Subscribe: Letters to the Editor
http://www.nwherald.com/?rss=opinion/letters
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
county  crystal lake  crystal  house  lake  mchenry county  mchenry  people  police  president  trump  year     
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Letters to the Editor

Northwest Herald



Recent news from Northwest Herald



 



Meteor credited for bright light, noise rattling Michigan, IllinoisIn this late Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, image made from dashcam video, a brightly lit object falls from the sky above a highway in the southern Michigan skyline. (Zack Lawler/WWMT via AP)

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 14:38:00 GMT

DETROIT — Experts say a bright light and what sounded like thunder in the sky above Michigan was a meteor.

The American Meteor Society says it received hundreds of reports of a fireball Tuesday night over the state, including many in the Detroit area. Reports also came in from several other states and Ontario, Canada.

Some Michigan residents reported their homes shaking.

The society says the reports suggest a space rock penetrated deep into the Earth's atmosphere before it broke apart. The U.S. Geological Service says it registered as a 2.0 magnitude earthquake in Michigan.

Bill Cooke with NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office tells The Detroit News it was "definitely a meteoroid" and a rare sight for Michigan.

Other states where people reported seeing a fireball included Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Missouri.

In this late Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, image made from dashcam video, a brightly lit object falls from the sky above a highway in the southern Michigan skyline. (Zack Lawler/WWMT via AP)


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/17/b814fea7f37944879113d9967da82c1b/2ee941a8-d267-47e8-a91d-ba76dc2080d1/image-pv_web.jpg




Rauner spokesman: 'Governor believes David Duke is a racist'Gov. Bruce Rauner addresses the media, public and elected officials from Will County during a news conference July 11 announcing the construction of a bridge connecting Houbolt Road and CenterPoint in Joliet.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:39:00 GMT

CHICAGO – After fumbling the answer to a question about whether a former Ku Klux Klan leader is a racist, the campaign of Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner on Tuesday clarified the governor’s opinion of David Duke.

During a radio interview on Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, Rauner was asked whether President Donald Trump was racist after reports that he used vulgar language to refer to African nations. Trump allegedly also questioned why America would want to accept more immigrants from Haiti. Rauner repeatedly declined to directly answer, saying “that language has no place in our political conversation.”

On Monday, when WVON-AM host Charles Thomas asked if Duke is a racist, Rauner would only respond “we have racism in our society.”

“We have got to come together to change our system,” Rauner said.

On Tuesday, Rauner campaign spokesman Justin Giorgio sought to clarify those comments. In a statement, he said Rauner “believes that David Duke is a racist.”

Democrats were quick to seize on what they characterized as Rauner’s attempt to “mince words.”

“Instead of having a spine and standing up for what’s right, Rauner dodges even the most basic of questions to avoid giving Illinoisans the answers they deserve,” said Jordan Abudayyeh, spokeswoman for Democratic gubernatorial hopeful J.B. Pritzker.

Also on Tuesday, Duke spoke about Rauner’s initial failure to call him a racist.

“Probably at some point, he’s heard about David Duke, and deep down in his soul, something’s happened inside of him and he knows that I am not really a racist in the sense that I want to oppress and oppose other people,” Duke told the Chicago Tribune.

Sen. Kwame Raoul, a Chicago Democrat running for attorney general, cited King when he noted Rauner’s failure to call Duke a racist.

“Martin Luther King Jr. taught us that our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter, and Bruce Rauner’s inability to clearly state that David Duke is a racist is pretty damning,” said Raoul, the son of Haitian immigrants.

Gov. Bruce Rauner addresses the media, public and elected officials from Will County during a news conference July 11 announcing the construction of a bridge connecting Houbolt Road and CenterPoint in Joliet.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/17/3d4376323e2148898cfa6005f85fa7cf/9b016293-74e2-4682-a64c-06e36ebf68c0/image-pv_web.jpg




Rebel ex-police officer among dead in Venezuela shootoutAP file photo Oscar Perez speaks to the press July 13 at a night vigil to honor the more than 90 people killed during three months of anti-government protests, in Caracas, Venezuela. Venezuelan officials said Monday that they have exchanged fire during an attempt to capture the fugitive police officer who led a high-profile attack in Caracas last year from a stolen helicopter.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:38:00 GMT

CARACAS, Venezuela – Officials in Venezuela confirmed Tuesday that a rebellious police officer who led a brazen helicopter attack in Caracas last year was among those killed in a violent shootout with security forces. Oscar Perez was among the seven who died fighting against police and soldiers Monday in a small mountain community outside of Caracas, Interior Minister Nestor Reverol said. Two police officers were killed and eight others gravely injured, he said. “The terrorist acts committed by this terrorist cell showed the destabilizing objectives that they were pursuing,” Reverol said. Opposition lawmakers and human rights groups called for a transparent investigation into the deaths after video images showed Perez shouting over gunfire that they wished to surrender. “We’re going to turn ourselves in!” Perez said in the video. A former police officer, action-movie star and pilot, Perez leaped into the spotlight in June, when he stole a helicopter and used it to lob grenades and fire at two government buildings in Caracas. Nobody was killed in the attack. Perez, 36, had been one of Venezuela’s most wanted fugitives ever since, periodically posting videos on Instagram calling upon Venezuelans to take to the streets against what he called President Nicolas Maduro’s tyrannical government. Perez claimed that he was fighting for Venezuela’s freedom from a government that is starving its people. He garnered tens of thousands of followers online and has piqued the curiosity of Venezuelans who either hail him as hero, condemn him as a criminal or question whether he might be a ruse to support Maduro’s assertion that the nation is under attack by opposition conspirators. In December, Perez posted videos showing him and a small armed band taking over a military outpost and smashing a portrait of Maduro with his foot. Perez and the assailants berated several detained guardsmen for doing nothing to help their fellow citizens. Perez surfaced online again early Monday in videos – blood dripping across his face – and holed up in a mountainside house. Perez shouted over a spray of gunfire that the group wished to surrender, but that the police outside were set on killing them. “I want to ask Venezuela not to lose heart – fight, take to the streets,” he said. “It is time for us to be free, and only you have the power now.” Reverol said that an intense search finally led security forces to the house. Perez’s group opened fire first, requiring a response from authorities, he said. Troops arrested six more people identified as members, collaborators and financiers of the group. They also confiscated rifles, smoke grenades, military uniforms, ammunition, and a pickup, officials said. Mystery surrounded Perez’s fate for nearly 24 hours as officials remained silent until the announcement on state television that he was among the dead. The Venezuelan Program of Education and Action on Human Rights has called for the government to provide a full report. The opposition-controlled National Assembly early Tuesday formed a special commission to conduct its own investigation. “How is it possible that while surrendering, they riddled him with bullets?” said Delsa Solorzano, National Assembly deputy assigned to head the commission. Solorzano called for the government turn the bodies over to relatives rather than cremate them, allowing for a transparent investigation. AP file photo Oscar Perez speaks to the press July 13 at a night vigil to honor the more than 90 people killed during three months of anti-government protests, in Caracas, Venezuela. Venezuelan [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/497b7239f08e49e2b49981788ec2171e/a4660ac7-3183-4d37-bf31-50dd55724619/image-pv_web.jpg




California mom of malnourished children was 'perplexed' by police visitAP photo Louise Anna Turpin (left) and David Allen Turpin are shown in photos provided by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department on Sunday.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:38:00 GMT

PERRIS – The mother of 13 malnourished children and young adults who were held in filthy conditions, some chained to furniture, was “perplexed” when deputies arrived at the family’s Southern California home, a sheriff’s official said Tuesday.

The deputies had been summoned by a 17-year-old daughter who jumped out a window and called 911. Riverside County sheriff’s Capt. Greg Fellows described the reaction of the mother, Louise Anna Turpin, 49, without elaborating. He said he did not know how the father, 57-year-old David Allen Turpin, reacted.

The situation at the home in Perris, about 70 miles southeast of Los Angeles, was discovered when the daughter escaped early Sunday, Fellows said.

U.S. withholds $65M from Palestinian aid programs

WASHINGTON – The Trump administration on Tuesday cut tens of millions of dollars in money for Palestinian refugees, demanding that the U.N. agency responsible for the programs undertake a “fundamental re-examination,” the State Department said.

In a letter, the State Department notified the U.N. Relief and Works Agency that the U.S. is withholding $65 million of a planned $125 million funding installment. The letter also makes clear that additional U.S. donations will be contingent on major changes by UNRWA, which has been heavily criticized by Israel.

“We would like to see some reforms be made,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said, adding that changes are needed to the way the agency operates and is funded. “This is not aimed at punishing anyone.”

The State Department said it was releasing the rest of the installment – $60 million – to prevent the agency from running out of cash by the end of the month and closing down.

AP photo Louise Anna Turpin (left) and David Allen Turpin are shown in photos provided by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department on Sunday.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/62325be8b0d5450bbc5bb4b42ed69afa/5a45e27e-3d57-4394-afe6-21fc5c9b6137/image-pv_web.jpg




Pope acknowledges pain of abuse among victims Рand priests in Catholic churchPope Francis arrives to celebrate Mass at O'Higgins Park in Santiago, Chile, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. Francis begged for forgiveness Tuesday for the “irreparable damage” done to children who were raped and molested by priests, opening his visit to Chile by diving head-first into a scandal that has greatly hurt the Catholic Church’s credibility here and cast a cloud over his visit. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)AP photo Demonstrators protest against the Catholic church and the visit of Pope Francis Monday as Pope Francis drives by, in Santiago, Chile. Francis' visit to Chile is expected to be fraught with a high level of opposition. Firebombings of Catholic churches in recent days have added to the tensions, as have planned protests of sex abuse and cover-ups.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:38:00 GMT

SANTIAGO, Chile – Pope Francis dove head first into the sex abuse scandal that has devastated the Catholic Church’s credibility in Chile, apologizing Tuesday for the “irreparable damage” to victims, but also acknowledging the “pain” of priests who have been held collectively responsible for the crimes of a few. Francis’ words were delivered amid unprecedented opposition to his visit: Three more churches were torched overnight, including one burned to the ground in the southern Araucania region where Francis celebrates Mass on Wednesday. Police used tear gas and water cannons to break up an anti-pope protest outside Francis’ big open-air Mass in the capital, Santiago. Despite the incidents, huge numbers of Chileans turned out to see the pope on his first full day in Chile, including an estimated 400,000 for his Mass, and he brought some inmates to tears with an emotional visit to a women’s prison. But his comments in his first speech of the day were what many Chileans were waiting to hear: Speaking from the presidential La Moneda palace, Francis told Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, lawmakers, judges and other authorities that he felt “bound to express my pain and shame” that some of Chile’s clergy had sexually abused children in their care. “I am one with my brother bishops, for it is right to ask forgiveness and make every effort to support the victims, even as we commit ourselves to ensuring that such things do not happen again,” the pope said. Francis did not refer by name to Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, who in 2011 was barred from all pastoral duties and sanctioned by the Vatican to a lifetime of “penance and prayer” for sexually molesting minors. Nor did he refer to the fact that the emeritus archbishop of Santiago, a top papal adviser, has acknowledged he knew of complaints against Karadima but didn’t remove him from ministry. Karadima had been a politically connected, charismatic and powerful priest who ministered to a wealthy Santiago community and produced dozens of priestly vocations and five bishops. Victims went public with their accusations in 2010 after complaining for years to church authorities that Karadima had kissed and fondled them when they were teenagers. While the cover-up continued to roil the church, many Chileans are still furious over Francis’ subsequent decision in 2015 to appoint a Karadima protege as bishop of the southern city of Osorno. Bishop Juan Barros has denied knowing about Karadima’s abuse but many Chileans don’t believe him, and his appointment has badly split the diocese. Francis referred again to the scandal later in the day, but this time his words were directed at the hundreds of priests gathered in Santiago’s cathedral who have seen their influence and moral authority plummet as a result of the Karadima case and cover-up. Francis told them that the scandal had not only caused pain in the victims, but in the broader church community and among anyone who wears a clerical collar. He said he knew the pain of priests and nuns “who after working so hard, have seen the harm that has led to suspicion and questioning; in some or many of you this has been a source of doubt, fear or lack of confidence.” He said some priests had even been insulted in the subway or walking on the street, and that by wearing clerical attire they had “paid a heavy price.” But he urged them to press on. It was similar to the message that Francis delivered to American bishops in 2015 – one that infuriated sex abuse survivors who accused the pope of drawing a moral equivalency between the lifelong trauma endured by [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/72177be41a924294ac7b38391f530bf5/ead17e2c-6ad5-4e45-aaa7-3680fc33ba56/image-pv_web.jpg




Big decisions about immigration await CongressAP file photo The Capitol is seen Jan. 3 in Washington. The government is financed through Friday, Jan. 19, and another temporary spending bill is needed to prevent a partial government shutdown after that.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:38:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – Before a potential government shutdown at midnight Friday night, a host of leftover Washington business is bottled up in Congress, waiting on a deal to prevent the deportation of young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children and an agreement on other immigration-related issues, including President Donald Trump’s long-sought U.S.-Mexico border wall. Lawmakers in both major parties are confronted with a consequential week that includes shutdown brinksmanship linked to politically freighted negotiations over immigration. House Republican leaders scheduled a Tuesday evening meeting to discuss options with the GOP rank and file to avert a shutdown at midnight Friday. Meanwhile, there are increasingly urgent deadlines for disaster aid and renewal of the popular Children’s Health Insurance Program. A governmentwide spending deal, billions of dollars in help for hurricane-slammed Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, and health care financing for 9 million children from low-income families have been on hold for weeks, caught first in a crossfire over taxes and now held up in a standoff on immigration. Lawmakers are angry that their pet priorities are stuck and are getting fed up. That rank-and-file anger has GOP leaders in a bind as they work to deliver a stopgap spending bill to stave off a shutdown. They are privately worried that if there’s no breakthrough on immigration, they could blunder their way into a shutdown that all say they want to avoid. Here are the moving parts in Capitol Hill’s high-wire week: Immigration Trump has dismissed a bipartisan deal by Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., that would pair protections for the young immigrants with border security money and other measures. Instead, Republicans are invested in a rival bipartisan group led by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California. Four issues are the focus of the talks: protection for the young immigrants, limits on family migration for their parents, border security, and elimination of a diversity visa lottery system. But there are huge obstacles to a deal, considering intense political pressure from both the right and the left, Trump’s erratic and impulsive behavior, months of hard feelings, and suspicion of bad faith harbored on both sides. On the other hand, pressure is intense for an agreement because, without one, much of the rest of Washington’s agenda is on hold. Stopgap spending The government is financed through Friday, and another temporary spending bill is needed to prevent a partial government shutdown after that. In a shutdown, vital government services like law enforcement and air traffic control would continue, as would benefit programs such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. But national parks would close, and many federal bureaucrats would be sent home. No one says they want a government shutdown, though House Democrats – whose votes may be needed for another stopgap spending bill – opposed two stopgap spending bills last month. House GOP leaders overcame the obstacle then but aren’t so sure they can produce the votes now. Democrats are demanding real progress on immigration to vote to stave off a shutdown. But what happens if the pressure is really cranked up isn’t necessarily clear – either for GOP holdouts or House Democrats. It’s more than likely that if a stopgap bill passes the House, it would again glide through the Senate. Budget caps Both sides say they want a deal to increase spending [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/7f889984f73441fbbc16638b6a468ff7/2c4251a3-c42c-4b3b-9aff-c64e1a07c494/image-pv_web.jpg




