors asked Judge James Cowlin on Monday to increase Ryan C. Yarber's bond or revoke it, based on the fact that he has limited ties to McHenry County and is an "extreme risk of safety to others."

Crystal Lake police responded Aug. 3 to 185 Marian Parkway after a report of a woman armed with a knife. Before they arrived, they also learned that a man with a handgun, later identified as Yarber, also was at the house, authorities have said. Once they arrived, police found 31-year-old Allania Yarber and her 15-year-old sister dying of multiple gunshot wounds inside the home, authorities have said. Officers tried to save their lives, but both died at the scene. The 15-year-old girl has not been named because of her age and a "request by family," according to the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Assistant State's Attorney Robert Zalud said in his motion that Yarber shot the two multiple times with a firearm while other children were present in the home, according to court documents.One of the man’s sons was upstairs watching Netflix with a neighbor when the shooting occurred. Yarber could spend the rest of his natural life in prison if he is convicted of killing both women. Charges and/or punishments could be enhanced once he is indicted, Zalud said, based on the fact that he is accused of using a gun during the crime. Yarber and his wife moved to their Crystal Lake home in October 2016. Zalud said Yarber has "significant ties" to both Oregon and California and because of his limited time in Illinois, Yarber should be considered a flight risk.Cowlin denied the state's request to increase or revoke bond, but he agreed that additional conditions must be met if Yarber posts bond, including that he would need to be on electronic monitoring; he would have to live in McHenry County and must not leave the country; he could not have contact with family members of the victims or any witnesses; and he would have to surrender his passport. Yarber next appears in court Sept. 1.


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Crystal Lake police talk heroin, opioid trends at 'Coffee with the Chief' eventH. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams discusses heroin and Opiate trends during a presentation at the Coffee with the Chief program in Crystal Lake.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:21:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – With opioid use and death on the rise, communication and collaboration are key to get the crisis under control, drug enforcement officials said at a community forum Tuesday.

The Crystal Lake Police Department hosted its monthly “Coffee with the Chief” event Tuesday with a focus on the opioid epidemic that is sweeping both the nation and McHenry County. Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams spoke at the meeting, which aimed to educate the public on the crisis.

“There is no typical addict,” Williams said. “Many times it will start out if someone sustains a back injury. … They get a prescription and get addicted to the opioid.”

At a certain point, the patient can’t get the prescription anymore, and so they turn to street drugs, Williams said.

The danger in this is that prescription medication is regulated, whereas with heroin, you don’t know what you’re getting, he said.

Six percent of patients prescribed a one-day supply of an opioid still were taking the drug a year later, according to a 2017 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number doubled to 12 percent if the patient was prescribed a six-day supply, and quadrupled if the patient was prescribed a 12-day supply, according to the study.

In McHenry County, 56 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, up from 43 drug overdose deaths in 2015. In 2014, 32 people died of drug overdose deaths, and Crystal Lake police officers began carrying Narcan, the brand name for naloxone, which counteracts the effects of heroin and other opioid drugs. Since the program’s inception, officers have saved 25 people’s lives, deputy chief Tom Kotlowski said.

Williams said that law enforcement couldn’t “arrest its way out” of the crisis. He said working with doctors, parents, schools and treatment centers is more effective.

“It’s about education,” he said. “The enforcement side, we already have that.”

He said that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with doctors prescribing opioids to patients who need them, but the education piece needs to be in place.

“If you have pain, opioids are a good option, but it’s not a long-term option.” he said.

H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams discusses heroin and Opiate trends during a presentation at the Coffee with the Chief program in Crystal Lake.


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Judge gives Crystal Lake man accused in double homicide chance to post $5 million bondRyan C. Yarber, 31, of Crystal Lake has been charged with four counts of first-degree murder in connection with the deaths of 31-year-old Allania Yarber and her 15-year-old sister.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 22:47:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A McHenry County judge denied a request from prosecutors to increase or revoke a $5 million bond set for a Crystal Lake man charged with first-degree murder in connection with the shooting death of his wife and her sister.

Prosecutors asked Judge James Cowlin on Monday to increase Ryan C. Yarber's bond or revoke it, based on the fact that he has limited ties to McHenry County and is an "extreme risk of safety to others."

Crystal Lake police responded Aug. 3 to 185 Marian Parkway after a report of a woman armed with a knife. Before they arrived, they also learned that a man with a handgun, later identified as Yarber, also was at the house, authorities have said.

Once they arrived, police found 31-year-old Allania Yarber and her 15-year-old sister dying of multiple gunshot wounds inside the home, authorities have said. Officers tried to save their lives, but both died at the scene. The 15-year-old girl has not been named because of her age and a "request by family," according to the McHenry County Coroner's Office.

Assistant State's Attorney Robert Zalud said in his motion that Yarber shot the two multiple times with a firearm while other children were present in the home, according to court documents.

One of the man’s sons was upstairs watching Netflix with a neighbor when the shooting occurred.

Yarber could spend the rest of his natural life in prison if he is convicted of killing both women. Charges and/or punishments could be enhanced once he is indicted, Zalud said, based on the fact that he is accused of using a gun during the crime.

Yarber and his wife moved to their Crystal Lake home in October 2016. Zalud said Yarber has "significant ties" to both Oregon and California and because of his limited time in Illinois, Yarber should be considered a flight risk.

Cowlin denied the state's request to increase or revoke bond, but he agreed that additional conditions must be met if Yarber posts bond, including that he would need to be on electronic monitoring; he would have to live in McHenry County and must not leave the country; he could not have contact with family members of the victims or any witnesses; and he would have to surrender his passport.

Yarber next appears in court Sept. 1.

Ryan C. Yarber, 31, of Crystal Lake has been charged with four counts of first-degree murder in connection with the deaths of 31-year-old Allania Yarber and her 15-year-old sister.


