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Lake in the Hills man accused of choking, punching family memberJonathan Wilson, 21, of the 4000 block of Heron Drive, was arrested Wednesday on charges of domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery/strangle and unlawful restraint.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 21:22:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS — A 21-year-old Lake in the Hills man faces felony domestic battery charges after police said he held down, punched and kicked a family member.

Jonathan Wilson, 21, of the 4000 block of Heron Drive, was arrested Wednesday on charges of domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery/strangle and unlawful restraint. He remains in McHenry County Jail custody in lieu of posting 10 percent of his $125,000 bond.

Wilson is accused of punching a woman in the face, using his forearm to apply pressure to the woman's neck and holding her down, according to court documents.

The Lake in the Hills Police Department sent out a Nixle alert Wednesday morning alerting community members that police were investigating a domestic incident. The alert said the incident occurred about 10:50 a.m. in the 4500 block of Barharbor Drive.

Wilson is also charged separately with felony and misdemeanor theft. He is accused of stealing $2,000 on July 29 from a home in the 4000 block of Heron Drive, Lake in the Hills.

He will next appear in court Aug. 23.

Jonathan Wilson, 21, of the 4000 block of Heron Drive, was arrested Wednesday on charges of domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery/strangle and unlawful restraint.


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6 reasons why you should play Pro Football Weekly's UPickem contest Registration is open for our 2017 UPickem contest. Not sure about signing up? Here are six reasons why you should play!

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 18:00:00 GMT

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Registration is open for our 2017 UPickem contest. Not sure about signing up? Here are six reasons why you should play!


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http://www.nwherald.com/lists/2017/08/18/6c981a774f3a4fb893180399ff79df14/c2c1e805-453b-4ebc-ba7b-45d2bd950c3a/image-pv_web.jpg




Barrington-area businessmen to break home sale deadlock with coin tossPhoto provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall House."Photo provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall HousePhoto provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall House."Photo provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall House."

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 17:31:00 GMT

PORT BARRINGTON — Two Barrington-area bussinessmen have agreed to break a $25,000 deadlock on the sale of the multi-million dollar "Waterfall House on the Fox River" Sunday during an event in Port Barrington. Jack Kraft advises internet advertising and technology start-ups on a variety of business and management issues. He has owned the riverfront property in River Glen in Barrington since 1987, according to a news release from No Wake Bar and Grill – the restaurant hosting Sunday's fundraising event. David Wescott is currently serving his 13th term on the Board of Directors of the CME Group, which owns the Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, New York Mercantile Exchange and various other futures exchanges. Wescott is about to buy Kraft's home. But the two can't agree on a price. Earlier this year, Wescott purchased the Waterfall home’s neighboring house from Kraft. Kraft purchased all of the home's neighboring houses to create "an enclave environment" for friends and family. Zillow.com valued the "waterfall house" at $1.7 million at its highest point in 2015. The two began negotiations on the larger property several months ago. Kraft rebuilt the home in 2009 and added a five-pool waterfall that drops into the Fox River. Featured on HGTV, the one-of-a-kind waterfall is surrounded by a series of custom-designed decks, a bridge and flowing staircase. The businessmen have worked their way down to a $25,000 difference in price from a $150,000 one and decided a coin toss was the best way to close the sale. “I wouldn’t flip for $50,000,” Kraft said of Wescott's initial suggestion. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed at 6 p.m. Sunday at Wescott's No Wake Bar and Grill, 99 Kazimour Drive, Port Barrington, to determine the home's final selling price. Additional coins, with illustrations depicting the waterfall and the Challenge, will be sold at the event. All proceeds will be donated to the Lake and McHenry county sheriff's offices. Kraft and Wescott plan to embed extra coins in the waterfall and in the bar and parking lot at the restaurant. Kraft decided to sell the property to downsize and spend more time in Florida with his wife, Alana Hadfield, and Wescott and his wife Carol have always wanted to live there. According to the release, both men are in good spirits about the deal, regardless of the outcome. “This is a property that needs to be loved and cared for,” Kraft said. “Dave and Carol are the perfect new owners. I’m thrilled to know it will be sold to a family that has admired it, and who will enjoy it as much as we have, and keep it intact.” Photo provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall House."Photo provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall HousePhoto provided Two prominent Barrington-area businessmen and longtime friends Jack Kraft and David Wescott will let fate decide their differences on the final purchase price of a multi-million dollar property on the Fox River. A specially-designed commemorative coin will be tossed in the “$25,000 Challenge” for the beautiful “Waterfall[...]


Media Files:
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AP sources: Strategist Steve Bannon leaving White HouseWhite House strategist Stephen Bannon waits for President Donald Trump to make a statement about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Trump announced that the U.S. will withdraw from the agreement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 17:13:00 GMT

WASHINGTON — White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving his White House post.

That's according to two people familiar with the decision who demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private conversations.

Bannon was a key adviser to President Donald Trump's general election campaign and has been a forceful but contentious presence in a divided White House.

The former leader of conservative Breitbart News pushed Trump to follow through with his campaign promises. But he's also sparred with some of Trump's closest advisers, including son-in-law Jared Kushner.

White House strategist Stephen Bannon waits for President Donald Trump to make a statement about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Trump announced that the U.S. will withdraw from the agreement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)


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Finnish police shoot man who stabs several people in TurkuArmed Finnish policemen on guard at the Helsinki airport on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, as Finnish authorities announced they will raise readiness levels after an incident in Turku Finland. Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Lehtikuva via AP)Turku Market Square on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, with a yellow ambulance on the corner of the square (behind red car). Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Lehtikuva via AP)People was emergency services working in Turku Market Square in Turku Finland on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Facebook via AP)

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 16:05:00 GMT

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — A man stabbed several people in Finland's western city of Turku before police shot him in a leg and detained him Friday, police said, adding that authorities were looking for more potential suspects.

Finnish broadcaster YLE says several people were seen lying on the ground in Puutori square in central Turku. On Twitter, police urged people to avoid that part of Turku.

One person has been "apprehended," Finnish police said, adding "several people had been stabbed" in two squares in the city. Their conditions weren't immediately available.

Tabloid Ilta-Sanomat says six people were injured, one man and five women, and that a woman with stroller was attacked by a man with a large knife.

Prime Minister Juha Sipila said the government was closely monitoring the ongoing police operation and holding an emergency meeting later Friday.

Witness Laura Laine told broadcaster YLE that she stood approximately 20 meters (65 feet) from where the stabbing took place.

"We heard that a young woman was screaming. We saw a man on the square and a knife glittered. He was waving it in the air. I understood that he had stabbed someone," Laine was quoted as saying.

Police planned a news conference at 7 p.m. (1600 GMT; 12 p.m. EDT) in Turku, about 150 kilometers (90 miles) west of Helsinki, with Finland's interior minister and the national police chief.

Finnish television channel MTV said security had been heightened at Helsinki's international airport but didn't give details.

"Police have told us not to go to the city center so we are in this coffee shop a few blocks away from the city center," said Vanessa Deggins, an American who is studying business in one of Turku's three universities. She didn't witness the actual attack, but heard sirens going past.

"This is a safe country by American standards. I have gone home alone at 2-3 a.m. ... I feel safe. This is a safe country."

Armed Finnish policemen on guard at the Helsinki airport on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, as Finnish authorities announced they will raise readiness levels after an incident in Turku Finland. Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Lehtikuva via AP)Turku Market Square on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, with a yellow ambulance on the corner of the square (behind red car). Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Lehtikuva via AP)People was emergency services working in Turku Market Square in Turku Finland on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku. (Facebook via AP)


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10 best places to watch a game in McHenry County

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 14:23:38 GMT

Here are the top 10 places to watch a game in McHenry County, as voted by our readers in the 2017 Best of the Fox competition. 

800 Feinberg Court, Cary | 847-516-3663

galatishideaway.com

5899 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake | 815-444-8180

wingsetc.com/crystal-lake

1040 Lake Ave., Woodstock | 815-338-6455

redmilltavern.com

214 S. State St., Marengo | 815-568-8676

facebook.com/TheSpotmarengo

1501 Route 31, McHenry | 815-578-0333

BulldogAleHouse.com

 

4018 Roberts Road, Island Lake | 847-526-7174

3dbowl.com

230 W. Virginia St., No. 300, Crystal Lake | 815-455-7398

facebook.com/PablosMexicanRestaurant

Voted one of the best places to watch a game in the 2017 Best of the Fox competition!

108 West Main St., Cary | tracksbarandgrill.com

Voted one of the best places to watch a game in the 2017 Best of the Fox competition!

461 S. Randall Road, Algonquin | 847-458-2333

5755 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake | 815-356-0333

3343 Shoppers Drive, McHenry | 815-344-9069

buffalowildwings.com/locations

Voted best place to watch a game in our 2017 Best of the Fox competition!

208 W. Main St., Cary | 847-639-7244

caryalehousebrewing.com


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Lake County correctional officers save man overdosing in courtroomThree Lake County Sheriff's Office correctional officers saved a man's life in a courtroom Wednesday. Officers Karrie Lee (left), Melissa Dunn (center) and Timothy Specht (right) administered Naloxone to a man suffering from an overdose in a public viewing area.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:21:00 GMT

WAUKEGAN — Three Lake County Sheriff's Office correctional officers successfully revived a man who was suffering from an opioid overdose in a courtroom Wednesday.

Lake County officers Karrie Lee and Melissa Dunn and Sgt. Timothy Specht noticed a 24-year-old man slumped over in a public viewing area in a Lake County Sheriff’s Office courtroom around 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. The man was not in custody or a Lake County jail inmate, but the officers, who transport inmates from jail to court, quickly intervened, according to a news release from the Lake County Sheriff's Office.

Upon closer inspection, the officers found the man was unconscious and barely breathing. They determined he was likely suffering from an opioid overdose. The man was given two doses of

Naloxone, a drug that can reverse the effects of an overdose, and he eventually regained consciousness. He was transported to a local hospital for evaluation, and later admitted to consuming Xanax and heroin, before the overdose.

“I am very proud of Corrections Sgt. Timothy Specht, Corrections Officer Karrie Lee, and Corrections Officer Melissa Dunn for their quick actions which resulted in a life being saved, as well as our court security officers who recognized the man was in distress," Lake County Sheriff Mike Curran said in a statement.

The man was not issued any citations, as he was not in possession of any drugs or related paraphernalia Lake County Sheriff's Office Sgt. Christopher Covelli said in an email.

"In situations like this, we suggest treatment for the person who overdosed," Covelli said.

Curran said a person overdosing in a courtroom highlights the extent of the national opioid crisis.

"The Lake County Sheriff’s Office continues to work with community stakeholders, battling the prevalent opioid problem through education and enforcement,” Curran said. 

Three Lake County Sheriff's Office correctional officers saved a man's life in a courtroom Wednesday. Officers Karrie Lee (left), Melissa Dunn (center) and Timothy Specht (right) administered Naloxone to a man suffering from an overdose in a public viewing area.


Media Files:
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McHenry County judge grants preliminary injunction to halt Lake in the Hills Sanitary District purchaseH. Rick Bamman file photo - hbamman@shawmedia.com Lake In The Hills waste water treatment facility 515 Plum St, Lake in the Hills.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:08:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A McHenry County judge again has halted efforts by the Lake in the Hills Sanitary District to purchase about 14 acres of Kane County farmland for more than $950,000. Judge Thomas Meyer granted a preliminary injunction after a hearing Wednesday that prevents the deal from going through. The McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office and County Board Chairman Jack Franks, D-Marengo, consider the decision a victory. Franks has claimed the proposed land deal under the district’s previous board was an effort to impede consolidating the board into the village of Lake in the Hills. Meyer issued a temporary restraining order last month after the county filed a motion asking the court to recognize that the two new sanitary district trustees were legitimately appointed by the County Board, and that their votes to rescind the land deal and a related annexation stand. A trial will be Sept. 19 to determine whether the sanitary district had the authority to annex the property. “The county pushed for the injunction after this independent taxing district took extraordinary steps to prevent a proposed consolidation aimed at reducing expenses and increasing government efficiency,” McHenry County State’s Attorney Patrick Kenneally said in a news release. Franks wrote a law during his final term as a state lawmaker that allows the McHenry and Lake county boards to eliminate governments that are entirely within their respective counties and if the boards appoint a majority of the trustees. “The outrageous actions taken by the sanitary district to preserve their fiefdom makes this unit of government the poster child as to why consolidation is needed,” Franks said in a news release. “If a taxing body feels the need to spend millions of dollars to snatch up a patch of land to silence even discussion of consolidation, it speaks volumes about whether that body is even necessary.” Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law Monday that gives every county in the state the authority to consolidate government if such rules apply. Records have shown that two members of the district’s three-member board of trustees, Terry Easler and Shelby Key, planned in the months after Frank’s election as board chairman in November to annex the entire right of way of Square Barn Road and purchase 13.88 acres in Kane County about a mile and a half from its service area. This purchase would make the sanitary district a multicounty district, which would make it exempt from the consolidation law and take away the County Board’s power to appoint its trustees. About 40,000 residents in Lake in the Hills, Crystal Lake and Huntley are served by the 11-square-mile district, which voters created in 1963 to handle wastewater management and pollution control. Key and Easler voted April 27 to annex the property. Former Trustee David McPhee, who resigned shortly after his January appointment to the Lake in the Hills Village Board, previously told the Northwest Herald that expanding into Kane County was never discussed during his nearly nine years on the sanitary district board. The County Board appointed Eric Hansen and Kyle Kane to replace McPhee and Key, whose term was up April 30. Key and Easler are both being represented by lawyer Derke Price, who was unavailable for comment Thursday. Price claims the annexation and proposed purchase already make the sanitary district a multicounty entity, which means the board did not have the authority to appoint new trustees, and the vote to undo the anne[...]