Dems accuse GOP official of 'amnesia' on President Donald Trump's vulgarityAP photo Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is sworn in Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:38:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – Republicans struggled to get their stories straight Tuesday as President Donald Trump’s Homeland Security secretary became the latest GOP official to offer an inconclusive version of a meeting in which Trump is said to have used vulgar remarks that have been criticized as racist. Democrats accused Republicans of selective amnesia, as Kirstjen Nielsen testified under oath that she “did not hear” Trump use a certain vulgarity to describe African countries. “It was a meeting of 12 people. There was cross-talk,” she explained at a congressional hearing, but she didn’t “dispute the president was using tough language.” Under persistent questioning, Nielsen said she didn’t recall the specific language used by Trump. “What I was struck with frankly, as I’m sure you were as well, was just the general profanity used in the room by almost everyone.” New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, angrily criticized Nielsen’s comments, telling her during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, “Your silence and your amnesia is complicity.” Nielsen’s comments came five days after the president ignited what GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham termed an “s-storm” with his Oval Office remarks. The White House has not substantively disputed accounts of the episode, in which Trump is said to have used the term “s---hole” to describe African countries of origin for potential immigrants to the U.S. The revelations, semi-denials and continuing comments have cast a pall over the White House’s legislative agenda, brought the country closer to the brink of a government shutdown and sparked international outrage. And with the midterm elections approaching, there are fresh fears among Republicans who were already anxious over the political climate going into November – and over Trump’s unpredictable actions. Administration officials and lawmakers spent the holiday weekend debating the precise presidential vulgarity used, and moved to cast last Thursday’s White House meeting as a salty affair, with expletives flying in all directions. The White House said Trump had no intention of apologizing. “The president hasn’t said he didn’t use strong language, and this is an important issue,” press secretary Sarah Sanders said, “He’s passionate about it, he’s not going to apologize for trying to fix our immigration system.” There is internal debate in the West Wing over whether Trump said “s---hole” or “s---house.” One person who attended the meeting told aides they heard the latter expletive, while others recalled the president saying the more widely reported “s---hole,” according to a person briefed on the meeting but not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations. Trump has not clarified to aides what he said, but told reporters Sunday night in Florida that comments attributed to him “weren’t made.” A confidant of Trump told The Associated Press that the president spent Thursday evening calling friends and outside advisers to judge their reaction to his remarks. Trump wasn’t apologetic and denied he was racist, said the confidant, who wasn’t authorized to disclose a private conversation and spoke on the condition of anonymity. White House officials tried to offer clarity on the two-hour period Thursday morning that saw Trump move from requesting a briefing on a potential immigration breakthrough to graphically rejecting the agreement reached by Graham and Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin. Chief of staff John Kelly phoned Trump from Capitol Hill t[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/17/2d5ca9ff332c4d9cb46fb72ecdb9d4b2/3fda7880-d3d7-4e01-8302-b3ee9f58f182/image-pv_web.jpg




U.S. withholds $65 million from Palestinian aid programsPalestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, speaks during a meeting with the Palestinian Central Council, a top decision-making body, at his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed,l)

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:37:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – The Trump administration on Tuesday cut tens of millions of dollars in money for Palestinian refugees, demanding that the U.N. agency responsible for the programs undertake a "fundamental re-examination," the State Department said. In a letter, the State Department notified the U.N. Relief and Works Agency that the U.S. is withholding $65 million of a planned $125 million funding installment. The letter also makes clear that additional U.S. donations will be contingent on major changes by UNRWA, which has been heavily criticized by Israel. "We would like to see some reforms be made," said State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert, adding that changes are needed to the way the agency operates and is funded. "This is not aimed at punishing anyone." The State Department said it was releasing the rest of the installment – $60 million – to prevent the agency from running out of cash by the end of the month and closing down. The U.S. is UNWRA's largest donor, supplying nearly 30 percent of its budget. The agency focuses on providing health care, education and social services to Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. Hundreds of thousands of Palestinians either fled or were forced from their homes during the war that led to Israel's establishment in 1948. Today, there are an estimated 5 million refugees and their descendants, mostly scattered across the region. The Palestinian Liberation Organization reacted angrily to the move, saying it is targeting "the most vulnerable segment of the Palestinian people and depriving the refugees of the right to education, health, shelter and a dignified life." "It is also creating conditions that will generate further instability throughout the region and will demonstrate that it has no compunction in targeting the innocent," the PLO leadership said in a statement. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he was not aware of the decision but warned that UNRWA provides "vital services." "I am very concerned and I strongly hope that in the end it will be possible for the United States to maintain the funding of UNRWA in which the U.S. has a very important share," he told reporters at the U.N. Israel's ambassador to the U.N., Danny Danon, praised the move, arguing that UNRWA misuses humanitarian aid to support propaganda against the Jewish state and perpetuate the Palestinians' plight. "It is time for this absurdity to end and for humanitarian funds to be directed towards their intended purpose: the welfare of refugees," Danon said in a statement. The U.S. donated $355 million to UNWRA in 2016 and was set to make a similar contribution in this year; the first installment was to have been sent this month. But after a highly critical Jan. 2 tweet from Trump on aid to the Palestinians, the State Department opted to wait for a formal policy decision before sending its first installment. Trump's tweet expressed frustration over the lack of progress in his attempts to broker peace between Israel and the Palestinians, and he pointed the finger at the Palestinians. "We pay the Palestinians HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS a year and get no appreciation or respect," he said. "But with the Palestinians no longer willing to talk peace, why should we make any of these massive future payments to them?" Israelis accuse the U.N. agency of contributing to Palestinian militancy and allowing its facilities to be used by militants. They also complain that some of UNRWA's staff are biased against Isra[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/0818481757934a7aabe6f51eea3bef6f/54718fce-b81e-46f4-b562-ba6609a20357/image-pv_web.jpg




House panel wants Steve Bannon to explain ex-FBI Director James Comey's firingAP file photo Former White House strategist Steve Bannon speaks during a Senate hopeful Roy Moore campaign rally Dec. 5 in Fairhope Ala. The House Intelligence Committee is poised to question Bannon, the onetime confidant to President Donald Trump, following his spectacular fall from power after accusing the president's son and others of "treasonous" behavior for taking a meeting with Russians during the 2016 campaign. Bannon is scheduled to testify before the panel on Tuesday, according to a person familiar with the committee's plans.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:37:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – A House panel questioned Steve Bannon on Tuesday, aiming to find out President Donald Trump’s thinking when he fired FBI Director James Comey, according to a person familiar with what the panel was planning to ask the former White House chief strategist. The committee also planned to press Bannon on other “executive actions” taken by Trump that have drawn interest from congressional investigators prying into ties between Trump’s campaign and Russian operatives, said the person, who wasn’t authorized to speak on the record about the closed-door session and spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity. Those key elements bear directly on the criminal investigation now underway by special counsel Robert Mueller, who is charged with determining if collusion existed between the Trump campaign and Russia and whether the president obstructed justice by firing Comey or by taking other actions to thwart investigators. As of early Tuesday afternoon, it appeared possible that Bannon could be interviewed all day by the House Intelligence panel – on par with other top-tier witnesses who have been called before congressional investigators for marathon sessions. Bannon started with the committee at 8 a.m., but questioning did not start until later in the morning. His interview follows his spectacular fall from power after being quoted in a book that he sees the president’s son and others as engaging in “treasonous” behavior for taking a meeting with the Russians during the 2016 campaign. In Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury,” Bannon accuses Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort of essentially betraying the nation by meeting with a group of Russian lawyers and lobbyists who they believed were ready to offer “dirt” on Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. More recently, Bannon has said he was not referring to Trump Jr. but rather to Manafort. Wolff stands by his account. After the book’s release, Trump quickly disavowed “Sloppy Steve Bannon” and argued extensively there was no evidence of collusion between his presidential campaign and operatives tied to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Bannon apologized a few days later but was stripped of his job leading the pro-Trump news site Breitbart News. Bannon last year had largely avoided the scrutiny of congressional investigators, who instead focused much of their energy on trying to secure interviews with top witnesses like Manafort and former national security adviser Michael Flynn. But Bannon played a critical role in the campaign, the presidential transition and the White House – all during times now under scrutiny from congressional investigators looking for possible evidence of a connection between Trump’s operations and Russia. Bannon recently retained the same lawyer being used by former Trump chief of staff Reince Priebus and current White House general counsel Don McGahn. Neither Bannon nor his lawyer immediately responded to a request for comment Monday. The House Intelligence Committee is speeding toward a conclusion of its interviews in its Russia investigation. The final result could be marred by partisan infighting, raising the probability that Republicans on the panel will issue one set of findings and the Democrats will issue their own report. AP file photo Former White House strategist Steve Bannon speaks during a Senate hopeful Roy Moore campaign rally[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/944ec35ec8ac4b54bbf1c5abd0755fa2/41124f4d-4926-42c5-a643-100802a792c0/image-pv_web.jpg




Filing: Suspected kidnapper's girlfriend fainted helping FBIAP file photo This photo provided by the Macon County Sheriff's Office in Decatur, Ill., shows Brendt Christensen. Attorneys for Christensen, accused of kidnapping resulting in the death of University of Illinois scholar Yingying Zhang from China, are asking a federal judge to dismiss the main charge against him and change the venue of his upcoming trial. Christensen's attorney filed 12 pretrial motions Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, including six to suppress or exclude evidence they say was illegally or improperly obtained.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:37:00 GMT

CHICAGO – The girlfriend of a 28-year-old man charged in the kidnapping and killing of a University of Illinois scholar from China was so nervous as she secretly recorded him for the FBI before his arrest last year that she fainted at least once in front of him, according to court filings.

The revelation came in a flurry of pretrial motions filed Monday by Brendt Christensen’s lawyers in central Illinois, where the university is located and where 26-year-old Yingying Zhang was last seen getting into Christensen’s black Saturn Astra on June 9 last year.

One motion asks U.S. District Judge Colin Bruce in Urbana to dismiss the headline charge – kidnapping resulting in death. It argues there’s no evidence that Christensen forced or tricked Zhang into the car. Authorities say Zhang is dead, though her body has never been found.

His attorneys also asked to change the trial’s location to western Illinois or Chicago, citing what their motions describe as a “tsunami” of “inflammatory and inherently prejudicial” media reports that render a fair hearing in the region impossible. Investigators first questioned Christensen three days after Zhang disappeared, then on June 16 enlisted the girlfriend’s help. Agents want people wearing wires to stay calm so suspects aren’t tipped off they’re being recorded, which can put people recording in danger. But in texts to agents supervising her, the girlfriend – referred to only by the initials T.E.B. – describes being overwhelmed, her “heart ... pounding” as she recorded Christensen. She says she “went into shock and passed out while talking to” Christensen, the filings say.

One place where she recorded Christensen was at a June 29 vigil for Zhang amid the search for her. He was arrested the next day.

Among the other revelations in the filings was that another female student reported earlier the day Zhang disappeared that a man wearing sunglasses pulled up to her in a car, flashed a badge and claimed to be an undercover officer. He asked her to get in; she refused and walked away. The woman later indicated the man looked similar to Christensen. The defense wants any testimony on that incident barred.

In addition to having a girlfriend, Christensen was also married at the time. Another of the new defense motions argues some statements he made to his spouse in private – including about “disturbing dreams” he’d been having – were protected by marital privilege.

His lawyers also contend agents misused a warrant allowing them to search Christensen’s car to enter his apartment on June 14, waking him and his wife around midnight. They say his wife consented to a search of the home under duress.

Christensen’s trial is slated to begin Feb. 27. He has pleaded not guilty.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney’s office in central Illinois declined comment Tuesday. Prosecutors have until Jan. 29 to respond to the defense motions with filings of their own.

AP file photo This photo provided by the Macon County Sheriff's Office in Decatur, Ill., shows Brendt Christensen. Attorneys for Christensen, accused of kidnapping resulting in the death of University of Illinois scholar Yingying Zhang from China, are asking a federal judge to dismiss the main charge against him and change the venue of his upcoming trial. Christensen's attorney filed 12 pretrial motions Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, including six to suppress or exclude evidence they say was illegally or improperly obtained.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/17/4ac3d9e392394b23bb94bbce502063f9/3d52d5d8-6c8a-4a5f-a05b-215aec54a1e2/image-pv_web.jpg




Will County Historical Museum discovers flowers from Abraham Lincoln's funeralThe Will County Historical Museum and Research Center announced the recent discovery of a small box of flowers from the 1865 funeral of President Abraham Lincoln.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:37:00 GMT

LOCKPORT – The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center recently announced the discovery of a collection of flowers that were lain on the funeral bier of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865 in Washington, D.C.

Historical museum President Sandy Vasko was the one who found the box of flowers as she and some volunteers were going through some of their many items at the museum in December.

Volunteer Al Smuskiewicz said that the box must have been lying around for about 50 years. He said it used to be at the Joliet Public Library and then somehow ended up at the museum, which has received thousands of donated historical items from all over the county throughout the years.

“It’s fascinating how it’s been lying around for all these years and it’s never really been discovered by anybody at the historical society,” Smuskiewicz said.

Smuskiewicz said the flowers were clipped off by a general related to the president’s wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, and then changed hands multiple times before eventually finding their way into the possession of the wife of former Joliet Mayor James Elwood.

A note by the box gives a short description of its history: “Among the James G. Elwood collection, this small box was found to contain a dried flower, and a note on the back is written: ‘Flowers from the bier of President Lincoln, while the remains were lying in state at the capital in Washington, D.C. April 20, 1865. Presented by General J.S. Todd to General I.M. Haynie, and by him presented of Mrs. Jas. G. Elwood (nee Pearce).’

“Dr. James Cornelius, Lincoln curator at the Abraham Lincoln Museum in Springfield, has determined they are genuine.”

To celebrate the discovery, the center will hold an unveiling at 4 p.m. Feb. 17, with a limited number of tickets going for $50 a person. After the presentation, participants will be treated to a buffet dinner, silent auction and a speaker from an expert on Lincoln.