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President Trump again blames Charlottesville violence on 'both sides'President Donald Trump points to members of the media as he answers questions in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)President Donald Trump speaks about the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:38:00 GMT

NEW YORK – A combative President Donald Trump insisted Tuesday "there is blame on both sides" for the deadly violence last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, appearing to once again equate the actions of white supremacist groups and those protesting them. The president's comments effectively wiped away the more conventional statement he delivered at the White House one day earlier when he branded members of the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who take part in violence as "criminals and thugs." Trump's advisers had hoped those remarks might quell a crush of criticism from both Republicans and Democrats. The president's retorts Tuesday suggested he had been a reluctant participant in that cleanup effort. During an impromptu press conference in the lobby of his Manhattan skyscraper, he praised his original response to Charlottesville and angrily blamed liberal groups in addition to white supremacist for the violence. Some of those protesting the rally to save a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee were "also very violent," he said. "There are two sides to a story," he said. He added that some facts about the violence still aren't known. His remarks were welcomed by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who tweeted: "Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth." Democrats were aghast at Trump's comments. Sen. Brian Schatz, a Hawaii Democrat, said on Twitter that he no longer views Trump as his president. "As a Jew, as an American, as a human, words cannot express my disgust and disappointment," Schatz said. "This is not my president." As Trump talked, his aides on the sidelines of the lobby stood in silence. Chief of staff John Kelly crossed his arms and stared down at his shoes, barely glancing at the president. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders looked around the room trying to make eye contact with other senior aides. One young staffer stood with her mouth agape. When asked to explain his Saturday comments about Charlottesville, Trump looked down at his notes and again read a section of his initial statement that denounced bigotry but did not single out white supremacists. He then tucked the paper back into his jacket pocket. Violence broke out Saturday in Charlottesville, a picturesque college town, after a loosely connected mix of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right extremists assembled for the largest gathering of its kind in a decade. Heather Heyer, 32, was killed when a man plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters. Trump, who has quickly deemed other deadly incidents in the U.S. and around the world acts of terrorism, waffled when asked whether the car death was a terrorist attack. "There is a question. Is it murder? Is it terrorism?" Trump said. "And then you get into legal semantics. The driver of the car is a murderer and what he did was a horrible, horrible, inexcusable thing." Trump said he had yet to call Heyer's mother, said that he would soon [...]


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Watch these adorable Lake in the Hills kids kick off a Kane County Cougars gameThese preschoolers were such a hit, they were already asked back for next year. Photo taken from video provided by The Goddard School.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:45:00 GMT

Students from The Goddard School in Lake in the Hills sang the national anthem before a Kane County Cougars game at the end of July. Don't worry, they were asked to sing next year, too.

These preschoolers were such a hit, they were already asked back for next year. Photo taken from video provided by The Goddard School.


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What You Need to Know About the New SAT Test

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 16:07:16 GMT

    There have been some significant changes to the SAT test that high school students and their parents need to be aware of. As of 2016, the test has a different format, different scoring, and even measures different skills. How will these changes affect your child’s preparation and testing experience? Should students take the new SAT test or plan to take the ACT instead? Join us for a look at the new test’s math section and a comparison between the new SAT and the ACT tests. The new SAT The biggest change relates to what the SAT tests for. Originally, the SAT was designed as a sort of aptitude test, grading students more on their ability to reason than on skills they learned in class. Filled with logic problems and analogies, it could seem more like an IQ test than a final exam. Now, the SAT is designed to only measure a student’s understanding of what they learned in high school. What does this mean for the math section? Math is now split between two sections, one where students are allowed to use calculators and one where they are not. All the questions for the no-calculator section are written with that in mind, so your kid doesn’t need to panic. Still, if it has been years since your child has done math without a computer, encourage them to do simpler calculations in their head, both in math class and during homework or other math enrichment. As for content, the test makers ground their questions in both high school curriculums and the real world so that students will be more familiar with the content. Arcane logic problems have been replaced with geometry questions modeled off the core curriculum and algebra problems about Spotify royalties. This is good news: Now, more than ever, just doing schoolwork will prepare students for the test. Finally, the SAT has gotten rid of the guessing penalty for all sections (math included) and this is huge. Past versions of the test would penalize wrong answers more harshly than blank ones, but that is no longer the case. Students can now tackle daunting problems without fear, and should fill in every answer on their test, even if they have to guess for the last few. ACT vs. the new SAT? Play to your strengths There was a time when students’ test choices were dictated by which test the schools they were applying to would accept. Now, all four-year institutions in the country accept both ACT and SAT scores for their admissions process. This means that your child can (and should!) focus on the test that best fits their strengths. Here are a few other considerations for your student to keep in mind. ●How well do I handle time limits? The ACT gives you 60 minutes to answer 60 math questions. The SAT gives you 70 minutes to answer 58 questions. The ACT in general is much more limited with its time-per-question than the SAT, and students who thrive under the pressure of a ticking clock will have an advantage over their pe[...]