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McHenry County judge grants preliminary injunction to halt Lake in the Hills Sanitary District purchaseJudge Thomas Meyer granted a preliminary injunction after a hearing Wednesday that prevents the deal from going through. The McHenry County State's Attorney's Office and County Board Chairman Jack Franks, D-Marengo, consider the decision a victory. Franks has claimed the proposed land deal under the district's previous board was an effort to impede consolidating the board into the village of Lake in the Hills. Meyer issued a temporary restraining order last month after the county filed a motion asking the court to recognize that the two new sanitary district trustees were legitimately appointed by the County Board, and that their votes to rescind the land deal and a related annexation stand. A trial will be Sept. 19 to determine whether the sanitary district had the authority to annex the property. "The county pushed for the injunction after this independent taxing district took extraordinary steps to prevent a proposed consolidation aimed at reducing expenses and increasing government efficiency," McHenry County State's Attorney Patrick Kenneally said in a news release.Franks wrote a law during his final term as a state lawmaker that allows McHenry and Lake county boards to eliminate governments that are entirely within their respective counties and if the boards appoint a majority of the trustees. "The outrageous actions taken by the sanitary district to preserve their fiefdom makes this unit of government the poster child as to why consolidation is needed," Franks said in a news release. "If a taxing body feels the need to spend millions of dollars to snatch up a patch of land to silence even discussion of consolidation, it speaks volumes about whether that body is even necessary." Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law Monday that gives every county in the state the authority to consolidate government if such rules apply. Records have shown that two members of the district's three-member board of trustees, Terry Easler and Shelby Key, planned in the months after Frank's election as board chairman in November to annex the entire right of way of Square Barn Road and purchase 13.88 acres in Kane County about a mile and a half from its service area.This purchase would make the sanitary district a multicounty district, which would make it exempt from the consolidation law and take away the County Board's power to appoint its trustees. About 40,000 residents in Lake in the Hills, Crystal Lake and Huntley are served by the 11-square-mile district, which voters created in 1963 to handle wastewater management and pollution control. Key and Easler voted April 27 to annex the property. Former Trustee David McPhee, who resigned shortly after his January appointment to the Lake in the Hills Village Board, previously told the Northwest Herald that expanding into Kane County was never discussed during his nearly nine years on the sanitary district board. The County Board appointed Eric Hansen and Kyle Kane to replace McPhee and Key, whose term was up April 30.Key and Easler are both being represented by lawyer Derke Price, who was unavailable for comment Thursday. Price claims the annexation and proposed purchase already make the sanitary district a multicounty entity, which means the board did not have the authority to appoint new trustees, and the vote to undo the annexation and land deal would be invalid. "The District has been planning an expansion for three years," Price wrote in his response to the county board's motion in July. "Franks' entire argument is that the District should not have exercised its lawful annexation powers to expand in Kane County because that thwarts his political goal to gobble up the district into a village or the county."

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:06:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A McHenry County judge again has halted efforts by the Lake in the Hills Sanitary District to purchase about 14 acres of Kane County farmland for more than $950,000. Judge Thomas Meyer granted a preliminary injunction after a hearing Wednesday that prevents the deal from going through. The McHenry County State's Attorney's Office and County Board Chairman Jack Franks, D-Marengo, consider the decision a victory. Franks has claimed the proposed land deal under the district's previous board was an effort to impede consolidating the board into the village of Lake in the Hills. Meyer issued a temporary restraining order last month after the county filed a motion asking the court to recognize that the two new sanitary district trustees were legitimately appointed by the County Board, and that their votes to rescind the land deal and a related annexation stand. A trial will be Sept. 19 to determine whether the sanitary district had the authority to annex the property. "The county pushed for the injunction after this independent taxing district took extraordinary steps to prevent a proposed consolidation aimed at reducing expenses and increasing government efficiency," McHenry County State's Attorney Patrick Kenneally said in a news release.Franks wrote a law during his final term as a state lawmaker that allows McHenry and Lake county boards to eliminate governments that are entirely within their respective counties and if the boards appoint a majority of the trustees. "The outrageous actions taken by the sanitary district to preserve their fiefdom makes this unit of government the poster child as to why consolidation is needed," Franks said in a news release. "If a taxing body feels the need to spend millions of dollars to snatch up a patch of land to silence even discussion of consolidation, it speaks volumes about whether that body is even necessary." Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law Monday that gives every county in the state the authority to consolidate government if such rules apply. Records have shown that two members of the district's three-member board of trustees, Terry Easler and Shelby Key, planned in the months after Frank's election as board chairman in November to annex the entire right of way of Square Barn Road and purchase 13.88 acres in Kane County about a mile and a half from its service area.This purchase would make the sanitary district a multicounty district, which would make it exempt from the consolidation law and take away the County Board's power to appoint its trustees. About 40,000 residents in Lake in the Hills, Crystal Lake and Huntley are served by the 11-square-mile district, which voters created in 1963 to handle wastewater management and pollution control. Key and Easler voted April 27 to annex the property. Former Trustee David McPhee, who resigned shortly after his January appointment to the Lake in the Hills Village Board, previously told the Northwest Herald that expanding into Kane County was never discussed during his nearly nine years on the sanitary district board. The County Board appointed Eric Hansen and Kyle Kane to replace McPhee and Key, whose term was up April 30.Key and Easler are both being represented by lawyer Derke Price, who was unavailable for comment Thursday. Price claims the annexation and proposed purchase already make the sanitary district a multicounty entity, which means the board did not have the authority to appoint new trustees, and the vote to undo the annexation and land deal would be invalid. "The District has been planning an expansion for three years," Price wrote in his response to the county board's motion in July. "Franks' entire argument is that the District should not have exercised its lawful annexation powers to expand in Kane County because that thwarts his political goal to gobble up[...]


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Spain manhunt deepens as Barcelona insists 'I am not afraid'People observe a minute of silence in memory of the terror attack victims in Cambrils, Spain, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Spanish police on Friday shot and killed five people carrying bomb belts who were connected to the Barcelona van attack that killed at least 13, as the manhunt intensified for the perpetrators of Europe's latest rampage claimed by the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)A man holding flowers waits before Spanish embassy staff members observed a minute of silence in memory of the terrorist attacks victims in Spain, Friday Aug.18, 2017 in the courtyard of the embassy in Paris. Spanish police say death toll in Spain attacks rises to 14 after woman injured in seaside resort dies. (AP Photo/Bertrand Combaldieu)Armed police officers patrol a deserted street in Las Ramblas, in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona's historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents. Police said 13 people were killed and more than 50 wounded in what they called a terror attack.(AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)King Felipe of Spain, center, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, center left, and Catalonia regional President Carles Puigdemont, center right, observe a minute of silence in memory of the terrorist attacks victims in Las Ramblas, Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Spanish police on Friday shot and killed five people carrying bomb belts who were connected to the Barcelona van attack that killed at least 13, as the manhunt intensified for the perpetrators of Europe's latest rampage claimed by the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)Candles and bunches of flowers placed by people rest on the ground in Las Ramblas, Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Police on Friday shot and killed five people carrying bomb belts who were connected to the Barcelona van attack, as the manhunt intensified for the perpetrators of Europe's latest rampage claimed by the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)A man touches a newspaper displaying a photograph of the aftermath of the terror attack in Las Ramblas, in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona's historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents. Police said 13 people were killed and more than 50 wounded in what they called a terror attack.(AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)A person is carried in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 12:17:00 GMT

BARCELONA, Spain — Police shot and killed five people wearing fake bomb belts who staged a deadly car attack in a seaside resort in Spain's Catalonia region Friday, just hours after a van plowed into pedestrians on a busy Barcelona promenade. Spanish authorities said the back-to-back vehicle attacks — as well as an explosion earlier this week in a house elsewhere in Catalonia — were related and the work of a large terrorist group. Three people were arrested, but a manhunt was underway for the driver of the van used in Thursday's Barcelona attack, which killed 13 people and injured 100 others. The Islamic State group quickly claimed responsibility. Amid heavy security, Barcelona tried to move forward Friday, with its iconic Las Ramblas promenade quietly reopening to the public and King Felipe VI and Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy joining thousands of residents and visitors in observing a minute of silence in the city's main square. "I am not afraid! I am not afraid!" the crowd chanted in Catalan amid applause. But the dual attacks unnerved a country that hasn't seen an Islamic extremist attack since 2004, when al-Qaida-inspired bombers killed 192 people in coordinated assaults on Madrid's commuter trains. Unlike France, Britain, Sweden and Germany, Spain has largely been spared, thanks in part to a crackdown that has netted some 200 suspected jihadis in recent years. Authorities were still reeling from the Barcelona attack when police in the popular seaside town of Cambrils, about 130 kilometers (80 miles) to the south, fatally shot five people near the town's boardwalk who had plowed into a group of tourists and locals with their blue Audi 3. Catalonia's interior minister, Joaquim Forn, told Onda Cero radio they were wearing fake bomb belts. One woman died Friday from her injuries, Catalan police said on Twitter. Five others were injured. Cambrils Mayor Cami Mendoza said the town had taken precautions after the Barcelona attack, but that the suspects had centered their assault on the narrow path to the boardwalk, which is usually packed with locals and tourists late into the evening. "We were on a terrace, like many others," said bystander Jose Antonio Saez. "We heard the crash and intense gun shots, then the dead bodies on the floor, shot by the police. They had what looked like explosive belts on." Others described scenes of panic, and found safety inside bars and restaurants until police had secured the area. Local resident Markel Artabe said he was heading to the seafront to get an ice cream when he heard the shots. "We began to run. We saw one person lying on the pavement with a shot in his head, then 20 to 30 meters farther on we saw two more people, who must have been terrorists as they had explosive belts around them. We were worried so we hid." The Cambrils attack came soon after a white van veered onto Barcelona's picturesque Las Ramblas promenade and mowed down pedestrians, zig-zagging down the strip packed with locals and tourists from around the world. Catalonian authorities tweeted that the dead and injured in the two attacks were people of 34 different nationalities. Forn told local radio RAC1 the Cambrils attack "follows the same trail. There is a connection." He told Onda Cero that the Cambrils and Barcelona attacks were being investigated together, as well as a Wednesday night explosion in the town of Alcanar in which one person was killed. "We are not talking [...]


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Crystal Lake Park District board examines plans for $69 million development for Sunset Meadows ParkSarah Nader - snader@shawmedia.com Commissioners Thomas Aquilina (left), Julie Matens and Shawn Zimmerman listen to presentations at Thursday's meeting Aug. 17, 2017. The board examined the results of a feasibility study for developing Sunset Meadows Park. Representatives from several firms presented their findings to the board.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 06:08:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – The Crystal Lake Park District is examining preliminary plans for a possible multimillion-dollar development on a large portion of Sunset Meadows Park, which includes a community center. The Crystal Lake Park District Board of Commissioners looked at plans Thursday for a $69 million development on about 90 of the 138 acres at Sunset Meadows Park, located off Route 176 and Briarwood Road on the city’s watershed, which resulted from a feasibility study on developing the land. The budget was created for the entire development and considered costs for construction, engineering, architectural and impact associated with the project in addition to other estimated fees, such as utility connections and following the city’s watershed ordinance. The Crystal Lake Watershed is about 2,300 acres of land that feeds the city’s namesake recreational lake. Executive Director Jason Herbster emphasized, however, that the study was conducted to simply assess whether development is possible on the land and would depend on a community needs assessment to see what aspects of the development residents would want. “This isn’t a project we’re set to do,” Herbster said. “This is just a very small step in getting to maybe someday do this. This is simply just step one in a very long process.” Representatives from the four companies behind the feasibility study described the plans as the “Cadillac version” of developing the property, considering all of the Park District’s potential uses for the land and finding the most cost-efficient model for including each one. The budget allotted about $39 million for the community center building, $9.9 million for outdoor aquatics, $1.7 million for indoor aquatics and $362,000 for a dog park on the south end of the property. Expenses also were budgeted for installing multiple bike trails around the wetlands for $684,000 and future expansion to the proposed facilities. An additional $500,000 was budgeted as an allowance for relocating the ComEd power lines that run across the proposed development site. The budget also included about $6 million to account for escalation, or the rising of construction costs over the next five years. Portions of those costs would be eliminated depending on when the park district starts the project – if it starts at all. “The sooner you built it, the cheaper it will be,” said Leigh McMillen, a representative from Leopardo Companies. A preliminary rendering for the 90 acres outlined two major areas: one that includes the community center and outdoor aquatic areas to the northeast of Briarwood Road ,and another farther southeast for the dog park, picnic shelter and outdoor restrooms. The bike trails would be installed along the edges of the wetlands and could serve as an enhancement to the regional trail system, connecting to nearby trails. Several attempts to build either a recreation center or outdoor swimming pool have been squashed in years past. Voters rejected two multimillion-dollar referendums to build a community center and swimming pools in 1988 and 1992. The City Council also denied a park district proposal to buy the former Viking Dodge dealership property at the corner of Route 14 and Route 176 in order to build a community center. In 2015, a proposal for a recreation and aquatic center planned for the 27 acres at 8917 Ackman Road in [...]


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Tech companies banishing extremists after CharlottesvilleAP photo This photo combo of images shows a Google sign at a store in Hialeah, Fla., the Twitter app displayed on a smartphone, PayPal headquarters in San Jose, Calif., and the Facebook app displayed on an iPad. It took a violent rally to get tech companies, such as these and others, to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:49:00 GMT

NEW YORK – It took bloodshed in Charlottesville to get tech companies to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence. In the wake of the deadly clash at a white-nationalist rally last weekend in Virginia, major companies such as Google, Facebook and PayPal are banishing a growing cadre of extremist groups and individuals for violating service terms. What took so long? For one thing, tech companies have long seen themselves as bastions of free expression. But the Charlottesville rally seemed to have a sobering effect. It showed how easily technology can be used to organize and finance such events, and how extreme views online can translate into violence offline. “There is a difference between freedom of speech and what happened in Charlottesville,” said Rashad Robinson, executive director of Color of Change, an online racial justice group. The battle of ideas is “different than people who show up with guns to terrorize communities.” A slow reaction Tech companies are in a bind. On one hand, they want to be open to as many people as possible so they can show them ads or provide rides, apartments or financial services. On the other hand, some of these users turn out to be white supremacists, terrorists or child molesters. Keegan Hankes, an analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center’s intelligence project, said his group has been trying for more than a year to get Facebook and PayPal to shut down these accounts. Even now, he said, the two companies are taking action only in the most extreme cases. “They have policies against violence, racism, harassment,” said Hankes, whose center monitors hate groups and extremism. “The problem is that there has been no enforcement.” Case in point: The neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer has been around since 2013. But it wasn’t effectively kicked off the internet until it mocked the woman killed while protesting the white nationalists in Charlottesville. Shifting line PayPal said groups that advocate racist views have no place on its service, but added that there is a “fine line” when it comes to balancing freedom of expression with taking a stand against violent extremism. Other companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Google struggle with the same balancing act. The fine line is constantly moving and being tested. Ahead of the rally, Airbnb barred housing rentals to people it believed were traveling to participate. Before and after Charlottesville, PayPal cut off payments to groups that promote hate and violence. GoDaddy and Google yanked the domain name for Daily Stormer after the rally. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are removing known hate groups from their services, and the music streaming service Spotify dropped what it considers hate bands. “Companies are trying to figure out what the right thing is to do and how to do it,” said Steve Jones, a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago who focuses on communication technology. What happens from here is “partly going to depend on the individual leadership at these companies and company culture – and probably resources, too.” Cat and mouse Although traditional brands such as Tiki had no way of knowing that their torches were being bought for the rally, tech companies have tools to identify a[...]