The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center is at 803 S. State St. in Lockport.

The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center announced the recent discovery of a small box of flowers from the 1865 funeral of President Abraham Lincoln.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/17/54be227d521f445ab8440b233b886ff8/7c187686-72fc-4d57-bb6e-a353b29e13e3/image-pv_web.jpg




Police: Crystal Lake man found with more than 17 ounces of marijuana, marijuana plantsDavid P. Ready, 53, of the zero to 100 block of East Crystal Lake Avenue, Crystal Lake, has been charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a hypodermic syringe and production of marijuana sativa plants.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:35:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – A Crystal Lake man has been arrested on numerous felony drug charges after an unrelated incident that brought police to his apartment.

David P. Ready, 53, of the zero to 100 block of East Crystal Lake Avenue, has been charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a hypodermic syringe and production of marijuana sativa plants, according to a news release from Crystal Lake police.

Police responded at 8:40 p.m. Monday to a call to Ready’s apartment when someone at the home reported a man trying to force his way inside. A 52-year-old woman who lived at the apartment and her 34-year-old friend were unharmed during the incident, which police said is being investigated as a domestic violence case. The suspect fled before police arrived, Crystal Lake police said.

While officers investigated the domestic violence incident, they discovered evidence of narcotics at the home. Police obtained a search warrant, and during a search, they found Ready hiding in a locked bedroom.

Police arrested Ready after they found more than 17 ounces of marijuana and several marijuana plants in Ready’s bedroom, according to the release. He also had an outstanding warrant for failing to appear for driving offenses out of Kane County, police said.

Ready was booked into the McHenry County Jail and is awaiting a bond hearing. The investigation is ongoing, and additional charges and arrests are pending, police said.

If convicted of the most serious charge, Ready could face from three to seven years in prison.

Ready was found guilty in 2015 for producing less than five marijuana plants, according to McHenry County court records.

David P. Ready, 53, of the zero to 100 block of East Crystal Lake Avenue, Crystal Lake, has been charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a hypodermic syringe and production of marijuana sativa plants.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/1fe22e0c037c4d11b0689686c2b8da60/dbe80312-8961-408e-b4bd-d9ba696cfb33/image-pv_web.jpg




Crews replace utility pole damaged in Crystal Lake crash, close part of Route 31

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:31:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Part of Route 31 was reduced to one lane Tuesday morning in Crystal Lake while utility crews worked to replace a pole damaged in a crash.

About 7 a.m. Tuesday, a teenager driving north on Route 31 lost control of a vehicle and slid because of icy road conditions, Crystal Lake Patrol Cmdr. Scott Miller said.

The vehicle left the roadway, traveled down an embankment and struck the utility pole. Miller said he believed the pole cracked, but its wires remained intact.

No power outages appeared on ComEd’s outage map.

The car’s air bags deployed, and the teenager was not injured. Miller said the individual was cited for driving too fast for conditions.

The Crystal Lake Police Department sent an alert at 8:46 a.m. Tuesday to warn motorists that northbound traffic on Route 31 north of Three Oaks Road was reduced to one lane so ComEd crews could replace a pole.

Repairs were expected to be finished Tuesday afternoon, according to the alert.

Between Sunday and Monday, McHenry County received between 4 and 6 inches of snow. The precipitation combined with below freezing temperatures made for slick roads Tuesday morning.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/59f887eabb9945d4bf5b67310ec22e5c/b43b9cab-434d-41ec-93ee-8aa2c244d5fa/image-pv_web.jpg




Metra fares to increase Feb. 1 to close $45 million funding gapMetra employees board an inbound train to Chicago at the Cary station Jan. 7, 2014. The fare increase that Metra officials voted on in November will go into effect Feb. 1.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:30:00 GMT

The fare increase that Metra officials voted on in November will go into effect Feb. 1. As part of the commuter rail system’s $797.2 million operating budget for 2018, several fare increases are about to take effect, according to a news release from Metra. Those increases include: • The price of one-way tickets increasing by 25 cents in all zones (a 2.3 percent to 6.7 percent increase, depending on the zone). • The price of 10-ride tickets increasing from $4.25 to $7.75 (8 percent to 12.6 percent), depending on the zone. • The price of monthly passes increasing from $9 to $12.50 (4.1 percent to 8.4 percent), depending on the zone. Monthly tickets are available to buy in advance, with sales beginning on the 20th of each month. • The price of a weekend pass, which allows unlimited rides throughout the Metra system on both Saturday and Sunday, increasing to $10 from $8. • The price of some reduced-fare tickets and passes increasing. Additionally, a number of weekday trains will be curtailed or eliminated on the North Central Service, SouthWest Service and Rock Island Line – and weekend trains will be cut on the Milwaukee District North Line – starting Feb. 5. This has resulted in some train runs being eliminated, some train departure times being changed, some trains being renumbered and others having to change or add station stops. “Customers are advised to check the new schedules to understand how their commute may be affected,” the release stated. New schedules are available online at metrarail.com, and paper copies will be available at Metra’s downtown stations next week. Metra officials agreed on the changes in November in an effort to close a $45 million funding gap. The company’s new budget included about $17 million in fare increases, about $3 million in service cuts and a variety of other changes. The board also approved a 2018 capital budget totaling $196.8 million – only one-sixth of Metra’s estimated annual need for the maintenance and renewal of its capital assets, according to the release. “We are raising fares because everything we did last year will cost more to do this year,” Metra CEO/Executive Director Jim Derwinski said. “And we are raising fares because the public subsidies that would normally help us cover those rising costs have been cut. We are simply using these funds to cover the increased costs of operating the railroad.” While voting to approve the 2018 budget, board members said the shortfalls in funding for both operating and capital needs point to a growing problem with local, state and federal subsidies for public transportation. “The sales taxes and state aid that fund about half of Metra’s operating budget and the local, state and federal grants that pay for nearly all of its capital budget are not keeping up with rising costs and the aging system’s replacement and renovation needs,” the release stated. For information about fare increases and service cuts, visit metrarail.com. Metra employees board an inbound train to Chicago at the Cary station Jan. 7, 2014. The fare increase that Metra officials voted on in November will go into effect Feb. 1.[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/2793afc63a7d437c822f5b91af4d6e25/6c72589f-a640-4ae8-bc9a-3045e04f293f/image-pv_web.jpg




Woodstock discusses liquor licenses for Your Sister's Tomato restaurant, The Double Yolk Cafe

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:30:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – The owners of Your Sister’s Tomato food truck plan to open a restaurant in Woodstock.

Tammy Hinchee and Lisa Foss have requested a liquor license for the new restaurant, 110 Irving Ave. in Woodstock. City Council members met Tuesday to consider the request, which would allow the business to sell liquor for on-premise consumption as well as permit packaged wine and beer sales.

Your Sister’s Tomato has been operating as a mobile, wood-fired pizza truck that caters corporate events, weddings, parties and festivals.

Council members also debated waiving the city’s moratorium on liquor licenses so another Woodstock business can apply. The Double Yolk Cafe, at 117 E. Van Buren St. on the Square, has requested a license to sell alcohol at the restaurant. A bar would not be permitted under the requested Class D license, according to city documents.

Thomas Teresi of Huntley took over the restaurant formerly known as Papa G’s last year.

Council members imposed a moratorium on the acceptance of liquor license applications in April 2015 to better allow the city to monitor the presence of businesses that sell alcohol.

At the meeting, two residents protested the city’s perceived relaxed attitude toward granting liquor licenses and voiced concerns about liquor licenses acting as a gateway to video gaming terminals.

“If you are going to have a moratorium, really have a moratorium,” resident Lisa Hanson said. “I think [the] City Council needs to come up with a better solution. ... I feel like we are at a point where we need to look at the entire liquor licensing process and restructure.”


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/e6914bc8b991498cae21880fbebc2591/b53ee075-1212-4868-9f54-91f046acc00f/image-pv_web.jpg




New Directions Addiction Recovery Services to host 1st fundraiser dinner

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:29:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – The New Directions Addiction Recovery Services organization will host its first fundraising dinner to benefit a third sober living home bought in December.

The fundraiser, starting at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 3 at Pinstripes, 100 W. Higgins Road, South Barrington, will be a chance for people to look back and celebrate on what the organization has done in the past six years since opening in 2011, President Chris Reed said.

“We’ve had so much support from the community, so we wanted to take an opportunity to share everything we’ve been able to do as a result of the support,” Reed said. “It’s certainly a fundraiser, but also a chance to get everyone together in one room and look back.”

Money raised during the event will go toward the $20,000 needed in renovations to the third house bought by New Directions, 4612 Tile Line Road, in unincorporated Crystal Lake, and scholarship programming, Reed said.

The purchase of the third house closed Dec. 28, and Reed hopes to have it up and running within the next two months. Reed said the zoning code allows for group homes in the area.

Residents attending a Nunda Township meeting Thursday night spoke out against the group home.

The house previously was foreclosed on and needs new plumbing and a remodeled kitchen, Reed said.

It has not yet been decided whether the house will be for women or men, and Reed said he is waiting to see how the women’s waiting list looks after the opening of the second house.

The event will feature bowling and bocci, live music by Althea Grace, a live auction, silent auction and 50/50 raffle.

Blackhawks 2010 Stanley Cup winner Brent Sopel will host the event, and Brandon Novak, author of “Dreamseller” and an actor on the MTV show “Jackass,” will give a speech.

“We’ve known Brandon for a while just through crossing paths in the recovery community, and he was willing to come out and tell his story,” Reed said. “Brent is able to share his experience with drug abuse and addiction in the NHL, and his girlfriend’s younger brother passed away from a drug overdose, so he’s personally drawn to the cause.”

Tickets cost $95 a person and can be bought online at www.ndars.org/tickets.




Join eagle search activities Saturday along Fox River, Geneva Lake

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:29:00 GMT

RICHMOND – Celebrate the return of eagles to the Fox River Valley on Saturday.

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources, McHenry County Audubon Society, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Friends of the Hackmatack National Wildlife Refuge will be present from 8 to 10 a.m. at numerous locations along the Fox River and Geneva Lake to help participants search for eagles Saturday.

Volunteers and wildlife staff will have spotting scopes and binoculars, and they can help identify birds seen in the areas near the McHenry, Algonquin and Carpentersville dams and at Fontana Beach on Geneva Lake in Wisconsin.

A complete map is posted at tinyurl.com/InSearchofEagles.

For information, call Cindy Skrukrud of Friends of Hackmatack National Wildlife Refuge at 312-251-1680, ext. 1015.




Judge won't reduce bond for man charged with DUI in fatal McHenry crashEduardo Figueroa-Martinez, of the 4400 block of West Ramble Road, McHenry, faces charges of aggravated driving under the influence after the car he was driving Dec. 26 struck a pole and his passenger, 22-year-old Jose Luis Ortiz Reyes of Wonder Lake, was ejected and killed.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:29:00 GMT

McHENRY – A judge said she won’t reduce bond Tuesday for a man charged with aggravated driving under the influence in a crash that killed a 22-year-old Wonder Lake man in December.

Defense attorney Dan Hofmann asked the judge to reduce 20-year-old Eduardo Figueroa-Martinez’s bail from $50,000 to $10,000.

Figueroa-Martinez’s relatives said they could pull together $10,000 to have him released, but prosecutors said reducing his bond would “diminish the gravity of the offense.”

Figueroa-Martinez, of the 4400 block of West Ramble Road, McHenry, faces charges for aggravated driving under the influence after the car he was driving Dec. 26 struck a pole.

A passenger in the car, 22-year-old Jose Luis Ortiz Reyes of Wonder Lake, was ejected and killed, according to a news release at the time.

Prosecutors also argued that Figueroa-Martinez would be a flight risk, noting that he’s not a U.S. citizen and has family outside the state and country.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents have a hold on Figueroa-Martinez, meaning he could be taken into federal custody and required to post additional bail to be released.

He is due in court Jan. 26.

Eduardo Figueroa-Martinez, of the 4400 block of West Ramble Road, McHenry, faces charges of aggravated driving under the influence after the car he was driving Dec. 26 struck a pole and his passenger, 22-year-old Jose Luis Ortiz Reyes of Wonder Lake, was ejected and killed.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/988ce1d3c1314b388683b30c050a72e1/2db4ff3d-213b-48cd-ad52-a547909becbb/image-pv_web.jpg




Crystal Lake City Council OKs preliminary plan for Mercyhealth facilityMercyhealth plans to build a small hospital in Crystal Lake at the corner of Three Oaks Road and Route 31. Mercyhealth officials received preliminary approval Tuesday from the Crystal Lake City Council.Mercyhealth Vice President of Government Relations Jennifer Hall and attorney Joe Gottemoller present design proposals for Mercyhealth's proposed facility to the Crystal Lake Planning and Zoning Commission on Jan. 3. Mercyhealth received preliminary approval for the plan Tuesday from the City Council.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – The Crystal Lake City Council approved a preliminary plan Tuesday night for Mercyhealth’s proposed small hospital and medical office facility on Route 31. The 111,346-square-foot hospital at the southeast corner of the Route 31-Three Oaks Road intersection would house 11 medical-surgical beds, two intensive care beds, a comprehensive emergency room, two operating rooms, full-service radiology imaging, a laboratory and a pharmacy. A 39,922-square-foot office building connected to the hospital would have 42 examination rooms. The site also would feature a helipad that could be used to transport trauma victims to larger, better-equipped facilities. The City Council had no problem with the design of the facility itself, but there was a brief discussion regarding the helipad and how to best address traffic concerns in the surrounding area. Mercyhealth officials believe that the helipad, located on the northeastern section of the site, would not be used often. Although it does not meet the minimum 1,000-foot distance from the nearest residence, the effect of the helicopter will be less than that of a full-service hospital, according to city documents. The small hospital is not a Level I trauma center, so no patients would be flown to it. Council member Haig Haleblian was concerned about prevailing winds from the west having an effect on the proposed north-south flight plan. “Most runways in the area are east-west runways,” Haleblian said. Ultimate approval of the helipad and its corresponding flight plan will not be up to the city, however, and the proposal could be tweaked. Inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration will visit the site to determine whether Mercyhealth’s proposal makes sense. Regarding traffic implications, Public Works Director Michael Magnuson pointed the City Council’s attention to the city’s long-held desire to align Raymond Drive and Tek Drive and push the Illinois Department of Transportation for a traffic signal where the roads would intersect with Route 31. Mercyhealth is against this proposal because Raymond Drive would have to be realigned and cut through the southern end of the 18-acre site. Council members, like most of the Planning and Zoning Commission earlier this month, were not in favor of that idea. Some council members suggested a right in, right out policy for Raymond Drive, as the prospect of a left turn onto Route 31 from there during rush hour already is dangerous. “Only an idiot is making a left hand turn off of Tek Drive or Raymond Drive onto 31, unless you’re there at midafternoon, when it’s possible to do it,” council member Ellen Brady Mueller said. Council members were in agreement that they do not want to push for another light on Route 31. Mayor Aaron Shepley, Centegra’s Health System’s general counsel and president of insurance services, recused himself from discussion by leaving City Hall before it began. Mercyhealth plans to build a small hospital in Crystal Lake at the corner of Three Oaks Road and Route 31. Mercyhealth officials received preliminary approval Tuesday from the Crystal Lake City Council.[...]Mercyhealth Vi[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/860caf8df3ea4eaa9dee14d52c114d8a/30ef3ad2-55af-4ded-827a-81fb50aaa8d1/image-pv_web.jpg




Illinois judge orders intractable pain onto marijuana treatment list

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

CHICAGO – A judge has ordered the state of Illinois to expand the qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use to include intractable pain.