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Simone Askew is first black woman to lead West Point cadetsCadet Simone Askew, of Fairfax, Va., who has been selected first captain of the U.S. Military Academy Corps of Cadets for the upcoming academic year, in West Point, NY, walks to a press conference Monday, Aug. 14, 2017. This marks the first time in history that an African-American woman will take the top position in West Point's cadet chain of command.. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:14:00 GMT

WEST POINT, N.Y. – Simone Askew marched into history Monday as the first black woman to lead the Long Gray Line at the U.S. Military Academy. After an early-morning 12-mile march back to the gray stone academic complex with 1,200 new cadets she led through the rigors of basic training at “Beast Barracks,” the 20-year-old international history major from Fairfax, Virginia, assumed duties as first captain of the 4,400-member Corps of Cadets. That’s the highest position in the cadet chain of command at West Point. “It’s humbling, but also exciting as I step into this new opportunity to lead the corps to greatness with my teammates with me,” a beaming Askew, still in camouflage fatigues from her march, told reporters. As first captain, Askew is responsible for the overall performance of the Corps of Cadets. Her duties also include implementing a class agenda and acting as a liaison between the cadets and the administration. “Simone truly exemplifies our values of Duty, Honor, Country,” said Brig. Gen. Steven W. Gilland, commandant of cadets. “I can’t believe this has happened in my lifetime,” said Pat Locke, one of two African-American women in the first class of women to graduate from West Point in 1980. “When I entered the Academy in 1976, the men did not want us there. Now 40 years later, everybody recognizes the talent and skills women bring to the game.” Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander of U.S. Forces Korea, was West Point’s first African-American first captain in 1979. The first female in that role, in 1989, was Col. Kristin Baker, now commander of the Joint Intelligence Operations Center Europe, Analytic Center. Women make up about 20 percent of cadets, who are usually commissioned as second lieutenants in the Army upon graduation. The academy created a diversity office in 2014 with the goal of recruiting more women and African-Americans and increasing diversity among department heads and other leaders. Pam Askew, of Fairfax, said her daughter is a natural born leader with incredible drive. “That leadership is something I’ve seen throughout her life – wanting to be first, wanting to be the best, wanting to win, in sports, in academics, in every aspect of her life,” Askew said. “And to serve others, as well.” Askew’s appointment comes a year after a photo of 16 graduating black female cadets raising their fists drew criticism from online commentators who accused them of supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. Supporters said they were making a gesture of solidarity and accomplishment as graduation drew near. West Point investigated and determined they hadn’t violated any Army rules. “What that photo said to me was how few black women are graduating,” Locke said. “We average less than 20 African-American women graduating each year out of a class of 1,000. And yet, out of that 20 we got a first captain. Isn’t that [...]


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British cybersecurity expert pleads not guilty to U.S. chargesFILE - This Monday, May 15, 2017, file photo shows British IT expert Marcus Hutchins, branded a hero for slowing down the WannaCry global cyberattack, during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. Prosecutors have charged Hutchins and an unnamed co-defendant with conspiring to commit computer fraud in the state and elsewhere. Hutchins could enter a plea during a hearing Monday, Aug. 14, in Wisconsin federal court. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:14:00 GMT

MILWAUKEE – A British cybersecurity researcher credited with helping curb a recent worldwide ransomware attack pleaded not guilty Monday to federal charges accusing him of creating malicious software to steal banking information three years ago. Marcus Hutchins entered his plea in Wisconsin federal court, where prosecutors charged him and an unnamed co-defendant with conspiring to commit computer fraud in the state and elsewhere. Authorities arrested the 23-year-old man Aug. 2 at McCar-ran International Airport in Las Vegas, where he was going to board a flight to his home in Ilfracombe, England. He had been in Las Vegas for a cybersecurity convention. Hutchins’ attorney, Marcia Hofmann, said after Monday’s brief hearing that Hutchins will fight the charges and that “when the evidence comes to light, we are confident he will be fully vindicated.” “Marcus Hutchins is a brilliant young man and a hero,” Hofmann said. Hutchins left afterward in a white SUV with tinted windows and did not talk to reporters. During the hearing, he only spoke to say “I do,” when Magistrate Judge William E. Duffin asked him whether he understood his rights. Hutchins is free on $30,000 bail, but with strict conditions. His bond has been modified so that he can stay in Los Angeles near his attorney and travel anywhere in the U.S., but he cannot leave the country. He was also granted access to use a computer for work, a change from an earlier judge’s order barring him from using any device with access to the internet. Hutchins has been working for a network security company, according to prosecutors, who did not oppose allowing him access to a computer for work. Hutchins is required to wear a GPS monitor, but Duffin said the court will consider removing that requirement once Hutchins has found a home in Los Angeles and is complying with the terms of his bond. The next hearing in the case was set for Oct. 17, with an Oct. 23 trial date, though the latter was expected to change due to the case’s complexity. The legal troubles Hutchins faces are a dramatic turnaround from the status of cybercrime-fighting hero he enjoyed four months ago when he found a “kill switch” to slow the outbreak of the WannaCry virus. It crippled computers worldwide, encrypting files and making them inaccessible unless people paid a ransom ranging from $300 to $600. Prosecutors allege that before Hutchins won acclaim, he created and distributed a malicious software called Kronos to steal banking passwords from unsuspecting computer users. In addition to computer fraud, the indictment lists five other charges, including attempting to intercept electronic communications and trying to access a computer without authorization. The indictment says the crimes happened between July 2014 and July 2015, but the court document doesn’t offer any details about the number of victims. Prosecutors have not said why [...]


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Questions about lawyers' fees put El Chapo defense in limboFILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017, file photo provided U.S. law enforcement, authorities escort Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, center, from a plane to a waiting caravan of SUVs at Long Island MacArthur Airport, in Ronkonkoma, N.Y. Guzman wants new lawyers in his U.S. drug trafficking case. Guzman is scheduled to appear in federal court in Brooklyn on Monday, Aug. 14. He's seeking to have his public defenders replaced by private lawyers, but questions remain about how they will get paid. (U.S. law enforcement via AP, File)