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Geneva Rep. Steve Andersson bows out, announces he won't seek third termShaw Media file photo State Rep. Steven Andersson, R-Geneva, speaks Dec. 12 during the 28th annual Kane County Legislative Forum on Aging and Disability Issues. Andersson has announced he is not seeking reelection.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:45:00 GMT

GENEVA – State Rep. Steve Andersson, R-Geneva, will not seek a third term, he announced Thursday in a news release, stating that he believes his advocacy would be stronger outside of the General Assembly than within it. “There are others who are better suited to the current partisan politics of this chamber,” the release said. “At the end of this term, I’ll be stepping aside to afford that opportunity to another individual.” Andersson’s release also noted changing politics, even within the time he has served, as a factor in his decision. “The temperament of my party has shifted, and the Republican Party values I grew up with seem to be increasingly absent or changing,” Andersson said. “Moving forward, I will continue to fight, and I will continue to lead, with the same Republican values I have held to for 40 years.” Those values are “entrenched in the notion of living within our means, honoring our commitments, building strong businesses, ensuring equality for all, valuing human life and delivering a sustainable government,” the release said. “In addition, I will also fight for those who have the least voice: the mentally ill, the developmentally disabled, those afflicted with substance abuse and other issues,” the release said. Referring to his vote to approve the state’s first budget in two years, Andersson’s release noted that when the state was “on the brink of a financial cliff of such enormity that we would not recover for decades, I came to the same conclusion as many of my colleagues, that the cost of inaction outweighed the cost of compromise.” “As a result of the vote, we brought the state back from the fiscal edge and passed a balanced budget – the first in decades – while continuing the fight to build on the many reforms we did achieve,” Andersson’s release said. “I, along with 14 other Republicans, rose up and joined rank-and-file Democrats in an effort to end the impasse,” Andersson’s release said. “Due to the partisan infighting, the clock had run out and time was up, despite two and a half years of negotiations, there was no viable deal that could be passed in time to save our state from disaster. We could no longer watch while our state burned without a budget for the longest time of any state in U.S. history.” But Republicans continued the fight “to build on the many reforms we did achieve,” the release said. “These significant reforms include procurement reform, government consolidation initiatives and criminal justice reform,” the release said. “We lived to fight another day and saved the state from financial collapse.” “I am proud of the work I have done during my tenure,” the release said. Legislation and initiatives Andersson worked on included passing legislation giving voters the right to dissolve local governments; being a staunch advocate from the beginning for the future energy jobs bill; ensuring children get screened for social and emotional learning problems at an early age, making local government and the courts run more efficiently, and for honoring Gold Star Families with their own day each year, the release said. Andersson was first elected in November 2014 and was re-elected in November 2016. His term is up in the 2018 general election. Shaw Media file photo State Rep. Steven Andersson, R-Geneva, speaks Dec. 12 during[...]


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Metra Board selects new executive director to lead agencyThe Metra Board of Directors selected James M. Derwinski as the commuter rail agency's next executive director/CEO Wednesday. Derwinski will replace Don Orseno, who is retiring at the end of 2017.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:42:00 GMT

CHICAGO – The Metra Board of Directors gave a man who began as an electrician for the company and made his way through the ranks a new title Wednesday – executive director/CEO.

James M. Derwinski, Metra’s chief mechanical officer, was selected to lead the commuter rail agency, according to a new release from Metra.

“In Jim Derwinski we have an inspirational leader, well known for his effective communications and ability to develop people, thus earning him great respect within Metra,” Metra board Chairman Norman Carlson said in a statement. “Using his intelligence and skills, Jim has developed processes and procedures that make efficient use of taxpayer dollars.”

Derwinski, 49, oversees 650 employees responsible for the repair, inspection, cleaning and maintenance of about 1,200 railcars and locomotives as chief mechanical officer. He also is in charge of in-house railcar and locomotive rehabilitation programs, a contract for locomotive remanufacturing and the installation of Positive Train Control on cab cars and engines.

“We interviewed many qualified candidates for this position, but we feel Jim is best qualified to lead Metra,” board Vice Chairman Romayne C. Brown, who led the board’s search, said in a statement. “With our funding challenges, we need someone with his proven energy and resourcefulness to keep us on track as we face some difficult years ahead. Jim is that person. He is an innovator who is willing to try new things that have achieved very effective use of precious capital dollars.”

Executive Director/CEO Don Orseno is retiring from the position at the end of 2017.

The board made the selection at this time so that there will be a lengthy transition period, according to the release. Derwinski will be paid a salary of $275,000.

“With Jim’s background, railroad knowledge and collaborative working relationship with BNSF, Union Pacific and the regulatory agencies, I am confident he will hit the ground running when he takes the helm at Metra in 2018,” Orseno said in a statement. “I will be pleased to leave the agency under Jim’s leadership.”

Derwinski spent six years with the U.S. Navy as an electrician on nuclear submarines before the Chicago and North Western Railway hired him as a locomotive electrician in 1993.

He joined Metra as an electrician in 1997 and steadily rose through the ranks, serving as a foreman, general foreman, shop superintendent, director of systems maintenance, locomotive superintendent, Rock Island division director, Milwaukee division director and then senior director of mechanical operations.

He was named chief mechanical officer in September 2013.

The Metra Board of Directors selected James M. Derwinski as the commuter rail agency's next executive director/CEO Wednesday. Derwinski will replace Don Orseno, who is retiring at the end of 2017.


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FEMA to begin flood damage estimates in McHenry, Lake countiesKayla Wolf for Shaw Media Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner addresses the media Sunday, July 16, 2017 at Algonquin Public Works. Rauner spoke about the rising water level and then toured parts of Algonquin along the Fox River.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:36:00 GMT

SPRINGFIELD – Gov. Bruce Rauner asked the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Thursday to join the state in assessing the extent of flood damage across McHenry, Lake, Kane and Cook counties. The assessments will start as early as Friday morning.

Areas within these counties were greatly affected by near-record flooding in July, according to a news release from the governor’s office. Rauner submitted the request after initial damage assessments conducted by county officials showed about 300 homes suffered major damage or were destroyed and more than 3,000 others were affected by flood waters, according to the release.

“Many people in these counties are struggling to recover from this flood, and we want to do everything possible to help them,” Rauner said in a statement. “These damage assessments will provide a clearer picture, not only of the damage, but also of what people need in order to fully recover from this disaster.”

The Illinois Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Small Business Administration and local emergency management agencies will join FEMA to begin assessing damaged homes Friday morning. Assessments will continue through the weekend until all are complete.

IEMA also will work closely with local municipalities and county governments to document flood-related costs.

“That assessment will help determine whether the state could meet the federal threshold of $18.3 million for assistance that could help government agencies receive reimbursement for some of those flood-related expenses,” the release stated.

Those funds affect people such as Fox Waterway Agency Director Joe Keller. Earlier this month, Keller said he was concerned about funding coming through for his agency. He said his agency now is working to clean debris from the waterway, but Keller is worried about how much that will cost.

“You’re talking about millions of dollars of damage seen and unseen,” Keller said.

In Springfield, the State Emergency Operations Center was activated for two weeks to help residents within these four counties and throughout northwest Illinois fight the flood.

Kayla Wolf for Shaw Media Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner addresses the media Sunday, July 16, 2017 at Algonquin Public Works. Rauner spoke about the rising water level and then toured parts of Algonquin along the Fox River.


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Crystal Lake Park District board examines multimillion-dollar development at Sunset Meadows ParkThe Crystal Lake Park District Board of Commissioners looked at plans Thursday for a $69 million development on about 90 of the 138 acres at Sunset Meadows Park, located off Route 176 and Briarwood Road on the city’s watershed, which resulted from a feasibility study on developing the land. The budget was created for the entire development and considered costs for construction, engineering, architectural and effect associated with the project in addition to other estimated fees, such as utility connections and following the city’s watershed ordinance. The Crystal Lake Watershed is about 2,300 acres of land that feeds the city’s namesake recreational lake. Executive Director Jason Herbster emphasized, however, that the study was conducted to simply assess whether development is possible on the land and would depend on a community needs assessment to see what aspects of the development residents would want. “This isn’t a project we’re set to do,” Herbster said. “This is just a very small step in getting to maybe someday do this. This is simply just step one in a very long process.”Representatives from the four companies behind the feasibility study described the plans as the “Cadillac version” of developing the property, considering all of the Park District’s potential uses for the land and finding the most cost-efficient model for including each one. The budget allotted about $39 million for the community center building, $9.9 million for outdoor aquatics, $1.7 million for indoor aquatics and $362,000 for a dog park on the south end of the property. Expenses also were budgeted for installing multiple bike trails around the wetlands for $684,000 and future expansion to the proposed facilities. An additional $500,000 was budgeted as an allowance for relocating the ComEd power lines that run across the proposed development site. The budget also included about $6 million to account for escalation, or the rising of construction costs over the next five years. Portions of those costs would be eliminated depending on when the park district starts the project – if it starts at all. “The sooner you built it, the cheaper it will be,” said Leigh McMillen, a representative from Leopardo Companies.A preliminary rendering for the 90 acres outlined two major areas: one that includes the community center and outdoor aquatic areas to the northeast of Briarwood Road, and another farther southeast for the dog park, picnic shelter and outdoor restrooms. The bike trails would be installed along the edges of the wetlands and could serve as an enhancement to the regional trail system, connecting to nearby trails. Several attempts to build either a recreation center or outdoor swimming pool have been squashed in years past. Voters rejected two multimillion-dollar referendums to build a community center and swimming pools in 1988 and 1992. The City Council also denied a Park District proposal to buy the former Viking Dodge dealership property at the corner of routes 14 and 176 in order to build a community center.In 2015, a proposal for a recreation and aquatic center planned for the 27 acres at 8917 Ackman Road in Lake in the Hills fell through after a billboard company, which had an existing contract with the property owner, wanted to add two digital billboards. The Park District determined the billboards would not be appropriate for the neighborhood. Eight months later, the board of commissioners gave a thumbs-up to investigating the feasibility of the Sunset Meadows property, and in the fall officially authorized conducting the survey for $80,000. More than 50 percent of residents expressed interest in a recreation center when it was last assessed in 2009. Another assessment would need to be budgeted in the city's 2018-19 budget and could not occur until after May 1. “The needs assessment should tell you if there’s enough support to move forward on it, and then it comes down to cents and dollars,” Herbster said about drumming support for possible developments. “Then the next step is [determining] the community’s willingness to go that extra step if we need to ask them for money.”

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:30:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – The Crystal Lake Park District is examining preliminary plans for a possible multimillion-dollar development on a large portion of Sunset Meadows Park, which includes a community center. The Crystal Lake Park District Board of Commissioners looked at plans Thursday for a $69 million development on about 90 of the 138 acres at Sunset Meadows Park, located off Route 176 and Briarwood Road on the city’s watershed, which resulted from a feasibility study on developing the land. The budget was created for the entire development and considered costs for construction, engineering, architectural and effect associated with the project in addition to other estimated fees, such as utility connections and following the city’s watershed ordinance. The Crystal Lake Watershed is about 2,300 acres of land that feeds the city’s namesake recreational lake. Executive Director Jason Herbster emphasized, however, that the study was conducted to simply assess whether development is possible on the land and would depend on a community needs assessment to see what aspects of the development residents would want. “This isn’t a project we’re set to do,” Herbster said. “This is just a very small step in getting to maybe someday do this. This is simply just step one in a very long process.”Representatives from the four companies behind the feasibility study described the plans as the “Cadillac version” of developing the property, considering all of the Park District’s potential uses for the land and finding the most cost-efficient model for including each one. The budget allotted about $39 million for the community center building, $9.9 million for outdoor aquatics, $1.7 million for indoor aquatics and $362,000 for a dog park on the south end of the property. Expenses also were budgeted for installing multiple bike trails around the wetlands for $684,000 and future expansion to the proposed facilities. An additional $500,000 was budgeted as an allowance for relocating the ComEd power lines that run across the proposed development site. The budget also included about $6 million to account for escalation, or the rising of construction costs over the next five years. Portions of those costs would be eliminated depending on when the park district starts the project – if it starts at all. “The sooner you built it, the cheaper it will be,” said Leigh McMillen, a representative from Leopardo Companies.A preliminary rendering for the 90 acres outlined two major areas: one that includes the community center and outdoor aquatic areas to the northeast of Briarwood Road, and another farther southeast for the dog park, picnic shelter and outdoor restrooms. The bike trails would be installed along the edges of the wetlands and could serve as an enhancement to the regional trail system, connecting to nearby trails. Several attempts to build either a recreation center or outdoor swimming pool have been squashed in years past. Voters rejected two multimillion-dollar referendums to build a community center and swimming pools in 1988 and 1992. The City Council also denied a Park District proposal to buy the former Viking Dodge dealership property at the corner of routes 14 and 176 in order to build a community center.In 2015, a proposal for a recreation and aquatic center planned for the 27 acres at 8917 Ackman Road in Lake in the Hills fell through after a billboard company, which had an existing contract with the property owner, wanted to add two digital billboards. The Park District determined the billboards would not be appropriate for the neighborhood. Eight months later, t[...]


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See volunteers create a memorial garden for a 22-year-old Lake in the Hills manKincaid said Connor had a passion for the outdoors and found comfort in the serenity of the lake and surrounding nature for his entire life, until the 22-year-old Lake in the Hills man was killed in a car crash in Harvard in August 2016. “Up until the week of his car accident, Connor would come home from work after a long day and he would either go out and cast for an hour from the dock or he would eat dinner, shower and then jump in the boat and spend the rest of the evening out until sunset,” Kincaid said.The Kincaids will honor their late son’s lifelong affinity for the outdoors with the Connor Kincaid Memorial Fishing Tournament from 8 to 11 a.m. at Indian Trail Beach on Saturday, which would have been his 23rd birthday. Entry is $8 and includes a light breakfast, lunch and an awards celebration. All proceeds will be used to restock the village’s fishing areas. The family also will host a private dedication for family and friends at 4:30 p.m. for the 75-by-75-foot memorial garden built in Connor’s honor at Indian Trail Beach, which the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Department and Village boards unanimously approved.Kincaid said the garden will have a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony later in August for sponsors and the village. “It’s a perfect reflection of the lake where Connor spent a lot of time, a place that gave him just time for personal meditation and quiet time,” Kincaid said. “I hope other people get to enjoy that space how Connor did.”The angler life suited Connor from a young age, but his mother said the motto of being a lifelong angler really stuck when he was about 15. Even when he got older and started working, Connor found time when he could to get out on the water. He regularly shared pictures on social media of himself either hunting or fishing in the months before he died, usually holding his prized catch with a hat and a smile. “As I reflect, overarching, that is true of him,” Kincaid said. “And I think about now and where he’s at, and he’s a still lifetime angler.”Registration for the tournament can be completed at the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation office, on the village’s payment website or from 7:30 to 8 a.m. Saturday before the tournament. Fishing equipment and boats will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you go WHAT: Connor Kincaid Memorial Fishing Tournament WHERE: Indian Trail Beach, 228 Indian Trail, Lake in the Hills WHEN: 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday. On-site pre-registration can be completed from 7:30 to 8 a.m. INFORMATION: 847-960-7460

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 18:39:00 GMT

Dawn Kincaid always circles back to one clear memory of her son, Connor – when she found him standing in the kitchen early one morning wearing a fisherman’s vest. None of his three siblings were dressed yet, but 6-year-old Connor wanted to fish.