The order issued Tuesday by Cook County Circuit Judge Raymond Mitchell seeks to overturn a decision by the Illinois Department of Public Health rejecting pain that’s resistant to treatment as a qualifier for medical marijuana use. Last year, Director Dr. Nirav Shah cited a “lack of high-quality data” as a reason for denying a recommendation by the now-defunct Illinois Medical Cannabis Advisory Board for the decision.

A health department spokeswoman said Mitchell’s ruling will be appealed.

The ruling is the result of a lawsuit filed by Ann Mednick of Rolling Meadows. She contended that she has taken opioid pills to cope with extreme pain caused by osteoarthritis but wants a treatment with fewer side effects.




Algonquin Township fires Ryan Provenzano as chief of staffTownship Supervisor Charles Lutzow's 23-year-old chief of staff Ryan Provenzano is seen Tuesday in the parking lot of the township office at 3702 Route 14 in Crystal Lake. Lutzow fired Provenzano on Tuesday. Provenzano, a political insider, was making more than $33 an hour in two Algonquin Township offices.Algonquin Township Supervisor Charles Lutzow's 23-year-old chief of staff, Ryan Provenzano, walks in the parking lot of the township office, 3702 Route 14, in Crystal Lake on Tuesday. Lutzow fired Provenzano, a political insider who made more than $33 an hour in two township offices.Algonquin Township Supervisor Charles Lutzow's 23-year-old chief of staff, Ryan Provenzano, walks in the parking lot of the township office, 3702 Route 14, in Crystal Lake on Tuesday. Lutzow fired Provenzano, a political insider who made more than $33 an hour in two township offices.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:27:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – Ryan Provenzano, a political insider who earned more than $33 an hour in two Algonquin Township offices, has been fired. Township Supervisor Charles Lutzow terminated his 23-year-old chief of staff Tuesday morning and banned him from the premises. Lutzow would not comment on why he fired Provenzano, whose roles in two offices have raised questions among township officials and road district employees who contend that his hiring was the product of patronage and cronyism. Despite several phone calls to his cellphone, Provenzano could not be reached for comment Tuesday.  The Republican had agreements in place to earn $32 an hour and $63,000 a year working full time as the chief of staff in Lutzow’s office, and another deal working part time as deputy highway commissioner at the Algonquin Township Highway Department, where he made $33 an hour. That’s about $4 more an hour than the road district’s highest-paid employee, Randy Voss, who has worked for the highway department for 44 years and earns $29.14 an hour. It is unclear whether Provenzano will continue working for the road district. Highway Commissioner Andrew Gasser could not be reached for comment. Algonquin Township trustees commended Lutzow’s firing of Provenzano. “Although there is much more work to be done to repair Algonquin Township, I believe Supervisor Lutzow made the right decision in this instance,” Trustee Rachael Lawrence said. “It was the only thing that could be done,” Trustee Dan Shea said. “Working for the two departments was ill-advised.” Provenzano picking up hours across the hall in the road district did not sit well with township officials, Trustee Dave Chapman said. “Chuck [Lutzow] felt that action brought disrepute upon Algonquin Township,” Chapman said. “It was untenable to have him working there, and every one of us had a bad taste in our mouth.” Provenzano is the son of former McHenry County Board member Nick Provenzano, who now works for U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, and the nephew of former Maine Township Highway Commissioner Robert Provenzano.  He is a graduate of Marian Catholic High School and former employee of McHenry Harley-Davidson. Ryan Provenzano spent 10 months as a front house manager at Plum Garden Restaurant – a popular Chinese eatery in McHenry owned by former McHenry County Board member Perry Moy, who donated $550 to Nick Provenzano’s political efforts in 2004, according to campaign finance records. Ryan Provenzano helped McHenry Mayor Wayne Jett win election as his campaign manager, and he worked as a field director for Gov. Bruce Rauner’s campaign operations in McHenry County. Ryan Provenzano and his father helped Lutzow run his campaign for township supervisor. Lutzow has denied that Ryan Provenzano was hired as a political favor. Former Algonquin Township Supervisor Dianne Klemm hired Ryan Provenzano early last year to help transition the office into the hands of Lutzow, who recently was elected supervisor. Provenzano then earned $13 an hour as an administrative assistant – a job that belong[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/13cd7b7b24e040b98391036dea65837e/acab442c-07c1-4a50-8d20-e948a450227e/image-pv_web.jpg




Families, friends mourn Hebron woman, Marengo man killed in weekend crashPersonnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.Falynn Hironimus, 29, of Hebron was pronounced dead at the scene of a car collision about 4:20 p.m. Sunday in the 7400 block of Route 47 in Hebron, McHenry County Sheriff’s Deputy Sandra Rogers said.Personnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:27:00 GMT

HEBRON – For Juan Castillo, the few days after a fatal crash in Hebron have given him little time to grieve as he takes care of two daughters who lost their mother. “I have to stay strong for them, so our day is rolling like any other day,” Castillo said. “They cry out for their mom, but they don’t understand.” Falynn Hironimus, 29, of Hebron and Jose Rodriguez, 42, of Marengo were pronounced dead at the scene of a car collision about 4:20 p.m. Sunday in the 7400 block of Route 47 in Hebron, McHenry County Sheriff’s Deputy Sandra Rogers said. Autopsies completed Tuesday showed that Rodriguez died from blunt force trauma to the chest and Hironimus died from blunt force trauma to the head, neck, chest and abdomen, McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski said. For the Rodriguez family, the past two days have been busy filled with trying to make funeral arrangements while still in the hospital, friend Antonio Ramirez said. Rodriguez’s wife and his two children, ages 9 and 12, were passengers in a vehicle that was struck Sunday. The wife and one child were taken to Centegra Hospital – McHenry in critical condition and later sent to Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge. The other child was taken to Centegra Hospital – Huntley in stable condition, police said. All three were in stable condition Tuesday, Rogers said. Officials would not say what caused the crash. Hironimus was driving north in a 2009 Kia Rio, and for unknown reasons, she crossed into the southbound lane and crashed into a 2005 Chevy Impala driven by Rodriguez, Rogers said. The Northwest Herald submitted a Freedom of Information Act request Tuesday seeking police reports from the incident. Hironimus was someone who always went out of her way to help others, Castillo said. She was on her way home from cleaning her disabled father’s home at the time of the crash. Hironimus’ two daughters – Madison, 3, and Katelynn, 1 – were the center of her world, said Castillo, her fiance, who she’d been with for five years. Castillo said she cared for the children while he was at work. “She was a strong people person,” he said. “Hebron is a small town, but everyone around here loved her.” Hironimus used to work at the Dollar General in Hebron, where she met the whole town, Castillo said. “I’ve been hearing from people all over, and I knew she had a connection with people, but it was stronger than I could ever imagine,” Castillo said. “Her whole life was helping people.” Hironimus cleaned her father’s home after he had a stroke, and she also spent time helping an older woman she met at Dollar General clean her home and take care of her horses. “She did that just because she wanted to,” Castillo said. “That’s just the type of person she was.” The visitation for Hironimus will be from 10 a.m. until the noon funeral service Saturday, Jan. 20, at Strang Funeral Chapel & Crematorium, 410 E. Belvidere Road, Grayslake. Interment will follow the service at Ascension Catholic Cemetery, 1920 Buckley Road, Libertyville. [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/94cf331d13f54886ab3de96c5b7dff3f/cdf5fd6a-9305-41d3-888a-1090e6ce73b3/image-pv_web.jpg




Will County Historical Museum discovered flowers from Lincoln’s funeralThe Will County Historical Museum and Research Center announced the recent discovery of a small box of flowers from the 1865 funeral of President Abraham Lincoln.

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 04:43:00 GMT

LOCKPORT – The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center recently announced the discovery of a collection of flowers that were lain on the funeral bier of President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C., in 1865.

Will County Historical Museum and Research Center President Sandy Vasko was the one who found the box of flowers as she and some volunteers were going through some of their many items at the museum in December.

Volunteer Al Smuskiewicz said that the box must have been lying around for about 50 years. He said it used to be at the Joliet Public Library and then somehow ended up at the museum, which has received thousands of donated historical items from all over the county throughout the years.

“It’s fascinating how it’s been lying around for all these years and it’s never really been discovered by anybody at the historical society,” Smuskiewicz said.

Smuskiewicz said the flowers were clipped off by a general related to the president’s wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, and then changed hands multiple times before eventually finding its way into the possession of the wife of former Joliet Mayor James Elwood.

A note by the box gives a short description of its history:

“Among the James G. Elwood collection this small box was found to contain a dried flower and a note on the back is written:

‘Flowers from the bier of President Lincoln, while the remains were lying in state at the capital in Washington, D.C. April 20, 1865. Presented by General J.S. Todd to General I.M. Haynie, and by him presented of Mrs. Jas. G. Elwood (nee Pearce).’

Dr. James Cornelius, Lincoln curator at the Abraham Lincoln Museum in Springfield, has determined they are genuine.”

To celebrate the discovery, the center will hold an unveiling on Saturday, Feb. 17, at 4 p.m. with limited tickets going for $50 a person. After the presentation, participants will be treated to a buffet dinner, silent auction and a speaker from an expert on Lincoln.

The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center is located at 803 S. State St. in Lockport.

The Will County Historical Museum and Research Center announced the recent discovery of a small box of flowers from the 1865 funeral of President Abraham Lincoln.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/06/f24f31554e7c4f3fa31188fb6645ac20/4d9c213b-34c8-4b13-9d80-470e6e36fa04/image-pv_web.jpg




Doc: Trump healthy, did 'exceedingly well' on cognitive testWhite House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson speaks to reporters during the daily press briefing in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 22:26:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump's overall health "is excellent" and he did "exceedingly well" on cognitive screening, the Navy doctor who performed Trump's first medical checkup said Tuesday. Ronny Jackson had issued a blanket declaration that Trump was in "excellent health" after last Friday's exam, and promised to provide a fuller readout on Tuesday. He reported that the 6-foot-3 president weighed in at 239 pounds — three pounds heavier than he was in September 2016, the last time Trump revealed his weight to the public. Trump's blood pressure was 122 over 74, and his total cholesterol was 223, which is higher than recommended. Trump was 70 when he took office on Jan. 20, 2017, making him the oldest person ever elected to the presidency. Trump's heart exam was normal, with regular rhythm and no abnormal sounds, which Jackson said led him to conclude with confidence that Trump "has a very strong and a very probable possibility of making it completely through his presidency with no medical issues." Trump has no heart disease and no family history of it. The 71-year-old president performed "exceedingly well" on cognitive screening, which is not standard but was requested by Trump. The doctor said he had "absolutely no concerns" about Trump's cognitive abilities. He speculated that Trump requested the exam in an attempt to beat back the narrative of the past few weeks that he is mentally unfit for office. "He's very sharp. He's very articulate when he speaks to me," Jackson said. "I've never known him to repeat himself when he's around me. I found no reason whatsoever to think the president has any issues whatsoever with his thought process." Trump last revealed details about his health two months before the November 2016 election. Trump's cholesterol reading from Friday's exam was borderline high even though he takes a low dose of the statin drug Crestor. Jackson said he would increase that dose in an effort to get Trump's so-called "bad" cholesterol, or LDL level, below 120; it currently is 143. Trump's body mass index, or BMI, of 29.9 puts him in the category of being overweight for his height. A BMI of 30 and over is considered obese. Jackson said he prescribed a diet lower in fat and carbohydrates, and exercise. He'd like the president to lose 10 to 15 pounds over the next year. Despite the diet and cholesterol concerns, Jackson stressed that Trump's "cardiac health is excellent." He passed a battery of heart exams including a stress test that Jackson said showed an above-average exercise capacity for a man of his age, despite some calcium buildup in his arteries. He also takes a low-dose aspirin for heart health. With such a bad dietary history, how can that be? Jackson said Trump has avoided some big heart risks — he's never smoked and isn't diabetic — and has no family history of heart problems. Trump did not undergo a psychiatric exam. But in a surprise, Jackson said he did perform a cognitive screening test, at Trump's request. Called the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, it is designed to detect early signs of memor[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/7f8fa3323bc4408f9a0753ce59316feb/2bef9359-c7d2-469c-8c48-8f616ec2cc91/image-pv_web.jpg




Panama Hotel votes to drop Trump Рbut his company won't goFILE - In this photo taken July 4, 2011, shows the Trump Ocean Club International Hotel and Tower, third building from left, in Panama City. An attempt to oust President Donald Trump’s hotel business from managing a Panama luxury hotel has turned bitter, with accusations of financial misconduct. Trump Hotels is contesting its firing, and two people told The Associated Press that Trump’s staff ran off a team of Marriott executives invited last month to visit the property during a search for a new hotel operator. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 18:52:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – An attempt to oust President Donald Trump's hotel business from managing a luxury hotel in Panama has turned bitter, with accusations of financial misconduct. Trump Hotels is contesting its firing, and its staff ran off a team of Marriott executives invited last month to visit the property during a search for a new hotel operator, according to two people familiar with the matter. After the owners' association accused Trump Hotels of mismanagement and financial misconduct in a $15 million arbitration claim, the company owned by the president fired back with a $200 million counterclaim and refused to turn over the property's financial records. When a team from Marriott International Inc. came to the property at the invitation of the hotel's majority owner, Trump staff asked them to leave, according to the two people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss publicly what happened behind the scenes. The head of Trump Hotels, Eric Danziger, also called Marriott chief executive Arne Sorenson to complain about the visit, the two people said. Marriott generally steers clear of properties facing ownership and management disputes. But the call from a senior Trump executive to the CEO of Marriott, which manages more than 6,000 hotels, raised the awkward matter of how American companies interact with a business owned by the president. Marriott, like most major international companies, has significant business and public policy interests before the Trump administration. Federal employees who travel and hold government conferences pay to use its properties, and Marriott has been lobbying the administration and Congress over U.S. tourism, trade and legal restrictions against property ownership in Cuba, disclosures to consumers about resort fees, and other issues. Trump Organization general counsel Alan Garten said the call was not intended to pressure Marriott. "We have a great relationship with Marriott," Garten said. "They were appreciative that we let them know that we have a valid contract." A spokeswoman for Marriott declined to comment. The matter highlights potential ethics concerns raised by Trump's decision not to divest himself from his businesses, said Larry Noble, head of the Campaign Legal Center, a Washington-based public interest group that studies issues of democracy. "I don't know if they've got a valid contract or not," Noble said. "But if you're a big company, you'd really have to think twice before getting into a fight with one of the president's companies." Since Trump took office, Trump hotels in New York and Toronto have quietly reached deals to separate themselves from Trump's brand. But the Panama dispute is shaping up as a brawl. In a letter to fellow owners, the investor leading the hotel owners' board of directors accused Trump Hotels of "gross mismanagement, breaches of contract, conversion and breaches of fiduciary duties." Conversion is a legal term for the misuse of someone else's property for one's own gain. "Our investment has no futu[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/87963f3475c543e1bd6305864a1ff4b0/a304d811-30f5-4d51-a769-a6a21efb96d3/image-pv_web.jpg




Sage YMCA in Crystal Lake sets preschool open houseH. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com Sage YMCA counselor Matt Gagnon instructs his charges in the Discover preschoolers camp how to jump over two ropes then run back in line. In addition to the "traditional" summer day camp complete with campfires and songs, the Sage YMCA also is launching its all-day specialty camp option this summer.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 14:37:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Sage YMCA is hosting open houses for the organization’s preschool, which is enrolling students for the 2018-19 school year.