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:14:00 GMT

NEW YORK – Private lawyers seeking to represent Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in his U.S. drug-trafficking case failed to get assurances Monday that they’ll get paid, leaving the Mexican drug lord’s defense in limbo. During a hearing in federal court in Brooklyn, U.S. District Judge Brian Cogan told the lawyers that if they took the case, there was no guarantee that prosecutors wouldn’t later seize their fees if they could show that the money came from his estimated $14 billion in drug profits. “I’m not going to pressure the government to create a carve-out for counsel fees,” Cogan said. Guzman smiled and waved at family members as he was led into the courtroom, but he didn’t speak during the brief appearance. Afterward, the lawyers told reporters that they still hope to find a way to represent Guzman. They said they were waiting for him to consult with his sister on Thursday – the first jail visit he’s had by family member since he was brought to the U.S. from Mexico in January. “We are looking forward, desperately, to come into this case and fight for Joaquin Guzman. ... The guy has a constitutional right to the best counsel he can get,” said one of the lawyers, Jeffrey Lichtman. Prosecutors have argued that taxpayers shouldn’t have to pay for his defense. But they also said in a letter to the court last week that the government will not “grant a blanket prospective assurance” that it won’t go after money spent on a private defense. Michelle Gelernt, a public defender currently representing Guzman, called that position “hypocritical.” Lichtman is known for successfully defended John “Junior” Gotti, son of the notorious organized crime family boss, at a 2005 trial. The younger Gotti walked free after an acquittal on a securities fraud count and a mistrial on more serious racketeering counts. The lawyer said he has met with Guzman on a weekly basis, hoping to defend him at a trial in April. “He is charming, funny, highly intelligent. I enjoyed getting to know him. ... I don’t judge someone by what I read in the papers,” Lichtman told The Associated Press last week. Another candidate for the defense team, attorney Eduardo Balarezo, represented Mexican drug kingpin and former Guzman rival Alfredo Beltran Leyva in a separate U.S. drug case. Leyva was sentenced to life in prison earlier this year. Guzman has pleaded not guilty to charges that his drug trafficking operation, the Sinaloa cartel, laundered billions of dollars and oversaw a ruthless campaign of murders and kidnappings. The defense has claimed that he’s being held in inhumane and overly restrictive conditions at a high-security jail in Manhattan known for housing alleged mobsters and terrorists. The government has argued that his stri[...]


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Former Algonquin-based School District 300 substitute teacher faces more child sex chargesCarlos A. Bedoya, 62

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:12:00 GMT

CARPENTERSVILLE – A substitute teacher at an elementary school in Algonquin-based School District 300 accused of sexually abusing a child has been charged with additional sex crimes involving three more victims.

Carlos A. Bedoya, 62, of Lake in the Hills was indicted on predatory criminal sexual abuse, aggravated criminal sexual abuse of a child and indecent solicitation of a child charges.

Bedoya is accused of having sexual contact with four victims younger than 13 years old between August 2015 and June 2017, according to a news release from the Kane County State’s Attorney’s Office.

He faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge. If convicted, he also would register as a sex offender for life.

He was first arrested in July after authorities said he had sexual contact with one child younger than 13 between August 2016 and May 2017.

Bedoya posted $10,000 bond on the original complaint in July and was released, according to a news release. Since the indictment was filed, Bedoya is back in jail and his bond has increased to $3 million, meaning he would be required to post $300,000 to be released.

If he posts bond, Bedoya is not allowed to have contact with the victims or anyone younger than 18 years old, according to a news release.

He also is required to resign in writing from all teaching and coaching positions.

He will appear Aug. 31 in Kane County court.

The case remains under investigation, and anyone with information can call local police or the Kane County Child Advocacy Center at 630-208-5160.

Carlos A. Bedoya, 62


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California man arrested on drug trafficking charges after Fox Lake traffic stopEusvaldo Valenzuela-Gaxiola, 39, of Tulare, California, faces charges of marijuana trafficking after police said they found about 50 pounds of marijuana in his vehicle during a traffic stop Friday.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:11:00 GMT

FOX LAKE – A California man was arrested on marijuana trafficking charges after police said they found about 50 pounds of marijuana in his vehicle after he was pulled over Friday in Fox Lake.

Eusvaldo Valenzuela-Gaxiola, 39, of Tulare, California, was charged with marijuana trafficking, delivery of marijuana, possession of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance and two traffic-related offenses. He could face up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge.

Lake County Sheriff’s deputies pulled over a vehicle without any visible registration about 12:30 p.m. Friday on Route 59 in the area of Delvin Road in Fox Lake, according to a news release.

Deputies said they smelled marijuana, searched the vehicle and found more than 49 pounds of packaged marijuana, according to a news release.

The street value is estimated at $150,000, deputies said.

Valenzuela-Gaxiola also had cocaine in his possession, according to a news release.

He remains at the Lake County Jail in lieu of posting 10 percent of his $2 million bond.

He will appear Aug. 28 in Lake County court.

Eusvaldo Valenzuela-Gaxiola, 39, of Tulare, California, faces charges of marijuana trafficking after police said they found about 50 pounds of marijuana in his vehicle during a traffic stop Friday.


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Coroner IDs Algonquin women killed in crash SundayAuthorities respond to a crash Sunday at 902 E. Algonquin Road.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:11:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – The McHenry County coroner has identified the two women killed Sunday in a three-vehicle crash on Algonquin Road.

Elizabeth A. Jay, 58, and Louise J. Schreiner, 78, both of Algonquin, died after the collision that occurred about 3:12 p.m. Sunday at 902 E. Algonquin Road. Jay died of blunt trauma to the chest, and Schreiner died of blunt trauma to the head, neck and chest, McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski said.

The crash occurred when Jay, driving east on Algonquin Road, crossed the center line and struck two vehicles traveling west, police said.

Authorities took Jay to Centegra Hospital – Huntley, where she was pronounced dead at 3:48 p.m. Schreiner died at the scene.

The crash remains under investigation by the Kane County Accident Reconstruction Team, Algonquin Police Department and the coroner’s office.  

Route 62 between Longwood Drive and Sandbloom Road in Algonquin was shut down temporarily because of the crash.

Authorities respond to a crash Sunday at 902 E. Algonquin Road.