Kincaid said Connor had a passion for the outdoors and found comfort in the serenity of the lake and surrounding nature for his entire life, until the 22-year-old Lake in the Hills man was killed in a car crash in Harvard in August 2016. “Up until the week of his car accident, Connor would come home from work after a long day and he would either go out and cast for an hour from the dock or he would eat dinner, shower and then jump in the boat and spend the rest of the evening out until sunset,” Kincaid said.The Kincaids will honor their late son’s lifelong affinity for the outdoors with the Connor Kincaid Memorial Fishing Tournament from 8 to 11 a.m. at Indian Trail Beach on Saturday, which would have been his 23rd birthday. Entry is $8 and includes a light breakfast, lunch and an awards celebration. All proceeds will be used to restock the village’s fishing areas. The family also will host a private dedication for family and friends at 4:30 p.m. for the 75-by-75-foot memorial garden built in Connor’s honor at Indian Trail Beach, which the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Department and Village boards unanimously approved.Kincaid said the garden will have a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony later in August for sponsors and the village. “It’s a perfect reflection of the lake where Connor spent a lot of time, a place that gave him just time for personal meditation and quiet time,” Kincaid said. “I hope other people get to enjoy that space how Connor did.”The angler life suited Connor from a young age, but his mother said the motto of being a lifelong angler really stuck when he was about 15. Even when he got older and started working, Connor found time when he could to get out on the water. He regularly shared pictures on social media of himself either hunting or fishing in the months before he died, usually holding his prized catch with a hat and a smile. “As I reflect, overarching, that is true of him,” Kincaid said. “And I think about now and where he’s at, and he’s a still lifetime angler.”Registration for the tournament can be completed at the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation office, on the village’s payment website or from 7:30 to 8 a.m. Saturday before the tournament. Fishing equipment and boats will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you go WHAT: Connor Kincaid Memorial Fishing Tournament WHERE: Indian Trail Beach, 228 Indian Trail, Lake in the Hills WHEN: 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday. On-site pre-registration can be completed from 7:30 to 8 a.m. INFORMATION: 847-960-7460


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Students navigate classes during a practice run on first dayMcHenry High School counselor Curtis Menke hands out class schedules to freshmen Wednesday during orientation at the west campus.McHenry High School freshmen Madison Berrard (from left), Iasbelle Wickert and Sam Koeune look over their schedules during orientation for the Class of 2021 on Wednesday at the west campus.McHenry High School freshman John Cyboran asks Debbie Fenton, a teacher, for directions to his first period class Wednesday. Class of 2021 freshmen were able to navigate their class schedule during orientation at the west campus.McHenry High School freshmen sit in chemistry class during orientation Wednesday for the Class of 2021 at the west campus.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 18:19:00 GMT

Freshman dodged through the halls during a practice run through their daily schedule at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday as members of the McHenry High School West campus student leadership team stood by to offer assistance in navigating classrooms, lockers and any other first day problems that arose.

McHenry High School counselor Curtis Menke hands out class schedules to freshmen Wednesday during orientation at the west campus.McHenry High School freshmen Madison Berrard (from left), Iasbelle Wickert and Sam Koeune look over their schedules during orientation for the Class of 2021 on Wednesday at the west campus.McHenry High School freshman John Cyboran asks Debbie Fenton, a teacher, for directions to his first period class Wednesday. Class of 2021 freshmen were able to navigate their class schedule during orientation at the west campus.McHenry High School freshmen sit in chemistry class during orientation Wednesday for the Class of 2021 at the west campus.


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Van plows into crowd in Barcelona; Police view it as terrorPolice officers tell members of the public to leave the scene in a street in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in the northern Spanish city of Barcelona say a white van has jumped the sidewalk in the city's historic Las Ramblas district, injuring several people. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)Children are escorted down a road in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in Barcelona say a white van has mounted a sidewalk, struck several people in the city's Las Ramblas district. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)Police officers cordon off a street in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in the northern Spanish city of Barcelona say a white van has jumped the sidewalk in the city's historic Las Ramblas district, injuring several people. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)A police officer cordons off a street in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in the northern Spanish city of Barcelona say a white van has jumped the sidewalk in the city's historic Las Ramblas district, injuring several people. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)Injured people are treated in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)Injured people are treated in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)Children, some in tears, are escorted down a road in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in Barcelona say a white van has mounted a sidewalk, struck several people in the city's Las Ramblas district. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)Children, some in tears, are escorted down a road in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in Barcelona say a white van has mounted a sidewalk, struck several people in the city's Las Ramblas district. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)People flee the scene in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)An injured person is treated in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)An injured person is carried in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017 after a white van jumped the sidewalk in the historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. (AP Photo/Oriol Duran)

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 17:12:00 GMT

BARCELONA, Spain — A white van jumped the sidewalk Thursday in Barcelona's historic Las Ramblas district, killing and injuring several people as it plowed into a summer crowd of tourists and residents, police said. The El Pais newspaper said police were treating the crash as a terror attack. Police cordoned off the broad, popular street, ordering stores and nearby Metro and train stations to close. They asked people to stay away from the area so as not to get in the way of emergency services. A helicopter hovered over the scene. Quoting unnamed police sources, El Pais said the two perpetrators of the crash were holed up in a bar in Tallers Street. There was no immediate police confirmation of the report. Catalan police tweeted that "there are mortal victims and injured from the crash" without specifying numbers. The Barcelona-based La Vanguardia newspaper reported at least one dead and 20 injured from the van. In a photograph on public broadcaster RTVE, three people were lying on the ground in the street of the northern Spanish city Thursday afternoon, apparently being helped by police and others. Other videos showed five people down and recorded people screaming as they fled the scene. Las Ramblas, a street of stalls and shops that cuts through the center of Barcelona, is one of the city's top tourist destinations. People walk down a wide, pedestrian path in the center of the street but cars can travel on either side. Keith Fleming, an American who lives in Barcelona, was watching TV in his building just off Las Ramblas when he heard a noise and went out to his balcony. "I saw women and children just running and they looked terrified," he said. There was a bang, possibly from someone rolling down a store shutter, and more people ran by. Then police arrived and pushed everyone down the street, a full block away. Even people leaning out of doors were being told to go back inside, he said. He said police are there with their guns drawn and riot police are at the end of his block. He said his street is now deserted. "It's just kind of a tense situation," Fleming said. "Clearly people were scared." Cars, trucks and vans have been the weapon of choice in multiple extremist attacks in Europe in the last year. The most deadly was the driver of a tractor-trailer who targeted Bastille Day revelers in the southern French city of Nice in July 2016, killing 86 people. In December 2016, 12 people died after a driver used a hijacked trick to drive into a Christmas market in Berlin. There have been multiple attacks this year in London, where a man in a rented SUV plowed into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, killing four people before he ran onto the grounds of Parliament and stabbed an unarmed police officer to death in March. Four other men drove onto the sidewalk of London Bridge, unleashing a rampage with knives that killed eight people in June. Another man also drove into pedestrians leaving a London mosque later in June. Police officers tell members of the public to leave the scene in a street in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Police in the northern Spanish city of Barcelona say a white van has jumped the sidewalk in the city's histori[...]


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Spring Grove woman charged with drug-related DUI after crashing into treeEugenia D. Frosolone, 24, of Spring Grove was found unresponsive in a vehicle that had crashed into a tree in McHenry Tuesday night. Frosolone was taken to Centegra Hospital-McHenry and later charged with driving under the influence of drugs.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 13:22:00 GMT

MCHENRY – A Spring Grove woman was charged with driving under the influence of drugs after she was found unresponsive in her car that had crashed into a tree Tuesday night, police said.

McHenry firefighters and police responded to the crash about 9:45 p.m. Tuesday in the 2600 block of Arbor Drive, McHenry Fire Battalion Chief Kevin Sears said. The driver experienced a medical emergency and was unresponsive when crews arrived, Sears said. He would not say what that medical emergency was.

Eugenia D. Frosolone, 24, of Spring Grove was taken to Centegra Hospital – McHenry and released, McHenry Police Cmdr. Paul Funk said. Frosolone later was arrested and charged with driving under the influence of drugs. Funk said he did not know how the woman crashed into the tree.

Frosolone posted bail and was released. She is next due in court Sept. 20.

Eugenia D. Frosolone, 24, of Spring Grove was found unresponsive in a vehicle that had crashed into a tree in McHenry Tuesday night. Frosolone was taken to Centegra Hospital-McHenry and later charged with driving under the influence of drugs.


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Judge finds Spring Grove woman guilty of having more than 250 grams of cocaine

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 13:18:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A McHenry County judge found a Spring Grove woman guilty of having more than 250 grams of cocaine in the basement of her home.

McHenry County Judge Robert Wilbrandt found Renee Hermes, 54, guilty of possession of 100 to 400 grams of cocaine and not guilty of possession with the intent to deliver 100 to 400 grams of cocaine, according to the McHenry County State's Attorney's Office.

Hermes was charged in April 2014 after she called 911 to report possible carbon monoxide poisoning. She later admitted to being high on cocaine at the time of the call, prosecutors said. Authorities arrived at the scene and found more than 250 grams of cocaine in her basement.

She will be sentenced Oct. 11. Hermes faces probation or up to 30 years in prison on the conviction.


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President Trump increasingly isolated as business panels dismantledPeople including a protestor holding a sign line Fifth Avenue as they watch President Donald Trump's motorcade leave Trump Tower, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, in New York. With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump on Wednesday disbanded a pair of advisory business councils _ the latest fallout from his comments on racially charged violence in Charlottesville. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 13:17:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump abruptly abolished two of his White House business councils, an attempt to manage his increasing isolation and the continued fallout from his combative comments on racially charged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. "Rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum, I am ending both. Thank you all!" Trump tweeted from New York. Trump's comments came after one of the panels had already agreed to disband earlier in the day. A growing number of business leaders on the councils had openly criticized his remarks laying blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally on "both sides." The White House is trying to deal with the repercussions from Trump's defiant remarks on the Virginia tragedy. Presidential advisers hunkered down Wednesday, offering no public defense while privately expressing frustration with his comments. Some Republicans and scores of Democrats denounced Trump's statements as putting white supremacists on equal moral footing with counter-protesters in Charlottesville and called for an apology. Most of those Republicans, including congressional leaders, did not specifically criticize the president. Trump himself stayed out of sight, tweeting occasionally about a primary in Alabama, the stock market and, once, his campaign slogan. Midday, he traveled from New York to his golf club in New Jersey for the night. But he returned to Twitter early Thursday to chastise Sen. Lindsey Graham for remarks the South Carolinian made about Trump's take on Charlottesville, and also had harsh words for Sen. Jeff Flake, an Arizona Republican. He posted one tweet saying that "publicity-seeking Lindsey Graham falsely stated that I said there is moral equivalency" between the white supremacists and the counter-demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia, at Saturday's violent protest. Earlier, the president told associates he was pleased with how his press conference went Tuesday, saying he believed he had effectively stood up to the media, according to three people familiar with the conversations who demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about them. Business leaders felt differently. Denise Morrison, chief executive of Campbell Soup, declared she was leaving Trump's manufacturing council, saying, "The president should have been — and still needs to be — unambiguous" in denouncing white supremacists. CEOs had begun tendering their resignations from White House panels after Trump's initial comments following the Saturday violence. The first to step down, Kenneth Frazier of Merck, drew a Twitter tongue-lashing from the president. Later, Trump called those who were leaving "grandstanders" and insisted many others were eager to take their places. Members of the Strategy and Policy group, led by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, concluded after a 45-minute conference call in the morning that they would end the council and announce their decision in a statement, according to two people familiar with the discussions. They insisted on anonymity to discuss private conversations. In a subse[...]


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Bannon: No military solution in North KoreaFILE - In this April 29, 2017, file photo, Steve Bannon, chief White House strategist to President Donald Trump is seen in Harrisburg, Pa. Bannon says there’s no military solution to North Korea’s threats and says the U.S. is losing the economic race against China. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 12:49:00 GMT

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — President Donald Trump's chief strategist Steve Bannon says there's no military solution to the threat posed by North Korea and its nuclear ambitions, despite the president's recent pledge to answer further aggression with "fire and fury." In an interview with The American Prospect posted online Wednesday, Bannon tells the liberal publication that the U.S. is losing the economic race against China. He also talks about purging his rivals from the Defense and State departments. Bannon is also asked about the white supremacist movement, whose march on Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend led to deadly violence. He dismisses them as "losers," ''a fringe element" and "a collection of clowns." The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment. It's highly unusual for Bannon, one of the most contentious members of Trump's inner circle, to give a lengthy interview to a journalist, much less one from a liberal publication. His comments on North Korea, which contradict Trump's tough approach, could add to pressure on the president to fire him. Bannon has survived earlier rounds of having fallen out of favor with Trump, who is irked by perceptions that he was the mastermind of Trump's winning campaign and guides policy in the White House. "There's no military solution (to North Korea's nuclear threats), forget it," Bannon says. "Until somebody solves the part of the equation that shows me that 10 million people in Seoul don't die in the first 30 minutes from conventional weapons, I don't know what you're talking about, there's no military solution here, they got us." Trump tweeted earlier Wednesday that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un "made a very wise and well-reasoned decision" by backing down after heightening fears of nuclear conflict in a series of combative threats, including against the U.S. territory of Guam. Bannon also outlined his push for the U.S. to adopt a tougher stance on China trade, without waiting to see whether Beijing will help restrain Kim, as Trump has pressed China's leader to do. Trump also has lamented U.S. trade deficits with China. "The economic war with China is everything," Bannon says. "And we have to be maniacally focused on that. If we continue to lose it, we're five years away, I think, 10 years at the most, of hitting an inflection point from which we'll never be able to recover." A Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said Thursday both sides have benefited from trade. Asked about Bannon's comments, Hua said at a regular new briefing, "There is no winner in a trade war. We hope the relevant people can refrain from dealing with a problem in the 21st century with a zero-sum mentality from the 19th or the 20th century." Hua appealed for dialogue to "preserve the sound and steady growth of China-U.S. relations." Bannon was a key general election campaign adviser and has been a forceful presence in a divided White House. The former leader of conservative Breitbart News, Bannon has drawn fire from some of Trump's closest advisers, including son-in-law Jared Kushner. Earlier this week, [...]