Upcoming open house dates are from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 25 and 10 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 27. Prospective preschool parents are invited to attend, according to a news release.

For information, visit http://www.ymcachicago.org/sage/pages/sage-y-preschool, or to schedule a personal tour if unable to attend an open house, contact Barbie Fredrick at 815-526-1632 or bfredrick@ymcachicago.org.

The Sage YMCA preschool offers a variety of programs for children 2½ years old and older.

Available sessions include two-, three-, four- or five-day programs, as well as both half-day morning or afternoon and full-day classes.

H. Rick Bamman - hbamman@shawmedia.com Sage YMCA counselor Matt Gagnon instructs his charges in the Discover preschoolers camp how to jump over two ropes then run back in line. In addition to the "traditional" summer day camp complete with campfires and songs, the Sage YMCA also is launching its all-day specialty camp option this summer.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/9dd07388f694449e96017e8d53a3952b/7a0284d2-93cb-4e66-bf1a-a979e8d475e7/image-pv_web.jpg




McHenry completes boat launch project at Miller Riverfront ParkShaw Media file photo

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 14:34:00 GMT

McHENRY – The city has completed its motorized boat launch at Miller Riverfront Park nearly three decades after its initial design and construction.

The McHenry City Council met Monday to discuss the project and a final payment to R.E. Hummel Construction Co. The city paid the Island Lake-based company $239,953 for the completed work on the launch, according to city documents.

The project has been part of plans for the park since 1988, but it stalled because of then-new rules adopted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The policy limited the number of boat ramps and multiuser piers in the Fox Lake-Chain O’ Lakes region to those that already existed, according to city documents.

The remainder of the project, such as installation of a gravel parking lot, proceeded. The city also developed a road with space to accommodate boats and a path leading to a carry-in area for canoes and rowboats, according to city documents.

The project includes the ramp itself along with galvanized seawalls, boat tie-ups and bollards, according to city documents.

McHenry Parks and Recreation Director Bill Hobson said the ramp installation has been a goal and priority for his department as well as the city.

“Increasing access to the Fox River has constantly ranked near the top of both the master and strategic plan,” Hobson said. “Unfortunately, simply acquiring the rights to the boat launch … has long been a stumbling block.”

The city worked with Lakemoor and Johnsburg to acquire rights to an approved but unused boat launch, which allowed the project to move forward, Hobson said.

Miller Riverfront Park, 2900 Charles Miller Road, also offers a playground and nature area with fishing and picnic amenities.

Shaw Media file photo


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/7c00266d5fec4d82ba2bf5d043579e36/1d4cb35f-982a-4ea3-bd92-26cee735a7ed/image-pv_web.jpg




California teen leads deputies to parents' house of horrorsIn this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 photo released by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department shows Louise Anna Turpin. Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, with some of them malnourished and chained to beds. Riverside County sheriff's deputies arrested the parents David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin on Sunday. The parents could face charges including torture and child endangerment. (Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP)In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 photo released by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department shows suspect David Allen Turpin. Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, with some of them malnourished and chained to beds. Riverside County sheriff's deputies arrested the parents David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin on Sunday. The parents could face charges including torture and child endangerment. (Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 13:36:00 GMT

PERRIS, Calif. — A 17-year-old girl called police after escaping from her family's home where she and her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, some so malnourished officers at first believed all were children even though seven are adults. The girl, who was so small officers initially believed she was only 10, called 911 and was met by police who interviewed her and then went to the family home in Perris, about 70 miles southeast of Los Angeles. They found several children shackled to their beds with chains and padlocks in dark, foul-smelling surroundings, according to the Riverside County Sheriff's Department. The children, ages 2 to 29, "appeared to be malnourished and very dirty," according to a press release announcing Sunday's arrest of the parents. "The victims were provided with food and beverages after they claimed to be starving." David Allen Turpin, 57, and Louise Anna Turpin, 49, each were held on $9 million bail and could face charges including torture and child endangerment. It wasn't immediately known if they had attorneys. State Department of Education records show the family home has the same address as Sandcastle Day School, where David Turpin is listed as principal. In the 2016-17 school year it had an enrollment of six with one student in each of the fifth, sixth, eighth, ninth, 10th and 12th grades. Neighbors said they were stunned by the arrests. Andrew Santillan, who lives around the corner, heard about the case from a friend. "I had no idea this was going on," he told the Press-Enterprise of Riverside. "I didn't know there were kids in the house." Other neighbors described the family as intensely private. A few years ago, Robert Perkins said he and his mother saw a few family members constructing a Nativity scene in the Turpins' front yard. Perkins said he complimented them on it. "They didn't say a word," he said. The Turpins filed for bankruptcy in 2011, stating in court documents they owed between $100,000 and $500,000, The New York Times reported. At that time, Turpin worked as an engineer at Northrop Grumman and earned $140,000 annually and his wife was a homemaker, records showed. Their bankruptcy lawyer, Ivan Trahan, told the Times he never met the children but the couple "spoke about them highly." "We remember them as a very nice couple," Trahan said, adding that Louise Turpin told him the family loved Disneyland and visited often. In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 photo released by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department shows Louise Anna Turpin. Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, with some of them malnourished and chained to beds. Riverside County sheriff's deputies arrested the parents David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin on Sunday. The parents could face charges including torture and child endangerment. (Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP)[...]In th[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/dde3ac1ece794b2f9536ae73c8042823/4abddd32-4f66-49e0-bc57-da35e7bb9c85/image-pv_web.jpg




Image problem? Some cities end their role in A&E's 'Live PD'A crew from the TV program "Live PD," a reality show by the A&E Network, records an officer from the Bridgeport Police Department while on patrol Nov. 3, 2016, in Bridgeport, Conn. Some law enforcement agencies, including the Bridgeport police, have ended their agreements to be on the show after local government leaders concluded that the national spotlight on criminal activity overshadowed the positive things happening in their hometowns.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

HARTFORD, Conn. – For some of the law enforcement agencies that agreed to be on A&E Network’s real-time police show “Live PD,” the goal of being more transparent with their profession under increasing scrutiny clashed with concerns over public image. Police departments in Bridgeport, Connecticut; Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Streetsboro, Ohio, decided not to renew their contracts to be on the program since it premiered in October 2016 as some local government leaders concluded the national spotlight on criminal activity overshadowed the positive things happening in their hometowns. Another department, the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office in South Carolina, ended its run on the show in August, saying deputies needed a break from the cameras. The show, which airs Friday and Saturday nights, has live camera crews following officers in several police departments as they patrol. There is a delay of five to 20 minutes to prevent the airing of disturbing content or the release of information that could compromise investigations, the show’s producers say. “As the debate over the policing of America continues to be a part of the daily conversation across the nation, Live PD viewers get unfettered and unfiltered live access inside a variety of the country’s busiest police forces, both urban and rural, and the communities they patrol on a typical night,” the show’s website says. In Bridgeport, officials were pleased the program showed the hard work and bravery of city police officers, but complaints started rolling in from businesses, the University of Bridgeport and others interested in attracting people and investments to Connecticut’s largest city, said Av Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Joe Ganim. “If that’s the only thing that’s being publicized nationally about our city, it can have a negative impact,” he said. “We don’t have the Travel Channel doing anything on how wonderful all our economic development projects are.” Bridgeport, a city with pockets of deep poverty that saw homicides double to 23 last year, left the show in December 2016, less than two months after the series began. During the city’s short run on the program, a police sergeant was arrested on a domestic violence charge, which was later dismissed, shortly after she appeared on an episode warning viewers about the dangers of domestic violence. Two people shown on the show later filed lawsuits accusing police of brutality. Another sergeant responding to a call involving a dead baby was shown breaking down in his cruiser as he talked about it afterward, which drew media coverage and praise on social media for showing officers’ sensitive sides. Feedback from most of the two dozen police departments that have appeared on the show has been positive, said Dan Cesareo, creator and executive producer of “Live PD.” “Our only goal is to document policing across America,” said Cesareo, president of Big Fish Entertainment. “We very much are very neutral in terms of what we’re showing.”[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/4946268499a94f549ea48d69483be220/60c85ab3-a41e-4168-9ab5-7902157eb4e7/image-pv_web.jpg




Casino company: Boat that caught fire had no past problemsIn this photo provided by Pasco County flames engulf a boat Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, in the Tampa Bay area. The boat ferrying patrons to a casino ship off the Florida Gulf Coast caught fire near shore Sunday afternoon, and dozens of passengers and crew safely made it to land, authorities said. (Tambrey Laine/Pasco County via AP)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

TAMPA, Fla. – A casino company said Monday that it never had a problem with the shuttle boat that burst into flames off Florida's Gulf Coast, leading to the death of a female passenger. Tropical Breeze Casino spokeswoman Beth Fifer said the company does not know what caused Sunday's huge blaze, which gutted the 12-year-old shuttle boat and forced about 50 passengers to jump into chilly waters off Port Richey. "We are deeply saddened for the loss of our passenger, the 14 injured and anyone else who was affected by this tragedy," Fifer said. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point spokesman Kurt Conover said Monday that the passenger arrived at the hospital's emergency room at 10 p.m. Sunday and died shortly afterward. He said she had apparently gone home after the fire but became ill. Pasco County Sheriff's Office spokesman Kevin Doll said the victim was 42. Her name has not been released and a cause of death has not been determined. Conover said eight other passengers were treated at the hospital and released. Authorities originally said no injuries were life-threatening. Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Michael De Nyse said investigators will determine the cause of the fire and examine the history of the boat and Tropical Breeze Casino. Helicopter video taken by WTSP-TV early Monday shows the boat was burned down to its hull, with only an American flag on its bow uncharred. The shuttle boat regularly carried people back and forth from the Tropical Breeze's offshore casino, about a 45-minute ride into international waters. There, passengers would play games such as black jack, which is illegal at non-Indian casinos in Florida, and roulette, which is illegal statewide. The shuttle boat caught fire about 4 p.m. Sunday, quickly engulfing the boat close to shore near residential neighborhoods. Officials said the boat was headed out to the casino ship at the time. Port Richey Police Chief Gerard DeCanio said the shuttle boat experienced engine problems after leaving the dock at Port Richey, a suburban community about 35 miles (55 kilometers) northwest of Tampa. But as the vessel turned back, flames kicked up and people began jumping overboard into shallow water, according to witness accounts. Larry Santangelo, 57, said he had just driven into his neighborhood when he saw smoke and fire and thought a house – possibly his own – was ablaze. But then he realized it was the boat just about 100 yards offshore. He told the Tampa Bay Times that he then saw people wandering about confused, wet and cold, after they reached land. One woman collapsed upon reaching shore and vomited, he said. Santangelo said he took about 30 of the passengers into his garage to warm up and recover. "It was so windy and they were soaking wet," said Santangelo. He worried that some might suffer from hypothermia. It wasn't immediately clear what caused the fire, which sent a hu[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/6a7fc0a1289849f1816c09ac417e94ac/25fe15f7-fabc-436c-9885-be3ab0dcdcfc/image-pv_web.jpg




Across the Mideast, Palestinians brace for Trump aid cutsIn this Thursday Jan. 11, 2018 photo, Palestinian children play in an alley at the Shati refugee camp in Gaza City. From the Gaza Strip to Jordan and Lebanon, millions of Palestinians are bracing for the worst as the Trump administration moves toward cutting funding to the U.N. agency that assists Palestinian refugees across the region. The expected cuts could deliver a painful blow to some of the weakest populations in the Middle East and risk destabilizing the already struggling countries that host displaced Palestinian refugees and their descendants. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

SHATI REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip – Mahmoud al-Qouqa can't imagine life without the three sacks of flour, cooking oil and other staples he receives from the United Nations every three months. Living with 25 relatives in a crowded home in this teeming Gaza Strip slum, the meager rations provided by UNRWA, the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugee families, are the last thing keeping his family afloat in the territory hard hit by years of poverty and conflict. But that could be in danger as the U.S., UNRWA's biggest donor, threatens to curtail funding. "It will be like a disaster and no one can predict what the reaction will be," al-Qouqa said. Across the Middle East, millions of people who depend on UNRWA are bracing for the worst. The expected cut could also add instability to struggling host countries already coping with spillover from other regional crises. UNRWA was established in the wake of the 1948 Mideast war surrounding Israel's creation. An estimated 700,000 Palestinians fled or were forced from their homes in the fighting. In the absence of a solution for these refugees, the U.N. General Assembly has repeatedly renewed UNRWA's mandate, the original refugee camps have turned into concrete slums and more than 5 million refugees and their descendants now rely on the agency for services including education, health care and food. The largest populations are in Gaza, the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon. Seen by the Palestinians and most of the international community as providing a valuable safety net, UNRWA is viewed far differently by Israel. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accuses the agency of perpetuating the conflict by helping promote an unrealistic dream that these people have the "right of return" to long-lost properties in what is now Israel. "UNRWA is part of the problem, not part of the solution," he told foreign journalists last week. Noting that the Palestinians are the only group served by a specific refugee agency, he said UNRWA should be abolished and its responsibilities taken over by the main U.N. refugee agency. Some in Israel have even tougher criticism, accusing UNRWA of teaching hatred of Israel in its classrooms and tolerating or assisting Hamas militants in Gaza. Blaming the Palestinians for lack of progress in Mideast peace efforts, President Donald Trump has threatened to cut American assistance to the Palestinians. UNRWA would be the first to be affected. The U.S. provides about $355 million a year to UNRWA, roughly one-third of its budget. U.S. officials in Washington said this week the administration is preparing to withhold tens of millions of dollars from the year's first contribution, cutting a planned $125 million installment by half or perhaps entirely. The decision could come as early as Tuesday. Matthias Schmale, UNRWA's director in Gaza, said Washington has not informed the agency of any changes. However, "we are worried because of th[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/bb3c2ff26fb24ca5aa3c3a7a081905e1/ec4dca4f-c9f1-4940-9e35-4431bc43c98c/image-pv_web.jpg