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Social media harnessed to expose white nationalists at rallyAP photo White nationalist demonstrators walk into the entrance of Lee Park surrounded by counter demonstrators Saturday in Charlottesville, Va. People are using social media to identify and shame white nationalists who attended this past weekend's gathering in Charlottesville.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:11:00 GMT

NEW YORK – One of the social media posts resembled a wanted poster or a missing-persons flyer: Photographs of men were arranged in rows, seeking their names and employers. But the Facebook post wasn’t circulated by law enforcement in the search for a suspect or by relatives looking for a missing loved one. It was an example of ordinary people trying to harness the power of social media to identify and shame the white nationalists who attended last weekend’s violent rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. A Twitter account dedicated to calling out racism identified people who attended the rally using photos culled from the news and social media and listed their places of employment and other information. “I’m a white Jewish man. So I strongly believe that white people in particular have a responsibility to stand up against bigotry because bigotry thrives on silence,” the creator of the account, Logan Smith of Raleigh, North Carolina, told The Associated Press. Using the handle YesYoureRacist, his account grew from about 64,000 followers Saturday to more than 300,000 by Monday afternoon. A website created Sunday dedicated itself to collecting the names, social media profiles, colleges and employers of people photographed at the rally. At least one person has lost his job as a result. Together, the efforts showed that angry online groups can be used to renounce racism as well as promote it. “The goal with online shaming is very short term and driven by people’s desire to feel as if they are fighting back and having an impact,” said Brian Reich, who’s written several books on digital communications, behavior and political influence. “They are afraid, appalled and they want to stop it.” But is it helpful? Reich said the people behind these efforts “are arguably fanning the flames,” giving attention to a group – white supremacists – that feeds on attention. The end of anonymity? Nicholas Brody, professor of communications at the University of Puget Sound, said the events show that in the age of social media, “nothing is really anonymous anymore.” People attending a white supremacist rally decades ago may have had the comfort of knowing that their schools, employers and disapproving family members probably wouldn’t find out about their activity. These days, not only can information be quickly and widely shared, but a lot of data are available about people on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Image searches and facial-recognition technology, meanwhile, can make it relatively easy to identify people online. Smith said he called out the people pictured in photos from the rally through a combination of tips from former classmates and others and online sleuthing. Bu[...]


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McHenry County residents hold all-faith vigil for CharlottesvilleGregory Shaver for Shaw Media The Rev. Eric Fistler of the First Congregational Church in Crystal Lake speaks during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Patrick Murfin holds a candle in silence during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events of Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People sing "Love Will Guide Us" as they hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People sing "Love Will Guide Us" as they hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People hold candles as they stand in silence during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:11:00 GMT

McHenry County residents turned out to participate in a vigil Monday night for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road.

Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media The Rev. Eric Fistler of the First Congregational Church in Crystal Lake speaks during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Patrick Murfin holds a candle in silence during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events of Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People sing "Love Will Guide Us" as they hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People sing "Love Will Guide Us" as they hold candles during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media People hold candles as they stand in silence during an all-faith vigil Monday for victims of the events in Charlottesville, Va., at the Tree of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 5603 Bull Valley Road. About 100 people attended the vigil to pray, sing and hold candles along Bull Valley Road.


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Woodstock man faces aggravated battery charge after altercation with womanColton M. Howell, 19, of Woodstock was charged Aug. 9 with aggravated battery after police said he punched and kicked a woman who was arguing with his girlfriend.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:10:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A Woodstock man is in McHenry County Jail custody after police said he punched and kicked a woman who was arguing with his girlfriend earlier this month.

Colton M. Howell, 19, was charged Wednesday with aggravated battery in a public place. He could face up to seven years in prison if convicted of the felony charge.

The Woodstock Police Department responded about 4:30 p.m. Aug. 6 to the 1700 block of Walnut Drive, Woodstock, to an aggravated assault complaint, according to a news release Monday from the department.

An initial investigation found that there was an altercation at Bates Park between two women, police said. During the argument, police said the boyfriend of one of the women, who was later identified as Howell, punched and kicked a woman who was arguing with his girlfriend.

Howell was arrested and taken into McHenry County Jail custody, where he remains in lieu of posting 10 percent of his $20,000 bond.

He will appear in court Aug. 31 before Judge Sharon Prather.

Colton M. Howell, 19, of Woodstock was charged Aug. 9 with aggravated battery after police said he punched and kicked a woman who was arguing with his girlfriend.


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Man faces felony drug charges after police found bags of heroin, drug paraphernalia

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:09:00 GMT

LAKEMOOR – A local man facing felony drug charges after police said he had several bags of heroin and drug paraphernalia is in McHenry County Jail on $250,000 bond.

Jorge L. Gonzales-Martinez, 23, previously of Lakemoor and currently homeless, was charged Friday with possession of a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of hypodermic syringes and needles, resisting/obstructing a peace officer and possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver within 1,000 feet of a park.

He could face up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge.

Police said Gonzales-Martinez had 13 individual bags of heroin containing about 5 grams total in his front pocket near Route 120 and Willow Road in Lakemoor.

He also had a silver spoon and a clear and orange syringe, police said.

The 23-year-old fled from police, authorities said. In March, Gonzales-Martinez was convicted of possession of drug paraphernalia.

He will appear in court Aug. 23 before Judge Sharon Prather.