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Police investigating domestic incident in Lake in the Hills

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:52:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Police are investigating a domestic incident that occurred late Wednesday morning in Lake in the Hills.

The incident occurred about 10:50 a.m. in the 4500 block of Barharbor Drive, according to a Nixle alert from Lake in the Hills police.

A male suspect is in custody, and charges are pending, said Amanda Schmitt, public information officer for the Lake in the Hills Police Department.

Schmitt wouldn’t comment on the nature of the incident or say whether anyone was injured.

She said the occurrence was isolated, and there is no threat to the public.


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Ken Caudle resigns as Huntley fire chief before being placed on administrative leaveKen Caudle resigned Tuesday as Huntley Fire Protection District chief. The district's board accepted his resignation at Tuesday night's special meeting.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:51:00 GMT

HUNTLEY – Ken Caudle resigned as Huntley Fire Protection District chief before being placed on administrative leave in his new position.

The Huntley Fire Protection District board accepted Caudle’s resignation as chief at Tuesday night’s special meeting after discussing the situation in closed session, according to a district news release, but officials did not explain what led to Caudle stepping down.

In accordance with state law, Caudle was returned to the rank of battalion chief and placed on administrative leave. The reason for him being placed on leave and the length of his leave were not immediately clear.

Deputy Chief Scott Ravagnie was appointed as the acting fire chief.

Caudle, who has been with the district since 1998 and served as chief for five years, declined to comment other than to confirm that his resignation was discussed in Tuesday’s closed session.

Ravagnie did not respond to a request for comment. Trustees also have declined to comment on the “personnel matter,” according to the release.

Huntley police and the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office could not be reached for comment on whether there are any pending investigations regarding Caudle.

McHenry County online court records show no results for a case involving Caudle.

Ken Caudle resigned Tuesday as Huntley Fire Protection District chief. The district's board accepted his resignation at Tuesday night's special meeting.


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Back to bomb shelters? North Korea threats revive nuke fearsFILE - In this Jan. 29, 1962 file photo, the Spalding family, left, and the Richmond family demonstrate how people of the town would sit out a nuclear attack and its radioactive aftermath in Los Alamos, N.M., birthplace of the atomic and hydrogen bombs. For some baby boomers, North Korea's nuclear advances and the Trump administration's bellicose response have prompted flashbacks to a time when they were young, and when they prayed each night that they might awaken the next morning. For their children, the North Korean crisis was a taste of what the Cold War was like. (AP Photo, File)

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:51:00 GMT

LOS ANGELES – After the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the era of nuclear nightmares – of the atomic arms race, of backyard bomb shelters, of schoolchildren diving under desks to practice their survival skills in the event of an attack – seemed to finally, thankfully, fade into history. Until now. For some baby boomers, North Korea’s nuclear advances and President Donald Trump’s bellicose response have prompted flashbacks to a time when they were young, and when they prayed each night that they might awaken the next morning. For their children, the North Korean crisis was a taste of what the Cold War was like. “I’m not concerned to where I can’t sleep at night. But it certainly raises alarms for Guam or even Hawaii, where it might be a real threat,” said 24-year-old banker Christian Zwicky of San Bernardino, California. People of his parents’ generation were taught to duck and cover when the bombs came. “Maybe those types of drills should come back,” Zwicky said. He isn’t old enough to remember the popular 1950s public service announcement in which a cartoon character named Bert the Turtle teaches kids how to dive under their desks for safety. But Zwicky did see it often enough in high school history classes that he can hum the catchy tune that plays at the beginning. That’s when Bert avoids disaster by ducking into his shell, then goes on to explain to schoolchildren what they should do. “I do remember that,” said 65-year-old retiree Scott Paul of Los Angeles. “And also the drop drills that we had in elementary school, which was a pretty regular thing then.” Even as a 10-year-old, Paul said, he wondered how much good ducking under a desk could do if a bomb powerful enough to destroy a city fell nearby. No good at all, his teacher acknowledged. Then there were backyard bomb shelters, which briefly became the rage during the missile crisis of 1962, when it was learned the Soviets had slipped nuclear-tipped missiles into Cuba and pointed them at the United States. After a tense, two-week standoff between President John F. Kennedy and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev that some believe brought the world the closest it’s ever come to nuclear war, the missiles were removed and the shelters faded from public interest. Now they, too, seem to be having a revival. “When Trump took office it doubled our sales, and then when he started making crazy statements we got a lot more orders,” said Walton McCarthy of Norad Shelter Systems LLC of Garland, Texas. “Between now and a year ago, we’ve quadrupled our sales.” His competitor, California-based Atlas Survival Shelters, said it sold 30 shelters in three days last week. During its first year in business in 2011 it sold only 10. Bill Miller, a 74-year-old retired film director living in Sherborn, Massachusetts, thinks these days are more nerve-wracking than the standoff in October 1962. “I think it’s much, much crazier, scarier times,” he said. “I think the people w[...]


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Jogger alerts resident to McHenry house fire; home left uninhabitableFirefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:49:00 GMT

MCHENRY – A Wednesday morning fire left a McHenry home uninhabitable, according to a news release from McHenry Township Fire Protection District.

Firefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry, according to the release. Flames were coming from second floor windows when crews arrived.

The fire was confined to two rooms on the second floor, and other areas of the house sustained smoke, heat and water damage, according to the release.

A jogger alerted the resident of the home that the house was on fire. No operational smoke detectors were found inside the residence, according to the release.

No one was injured in the fire. The cause of the fire is under investigation, and a damage estimate has not yet been determined, according to the release.

Police asked drivers to avoid a portion of Route 31 near the home for about two hours during rush hour because of the fire.

Firefighters responded about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday to a house fire in the 3600 block of Grand Avenue, McHenry.


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Crystal Lake co-workers, veterans surprise Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury returning from serviceFlury's co-workers planned a welcome home Wednesday morning. Crystal Lake-based Boy Scout Troop 165 planted flags along the drive leading up to the office building, and members of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12014 waited for Flury's pickup truck to pull into the parking lot. “Veterans support veterans," post Cmdr. Danny Malone said. "Anything we can do to show honor and respect, we do."Flury arrived a bit later than anticipated after dropping off his daughter at school in Sycamore, but he was greeted by the entire office waving American flags when he pulled into the parking lot. “I was worried about my desk being decorated,” Flury said. The members of the VFW saluted Flury when he walked up to the office, shook his hand and said, "Welcome home."The group then posed for pictures with a flag Flury had sent back from Kuwait. It flew over his base before being displayed in the Curran Contracting lobby. While the Army Reserve captain served in Kuwait, Curran Contracting employees sent him care packages, cards and even an iPad so he could communicate better with his daughter. This was Flury's second tour – his first had been to Afghanistan.Pachla said he made sure Flury knew his job was waiting for him when he returned. "We're a medium-sized construction company, and he's pretty important," Pachla said. "We just want him to know, 'We're happy to have you back, even more so to have you back to safety.' "Flury said he knew he had a long day ahead of him, but he was excited to be back. “It feels more like family," Flury said. "That’s one of the reasons I love working here.”

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:45:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Two weeks ago, Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury surprised his 11-year-old daughter at a Brookfield Zoo dolphin show. He had been deployed in Kuwait for almost a year.

Wednesday was Flury's first day back at work as a project manager for Curran Contracting Co. in Crystal Lake, and his co-workers said it was their turn to surprise him.

“It’s a pretty big deal he’s coming home, and we want to do something special," said Mike Pachla, Flury's manager said. "None of us are risking our lives out there. To show our appreciation, we really want to welcome him home."

Flury's co-workers planned a welcome home Wednesday morning. Crystal Lake-based Boy Scout Troop 165 planted flags along the drive leading up to the office building, and members of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12014 waited for Flury's pickup truck to pull into the parking lot. “Veterans support veterans," post Cmdr. Danny Malone said. "Anything we can do to show honor and respect, we do."Flury arrived a bit later than anticipated after dropping off his daughter at school in Sycamore, but he was greeted by the entire office waving American flags when he pulled into the parking lot. “I was worried about my desk being decorated,” Flury said. The members of the VFW saluted Flury when he walked up to the office, shook his hand and said, "Welcome home."The group then posed for pictures with a flag Flury had sent back from Kuwait. It flew over his base before being displayed in the Curran Contracting lobby. While the Army Reserve captain served in Kuwait, Curran Contracting employees sent him care packages, cards and even an iPad so he could communicate better with his daughter. This was Flury's second tour – his first had been to Afghanistan.Pachla said he made sure Flury knew his job was waiting for him when he returned. "We're a medium-sized construction company, and he's pretty important," Pachla said. "We just want him to know, 'We're happy to have you back, even more so to have you back to safety.' "Flury said he knew he had a long day ahead of him, but he was excited to be back. “It feels more like family," Flury said. "That’s one of the reasons I love working here.”


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Crystal Lake co-workers, veterans surprise Army captain returning from serviceU.S. Army Reserve Capt. Joshua Flury hugs his daughter, Kristi. He surprised her at the Brookfield Zoo’s Dolphins in Action show with an early return from Kuwait after being gone for 10 months.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:44:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – Two weeks ago, Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury surprised his 11-year-old daughter at a Brookfield Zoo dolphin show. He had been deployed in Kuwait for almost a year.

Wednesday was Flury’s first day back at work as a project manager for Curran Contracting Co. in Crystal Lake, and his co-workers said it was their turn to surprise him.

“It’s a pretty big deal he’s coming home, and we want to do something special,” said Mike Pachla, Flury’s manager. “None of us are risking our lives out there. To show our appreciation, we really want to welcome him home.”

Flury’s co-workers planned a welcome home Wednesday morning. Crystal Lake-based Boy Scout Troop 165 planted flags along the drive leading up to the office building, and members of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12014 waited for Flury’s pickup truck to pull into the parking lot.

“Veterans support veterans,” post Cmdr. Danny Malone said. “Anything we can do to show honor and respect, we do.”

Flury arrived a bit later than anticipated after dropping off his daughter at school in Sycamore, but he was greeted by the entire office waving American flags when he pulled into the drive.

“I was worried about my desk being decorated,” Flury said.

The members of the VFW saluted Flury when he walked up to the office, shook his hand and said, “Welcome home.”

The group then posed for pictures with a flag Flury had sent back from Kuwait. It flew over his base before being displayed in the Curran Contracting lobby.

While the Army Reserve captain served in Kuwait, Curran Contracting employees sent him care packages, cards and even an iPad so he could communicate better with his daughter. This was Flury’s second tour – his first had been to Afghanistan.

Pachla said he made sure Flury knew his job was waiting for him when he returned.

“We’re a medium-sized construction company, and he’s pretty important,” Pachla said. “We just want him to know, ‘We’re happy to have you back, even more so to have you back to safety.’ ”

Flury said he knew he had a long day ahead of him, but he was excited to be back.

“It feels more like family,” Flury said. “That’s one of the reasons I love working here.”

U.S. Army Reserve Capt. Joshua Flury hugs his daughter, Kristi. He surprised her at the Brookfield Zoo’s Dolphins in Action show with an early return from Kuwait after being gone for 10 months.


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Fishing tournament to commemorate Lake in the Hills man killed in crashGregory Shaver for Shaw Media Volunteer Colleen Warchol (left) hugs Dawn Kincaid on Monday as Warchol works on a memorial garden in honor of Kincaid's son, Connor, who was killed in a car crash last year. The family will be hosting a fishing tournament in Connor's memory on Saturday.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Volunteer Josh Loeffler sweeps sand as he works on a patio Monday while helping to build a memorial garden in honor of Connor Kincaid, who was killed in a car crash last year. The Kincaid family will be hosting a fishing tournament in Connor's memory on Saturday.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Kelsey Kincaid places flowers as her dad, Kevin Kincaid, rakes dirt Monday while they work on a memorial garden in honor of Connor Kincaid, who was killed in a car crash last year.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Kaitlyn Kincaid plants flowers Monday as she works on a memorial garden in honor of her brother, Connor, who was killed in a car crash last year. The family will be hosting a fishing tournament in Connor's memory on Saturday.Gregory Shaver for Shaw Media Dawn and Kevin Kincaid hold a photograph of their son, Connor, who was killed in a car crash last year, in the new memorial garden that is being constructed on the lake in his memory. They will be hosting a fishing tournament in his memory on Saturday.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:33:00 GMT

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Dawn Kincaid always circles back to one clear memory of her son, Connor – when she found him standing in the kitchen early one morning wearing a fisherman’s vest. None of his three siblings were dressed yet, but 6-year-old Connor wanted to fish. Kincaid said Connor had a passion for the outdoors and found comfort in the serenity the lake and surrounding nature for his entire life, until the 22-year-old Lake in the Hills man was killed in a car crash in Harvard in August 2016. “Up until the week of his car accident, Connor would come home from work after a long day and he would either go out and cast for an hour from the dock or he would eat dinner, shower and then jump in the boat and spend the rest of the evening out until sunset,” Kincaid said. The Kincaids will honor their late son’s lifelong affinity for the outdoors with the Connor Kincaid Memorial Fishing Tournament from 8 to 11 a.m. at Indian Trail Beach on Saturday, which would have been his 23rd birthday. Entry is $8 and includes a light breakfast, lunch and an awards celebration. All proceeds will be used to restock the village’s fishing areas. The family also will host a private dedication for family and friends at 4:30 p.m. for the 75-by-75-foot memorial garden built in Connor’s honor at Indian Trail Beach, which the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Department and Village boards unanimously approved. Kincaid said the garden, which came together in about two weeks, would not have been possible without the dozens of community volunteers who have helped throughout its construction, including by donating bricks for the paver-brick patio and offering skilled services. Many of the volunteers included Connor’s friends from church and former co-workers from his career-building outdoor living spaces and landscaping. They spent several hours twice a week helping the garden project for the past month. Kincaid said the garden will have a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony later in August for sponsors and the village. “It’s a perfect reflection of the lake where Connor spent a lot of time, a place that gave him just time for personal meditation and quiet time,” Kincaid said. “I hope other people get to enjoy that space how Connor did.” The angler life suited Connor from a young age, but his mother said the motto of being a lifelong angler really stuck when he was about 15. Even when he got older and started working, Connor found time when he could to get out on the water. He regularly shared pictures on social media of himself either hunting or fishing in the months before he died, usually holding his prized catch with a hat and a smile.   “As I reflect, overarching, that is true of him,” Kincaid said. “And I think about now and where he’s at, and he’s a still lifetime angler.” Registration for the tournament can be completed at the Lake in the Hills Parks and [...]