King children criticize Trump, decry racism on MLK holidayThe Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, speaks during the Martin Luther King Jr. annual commemorative service Monday at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

Trump marked his first Martin Luther King Jr. Day as president buffeted by claims that during a meeting with senators on immigration last week, he used a vulgarity to describe African countries and questioned the need to allow more Haitians into the U.S. He also is said to have asked why the country couldn’t have more immigrants from nations such as Norway. In Washington, King’s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, criticized Trump, saying, “When a president insists that our nation needs more citizens from white states like Norway, I don’t even think we need to spend any time even talking about what it says and what it is.” He added, “We got to find a way to work on this man’s heart.” In Atlanta, King’s daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, told hundreds of people who packed the pews of the Ebenezer Baptist Church that they “cannot allow the nations of the world to embrace the words that come from our president as a reflection of the true spirit of America.” “We are one people, one nation, one blood, one destiny. ... All of civilization and humanity originated from the soils of Africa,” Bernice King said. “Our collective voice in this hour must always be louder than the one who sometimes does not reflect the legacy of my father.” Church pastor the Rev. Raphael Warnock also took issue with Trump’s campaign slogan to “Make America Great Again.” Warnock said he thinks America “is already great ... in large measure because of Africa and African people.” Down the street from Trump’s Mar-a-Lago retreat in Palm Beach, Florida, on Monday, Haitian protesters and Trump supporters yelled at each other from opposing corners. Trump was staying at the resort for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. Video posted by WPEC-TV showed several hundred pro-Haiti demonstrators yelling from one side of the street Monday while waving Haitian flags. The Haitians and their supporters shouted “Our country is not a s---hole,” referring to comments the president reportedly made. Trump has said that is not the language he used. The smaller pro-Trump contingent waved American flags and campaign posters and yelled “Trump is making America great again.” One man could be seen telling the Haitians to leave the country. Police kept the sides apart. Trump dedicated his weekly address to the nation, released Monday, to King. “Dr. King’s dream is our dream, it is the American dream, it’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people and written into the soul of humankind,” he said in the address, which he tweeted to his followers. “It is the dream of a world where people are judged by who they are, not how they look or where they come from.” The president’s remarks appeared not to resonate with the Rev. Al Sharpton, who also used the holiday to take aim at the racial rhetoric Trump is said to have used. [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/d2aa5b97312049a0ab5405793f9f1d40/65eb0893-da67-44ab-aff9-f283ccf28096/image-pv_web.jpg




In Chile, pope met with protests, passion and skepticismPope Francis waves to followers Monday on his way to the Apostolic Nunciature in Santiago, Chile.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:28:00 GMT

SANTIAGO, Chile – Pope Francis flew in to Chile’s capital Monday night for a visit expected to be met with protests over sexual abuse by priests and confronted by many Chileans deeply skeptical about the Roman Catholic Church. It’s the pope’s first visit to the Andean nation of 17 million people since taking the reins of the church in 2013. It comes at a time when many Chileans are furious over Francis’ 2015 decision to appoint a bishop close to the Rev. Fernando Karadima, who the Vatican found guilty in 2011 of abusing dozens of minors over decades. The Rev. Juan Barros, bishop of the southern city of Osorno, has always denied he knew what Karadima was doing when he was the priest’s protege, a position that many Chileans have a hard time believing. “It’s not just time for the pope to ask for forgiveness for the abuses but also to take action,” said Juan Carlos Cruz, a victim of Karadima. Cruz added that if it wasn’t possible to jail bad bishops, “at the very least they can be removed from their positions.” After deplaning, Francis was greeted by President Michelle Bachelet and a band played while the two walked on a red carpet as night began to fall. The pope traveled in a black sedan to the center of the city, flanked by several cars. He then transferred to a popemobile, waving to small crowds of well-wishers who lined up along avenues. Crowds were notably thin, particularly compared with papal visits in other Latin American countries. “Long live the pope!” some yelled as he passed by in the pope mobile. Others carried signs criticizing the pope or extolling him to act. “Stop the abuse, Francis!” one sign read. “You can so you must!” Over the next three days, Francis is scheduled to celebrate Mass in Santiago, the southern city of Temuco and the northern city of Iquique. On Thursday, the pope will go to Peru for a three-day visit. Francis’ trip was aimed at highlighting the plight of immigrants and indigenous peoples and underscoring the need to preserve the Amazon rain forest. However, sexual abuse by priests has taken front and center in the weeks before his arrival. Hours before Francis landed, activists on issues related to sex abuse by priests called for sanctions against both abusers and anyone who helped cover up their actions. About 200 people attended the first of several activities aimed at making the sex abuse scandal a central topic of Francis’ time in the country. The majority of Chileans continue to declare themselves Roman Catholics, but the church has lost the influence and moral authority it once enjoyed thanks to the scandals, secularization and an out-of-touch clerical caste. “I used to be a strong believer and churchgoer,” said Blanca Carvucho, a 57-year-old secretary in Santiago. “All the contradict[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/dbc8b8ee7311414da69f4414054cda6b/f31fecc6-b758-400b-b506-cca6fadd10b9/image-pv_web.jpg




Illinois lawmakers form subcommittee for digital currency

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:27:00 GMT

SPRINGFIELD – Illinois lawmakers have formed a subcommittee to explore state policies over decentralized digital currencies such as bitcoin.

The Department of Financial and Professional Regulation doesn’t consider digital currencies valid. But some lawmakers believe digital currencies and blockchain technology may have benefits that could make state government more efficient.

Rep. Mike Zalewski of Riverside will chair the House subcommittee. Zalewski told the State Journal-Register that his goal is to understand whether a digital currency would be a worthy investment or a risky gamble.

“As lawmakers, we all want government to run more efficiently and transparently,” Zalewski said. “Distributed ledger technology has the promise to do just that – replace old antiquated systems with a modern approach to serving citizens’ needs.”

He said he hopes the subcommittee can create a policy that puts consumers first.

Digital currencies like bitcoin have gained popularity in the past decade. Digital currency is unlike traditional currency because it’s created and exchanged independent of banks or governments.

Instead, they rely on peer-to-peer transactions that are recorded in an online ledger.

Blockchain is a database that can be used to record digital transactions and avoid duplication.

State Rep. Jaime Andrade of Chicago is chairman of the Cybersecurity, Data Analytics and IT committee. He said the aim of the subcommittee is to create an environment that “allows and fosters this technology.”

Andrade said a report will be released soon from the task force that was created last year to study how and if state, county and municipal governments can benefit from record keeping and service delivery based on a blockchain system.

No hearings have been scheduled yet for the new subcommittee.




Cary man faces attempted murder charges in Fox River Grove stabbingMichael D. Eccles, 60, of the 2400 block of Crystal Lake Road, Cary, is charged with attempted murder, aggravated battery and aggravated domestic battery.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:26:00 GMT

FOX RIVER GROVE – A Cary man has been charged with attempted murder after police said he sent another man to the hospital with serious injuries from multiple stab wounds.

Officers responded at 11:42 p.m. Saturday to the 200 block of Opatrny Drive, Fox River Grove, where someone reportedly had been stabbed, Fox River Grove Police Chief Eric Waitrovich said Monday.

Flight for Life took the victim, a 31-year-old man, to Advocate Condell Medical Center in Libertyville, where he remained Monday morning, Waitrovich said.

Michael D. Eccles, 60, of the 2400 block of Crystal Lake Road, Cary, was taken to the police station and later arrested in connection with the stabbing.

Eccles and the victim knew each other, and although the situation remains under investigation, police don’t believe there are any other suspects, Waitrovich said.

Further details about the incident were not available Monday. Court records also were not available because of the holiday.

Eccles is charged with attempted murder, aggravated battery and aggravated domestic battery, jail records show.

If he is convicted of attempted murder, Eccles could face a six- to 30-year prison sentence.

McHenry County Judge John Bolger set Eccles’ bond at $250,000 Monday morning. He must post $25,000 bail to be released, jail records show.

He was booked into the McHenry County Jail on Sunday afternoon, jail records show.

The McHenry County Major Investigations Assistance Team and Fox River Grove police are investigating the situation.

Eccles’ first court appearance is scheduled for Tuesday.

Michael D. Eccles, 60, of the 2400 block of Crystal Lake Road, Cary, is charged with attempted murder, aggravated battery and aggravated domestic battery.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/61fc75f1c46042d0b4d20323d1c48500/4468940f-3006-45c3-ac86-c8d5cc375cd3/image-pv_web.jpg




McHenry County in store for flurries, subzero wind chill, National Weather Service saysOff from school for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Hunter Mosolino glances over his shoulder while tubing down a Veteran Acres Park hill in Crystal Lake.Winding Creek Drive neighbors Mary Jane Kittl (left) and Linda Flatley visit with each other after clearing their driveways in McHenry. Kittl remarked on the new fallen snow: "This is so gorgeous," while Flatley said she "loves the snow."A Crystal Lake Public Works plow truck clears snow at the intersection of Main Street and McCollom Street on Monday.Snow clings to trees in Veteran Acres Park on Monday.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:23:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – McHenry County is in store for some frigid weather Tuesday – with a wind chill that feels like 10 degrees below zero.

As of 7:20 p.m. Monday, the National Weather Service had logged 3 to 6 inches of snowfall in McHenry County, meteorologist Kevin Donofrio said. In Woodstock alone, 5½ inches of snow covered the ground.

The National Weather Service tracked a winter storm band Monday expected to enter northern Illinois overnight, Donofrio said.

On Tuesday, McHenry County residents can expect lingering flurries and light snow showers throughout the morning, as the winter storm heads toward Lake Michigan.

Winds will blow from 10 to 15 mph, and temperatures will top out at 20 degrees – until Tuesday night, when the wind chill will feel like 10 degrees below zero.

On Monday morning, the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office warned of slippery roads as snow fell throughout the county.

McHenry County saw another 4 inches of snow Monday night, on top of the estimated 4 inches that fell from Sunday night into Monday.

High temperatures reached the lower 20s throughout the day Monday and later dropped to the mid-teens, according to the service.

A winter weather advisory remained in effect until noon Monday, according to the service. The advisory warned of limited visibility for drivers and snow-covered roads that could make travel difficult.

The sheriff’s office recommends that drivers slow down and be cautious.

Although many authorities in McHenry County reported little activity on the roads, others said there were some weather-related traffic incidents that kept emergency crews busy.

About 3:45 p.m. Monday in Wonder Lake, a man’s SUV slid off the road and crashed into a tree. He was taken to a Centegra hospital with minor injuries, Battalion Chief Chris Weber said.

Off from school for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Hunter Mosolino glances over his shoulder while tubing down a Veteran Acres Park hill in Crystal Lake.Winding Creek Drive neighbors Mary Jane Kittl (left) and Linda Flatley visit with each other after clearing their driveways in McHenry. Kittl remarked on the new fallen snow: "This is so gorgeous," while Flatley said she "loves the snow."A Crystal Lake Public Works plow truck clears snow at the intersection of Main Street and McCollom Street on Monday.Snow clings to trees in Veteran Acres Park on Monday.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/102a67d3113f4c79a71cecf9416e2429/2734df2b-ad94-4a86-b2e9-a6008183dc0b/image-pv_web.jpg




Joseph's Marketplace in Crystal Lake to closeCustomers order various foods from the deli at Joseph's Marketplace on May 22, 2013, in Crystal Lake. The grocer has been in business since 2005, priding itself on daily deliveries of produce and meats along with friendly customer service. Joseph's will close soon, store officials said Monday.Joseph's Marketplace in Crystal Lake Plaza on Route 14 is seen Monday. The store is expected to close soon, but ownership did not want to comment Monday.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:23:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Joseph’s Marketplace, an independent grocer in Crystal Lake for more than a decade, is closing.

Several store officials said Monday that the business, known for its fresh produce and some hard-to-find items, will close. But they did not say when, and they did not want to comment further.

A member of the store’s management team said they are not yet sure when the store will be closing.

A cashier at the store, which is in Crystal Lake Plaza on Route 14, could be heard telling a customer one or two weeks until close. Another said a month or six weeks.

Customers in the past couple of weeks have expressed disappointment on the store’s Facebook page about rumors that the store would close, while others posted that store employees confirmed the news to them.

Upon hearing the news, Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce President Mary Margaret Maule said it was “really unfortunate.”

“Joseph’s has served a unique role in the marketplace,” said Maule, who lived in Europe for five years and went to Joseph’s for certain items that she was introduced to overseas. “They have a lot of specialty offerings, a lot of European foods.”

On Monday, the store had not yet posted anything saying it is closing, nor had it advertised any going-out-of-business sales.

Some shelves inside the store were not fully stocked.

Joseph’s survived the recession after it opened in 2005, filling the space left vacant by an Eagle Food Center Inc. store.

It also bounced back from a three-month closure in 2011 after a partial roof collapse as a result of a powerful summer storm.

There’s fresh competition in the grocery store marketplace in Crystal Lake. Several new grocers have opened along Route 14 in the wake of the recession. Mariano’s plans to open a store nearby in April.

Maule lauded Joseph’s for always being active in the community, including its aiding in food drives to benefit the Crystal Lake Food Pantry.

A call to the property owner of Crystal Lake Plaza, Madison Corporate Group, was not returned Monday, a holiday.