Lake in the Hills Police Sgt. Mark Mogan retires after months on leave with a suspended licenseH. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board members Lawrence Howell (from left), Lloyd Howen, Lake in the Hills Finance Director Shane Johnson and Trustee Stan Helgerson met Monday to discuss the retirement pension application and benefit calculation for Mark Mogan, the Lake in the Hills police sergeant who was cleared of driving under the influence charges but had his license revoked after he refused to take a breath test.Mark G. Mogan

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:09:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Lake in the Hills Police Sgt. Mark Mogan, who kept his job with the department for months despite not having a valid driver’s license, has retired. The Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board unanimously approved Mogan’s retirement pension application Monday. Mogan’s pension collection will start at $61,091, village documents show. A 3 percent increase a year will kick in starting in 2022, when Mogan turns 55, documents show. The benefits last for life, and in 20 years, Mogan will be collecting more than $108,000, documents show. Mogan was arrested in December for allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol and striking 29-year-old Samantha Norris, who later died, in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He was cleared of charges in the incident in March. Prosecutors said Mogan’s blood-alcohol level was well below the legal limit at the time of the crash; however, his license revocation still stands because Walworth County Judge Phil Koss said that Mogan’s refusal to submit a blood test after the crash was not proper. After Mogan’s yearlong license suspension in Illinois took effect in April, he kept his job and paycheck by using medical leave and other benefits. Mogan was on leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act from April 3 until July 3, according to village documents and Human Resources coordinator Anita Neville. From July 3 to Thursday, his last day with the department, Mogan took time off through the village’s shared sick leave pooling policy, Neville said. The policy allows full-time employees to to share accrued sick days on a voluntary basis, village documents show. Mogan, who also is a Hebron trustee, earned a base salary of $106,246 a year in his role as sergeant. He had been with the department for nearly 24 years. Mogan sent an email on Aug. 4 to Police Chief David Brey giving notice of his retirement. “It has been my honor and privilege to serve and protect the residents of Lake in the Hills,” Mogan wrote in the email. “Over the years, I have seen much change in the department, the village and law enforcement, and I am proud to end my prestigious career with the Lake in the Hills Police Department, having served with law enforcement’s finest professionals, both sworn and civilian.” Mogan said he is grateful for the opportunities the village has provided him, and he cherishes the lifelong friendships he’s made over the past 24 years. “Please know that I have truly enjoyed every moment with the department,” Mogan wrote. Mogan did not respond to requests for comment Monday on his decision [...]Mark G. Mogan


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Rakow Road crash sends 3 to hospitalsPolice and firefighters check on the victims of a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads. Three people were sent to area hospitals. H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.comOne of three people involved in a crash is wheeled to a waiting ambulance to be taken to an area hospital after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.The driver of a pickup truck is placed on a stretcher before being taken to an area hospital after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.A Crystal Lake police officer directs traffic after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.One of three people is wheeled to a waiting ambulance after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.A driver for Whitey's Towing Inc. sweeps up debris in the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads after a two-vehicle crash Monday.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:09:00 GMT

Police and firefighters check on the victims of a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads. Three people were sent to area hospitals. H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.comOne of three people involved in a crash is wheeled to a waiting ambulance to be taken to an area hospital after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.The driver of a pickup truck is placed on a stretcher before being taken to an area hospital after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.A Crystal Lake police officer directs traffic after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.One of three people is wheeled to a waiting ambulance after a two-vehicle crash Monday at the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads.A driver for Whitey's Towing Inc. sweeps up debris in the intersection of Rakow and Pingree roads after a two-vehicle crash Monday.


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Owner of Goodfellas Beef in Huntley proposes plans for developing land off Route 47Mike Skala talks about his development plan Monday for a new residential, commercial and fire station complex to be built off Route 47 in Huntley.Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on a proposed development for a vacant site off Route 47 at Monday’s meeting. The site plan for the 17-acre property includes four multistory housing buildings totaling 170 units with underground parking available.A Huntley businessman is planning a residential and commercial complex on a long vacant site off Route 47 and Mill Street. Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on the proposed development at Monday’s meeting.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:04:00 GMT

HUNTLEY – A Huntley businessman is planning a residential and commercial complex on a long vacant site off Route 47 and Mill Street. Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on the proposed development at Monday’s meeting. The site plan for the 17-acre property includes four multistory housing buildings totaling 170 units with underground parking available. Four commercial buildings also have been proposed. Mike Skala, who owns Goodfellas Beef in Huntley, said he wants the complex to allow Huntley residents to fulfill their needs in town and have a destination place to shop, eat and let the kids play at the variety of play places that are proposed to be scattered throughout the site. “Being a resident here, my passion and my love is to see the village being a great place to work, play and live,” Skala said. “I am not a typical developer. I am a businessman. The take that I have on this is I want it to be done right. … The least concern I have is return on investment.” The site also could house a new fire station for the Huntley Fire Protection District, along with a park area and green space with areas for families to relax outside. The buildings in the complex would have green roofs, which means they could be used for amenities such as rooftop gardens, patios or outdoor dining, Skala said. Plan Commission members were largely supportive of the development of the site, but they expressed trepidation about the number of apartments, whether the modern look of the design would blend with Huntley’s downtown aesthetic, and whether the fire station should be included in the plan. “I know this needs to be developed,” commission member Robert Chandler said. “We really need restaurants in this area. The commercial and everything works great. ... My question would be [to commission members] do you feel it is departing too much from what is being done downtown right now?” Skala now must formalize his plans and bring them before the board again for approval at a future meeting, which has yet to be set. Mike Skala talks about his development plan Monday for a new residential, commercial and fire station complex to be built off Route 47 in Huntley.Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on a proposed development for a vacant site off Route 47 at Monday’s meeting. The site plan for the 17-acre property includes four multistory housing buildings totaling 170 units with underground parking available.A Huntley businessman is planning a residential and commercial complex on a long vacant site off Route 47 and Mill Street. Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on the proposed developme[...]