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Illinois lawmakers blast President Donald Trump's comments about CharlottesvilleSome members of Congress have called out President Donald Trump after he said there was "blame on both sides" after the demonstrations in Charlottesville, Va. Rep. Peter Roskam tweeted, "President must not allow neo-Nazis, white supremacists or Klansman any refuge in his statements. Their views are unequivocally repugnant and have no place in our public square."Some members of Congress have called out President Donald Trump after he said there was "blame on both sides" after the demonstrations in Charlottesville, Va. Rep. Peter Roskam tweeted, "President must not allow neo-Nazis, white supremacists or Klansman any refuge in his statements. Their views are unequivocally repugnant and have no place in our public square."

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:31:00 GMT

Illinois lawmakers are adding to the condemnation of President Donald Trump’s recent comments in which he has been criticized for blaming the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend “on both sides” – neo-Nazis, Klansmen and white supremacists on one side and counterprotestors on the other. The president’s comments Tuesday were praised by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. A white nationalist ran his car into a group of counterprotesters Saturday, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring at least 19 others. Two state troopers, H. Jay Cullen and Berke M. M. Bates, died in a helicopter crash while doing surveillance on the white nationalist rally. Several politicians, including U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, R-Plano, used social media to state their repudiation of Trump’s statements. “Racism and violence are morally wrong and should be unequivocally condemned at the highest levels of our country,” Hultgren said on Twitter. In an email, Hultgren said, “I expect President Trump and all Americans to condemn white supremacy and neo-Nazism without hesitation, equivocation or ambiguity.” U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Wheaton, also used Twitter to renounce Trump’s comments. “President must not allow neo-Nazis, white supremacists or Klansmen any refuge in his statements,” Roskam tweeted. “Their views are unequivocally repugnant and have no place in our public square. Our nation, while challenged, is full of promise as we work to heal our republic.” In another tweet, Roskam said, “We must reject and denounce the heinous views on display in Charlottesville today. White supremacists, neo-Nazis and the KKK do not represent American values. We are one nation under God, and together we must reject bigotry and hatred here and abroad.” Roskam also disagreed with Trump’s comments equating the removal of statues of Confederate generals with removing statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. “The president’s concern of a slippery slope diminishing Washington and Jefferson is misplaced,” Roskam said in an email. “Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that it is ‘self-evident’ that ‘all men are created equal.’ The only acceptable response to those articulating hate and division is unequivocal condemnation.” U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Channahon, also stated his opposition on Twitter. “The hate being spewed in Charlottesville is vile and un-American,” Kinzinger’s post said. “United we MUST stand in condemning this hate, bigotry and violence.” U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois, issued a statement condemning Trump’s comments that blamed the weekend’s violence in Charlottesville on “both sides” and “minimized the threat racist white nationalists and neo-Nazis pose to American citizens across the nation.” “There are American patriots, and then there are the white nationalists and Nazis that fo[...]


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Illinois lawmakers blast President Trump's comments on CharlottesvilleSeveral politicians, including U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, R-Plano, used social media to state their repudiation of Trump’s statements. “Racism and violence are morally wrong and should be unequivocally condemned at the highest levels of our country,” Hultgren said on Twitter. In an email, Hultgren said, “I expect President Trump and all Americans to condemn white supremacy and neo-Nazism without hesitation, equivocation or ambiguity.”U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Wheaton, also used Twitter to renounce Trump’s comments. “President must not allow neo-Nazis, white supremacists or Klansmen any refuge in his statements,” Roskam tweeted. “Their views are unequivocally repugnant and have no place in our public square. Our nation, while challenged, is full of promise as we work to heal our republic.” In another tweet, Roskam said, “We must reject and denounce the heinous views on display in Charlottesville today. White supremacists, neo-Nazis and the KKK do not represent American values. We are one nation under God, and together we must reject bigotry and hatred here and abroad.” Roskam also disagreed with Trump’s comments equating the removal of statues of Confederate generals with removing statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. “The president’s concern of a slippery slope diminishing Washington and Jefferson is misplaced,” Roskam said in an email. “Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that it is ‘self-evident’ that ‘all men are created equal.’ The only acceptable response to those articulating hate and division is unequivocal condemnation.”U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Channahon, also stated his opposition on Twitter. “The hate being spewed in Charlottesville is vile and un-American,” Kinzinger’s post said. “United we MUST stand in condemning this hate, bigotry and violence.” U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois, issued a statement condemning Trump’s comments that blamed the weekend’s violence in Charlottesville on “both sides” and “minimized the threat racist white nationalists and neo-Nazis pose to American citizens across the nation.” “There are American patriots, and then there are the white nationalists and Nazis that fought against them,”Duckworth said in the statement. “Members of my own family, along with countless brave American service members, defeated our enemies and protected our country. Members of my family also fought on both sides of the Civil War, but I’m not confused about which side was fighting for American values.” Duckworth called the violence in Charlottesville a “terrorist attack” that was “not the fault of many sides, no matter what Mr. Trump says. Heather Heyer was not murdered by both sides, no matter what the white nationalists who continue to be bolstered by the president’s offensive and ignorant words say.” “The terrorists who struck fear in the hearts of patriots around this country over the weekend are not ‘fine people,’ ” Duckworth said. “You cannot call yourself a patriot and be a racist, neo-Nazi [or] white nationalist at the same time. If the president cannot or will not recognize the threat these terrorists pose to our country and our people, then true patriots must ask what side he is on.”U.S. Rep. Bill Foster, D-Naperville, also condemned Trump's remarks. “The hatred and bigotry we saw on Saturday in Charlottesville has no place in a society that values equality and freedom for all Americans," Foster said in an email. "As the son of a civil rights lawyer, I am deeply disturbed that President Trump has chosen to defend white supremacists instead of standing up to the forces of hate that seek to divide our country.”

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:31:00 GMT

Illinois lawmakers are adding to the condemnation of President Donald Trump's recent comments in which he has been criticized for blaming the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend "on both sides" – neo-Nazis, Klansmen and white supremacists on one side and counter-demonstrators on the other. The president's comments Tuesday were praised by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. A white nationalist ran his car into a group of counter-protesters Saturday, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring at least 19 others. Two state troopers, H. Jay Cullen and Berke M. M. Bates, died in a helicopter crash while doing surveillance on the white nationalist rally. Several politicians, including U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, R-Plano, used social media to state their repudiation of Trump’s statements. “Racism and violence are morally wrong and should be unequivocally condemned at the highest levels of our country,” Hultgren said on Twitter. In an email, Hultgren said, “I expect President Trump and all Americans to condemn white supremacy and neo-Nazism without hesitation, equivocation or ambiguity.”U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Wheaton, also used Twitter to renounce Trump’s comments. “President must not allow neo-Nazis, white supremacists or Klansmen any refuge in his statements,” Roskam tweeted. “Their views are unequivocally repugnant and have no place in our public square. Our nation, while challenged, is full of promise as we work to heal our republic.” In another tweet, Roskam said, “We must reject and denounce the heinous views on display in Charlottesville today. White supremacists, neo-Nazis and the KKK do not represent American values. We are one nation under God, and together we must reject bigotry and hatred here and abroad.” Roskam also disagreed with Trump’s comments equating the removal of statues of Confederate generals with removing statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. “The president’s concern of a slippery slope diminishing Washington and Jefferson is misplaced,” Roskam said in an email. “Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that it is ‘self-evident’ that ‘all men are created equal.’ The only acceptable response to those articulating hate and division is unequivocal condemnation.”U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Channahon, also stated his opposition on Twitter. “The hate being spewed in Charlottesville is vile and un-American,” Kinzinger’s post said. “United we MUST stand in condemning this hate, bigotry and violence.” U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois, issued a statement condemning Trump’s comments that blamed the weekend’s violence in Charlottesville on “both sides” and “minimized the threat racist white nationalists and neo-Nazis pose to American citizens across the nation.” “There are American patriots, and then there are the white nationalists and Nazis that fought against them,”Duckworth said in the statement. “Members of my own family, along with countless brave American service members, defeated our enemies and protected our country. Members of my family also fought on both sides of the Civil War, but I’m not con[...]


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Survey: Citizens of many U.S. allies trust Russia's Vladimir Putin over Donald TrumpAP file photo President Donald Trump meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit July 7 in Hamburg. Putin is more trusted than Trump to do the right thing for the world among citizens of numerous U.S. allies, including Japan, South Korea and seven European NATO members, according to new survey released Wednesday.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:30:00 GMT

WASHINGTON – Vladimir Putin is more trusted than Donald Trump to do the right thing for the world among citizens of numerous U.S. allies, including Japan, South Korea and seven European NATO members, according to a survey released Wednesday. Both leaders scored poorly overall in the poll by the respected Pew Research Center. But Trump’s scores in particular point to a stunningly high level of international public distrust in the American president, a position colloquially described as “leader of the free world” as many smaller countries rely on the U.S. for support and defense. The U.S. is obligated to defend all NATO countries under the alliance’s treaty, which was initially aimed at the Soviet Union. The U.S. is also obliged to defend Japan and South Korea, which are threatened by North Korea, under separate defense treaties. In Greece, Germany, Turkey, Hungary, France, Italy and Spain, more people had confidence in the Russian president than in his U.S. counterpart “to do the right thing regarding world affairs,” according to the poll. That Trump is so distrusted by the populations of countries historically reliant on the U.S. for their defense points to the strains with U.S. allies caused by his often erratic international pronouncements. These have included questioning the validity and effectiveness of NATO, delaying affirmation of the alliance’s mutual defense pact, musing about more countries having nuclear weapons and, most recently, threatening “fire and fury” against North Korea if it persists in threatening the U.S. Not all NATO members’ citizens favored Putin. Trump scored higher than Putin in Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and Poland, according to the survey, which Pew said was conducted in 37 countries earlier this year. Trump also led among non-NATO U.S. allies Australia and the Philippines, as well as in Israel, where he was far more trusted than Putin. “Although confidence in Putin’s handling of foreign affairs is generally low, in many countries he is more trusted than American President Donald Trump,” the survey found. Globally, 60 percent of respondents said they lack confidence in Putin, with European nations most skeptical. Pew released some of its figures for Trump in June. It found only 22 percent of interviewees had confidence in Trump to do the right thing in world affairs. Almost three in four had little or no confidence in him. Trump trailed former President Barack Obama’s tenure-ending confidence levels in all but two countries surveyed: Israel and Russia. The disparity in favor of Putin over Trump was most dramatic in Greece and Germany – where he outscored the U.S. president by 31 and 14 points, respectively. Half of Greeks surveyed said they had confidence in Putin, while only 19 percent said the same of Trump. Putin had the confidence of a quarter of Germany, and Trump only 11 percent. [...]


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Corporate chiefs flee President Donald Trump, so he disbands White House advisory panelsIn this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump points to members of the media as he answers questions in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Republican leaders on Wednesday tiptoed around Trump's extraordinary comments on white supremacists. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:30:00 GMT

NEW YORK – With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump abruptly abolished two of his White House business councils Wednesday – the latest fallout from his combative comments on racially charged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Trump announced the action via tweet, although only after one of the panels had already agreed to disband earlier in the day. A growing number of business leaders on the councils had openly criticized his remarks laying blame for the violence at a white supremacists rally on "both sides." "Rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum, I am ending both. Thank you all!" Trump tweeted from New York. The decision came as the White House tried to manage the repercussions from Trump's defiant remarks a day earlier. Presidential advisers hunkered down, offering no public defense while privately expressing frustration with his comments. Some Republicans and scores of Democrats denounced Trump's statements as putting white supremacists on equal moral footing with counter-protesters in Charlottesville and called for an apology. Most of those Republicans, including congressional leaders, did not specifically criticize the president. Trump himself stayed out of sight, tweeting occasionally about a primary in Alabama, the stock market and, once, his campaign slogan. Midday, he traveled from New York to his golf club in New Jersey for the night. The president told associates he was pleased with how his press conference went, saying he believed he had effectively stood up to the media, according to three people familiar with the conversations who demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about them. Business leaders felt differently. Denise Morrison, chief executive of Campbell Soup, declared she was leaving Trump's manufacturing council, saying, "The president should have been – and still needs to be – unambiguous" in denouncing white supremacists. CEOs had begun tendering their resignations from White House panels after Trump's initial comments following the Saturday violence. The first to step down, Kenneth Frazier of Merck, drew a Twitter tongue-lashing from the president. Later, Trump called those who were leaving "grandstanders" and insisted many others were eager to take their places. On Wednesday, he appeared to be pre-empting the CEOs own decision to disband. Members of the Strategy and Policy group, led by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, concluded after a 45-minute conference call in the morning that they would end the council and announce their decision in a statement, according to two people familiar with the discussions. They insisted on anonymity to discuss private conversations. In a subsequent call with Trump, the president agreed it was the right course of action. He tweeted b[...]


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Express Scripts to limit opioids; doctors concernedAP file photo A building on the Express Scripts campus appears July 21 in Berkeley, Mo. Express Scripts, the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager, will limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users starting in September as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans. The new program is drawing criticism from the American Medical Association.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:30:00 GMT

ST. LOUIS – The nation’s largest pharmacy benefit manager soon will limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans. But the new program from Express Scripts is drawing criticism from the American Medical Association, the largest association of physicians and medical students in the U.S., which believes treatment plans should be left to doctors and their patients. About 12.5 million Americans misused prescription opioids in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More than 33,000 deaths that year were blamed on opioid overdoses. Express Scripts launched a yearlong pilot program in 2016 aimed at reducing patients’ dependency on opioids and the risk of addiction, said Snezana Mahon, the Missouri-based company’s vice president of clinical product development. Mahon said analysis of 106,000 patients in the pilot program showed a 38 percent reduction in hospitalizations and a 40 percent reduction in emergency room visits, compared with a control group. The program is scheduled to take effect nationwide Sept. 1 for Express Scripts members whose employer or health insurer has enrolled to participate. Under the program, new opioid users are limited to seven-day prescriptions, even if the doctor orders scripts for much longer. Mahon said the average prescription is for 22 days. The program also requires short-acting drugs for first-time opioid prescriptions, although many doctors prescribe long-acting opioids. Dosage is also limited, and the company will monitor and try to prevent for patterns of potential “pill shopping,” where a patient goes from doctor to doctor to collect prescriptions. The program does not apply to patients in hospice or palliative care, or to cancer patients. A competitor, CVS Caremark, has a similar program. “A lot of times physicians are prescribing these drugs blindly,” Mahon said. “They don’t know that a patient may be going to see multiple prescribers.” She said some physicians “are actually appreciative and saying, ‘Thank you, I didn’t know this was happening.’” But Dr. Patrice Harris, an Atlanta psychiatrist who chairs the American Medical Association’s Opioids Task Force, said doctors are already working toward addressing the opioid epidemic. Harris said doctors have reduced such prescriptions by 17 percent over the past couple of years and are directing patients to other forms of pain management, including physical therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. “We want to be pro-active in making sure the alternatives are available, versus a sort of blunt, one-size-fits-all-all approach regarding the number of prescriptions,” Harris said. “The AMA’s take has always b[...]