Customers order various foods from the deli at Joseph's Marketplace on May 22, 2013, in Crystal Lake. The grocer has been in business since 2005, priding itself on daily deliveries of produce and meats along with friendly customer service. Joseph's will close soon, store officials said Monday.Joseph's Marketplace in Crystal Lake Plaza on Route 14 is seen Monday. The store is expected to close soon, but ownership did not want to comment Monday.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/446e502ba38b4fc684f773ea73871615/f9e0a28f-d49f-480b-9541-c3cd6bd93d61/image-pv_web.jpg




Faith leaders, performers gather in McHenry County to honor Martin Luther King Jr.Cantorial soloist Lia Nicine McCoo leads attendees of the Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast in song Monday at D’Andrea Banquets and Conference Center in Crystal Lake.Cathy Daharsh (left), senior pastor of Bethany Lutheran Church in Crystal Lake, prays with FaithBridge board member Judy Engebretson (right) at the Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast on Monday.Elaine Twigg (left) of Crystal Lake talks with Oakwood Hills Police Chief Valiza Nash at the Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast on Monday in Crystal Lake.The Rev. Zina Jacque of the Community Church of Barrington speaks to an attendee during her keynote speech Monday at the Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast in Crystal Lake.Autumn Chase, a middle school student from Crystal Lake School District 47, reads her essay during the Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast on Monday in Crystal Lake.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:21:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Hope lingered in the air Monday morning at D’Andrea Banquets and Conference Center as an assortment of speakers and performers channeled the work of Martin Luther King Jr. Speakers ranging from the Rev. Zina Jacque of Community Church of Barrington – a holder of four degrees, including a doctorate and two master’s – to Crystal Lake Elementary School District 47 eighth-grader Autumn Chase graced the stage with remarks on King’s influence and how to best implement it in modern times. Jacque spoke of seeking out others for help and advice, even if they see things differently, and to step out of one’s comfort zone in all areas of life. “I want to be really clear – rugged individualism and self-dependence is, in part, what isolates us,” Jacque said. “[It’s] what keeps us apart. And let me go even further. If all your partners look like you do, that’s another problem. If all your partners think like you do, there’s another problem. If all your partners agree with you, pray for them.” The eighth annual Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Interfaith Prayer Breakfast was hosted by FaithBridge, a member of the North American Interfaith Network. Chase was the winner of FaithBridge’s essay contest, which asked middle school students to write 300 to 350 words responding to questions revolving around this year’s theme, “conditions of hope.” Chase won $50, two tickets to the breakfast and the opportunity to read her essay at the event. She received a standing ovation after concluding her speech. “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable,” Chase said. “You must work for what you believe in.” Chase’s essay explored what happens “when good people are silent about injustice.” “Many think that being brave is not saying anything – not taking an aggressor’s bait. But they are wrong,” Chase said. “Being brave in the cause of justice means standing up for your beliefs and not letting others speak for you.” The contrast of King’s famous words pushing for racial equality, compared with President Donald Trump’s recent remarks about immigrants from other mostly black nations, was not lost on those in attendance. Jacque, the keynote speaker at the event – which was filled with people of all racial and faith backgrounds – said she rewrote the start of her speech numerous times after news of Trump’s comments broke. “All I can tell you is that as I reduced down the emotion I’ve felt since Thursday is that the place I end up is – I refuse to give up hope. I refuse to give up hope,” Jacque said. “And let’s be clear, hope is the confident expectation of the coming good.” As a nonprofit formed in 2007, FaithBridge uses a variety of programs, ga[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/9629010c2029429f94a4dc255420086e/ab686d97-2871-48c4-a23e-6d9b80393185/image-pv_web.jpg




Coroner IDs Marengo man, Hebron woman killed in Route 47 crashPersonnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.Personnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:19:00 GMT

HEBRON – The identities of a Marengo man and a Hebron woman who died in a car crash Sunday afternoon on Route 47 have been released by the McHenry County Coroner’s Office.

Jose Rodriguez, 42, of Marengo and Falynn M. Hironimus, 29, of Hebron were pronounced dead at the scene, according to a news release from McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski. Autopsies will be performed Tuesday afternoon.

Two vehicles collided about 4:20 p.m. Sunday in the 7400 block of Route 47 in Hebron, between O’Brien and Thayer roads, McHenry County Sheriff’s Deputy Sandra Rogers said.

Hironimus was traveling north in a 2009 Kia Rio, and for unknown reasons, she crossed into the southbound lane of traffic, crashing into a 2005 Chevy Impala driven by Rodriguez, Rogers said.

There were three other people in the Chevy Impala – a 39-year-old woman, a 12-year-old girl and a 9-year-old girl, all from Marengo, police said. The 39- and 12-year-olds were taken to Centegra Hospital – McHenry in critical condition and later sent to Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge.

The 9-year-old was taken to Centegra Hospital – Huntley in stable condition, police said.

The passengers’ condition were not known Monday morning, Majewski said.

Air bags deployed in the Chevy Impala but not in the Kia, Rogers said. Hironimus and the two Marengo adults were wearing seat belts, but the 12-year-old and 9-year-old were not, Rogers said.

The McHenry County Sheriff’s Police Accident Investigation Unit and the McHenry County Coroner’s Office are investigating the cause of the crash.

Route 47 from Vanderkarr Road to Thayer Road in Hebron was closed for hours Sunday evening because of the crash, McHenry County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Trevor Vogel said.

Hironimus’ family declined to comment, and attempts to reach Rodriguez’s family at home were unsuccessful.

Personnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.Personnel from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office block traffic after a crash Sunday near the intersection of O’Brien Road and Route 47.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/be66cf14c82f487e82e25284dbab61e9/e5b3d60d-93ea-40a5-a6d1-caa0a6524611/image-pv_web.jpg




Thailand seizes large elephant tusks worth more than $450KAP photo Forensic officers inspect ivory seized at the customs office after a news conference Friday in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai authorities seized 326 pounds of full elephant tusk and 31 tusk fragments originating from Nigeria destined for China worth more than $469,800.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:19:00 GMT

BANGKOK – Thai authorities have seized 326 pounds of African elephant ivory, including three large tusks, worth about $469,800 from a Bangkok airport.

The haul from Nigeria consisted of the tusks and 31 tusk fragments that were seized Jan. 5 after the cargo was flagged by officials. The tusks were destined for China where there is a large demand for ivory, police Gen. Chalermkiat Srivorakan said Friday.

The size of the tusks shows they were taken from large African elephants, which remain scarce in the wild, and the tusks’ discolored state indicates they had been kept in storage for a long time, said Somkiat Soontornpittakkool, an official from the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation.

“From what I can tell, these ivory tusks were taken from very big elephants, and elephants of that size are now hard to find even in Africa,” Somkiat said. “And judging from how the tusks look, they appear to have been taken awhile ago. They weren’t hunted recently. They were taken and stored for a while before smugglers sent them out.”

A Customs Department statement said that the seized ivory will be impounded as police widen investigations to identify suspects involved in the smuggling.

Thailand had been considered to have the largest unregulated ivory market in the world and had been threatened with sanctions under the trade of protected wildlife species, but it introduced new laws and amendments in 2014 and 2015 to regulate domestic ivory markets and criminalize the sale of African elephant ivory.

Thailand still is considered a major transit hub and destination for smuggled tusks, but the biggest demand comes from China.

Last year, Thai officials seized 510 smuggled elephant tusk fragments in four separate cases, the Customs Department said. Rhinoceros horns, pangolin scales, turtles, and other exotic wildlife are also repeatedly smuggled through Thailand.

AP photo Forensic officers inspect ivory seized at the customs office after a news conference Friday in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai authorities seized 326 pounds of full elephant tusk and 31 tusk fragments originating from Nigeria destined for China worth more than $469,800.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/d3a19ceeb5b64d15be3521a95c231f66/41ca462f-a210-4b60-a309-19d0b6a621d6/image-pv_web.jpg




Shooting in McHenry sends 2 people to hospitalMcHenry police officers work a scene of a shooting Monday on Home Avenue in McHenry. Officers found a 36-year-old man and 32-year-old woman who both had suffered gunshot wounds. Both people were treated by the McHenry Township Fire Protection District and sent to Centegra Hospital – McHenry.Crime scene tape is positioned in front of a home in the 5100 block of Home Avenue, McHenry, on Monday morning. Police responded to a domestic disturbance about 12:47 a.m. and found a man and a woman each with single gunshot wounds.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:18:00 GMT

McHENRY – A shooting Monday morning in McHenry sent two people to the hospital with gunshot wounds. Each suffered a single wound, McHenry Township Fire Protection District Battalion Chief David Harwood said. It was not clear where on their bodies each person was wounded. A man was sent to the hospital in critical condition, and a woman was in stable condition with injuries not considered life-threatening, Harwood said. The McHenry Police Department responded to a domestic disturbance about 12:47 a.m. in the 5100 block of Home Avenue, according to a news release from McHenry police. Officers found a 36-year-old man and 32-year-old woman who both had been shot. They were treated by the McHenry Township Fire Protection District and sent to Centegra Hospital – McHenry. The man remained at the hospital Monday afternoon, McHenry Deputy Police Chief Thomas Walsh said. An update on his condition was not available Monday evening. Walsh declined to comment on whether officials anticipate filing criminal charges or if they have taken anyone to the police department for questioning. Walsh also declined to say whether a gun was recovered from the home, citing a department policy not to release information about evidence during an ongoing investigation. “It’s still under investigation, so we’re trying to determine what led to the incident,” he said. The incident is believed to be isolated to the home, and there is no danger to the public, police said. Family members stopped by the Home Avenue house Monday morning to retrieve clothes. A woman who identified herself as the homeowner declined to comment. No one answered the door when a Northwest Herald reporter stopped by the home later in the morning. Neighbors were unsure of what caused the dispute or the names of the people taken to the hospital. “I didn’t know anything about it until I saw it on the scanner, and then I peeped outside and saw the cops,” neighbor Michael Johann said. Police confirmed that at least two children live in the home. They are unharmed and staying with family, Walsh said. McHenry police officers work a scene of a shooting Monday on Home Avenue in McHenry. Officers found a 36-year-old man and 32-year-old woman who both had suffered gunshot wounds. Both people were treated by the McHenry Township Fire Protection District and sent to Centegra Hospital – McHenry.Crime scene tape is positioned in front of a home in the 5100 block of Home Avenue, McHenry, on Monday morning. Police responded to a domestic disturbance about 12:47 a.m. and found a man and a woman each with sing[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/15/97944a2533ac4c3295eb9ab77bc1773d/12eb2fb7-1981-47ee-8d03-d174dfd6fdba/image-pv_web.jpg




Trump marks King day out of view, buffeted by race claimsAnti-Trump protesters line the sidewalks as President Donald Trump's motorcade returns to Mar-a-Lago in West Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, after Trump played golf at Trump International Golf Club. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 04:33:00 GMT

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – President Donald Trump marked his first Martin Luther King Jr. national holiday Monday largely out of sight, buffeted by accusations that he used a racially tinged word to describe African countries and scoffed at the suggestion of admitting more Haitians to the U.S. Trump decamped to his Florida estate for the long weekend, spending hours each day at his Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach. On Friday, before he departed the White House, Trump encouraged the public "to observe this day with acts of civic work and community service in honor of Dr. King's extraordinary life ... and his great legacy" as he signed a proclamation recognizing Monday as the national holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. King's family also urges the public to observe the holiday by performing civic work and acts of kindness. Trump dedicated his weekly address to the nation, released Monday, to King. "Dr. King's dream is our dream, it is the American dream, it's the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people and written into the soul of humankind," Trump said in the address, which he tweeted out to his followers. "It is the dream of a world where people are judged by who they are, not how they look or where they come from," the president said. Trump's tribute followed the firestorm that erupted last week after he was accused of using the word "shithole" to describe African countries and seeming to balk at admitting more Haitians to the U.S. He voiced a desire for more immigrants from countries like Norway. Trump is said to have made the comments in the Oval Office during a meeting about immigration with a bipartisan group of senators. The White House has not denied that Trump used the vulgarity, but Trump and some Republicans have disputed public accounts of the meeting. Trump defended himself Sunday night, declaring that "I'm not a racist." He said comments attributed to him "weren't made." The president's defense appeared not to sway the sizable crowd of Haitians – waving their country's flag – who gathered near the foot of a bridge leading to Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach to jeer at Trump as the motorcade returned from the golf club. The Haitians and their supporters shouted, "Our country is not a shithole," according to video posted by WPEC-TV, and engaged in a shouting match with the pro-Trump demonstrators who typically gather on the other side of the street. The smaller pro-Trump contingent waved U.S. flags and campaign posters and yelled, "Trump is making America great again." One man could be seen telling the Haitians to leave the country. Polic[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/16/9d66afd836104e878f66dd887f563c7a/a6462df9-a30f-4324-bccf-1301d177d962/image-pv_web.jpg




Things To Know About the New SAT Test

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 15:33:46 GMT

  There have been some significant changes to the SAT test that high school students and their parents need to be aware of. As of 2016, the test has a different format, different scoring, and even measures different skills. How will these changes affect your child’s preparation and testing experience? Should students take the new SAT test or plan to take the ACT instead? Join us for a look at the new test’s math section and a comparison between the new SAT and the ACT tests. The new SAT The biggest change relates to what the SAT tests for. Originally, the SAT was designed as a sort of aptitude test, grading students more on their ability to reason than on skills they learned in class. Filled with logic problems and analogies, it could seem more like an IQ test than a final exam. Now, the SAT is designed to only measure a student’s understanding of what they learned in high school. What does this mean for the math section? Math is now split between two sections, one where students are allowed to use calculators and one where they are not. All the questions for the no-calculator section are written with that in mind, so your kid doesn’t need to panic. Still, if it has been years since your child has done math without a computer, encourage them to do simpler calculations in their head, both in math class and during homework or other math enrichment. As for content, the test makers ground their questions in both high school curriculums and the real world so that students will be more familiar with the content. Arcane logic problems have been replaced with geometry questions modeled off the core curriculum and algebra problems about Spotify royalties. This is good news: Now, more than ever, just doing schoolwork will prepare students for the test. Finally, the SAT has gotten rid of the guessing penalty for all sections (math included) and this is huge. Past versions of the test would penalize wrong answers more harshly than blank ones, but that is no longer the case. Students can now tackle daunting problems without fear, and should fill in every answer on their test, even if they have to guess for the last few. ACT vs. the new SAT? Play to your strengths There was a time when students’ test choices were dictated by which test the schools they were applying to would accept. Now, all four-year institutions in the country accept both ACT and SAT scores for their admissions process. This means that your child can (and should!) focus on the test that best fits their strengths. Here are a few other considerations for your student to keep in mind. The SAT has undergone some major changes, but they’re l[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/sponsored/articles/2018/01/15/46838424/New-SAT-SAT-vs-ACT-article.Shawedit.png




Co-owner of Algonquin Physical Medicine, other clinics gets prison for health care fraud

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 15:23:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – The co-owner of an Algonquin chiropractic clinic will serve 20 months in federal prison after billing an insurance carrier for unnecessary or nonexistent services, according to a news release.

Steven Paul, 46, of Northbrook was sentenced Tuesday in Chicago federal court, receiving “the lowest possible term of imprisonment” the judge would consider, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Northern District of Illinois.