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Lake in the Hills Police Sgt. Mark Mogan retires after months on leave with a suspended licenseThe Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board unanimously approved Mogan’s retirement pension application Monday. Mogan's pension collection will start at $61,091, village documents show. A 3 percent increase a year will kick in starting in 2022, when Mogan turns 55, documents show. The benefits last for life, and in 20 years, Mogan will be collecting more than $108,000, documents show. Mogan was arrested in December for allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol and striking 29-year-old Samantha Norris, who later died, in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He was cleared of charges in the incident in March. Prosecutors said Mogan’s blood-alcohol level was well below the legal limit at the time of the crash; however, his license revocation still stands because Walworth County Judge Phil Koss said that Mogan’s refusal to submit a blood test after the crash was not proper. After Mogan’s yearlong license suspension in Illinois took effect in April, he kept his job and paycheck by using medical leave and other benefits. Mogan was on leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act from April 3 until July 3, according to village documents and Human Resources coordinator Anita Neville. From July 3 to Thursday, his last day with the department, Mogan took time off through the village's shared sick leave pooling policy, Neville said. The policy allows full-time employees to to share accrued sick days on a voluntary basis, village documents show.Mogan, who also is a Hebron trustee, earned a base salary of $106,246 a year in his role as sergeant. He had been with the department for nearly 24 years. Mogan sent an email on Aug. 4 to Police Chief David Brey giving notice of his retirement. “It has been my honor and privilege to serve and protect the residents of Lake in the Hills,” Mogan wrote in the email. “Over the years, I have seen much change in the department, the village and law enforcement, and I am proud to end my prestigious career with the Lake in the Hills Police Department, having served with law enforcement’s finest professionals, both sworn and civilian.” Mogan said he is grateful for the opportunities the village has provided him, and he cherishes the lifelong friendships he’s made over the past 24 years. “Please know that I have truly enjoyed every moment with the department,” Mogan wrote. Mogan did not respond to requests for comment Monday on his decision to retire. Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board members Lawrence Howell, Stan Helgerson and Lloyd Howen approved Mogan's pension request in a special meeting that lasted less than 10 minutes Monday morning. Lake in the Hills Finance Director Shane Johnson said it’s typical to hold a special meeting if there is a time sensitive item to consider because the board meets quarterly. A number of factors – including a person’s age, time served and salary – are considered when determining a pension amount, Johnson said.Mogan applied for a restricted driving permit on June 6, which could have allowed him to drive to and from work as well as at work, even with a suspended license. As of Monday, the Secretary of State's Office had not made a decision on whether Mogan would be granted a restricted driving permit, Secretary of State's spokesperson Dave Druker said via email. The deadline for the determination to be made is Sept. 6, Druker said. A restricted driving permit typically allows someone to drive to and from work while their license is suspended. Certain conditions can be granted on a permit that also would allow someone to drive while on the job, Druker has said.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:04:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Lake in the Hills Police Sgt. Mark Mogan, who kept his job with the department for months despite not having a valid driver’s license, has retired. The Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board unanimously approved Mogan’s retirement pension application Monday. Mogan's pension collection will start at $61,091, village documents show. A 3 percent increase a year will kick in starting in 2022, when Mogan turns 55, documents show. The benefits last for life, and in 20 years, Mogan will be collecting more than $108,000, documents show. Mogan was arrested in December for allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol and striking 29-year-old Samantha Norris, who later died, in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He was cleared of charges in the incident in March. Prosecutors said Mogan’s blood-alcohol level was well below the legal limit at the time of the crash; however, his license revocation still stands because Walworth County Judge Phil Koss said that Mogan’s refusal to submit a blood test after the crash was not proper. After Mogan’s yearlong license suspension in Illinois took effect in April, he kept his job and paycheck by using medical leave and other benefits. Mogan was on leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act from April 3 until July 3, according to village documents and Human Resources coordinator Anita Neville. From July 3 to Thursday, his last day with the department, Mogan took time off through the village's shared sick leave pooling policy, Neville said. The policy allows full-time employees to to share accrued sick days on a voluntary basis, village documents show.Mogan, who also is a Hebron trustee, earned a base salary of $106,246 a year in his role as sergeant. He had been with the department for nearly 24 years. Mogan sent an email on Aug. 4 to Police Chief David Brey giving notice of his retirement. “It has been my honor and privilege to serve and protect the residents of Lake in the Hills,” Mogan wrote in the email. “Over the years, I have seen much change in the department, the village and law enforcement, and I am proud to end my prestigious career with the Lake in the Hills Police Department, having served with law enforcement’s finest professionals, both sworn and civilian.” Mogan said he is grateful for the opportunities the village has provided him, and he cherishes the lifelong friendships he’s made over the past 24 years. “Please know that I have truly enjoyed every moment with the department,” Mogan wrote. Mogan did not respond to requests for comment Monday on his decision to retire. Lake in the Hills Police Pension Fund Board members Lawrence Howell, Stan Helgerson and Lloyd Howen approved Mogan's pension request in a special meeting that lasted less than 10 minutes Monday morning. Lake in the Hills Fina[...]


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Huntley businessman plans commercial, residential complex off Route 47Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on the proposed development at Monday’s meeting. The site plan for the 17-acre property includes four multistory housing buildings totaling 170 units with underground parking available. Four commercial buildings also have been proposed.Mike Skala, who owns Goodfellas Beef in Huntley, said he wants the complex to allow Huntley residents to fulfill their needs in town and have a destination place to shop, eat and let the kids play at the variety of plays places that are proposed to be scattered throughout the site. “Being a resident here, my passion and my love is to see the village being a great place to work, play and live,” Skala said. “I am not a typical developer. I am a businessman. The take that I have on this is I want it to be done right. … The least concern I have is return on investment.”The site also could house a new fire station for the Huntley Fire Protection District, along with a park area and green space with areas for families to relax outside. The buildings in the complex would have green roofs, which means they could be used for amenities such as rooftop gardens, patios or outdoor dining, Skala said.Plan Commission members were largely supportive of the development of the site, but they expressed trepidation about the number of apartments, whether the modern look of the design would blend with Huntley’s downtown aesthetic, and whether the fire station should be included in the plan."I know this needs to be developed," commission member Robert Chandler said. "We really need restaurants in this area. The commercial and everything works great. ... My question would be [to commission members] do you feel it is departing too much from what is being done downtown right now?"Skala now must formalize his plans and bring them before the board again for approval at a future meeting, which has yet to be set.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:01:00 GMT

HUNTLEY – A Huntley businessman is planning a residential and commercial complex on a long vacant site off Route 47 and Mill Street.