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Republican leaders dance around President Donald Trump's remarksAP file photo In this Aug. 1, 2017 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks on Capitol Hill Washington. McConnell is condemning the "messages of hate and bigotry" carried by the KKK and white supremacist groups.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:30:00 GMT

NEW YORK – One after another, the nation's most powerful Republicans responded to President Donald Trump's extraordinary remarks about white supremacists. Yet few mentioned the president. The Senate's top Republican, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, condemned "hate and bigotry." House Speaker Paul Ryan charged that, "White supremacy is repulsive." Neither criticized the president's insistence that there were "very fine people on both sides" of a violent weekend clash between white supremacists and counterdemonstrators. The nuanced statements reflect the party establishment's delicate dance. Few top Republican officeholders defended the president in the midst of an escalating political crisis. Yet they are unwilling to declare all-out war against Trump and risk alienating his loyalists. And as the 2018 elections begin to take shape, the debate over Trump's words appears to be taking hold in GOP primaries. Trump's overall approval rating may be dismal, but a small group of die-hard supporters is expected to play an outsized role in next year's midterm elections when the Republican control of Congress is at stake. Those supporters are praising the president's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, which left one dead and many more wounded. "You got racism in both factions, on both sides," former New Hampshire GOP chair Jack Kimball said. "Trump has zero fault here. None." Republican leaders also need the president: They hope to work with him to enact meaningful legislation on infrastructure, taxes and health care to prove to voters their party can govern. The delicate relationship helps explain Wednesday's cautious comments from powerful Republicans like McConnell. "We all have a responsibility to stand against hate and violence, wherever it raises its evil head," McConnell said in a statement, noting that white supremacists are planning a rally in his home state of Kentucky. "Their messages of hate and bigotry are not welcome in Kentucky and should not be welcome anywhere in America," he said. Former Republican Presidents George H.W. and George W. Bush, usually silent on current political developments, released a joint statement that stopped short of criticizing Trump as well. "America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism and hatred in all forms," the Bushes said. The political tap dance frustrated as least one member of Trump's diversity council, CEO of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Javier Palomarez, who called Trump's response "a monumental failure in leadership." He challenged those who denounced racism in general terms without calling out the president by name. "That's a sign of weakness, and I don't think the American people and the Republican Party is going to forget," said Palomarez, who noted he [...]


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Charlottesville victim's mother urges 'righteous action'AP photo Heather Heyer's mother, Susan Bro, becomes emotional during a memorial for her daughter Wednesday at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va. Heyer was killed Saturday, when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:29:00 GMT

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The mother of the young woman mowed down while protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville urged mourners at a memorial service Wednesday to “make my child’s death worthwhile” by confronting injustice the way she did. “They tried to kill my child to shut her up. Well, guess what? You just magnified her,” said Susan Bro, receiving a standing ovation from the hundreds who packed a downtown theater to remember 32-year-old Heather Heyer. Heyer’s death Saturday – and President Donald Trump’s insistence that “both sides” bear responsibility for the violence – continued to reverberate across the country, triggering fury among many Americans and soul-searching about the state of race relations in the U.S. The uproar has accelerated efforts in many cities to remove symbols of the Confederacy. Heyer was eulogized as a woman with a powerful sense of fairness. The mourners, many of them wearing purple, her favorite color, applauded as her mother urged them to channel their anger not into violence but into “righteous action.” State troopers were stationed on the surrounding streets, but the white nationalists who had vowed to show up were nowhere to be seen among the residents, clergy and tourists outside the Paramount Theater, just blocks from where Heyer died. Heyer, a white legal assistant from Charlottesville, was killed and 19 others were injured Saturday when a car plowed into counterprotesters who had taken to the streets to decry what was believed to be the country’s biggest gathering of white nationalists in at least a decade. The hundreds of white nationalists – including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members – had descended on Charlottesville after the city decided to remove a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields Jr., a 20-year-old Ohio man described as an admirer of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, was arrested and charged with murder and other offenses. In other developments: • Trump tweeted for the first time about Heyer, calling her “beautiful and incredible” and a “truly special young woman.” The White House did not respond to questions about whether the president had contacted Heyer’s family. • Baltimore dismantled four Confederacy-related monuments under cover of darkness, including statues of Lee and Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, while the mayor of Birmingham, Alabama, had the city’s 52-foot Confederate memorial obelisk covered over with wooden panels. • The number of protesters arrested in connection with the toppling of a Confederate statue Monday night in Durham, North Carolina, climbed to four. • Citing security concerns, the University of Florida denied a request by a group headed[...]


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McHenry County students head back to schoolH. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com McHenry High School freshman John Cyboran asks Debbie Fenton, a teacher, for directions to his first period class Wednesday. Class of 2021 freshmen were able to navigate their class schedule during orientation at the west campus.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:26:00 GMT

McHENRY – Students named football games, extracurriculars and new courses as top reasons to be excited for the coming school year on the first day back at McHenry High School West. Freshmen dodged through the halls during a practice run through their daily schedule at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday as members of the McHenry High School West campus student leadership team stood by to offer assistance in navigating classrooms, lockers and any other first day problems that arose. “The freshmen have been pretty good at finding their way,” said team member and senior student Madison Schutze, 17. “I think the Freshman Rally helped a lot.” On Friday, McHenry High School held a rally at both campuses to acclimate new students and kick off the semester. Schools throughout McHenry County have done the same, with many students headed back this week, and the rest to follow next week. Marengo and Crystal Lake high schools marked first days of class Wednesday along with McHenry. Schutze said that leadership team members try to help freshman students not only find their way around the school, but also answer questions and push them to open up and find their voice in a new, potentially overwhelming environment. Schutze, who is on the school volleyball team, said she is looking forward to upcoming sporting events, including volleyball and football games. She said she also is excited about some of the courses she is enrolled in this semester. “In senior year you get a lot of freedom with the classes you choose,” she said. “So I am doing a lot of classes that I am actually interested in.” Students have a few new courses to choose from this year because the high school has implemented additional curriculum such as Advanced Placement environment science, computer science and other courses that focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, Principal Marsha Potthoff said. The district plans to boost its focus on technology during the course of the next few years, Potthoff said. “We are really focused on implementing a new learning management system called ‘Schoology,’ which will be a tool all of the teachers use,” she said. “Everybody will be on the same platform to post all of their information.” Parents, students and teachers will be able to access items such as grades, homework assignments and calendars using the system. The district hired five digital literacy teachers, as well, to help incorporate digital learning strategies in preparation for the district to achieve one-to-one technology next year, Potthoff said. “We also completed a lot of changes around the building to make it more welcoming,” she said. “We remodeled the south foyer and added couches, high tables, a tech bar – we are just trying to make students f[...]


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Illinois House schedules school-funding veto overrideAP photo Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan speaks at a news conference Wednesday in Springfield. The speaker said the Illinois House will try to reverse Gov. Bruce Rauner's veto of a public school funding revamp next week. Madigan, a Democrat from Chicago, slammed GOP members who would not support the legislation, proposed by Democrats, to incorporate the expansive changes Rauner made in an amendatory veto.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:19:00 GMT

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois House will try to reverse Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto of a public school funding revamp next week, the speaker said Wednesday after a failed vote on legislation Democrats introduced to gauge support for the Republican governor’s alternative ideas. House Speaker Michael Madigan, a Democrat from Chicago, slammed GOP members who would not support the legislation, which incorporated the expansive changes Rauner made in an amendatory veto. It failed without a single “yes” vote and 60 against. Most Republicans voted “present” after a debate in which GOP members admonished Democrats for not attempting a veto override that won’t be successful unless at least four Republicans vote for it. “You don’t even have the guts to put the bill up and see where the votes fall,” said Rep. Jeanne Ives, a Republican from Wheaton. School opened in most parts of the state Wednesday. Without a funding plan in place, the first state aid check due Aug. 10 was delayed. Most classes are starting but many administrators say they can’t stay open longer than the fall semester. The House will take a veto override vote Wednesday, Madigan said after the House session. The Senate voted to override Sunday, so success in the House would put into law a new funding formula designed to funnel new state money to the neediest schools first. Despite Rauner’s insistence that he’s willing to compromise, Madigan said he questions the governor’s sincerity. He said he offered a compromise last weekend on the issue which Rauner rejected. He would not elaborate. Rauner spokeswoman Laurel Patrick denied the governor received any offer. Rauner used his power of amendatory veto – available to only seven U.S. governors – to significantly alter the legislation, known as Senate Bill 1, the first major change to the way public schools are financed in two decades. His biggest gripes are that it unfairly favors Chicago schools over the rest of the state with a “bailout” for a mismanaged system and hamstrings future state-funding flexibility. Rauner’s action cut $450 million slated to go to Chicago and redistributed it throughout the state. He’s produced an analysis that shows more money this year for the vast majority of school districts. But his edits also include changes that opponents say will penalize school districts in the future, counting against them property tax revenue they can’t access. “I liken it to a payday loan,” Staunton Schools Superintendent Dan Cox told a House committee earlier Wednesday. “We get more money now – some of us – at a higher cost later.” During a political event in Springfield, Rauner blamed Madigan and other Chicago Democrats for blocking his changes and excoriated the “corrupt politi[...]


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Witnesses say bicyclist might have been wearing earbuds when fatally struck in WoodstockWoodstock fire Capt. Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call about a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m. Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was taken to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock, where he was pronounced dead about 8:45 p.m., the coroner said in a statement.A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was traveling east on Route 14 in the right lane when it crashed in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. A preliminary police investigation also indicated that the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department."Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said. Autopsy results show that James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending. Parsons said it did not appear that any citations would be issued at this time. He said that a multiagency Major Crash Assistance Team has been activated to investigate the crash along with the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:13:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A 25-year-old Woodstock man was killed after being hit by an SUV on Tuesday night at routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock, police said.

Woodstock fire Capt. Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call about a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m. Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office. Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was taken to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock, where he was pronounced dead about 8:45 p.m., the coroner said in a statement.A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was traveling east on Route 14 in the right lane when it crashed in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. A preliminary police investigation also indicated that the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department."Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said. Autopsy results show that James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending. Parsons said it did not appear that any citations would be issued at this time. He said that a multiagency Major Crash Assistance Team has been activated to investigate the crash along with the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.


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Army captain surprised by Crystal Lake co-workers, veteransCurran Contracting Co. employees Todd Gierke (left) and Jim Lancaster await the arrival of their co-worker, Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury, on Wednesday. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury reacts as members of the Crystal Lake Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12014 welcome him back to work at Curran Contracting Co. on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury thanks Curran Contracting Co. co-workers Wednesday after they surprised him on his first day back to work. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, served in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury (right) is welcomed back to work Wednesday by Curran Contracting Co. manager Mike Pachla. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, on his first day back to work after he was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year.Members of Crystal Lake VFW Post 12014 welcome Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury back to work at Curran Contracting Co. on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 23:17:00 GMT

Crystal Lake co-workers and veterans on Wednesday surprised Army Capt. Josh Flury, who returned to work after serving in Kuwait.

Curran Contracting Co. employees Todd Gierke (left) and Jim Lancaster await the arrival of their co-worker, Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury, on Wednesday. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury reacts as members of the Crystal Lake Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12014 welcome him back to work at Curran Contracting Co. on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury thanks Curran Contracting Co. co-workers Wednesday after they surprised him on his first day back to work. Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, served in Kuwait for nearly a year.Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury (right) is welcomed back to work Wednesday by Curran Contracting Co. manager Mike Pachla. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, on his first day back to work after he was deployed in Kuwait for nearly a year.Members of Crystal Lake VFW Post 12014 welcome Army Reserve Capt. Josh Flury back to work at Curran Contracting Co. on Wednesday. Co-workers surprised Flury, a Crystal Lake resident, after he served in Kuwait for nearly a year.


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NY Times' editorial page editor: No apology for Sarah Palin

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:47:00 GMT

NEW YORK – The editorial page editor of The New York Times has been grilled in federal court by a lawyer for Sarah Palin, who's suing over an editorial that linked right-wing political rhetoric to the 2011 shooting of former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords.

The newspaper published the editorial in June after a gunman opened fire on Republican lawmakers in Virginia, wounding U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise.

The piece originally accused a Palin political action committee of distributing a map depicting Democratic lawmakers beneath crosshairs.

Later, the newspaper issued a correction noting that the map actually showed electoral districts in crosshairs, not people.

Times editorial page editor James Bennet testified Wednesday that the newspaper didn't apologize to Palin for the error.

A federal judge plans to rule on whether Palin's lawsuit can proceed.