Paul previously had pleaded guilty to one count of health care fraud. Paul and another man, Bradley Mattson of Lake Forest, co-owned six chiropractic clinics in Chicago’s northern suburbs, including Algonquin Physical Medicine, the release stated.

Paul and Mattson admitted in plea agreements that they required patients to receive an initial X-ray and a preset schedule of clinic visits for six-month periods, regardless of whether the visits were necessary, according to the release.

Paul admitted that from 1999 to 2008, he billed Blue Cross Blue Shield $3.65 million for unnecessary tests or physical therapy services that were never provided, according to the release. As a result, Paul’s clinics collected $1.33 million in fraudulent reimbursements from the insurance company.

Mattson pleaded guilty to health care fraud and was sentenced in 2012 to six-and-a-half years in prison, the release stated.

During the investigation, an undercover FBI agent visited the Hawthorn clinic and complained of back pain.

Mattson diagnosed the officer with a pinched nerve, despite the opinions of the clinic’s medical doctor and a physical therapist, who believed the officer only had pulled a muscle. The chiropractor ordered daily visits for two weeks.


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2017/12/07/3c134b3a37af42248686d5b9e910b069/01a41c93-76fd-4405-b11b-ca2424234293/image-pv_web.jpg




What is natural gas?

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 15:13:31 GMT

It keeps our homes warm, our showers hot, and our clothes dry – natural gas is vital energy resource.  The U.S. used about 27 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in 2016, mainly to heat buildings and generate electricity, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

“Natural gas is one of the cleanest, safest, and most useful of all energy sources.  Because natural gas is the cleanest burning fossil fuel, it’s playing an increasing role in helping attain national goals of a cleaner environment, energy security, and a more competitive economy.  The two million-mile underground natural gas delivery system has an outstanding safety record,” explains the American Public Gas Association (APGA).

But what is it, and where does it come from?   Natural gas has been known since ancient times, seeping through the ground and sometimes linked to flames.  “Around 500 B.C., the Chinese started using crude bamboo ‘pipelines’ to transport gas that seeped to the surface, and used it to boil sea water to get drinkable water,” APGA reports.  “Naturally occurring natural gas was identified in America as early as 1626.”  It was used as a source of light, and later for home heating and cooking.  About 99 percent of natural gas used now in the U.S. comes from North America.

Considered a non-renewable energy source, natural gas is trapped in porous underground rocks.  It’s harvested, purified, and transported for home use.  Natural gas is a mixture of gases, including methane, which is colorless and tasteless.  For safety, natural gas companies add the odorant mercaptan (which smells like rotten eggs), to help consumers detect any dangerous leaks.  Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning companies can perform inspections to avoid leaks and address other problems with in-home natural gas use.  In emergency gas-leak situations, homeowners are advised to evacuate the home and call 911.

 

Dowe & Wagner : 11215 Commercial Street, Richmond, IL 60071 : 815.678.3000 : http://doweandwagner.com/


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/sponsored/articles/2018/01/15/02921274/DoweWagner_January_Gas_A2.png




Trust and truth under Trump: Americans are in a quandaryAP file photo Lori Viars, a longtime conservative activist in Warren County, sits in 2015 for a portrait at Village Ice Cream Parlor in Lebanon, Ohio.

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:26:00 GMT

RALEIGH, N.C. – When truck driver Chris Gromek wants to know what’s really going on in Washington, he scans the internet and satellite radio. He no longer flips TV channels because networks such as Fox News and MSNBC deliver conflicting accounts tainted by politics, he said. “Where is the truth?” asked the 47-year-old North Carolina resident. Answering that question accurately is a cornerstone of any functioning democracy, according to none other than Thomas Jefferson. But a year into Donald Trump’s fact-bending, media-bashing presidency, Americans increasingly are confused about who can be trusted to tell them reliably what their government and their commander in chief are doing. Interviews across the polarized country as well as polling from Trump’s first year suggest people seek out various outlets of information, including Trump’s Twitter account, and trust none in particular. Many say that practice is a new, Trump-era phenomenon in their lives as the president and the media he denigrates as “fake news” fight to be seen as the more credible source. “It has made me take every story with a large grain, a block of salt,” said Lori Viars, a Christian conservative activist in Lebanon, Ohio, who gets her news from Fox and CNN. “Not just from liberal sources. I’ve seen conservative ‘fake news.’ ” Democrat Kathy Tibbits of Tahlequah, Oklahoma, reads lots of news sources as she tries to assess the accuracy of what Trump is reported to have said. “I kind of think the whole frontier has changed,” said the 60-year-old lawyer and artist. “My degree is in political science, and they never gave us a class on such fiasco politics.” Although Trump’s habit of warping facts has had an effect, it’s not just him. Widely shared falsehoods have snagged the attention of world leaders such as Pope Francis and former President Barack Obama. Last year, false conspiracy theories led a North Carolina man to bring a gun into a pizza parlor in the nation’s capital, convinced that the restaurant was concealing a child prostitution ring. Just last week, after the publication of an unflattering book about Trump’s presidency, a tweet claiming that he is addicted to a TV show about gorillas went viral and prompted its apparent author to clarify that it was a joke. Trump has done his part to blur the lines between real and not. During the campaign, he made a practice of singling out for ridicule reporters covering his raucous rallies. As president, he regularly complains about his news coverage and has attacke[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/14/2761a6d6cedc4b91b739a6db93a3a236/b604c34c-5624-4c62-af71-54d4b60a3505/image-pv_web.jpg




My guns or my ganja? Firearm-owning pot fans face a choiceAP photo Phil Gruver poses Wednesday for a photograph with his Pennsylvania with his medical marijuana card in Emmaus, Pa.

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:26:00 GMT

HARRISBURG, Pa. – The federal government said grass and guns don’t mix, and that is putting gun owners who use marijuana – and the strongly pro-gun-rights administration of President Donald Trump – in a potentially uncomfortable position. As gun-loving Pennsylvania becomes the latest state to operate a medical marijuana program, with the first dispensary on track to begin sales next month, authorities are warning patients that federal law bars marijuana users from having guns or ammunition. “They’re going to have to make a choice,” said John T. Adams, president of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association. “They can have their guns or their marijuana, but not both.” That’s the official line, but the reality of how the policy might be enforced in Pennsylvania and other states is a little muddier. That includes the question of whether people who already own guns might have to surrender them, instead of just being prohibited from making new purchases. The political sensitivity was underscored Friday when Pennsylvania regulators reversed themselves and announced its registry of medical-pot patients will not be available, as was previously planned, through the state’s law enforcement computer network. Phil Gruver, a professional auto detailer from Emmaus who received a state medical marijuana card in mid-December, is weighing what to do with his .22-caliber rifle and a handgun he keeps for home defense. “It’s a violation of my Second Amendment rights,” Gruver said. “I don’t know of any time anyone’s been using marijuana and going out and committing acts of violence with a gun. Most of the time they just sit on their couch and eat pizza.” State laws allowing medical or, more recently, recreational use of pot have long been at odds with the federal prohibition on gun ownership by those using marijuana. But the government has traditionally taken a hands-off approach. Since 2014, Congress has forbidden the Department of Justice from spending money to prosecute people who grow, sell and use medical pot. The picture has become murkier under Trump, a Republican whose attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has long denounced the drug. Sessions recently rescinded a Barack Obama-era policy that was deferential to states’ permissive marijuana laws. Now, federal prosecutors in states that allow drug sales must decide whether to crack down on the marijuana trade. It’s not clear what impact the new policy will have on gun owners who use cannabis as medicine, or even how many people fit the bill. Nor is it clear whether any people[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/14/34dd40d0a4484763861d357acb5129aa/99435bef-b088-4f6e-b52d-11033f585c11/image-pv_web.jpg




Sears created modern retail in IllinoisCourtesy of Chicago History Museum Exterior view of the Sears Roebuck & Co. store on South State Street at Congress Parkway. A portion of a building across the street is visible, view taken above street-level. A vertical Sears sign is visible on the far side of the building. The Sears Roebuck and Co. store, located at 403 South State Street in the Loop community area od Chicago, Illinois, extended a whole block from Congress Parkway north to Van Buren Street. It was built in 1891 by William LeBaron Jenney. This is an example of the Chicago school or Commercial style of architecture. The building was originally called the Leiter Building II.

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:25:00 GMT

Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com. As the home of Sears since the late 19th century, Illinois is the birthplace of modern retail. Even today’s colossus, Amazon, can trace the roots of its business model to Sears’ original mail-order business that popularized the notion of buying products at home without first seeing and touching them in person. “There were some small mail-order companies before, but Sears became the largest, the most successful, the giant,” said Libby Mahoney, senior curator of the Chicago History Museum. And if it seems strange that such a retailer could grow strong enough to make its headquarters the tallest building in the world as Sears did in Chicago in 1973, consider today’s intense competition among cities to house Amazon’s second headquarters, she said. It was Chicago’s central position in the nation’s railroad and highway networks that made it a better place for Richard Sears to operate the mail-order watch company he’d started in Minneapolis the previous year, 1886. In Chicago, Sears partnered with watchmaker Alvah C. Roebuck, leading to the longtime name of the firm being Sears, Roebuck and Co. Its first catalog featuring only watches and jewelry was published in 1888, while its first large catalog of general merchandise came along in 1896. Sears wooed customers with promises of savings gained by eliminating the middleman. It popularized the money-back guarantee to build trust with the consumer, Mahoney said. The gradual diversification of the company’s products seemed to know no bounds, perhaps best illustrated by the advent of Sears Modern Homes. Between 1908 and 1940, Sears sold about 75,000 such homes around the country by mail-order. Many of the homes, which came in 447 different designs, exist today. Such a company at that time was largely dependent on the U.S. Post Office for its success and reliability, Mahoney said. But eventually, Sears, Roebuck’s original mail-order business began to be threatened by the greater urbanization of the country after World War I. The solution – championed by then-vice president and future company President Robert E. Wood – was the introduction of brick-and-mortar stores in the 1920s. [...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/12/26fa37ba0deb4f458a273077cfc8993a/1ab26a16-ba46-4c61-a882-222a59bd5f7d/image-pv_web.jpg




Kennedy targets gun violence in Illinois governor campaignAP file photo Democratic Illinois gubernatorial candidate Chris Kennedy (left), gathers with community leaders Jan. 3 to discuss gun violence in Chicago at a press conference accompanied by (from left), Chicago Alderman Rick Munoz, U.S. Rep. Danny Davis, Rev. Paul Jakes, and U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush in Chicago.

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:25:00 GMT

CHICAGO – Few people running for public office have been more personally affected by gun violence than Chris Kennedy, who was a child when his father and uncle, Sen. Robert Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy, were assassinated. Now the 54-year-old Democrat has made the issue a centerpiece of his campaign for Illinois governor, talking often about growing up without a father and family trips to Arlington National Cemetery, and saying too many people in Chicago and elsewhere in Illinois are dealing with the same kind of pain. The move has brought endorsements from African-American leaders, including U.S. Reps. Bobby Rush and Danny Davis, and could help Kennedy earn support in the March primary from black voters who have been disproportionately hurt by gun violence. But it’s also put him at odds with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and some others and prompted accusations of race baiting, after Kennedy said much of the violence is because of systemic disinvestment in black neighborhoods. He accused Emanuel, the former White House chief of staff, of pushing black people out of the city through a “strategic gentrification plan” that includes cutting funding for police and public schools. “Our government needs to be held accountable for subjecting our communities to a life of crimes of survival,” Kennedy told supporters. “We can reduce and control gun violence in our communities, but we need to be honest with ourselves about why it’s happening.” Emanuel called the comments “hallucinatory” and said he would like to hear “ideas, not insults,” while a mayoral spokesman said it was “a direct assault on one of this city’s greatest strengths – our diversity.” Kennedy’s other critics, including campaign rivals, called the comment hypocritical, noting he was praising Emanuel not long ago and even donated $5,000 to his campaign. The Chicago Tribune, in an editorial, called it “a cynical and divisive pitch for votes.” Kennedy is one of six Democrats seeking the party’s nomination March 20 for the chance to unseat first-term Gov. Bruce Rauner, who’s widely considered one of the most vulnerable Republican incumbents up for re-election this fall. Among the other Democrats running are state Sen. Daniel Biss and billionaire businessman J.B. Pritzker, who’s scooped up endorsements from Democratic county officials and major unions, including the Illinois Education Association. Rush and Davis, who have both lost family members to the city’s violence, said they’re backing Kennedy because he’s put vi[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/14/442440b00d1a4a87a5372baf7c4b177f/bdbe0fd6-d5e4-4475-b198-cb23364a690a/image-pv_web.jpg




Trump says program to protect 'Dreamers' is 'probably dead'AP photo President Donald Trump listens Wednesday during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington.

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:25:00 GMT

PALM BEACH, Fla. – President Donald Trump said Sunday that a program that protects immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children is “probably dead,” casting a cloud over already tenuous negotiations just days before a deadline on a government funding deal that Democrats have tied to immigration. At issue is the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program created by President Barack Obama to shield hundreds of thousands of these individuals, known as “Dreamers,” from deportation. Trump, who has taken a hard stance against illegal immigration, announced last year that he will end the program unless Congress comes up with a solution by March. “DACA is probably dead because the Democrats don’t really want it, they just want to talk and take desperately needed money away from our Military,” the Republican president tweeted. “I, as President, want people coming into our Country who are going to help us become strong and great again, people coming in through a system based on MERIT. No more Lotteries! #AMERICA FIRST.” Republicans and Democrats already were at odds over funding the government, and the negotiations became more complicated after Democrats – whose votes are needed to pass a government funding bill – insisted immigration be included. Government funding expires at midnight Friday without a deal in place, and some government functions will begin to go dark. Further roiling the talks are comments by Trump during an Oval Office meeting in which he questioned the need to admit more Haitians to the U.S., along with Africans from “s---hole” countries, according to people briefed on the conversation but not authorized to describe it publicly. He also said in the Thursday meeting he would prefer immigrants from countries such as Norway instead. The White House has not denied that Trump said the word “s---hole,” although Trump did push back on some depictions of the meeting. A confidant of Trump’s told The Associated Press that the president spent Thursday evening calling friends and outside advisers to judge their reaction on his inflammatory remarks. Trump wasn’t apologetic and denied he was racist, instead blaming the media for distorting his meaning, said the confidant, who wasn’t authorized to disclose a private conversation and spoke on the condition of anonymity. The president also rejected as insufficient an immigration deal drafted by the bipartisan group of lawmakers who attended that meeting. The deal had included a pathway to citizenship for the “Dreamers” that would take up to 12 y[...]


Media Files:
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2018/01/14/8fdda3dba11c4d578b8020f5c4dd558c/eb404b8d-db63-4100-9d33-f063a50f653e/image-pv_web.jpg