Members of Huntley’s Plan Commission heard details on the proposed development at Monday’s meeting. The site plan for the 17-acre property includes four multistory housing buildings totaling 170 units with underground parking available. Four commercial buildings also have been proposed.Mike Skala, who owns Goodfellas Beef in Huntley, said he wants the complex to allow Huntley residents to fulfill their needs in town and have a destination place to shop, eat and let the kids play at the variety of plays places that are proposed to be scattered throughout the site. “Being a resident here, my passion and my love is to see the village being a great place to work, play and live,” Skala said. “I am not a typical developer. I am a businessman. The take that I have on this is I want it to be done right. … The least concern I have is return on investment.”The site also could house a new fire station for the Huntley Fire Protection District, along with a park area and green space with areas for families to relax outside. The buildings in the complex would have green roofs, which means they could be used for amenities such as rooftop gardens, patios or outdoor dining, Skala said.Plan Commission members were largely supportive of the development of the site, but they expressed trepidation about the number of apartments, whether the modern look of the design would blend with Huntley’s downtown aesthetic, and whether the fire station should be included in the plan."I know this needs to be developed," commission member Robert Chandler said. "We really need restaurants in this area. The commercial and everything works great. ... My question would be [to commission members] do you feel it is departing too much from what is being done downtown right now?"Skala now must formalize his plans and bring them before the board again for approval at a future meeting, which has yet to be set.


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Trump's sanctuary city threat triggers confusion, changesFILE - In this Aug. 1, 2016 file photo the Kimo Theater is seen on historic Route 66 in downtown Albuquerque, N.M. U.S. cities and counties are poring over immigration rules to avoid losing millions in public safety dollars that the Trump administration has threatened to withhold amid a high-stakes clash over sanctuary policies. At least six locations are suing, with Chicago becoming the first so-called sanctuary city to scrutinize a specific grant. A New Mexico county mulled new rules encouraging cooperation with federal authorities. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:31:00 GMT

CHICAGO – From defiant lawsuits to reversing policies, U.S. cities and counties are zeroing in on their immigration rules to avoid losing millions in public safety dollars that the White House has threatened to withhold amid a high-stakes clash over sanctuary policies. President Donald Trump has made it a top priority to revoke federal dollars from so-called sanctuary cities, broadly defined as places that limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities. Trump says he believes such cities and counties are providing a haven for criminal activity. Amid an executive order and almost weekly threats by the administration, cities and counties are fighting back. At least seven cities and counties are suing, and California became the first state to join the legal fray on Monday. Leaders in Baltimore and the Las Vegas area have been trying to prove to the federal government that they don't have sanctuary policies so they can qualify for public safety help. Some local governments have sought to comply with the administration's edicts. The result for cities and counties: growing confusion, budgeting headaches, worries about increased crime and more tension with immigrant residents. And experts expect more lawsuits and turmoil at the local level. "They're not getting clarity," said Yucel Ors, a program director for public safety at the National League of Cities. "When you're planning budgets or there's an expectation for grants and applications, it becomes very difficult to properly judge what your resource is going to be, especially with law enforcement." Sanctuary policies have existed for decades. There's no single definition, but generally local officials enact policies friendly to people living in the U.S. without legal permission, including limiting cooperation with agents in local jails and prohibiting police from asking about immigration status during traffic stops. The nation's roughly 200 sanctuary cities and counties are now a focal point in the immigration debate with Trump in the White House. Some locales, including Florida's Miami-Dade County, have already changed their immigration policies to comply. Others are considering the same. But the more common tactic among sanctuary cities has been to push back. Several lawsuits have cited constitutional concerns in Trump's executive order, including three in California filed by Santa Clara County, San Francisco and the city of Richmond. Two of those lawsuits prompted a temporary injunction. Other lawsuits were filed[...]


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President Trump speaks on Charlottesville: 'Racism is evil'President Donald Trump arrives to speak about the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 17:11:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – Under pressure all weekend, President Donald Trump on Monday named and condemned hate groups as "repugnant" and declared "racism is evil" in an updated, more forceful statement on the deadly, race-fueled clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Trump had been under increasing pressure to call out the groups by name after his previous remarks bemoaning violence on "many sides" prompted criticism from fellow Republicans as well as Democrats. The president described members of the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who take part in violence as "criminals and thugs" in a prepared statement from the White House.

In his remarks he also called for unity.

"We must love each other, show affection for each other and unite together in condemnation of hatred, bigotry and violence. We must rediscover the bonds of love and loyalty that bring us together as Americans," he said.

His attorney general, Jeff Sessions, said earlier Monday that the violence in which a car plowed into a group of counter-protesters, killing one person, "does meet the definition of domestic terrorism in our statute."

He told ABC's "Good Morning America": "You can be sure we will charge and advance the investigation towards the most serious charges that can be brought, because this is an unequivocally unacceptable and evil attack that cannot be accepted in America."

Sessions said he expects to hear more from Trump on the matter after meeting with him Monday, as well as officials from the FBI. The president added a late-morning meeting with Sessions and FBI director Christopher Wray to his Monday schedule.

"We will not allow these extremist groups to obtain credibility," Sessions told "CBS This Morning."

In the hours after the incident on Saturday, Trump addressed the violence in broad strokes, saying that he condemns "in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides."

President Donald Trump arrives to speak about the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


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Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:55:01 GMT

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