Charlottesville victim's mother urges 'righteous action'Susan Bro, mother to Heather Heyer, becomes emotional during a memorial for her daughter, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va. Heyer was killed Saturday, when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally. (Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress via AP, Pool)Marcus Martin leaves a memorial service for Heather Heyer, who was killed during a white nationalist rally, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. Martin was injured in the same attack when a man plowed into a group of protesters against the white nationalist rally. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)Marcus Martin, right, hugs his fiance Marissa Blair, left, during a memorial for Heather Heyer Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va. Martin pushed his fiance out of the way of the vehicle that killed Heyer last Saturday. (Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress via AP, Pool)Parents of Heather Heyer, from left, Susan Bro and Mark Heyer, right, embrace during a memorial for their daughter, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va. Heyer was killed Saturday, when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally. (Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress via AP, Pool)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:41:00 GMT

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The mother of the young woman mowed down while protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville urged mourners at a memorial service Wednesday to "make my daughter's death worthwhile" by confronting injustice the way she did. "They tried to kill my child to shut her up. Well, guess what? You just magnified her," said Susan Bro, receiving a standing ovation from the hundreds who packed a downtown theater to remember 32-year-old Heather Heyer. Heyer's death Saturday – and President Donald Trump's insistence that "both sides" bear responsibility for the violence – continued to reverberate across the country, triggering fury among many Americans and soul-searching about the state of race relations in the U.S. The uproar has accelerated efforts in many cities to remove symbols of the Confederacy. Heyer was eulogized as a woman with a powerful sense of fairness. The mourners, many of them wearing purple, her favorite color, applauded as her mother urged them to channel their anger not into violence but into "righteous action." State troopers were stationed on the surrounding streets, but the white nationalists who had vowed to show up were nowhere to be seen among the residents, clergy and tourists outside the Paramount Theater, just blocks from where Heyer died. Heyer, a white legal assistant from Charlottesville, was killed and 19 others were injured Saturday when a car plowed into counterprotesters who had taken to the streets to decry what was believed to be the country's biggest gathering of white nationalists in at least a decade. The hundreds of white nationalists – including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members – had descended on Charlottesville after the city decided to remove a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields Jr., a 20-year-old Ohio man described as an admirer of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, was arrested and charged with murder and other offenses. In other developments: – Trump tweeted for the first time about Heyer, calling her "beautiful and incredible" and a "truly special young woman." The White House did not respond to questions about whether the president had contacted Heyer's family. – Baltimore dismantled four Confederacy-related monuments under cover of darkness, including statues of Lee and Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, while the mayor of Birmingham, Alabama, had the city's 52-foot (15-meter) Confederate memorial obelisk covered over with wooden panels. –The number of protesters arrested in connection with the toppling of a Confederate statue Monday night in Durham, North Carolina[...]


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Woodstock man fatally struck by SUV at inersection of Routes 14, 47Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District Woodstock police officers investigate the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District Woodstock police investigate the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District A Woodstock police officer looks over a bicycle at the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:28:00 GMT

WOODSTOCK – A 25-year-old Woodstock man was killed after being hit by an SUV Tuesday night at Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock, police said.

Woodstock Fire Capt. Brendan Parker said Woodstock firefighter/paramedics responded to a call about a car striking a pedestrian about 7:30 p.m.

Robert Amos James, 25, of Woodstock had been riding a bicycle north on Route 47, according to a news release from the McHenry County Coroner's Office.

Initially, emergency crews called a Flight For Life helicopter to airlift James, but Parker said the man was taken to Centegra Hospital – Woodstock, where he was pronounced dead about 8:45 p.m., the coroner said in a statement.

A 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe was traveling east on Route 14 in the right lane when it collided in the intersection with James, Woodstock Deputy Police Chief Jeff Parsons said. According to the release from the coroner's office, James reportedly entered the intersection against a red light. A preliminary police investigation also indicated that the SUV traveled through a solid green light, according to a news release from the Woodstock Police Department.

"Witnesses say the man may have had earbuds in his ears, which might have distracted him," Parsons said.

Autopsy results show that James died from blunt force injuries to the head, chest and abdomen. Toxicology results are pending.

Parsons said it did not appear that any citations would be issued at this time.

He said that a multiagency Major Crash Assistance Team has been activated to investigate the crash along with the McHenry County Coroner's Office. The crash remains under investigation.

Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District Woodstock police officers investigate the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District Woodstock police investigate the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.Photo provided by Alex Vucha of the Woodstock Fire Rescue District A Woodstock police officer looks over a bicycle at the scene of a crash where a 25-year-old man was killed after he was hit by an SUV Tuesday night at the intersection of Routes 14 and 47 in Woodstock.


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Numerous restrictions for Dennis Hastert as he starts probationDennis Hastert

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 18:57:00 GMT

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert's 15-month federal prison term for banking charges officially ended Wednesday. Hastert was released from federal prison in July but served the remainder of his sentence in either a halfway house or on home monitoring. Federal prison officials have not commented on where he served the remainder of his sentence. Although he was sentenced to federal prison on banking charges, the charges were linked to accusations by multiple students that Hastert molested them when he was a coach and teacher at Yorkville High School in the 1960s and 1970s. In his sentencing of Hastert, federal Judge Thomas Durkin referred to the former House speaker as a "serial child molester." Hastert now faces two years of supervised release, also known as probation, which carries with it a number of requirements. Hastert also owes fines of $250,000. According to the sentencing order filed with the U.S. District Court Northern District of Illinois in 2016, during the two years he is on probation he must not commit another federal, state or local crime; must not unlawfully possess a controlled substance; and must cooperate "in the collection of a DNA sample if the collection of such a sample is required by law." Hastert also must refrain from "knowingly meeting or communicating with" the three anonymous individuals named in the federal indictment or with Scott Cross, the brother of former Illinois House Republican Leader Tom Cross of Oswego, who has accused Hastert publicly of sexually assaulting him as a teenager. Hastert also is prohibited from possessing a firearm, "destructive device or other dangerous weapon." Hastert is required to "remain within the jurisdiction where you are being supervised, with a map of that jurisdiction being provided by the probation officer at the inception of supervised release, unless granted permission to leave by the court or a probation officer." Hastert is required to report to his probation officer and must permit a probation officer to visit him at "any reasonable time" at home or at an "other reasonable location specified by the probation officer," and he must permit "confiscation of any contraband observed in plain view of the probation officer." Hastert is required to notify the probation officer within 72 hours of "any change in residence, employer or workplace" and is required to notify the probation officer within 72 hours if "arrested or questioned by a law enforcement officer." As part of his probation, Hastert also must participate in a sex offender treatment program. "If the probation officer determin[...]


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In-ground pool, hot tub and fire pit: What $589,900 can get you in LakewoodLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.The home has a three-car garage with heated floorsEntrancewayGreat roomwith two-story fireplaceThe great room also has a web barGreat room leading to kitchen and sun roomKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantrySun room that leads out to patio and poolDining roomPrivate officeMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteThis bedroom suite has its own bathroom attached.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.Laundry roomIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 17:56:00 GMT

Ever drive by a house and wonder what it looks like inside? Or how much does it cost? Check out this Lakewood home, listed for sale on Zillow.

Lakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.The home has a three-car garage with heated floorsEntrancewayGreat roomwith two-story fireplaceThe great room also has a web barGreat room leading to kitchen and sun roomKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantryKitchen with walk-in pantrySun room that leads out to patio and poolDining roomPrivate officeMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteMaster suiteThis bedroom suite has its own bathroom attached.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.This is part of a "Jack and Jill" suite in the home.Laundry roomIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitIn-ground pool surrounded by a large patio, hot tub and fire pitLakewood home listed for sale on Zillow: 7990 Dunhill Drive. 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,721 square feet. Listed price: $589,900. Estimated mortgage: $2,247 per month. Step outside to your own five-star resort in your own backyard. This Lakewood home features four bedroom suites, with an impressive master bathroom. The great room features a two-story fireplace and a wet bar, while the kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a sunroom. The three-car garage has radiant heat floors. Outside, the large in-ground pool is surrounded by a two-tiered patio with a hot tub and a fire pit. Listing agent: Janet Hibbs, Berkshire Hathaway HomeSevices, Starck Real Estate: 815-459-5900.


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AP Fact Check: What Trump said about Charlottesville protestersIn this Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, photo, white nationalist demonstrators clash with counter demonstrators at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. President Donald Trump on Aug. 15, defended his response to Saturday’s racially-charged protests in Charlottesville in a winding, combative exchange with reporters that at times mischaracterized the message and purpose of event. In his remarks, Trump described the rally as largely a debate over removal of a Confederate monument, although organizers billed the rally as push back against the “anti-white climate.” Trump also misstated his levels of political support in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:24:00 GMT

NEW YORK – President Donald Trump has defended his response to Saturday's racially charged protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, in a winding, combative exchange with reporters that at times mischaracterized the message and purpose of the event. Trump described the rally as largely over the removal of a Confederate monument, although an organizer billed it as pushback against the "anti-white climate." Trump also misstated his levels of political support in the 2016 election. A look at Trump's claims and the facts: TRUMP: "But not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists, by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue, Robert E. Lee." THE FACTS: The organizer of the rally, a local right-wing blogger and activist, has said he initially was spurred because of the city's decision to remove the statue. But he has also said the event, dubbed "Unite the Right," came to represent much more than that. Jason Kessler told The Associated Press last week before the event that it was "about an anti-white climate within the Western world and the need for white people to have advocacy like other groups do." Those in the crowd included Ku Klux Klan members, skinheads and members of various white nationalist factions. Many were heavily armed. Some flew Nazi flags. They hurled racial slurs at counter-demonstrators and gave Nazi salutes. White nationalist Richard Spencer — who popularized the term "alt-right" to describe the fringe movement mixing white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-Semitism and anti-immigration populism — told the AP on Tuesday that the event was more than "just a Southern heritage festival." He said Confederate monuments are "a metaphor for something much bigger, and that is white dispossession and the de-legitimization of white people in this country and around the world." __ TRUMP: "In fact, the young woman, who I hear is a fantastic young woman and it was on NBC, her mother wrote me and said through, I guess Twitter, social media, the nicest things and I very much appreciated that. I hear she was a fine, really actually an incredible young woman. But her mother on Twitter thanked me for what I said." THE FACTS: Trump is correct. On Monday, NBC News tweeted that Susan Bro, the mother of the counter-protester killed on Saturday, had thanked Trump for "denouncing those who promote violence and hatred." When asked in an AP interview Tuesday about her [...]


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Dowe & Wagner sees savings with digital thermostats

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 14:24:32 GMT

Are digital programmable thermostats worth the time to learn how to use them, and the expense to buy and install them?   Yes because they save energy, plus some energy suppliers are offering rebates to customers, says Tom Eppers, co-owner, Dowe & Wagner, a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning company serving residential and commercial customers in Illinois and Wisconsin.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) says digital thermostats can save consumers as much as 10 percent on their energy bill each year.  These smart thermostats can be programmed to adjust the temperature for maximum comfort when people are home, and maximum savings when the house is empty.

Although digital thermostats are more expensive than traditional dial ones, the cost difference is made up in energy savings, often after one season.  They may also save on the wear and tear of the air conditioner and furnace, which can be programmed to run at variable temperatures, and not at an expensive constant rate. 

DOE says air conditioners consume about five percent of all electricity produced in the U.S.  Using less energy is also environmentally savvy by reducing waste. 

Many newer thermostats can be programmed for multiple settings throughout the day and week.  Have a change in plans?  A manual override feature is available, according to DOE.  Accessing your thermostat from a smart phone or tablet allows for more convenience and customized comfort.

Are they complicated to program?  Some thermostats are preprogrammed to help customers get started.  Like learning to use a smart phone, the process can get easier with use.  For professional thermostat installations, the service technician can walk customers through the programming process, and suggest other resources for maximizing this energy efficient device.         

For more information, contact Dowe & Wagner, a full-service heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning company based in Richmond at (815) 678-3000, or visit

http://doweandwagner.com/

 


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Crystal Lake police talk heroin, opioid trends at 'Coffee with the Chief' eventThe Crystal Lake Police Department hosted its monthly “Coffee with the Chief” event Tuesday with a focus on the opioid epidemic that is sweeping both the nation and McHenry County. Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams spoke at the meeting, which aimed to educate the public on the crisis.“There is no typical addict,” Williams said. “Many times it will start out if someone sustains a back injury. … They get a prescription and get addicted to the opioid.” At a certain point, the patient can’t get the prescription anymore, and so they turn to street drugs, Williams said. The danger in this is that prescription medication is regulated, whereas with heroin, you don’t know what you’re getting, he said.Six percent of patients prescribed a one-day supply of an opioid still were taking the drug a year later, according to a 2017 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number doubled to 12 percent if the patient was prescribed a six-day supply, and quadrupled if the patient was prescribed a 12-day supply, according to the study. In McHenry County, 56 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, up from 43 drug overdose deaths in 2015. In 2014, 32 people died of drug overdose deaths, and Crystal Lake police officers began carrying Narcan, the brand name for naloxone, which counteracts the effects of heroin and other opioid drugs. Since the program’s inception, officers have saved 25 people’s lives, Deputy Police Chief Tom Kotlowski said.Williams said that law enforcement can't “arrest its way out” of the crisis. He said working with doctors, parents, schools and treatment centers is more effective. “It’s about education,” he said. “The enforcement side, we already have that.”He said that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with doctors prescribing opioids to patients who need them, but the education piece needs to be in place. “If you have pain, opioids are a good option, but it's not a long-term option,” he said.

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:51:00 GMT

CRYSTAL LAKE – With opioid use and death on the rise, communication and collaboration are key to get the crisis under control, drug enforcement officials said at a community forum Tuesday.

The Crystal Lake Police Department hosted its monthly “Coffee with the Chief” event Tuesday with a focus on the opioid epidemic that is sweeping both the nation and McHenry County. Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge Brent Williams spoke at the meeting, which aimed to educate the public on the crisis.“There is no typical addict,” Williams said. “Many times it will start out if someone sustains a back injury. … They get a prescription and get addicted to the opioid.” At a certain point, the patient can’t get the prescription anymore, and so they turn to street drugs, Williams said. The danger in this is that prescription medication is regulated, whereas with heroin, you don’t know what you’re getting, he said.Six percent of patients prescribed a one-day supply of an opioid still were taking the drug a year later, according to a 2017 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number doubled to 12 percent if the patient was prescribed a six-day supply, and quadrupled if the patient was prescribed a 12-day supply, according to the study. In McHenry County, 56 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, up from 43 drug overdose deaths in 2015. In 2014, 32 people died of drug overdose deaths, and Crystal Lake police officers began carrying Narcan, the brand name for naloxone, which counteracts the effects of heroin and other opioid drugs. Since the program’s inception, officers have saved 25 people’s lives, Deputy Police Chief Tom Kotlowski said.Williams said that law enforcement can't “arrest its way out” of the crisis. He said working with doctors, parents, schools and treatment centers is more effective. “It’s about education,” he said. “The enforcement side, we already have that.”He said that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with doctors prescribing opioids to patients who need them, but the education piece needs to be in place. “If you have pain, opioids are a good option, but it's not a long-term option,” he said.


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Algonquin looks to fill vacancies on advisory commissions

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:49:00 GMT

ALGONQUIN – The village of Algonquin is looking for volunteers to fill vacancies on some of its advisory commissions.

There are open seats on the economic development, electrical, historic and public arts commissions, according to a news release from the village.

Applications are submitted to the village online, and appointments are made for the commission by the Village Board annually, or whenever vacancies occur, according to the release.

Applications and information on each commission, as well as when meetings are held, can be found at www.algonquin.org/volunteer.

– Northwest Herald


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