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Updated: 2017-05-24T18:58:05.453-07:00

 



Scary Halloween Moon Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:54.777-07:00

Scary Halloween Moon Wallpaper



Simple Blue Glow Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:54.883-07:00

Simple Blue Glow Wallpaper



Beautiful Swan Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:54.986-07:00

Beautiful Swan Wallpaper



Running Cheetah Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.087-07:00

Running Cheetah Wallpaper



Penguin and Son Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.403-07:00

Penguin and Son Wallpaper



Dean Fidelman

2012-06-03T07:32:37.741-07:00


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One of the many qualities of Bruce Weber is his generosity towards other photographers. As an enthusiast, collector, and publisher, Weber has brought a number of lesser known photographers to light, mostly through his self-published magazine "All-American" - now in its 10th volume.

In the most recent issue of "All-American" Weber has included a portfolio of photographs by Dean Fidelman which combine the schools of climbing photographs and the nude in a skilled and original way. I particularly like how unsalacious these pictures are. They're more about athleticism and have a kind of hippy/back to nature vibe linking them to the "Stone Master" photographers of the 70s.

My friend Tom Adler, another great discoverer of photographers, recently put together a terrific book on the Stone Masters which I somehow missed blogging about, but you can get it here.

Below, a few more pictures by Fidelman:


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A View from Above

2012-06-03T07:32:37.870-07:00


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We're all a little sick of the snow right now, yes? But to see exactly what a phenomenon the storms over the United States have been, this amazing satellite view courtesy NASA. It should certainly please Andreas Gursky! Click here if this reference needs further explanation.





Calm Scenery Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.520-07:00

Calm Scenery Wallpaper



Colorful Flower in Garden Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.619-07:00

Colorful Flower in Garden Wallpaper



Great Amazon River

2012-06-03T07:30:55.737-07:00

Great Amazon River



New Black Car Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.838-07:00

New Black Car Wallpaper



Kenneth O'Halloran

2012-06-03T07:32:38.011-07:00


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Another picture which stopped me in my tracks. This photograph from Kenneth O' Halloran's "Fair Trade" series (on Irish Fairs) is a stunner! I love its Heironymous Boschian composition, its dabs of color, and the way your eye is pulled back into the ever denser concentration of horses and figures at the back of the frame.

It's atypical of the rest of the series' Sanderesque portraits, but those are pretty strong too as you'll see below.

I'm beginning to feel that the Sander to Sartorialist composed portrait is becoming almost too prevalent these days, but what's interesting is how in the hands of someone with a distinctive vision, it still has some kick. But I'd love to see O'Halloran come up with more pictures like the top one.


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Harry Potter Dark Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:55.938-07:00

Harry Potter Dark Wallpaper



Batman The Dark Knight Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.036-07:00

Batman The Dark Knight Wallpaper



Dark Uchiha Itachi - Naruto Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.137-07:00

Dark Uchiha Itachi - Naruto Wallpaper



Black Cell Effect Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.242-07:00

Black Cell Effect Wallpaper



Black Butterfly Girl Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.341-07:00

Black Butterfly Girl Wallpaper



Happy New Year Flower Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.439-07:00

Happy New Year Flower Wallpaper



Happy Christmas Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.544-07:00

Happy Christmas Wallpaper



In The Morning Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.647-07:00

In The Morning Wallpaper



Huge Shark Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.751-07:00

Huge Shark Wallpaper



Silver Iron Man Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.874-07:00

Silver Iron Man Wallpaper



Liberty New Year Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:56.975-07:00

Liberty New Year Wallpaper



Milton Rogovin 1909 - 2011

2012-06-03T07:32:38.126-07:00

Milton Rogovin passed away this week at the surprising age of 101. I was lucky enough to represent Milton and put on two shows of his work and over the last few years I wrote about him a number of times on this blog. Re-reading what I wrote, I hope that much of it bears repeating."Sometimes life gets in the way of the art. This is one of the few plausible explanations of why Milton Rogovin is not more widely know or celebrated than he is. I have been lucky enough to represent Milton’s work for the last few years and I hope you’ll check out all the pictures on the Danziger Projects website. (Click here to view.) Hopefully you’ll see why he’s such a photographer’s photographer – a particular favorite of Alec Soth and Tanyth Berkeley amongst many others.Rogovin’s pictures consist almost entirely of portraits of workers and the working class. His prints are nearly all a modest 8 x 10 inches – a size that suits his commitment to activism above art world recognition and his dedication to social issues, most notably the plight of the miners around the world; the decline of the American steel industry, and the struggle of the working people of his home town of Buffalo, New York.Deceptively straightforward, Rogovin’s photographs reveal a personal style that up-ends the usual balance between a great photographer and the subject. While most masters of photography wittingly dominate the picture, in Rogovin's work the subject commands equal strength. The photographic style is deadpan. The camera simply provides a stage for his subjects to present themselves as they see fit. Rogovin trusts them and their ability to present themselves as the unique individuals they are. Whether because of his respect and empathy for his sitters or the sincerity of his humanism and politics, this seemingly simple concept re-addresses the delicate balance of power between the observer and the observed. My favorite example of this is his 1973 picture of Lower West Siders Johnny Lee Wines and Zeke Johnson. "It's a picture of pure happiness" said one viewer. So to spread the feeling, here are some unpublished and unseen shots of Johnny from that day."They seem to me as fitting a tribute today as ever.[...]



Fire Burning 3D Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.077-07:00

Fire Burning 3D Wallpaper



Fire Burning Gothic Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.177-07:00

Fire Burning Gothic Wallpaper



Best Dragon Fire Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.276-07:00

Best Dragon Fire Wallpaper



Angel and Devil Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.380-07:00

Angel and Devil Wallpaper



Circle of Fire Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.556-07:00

Circle of Fire Wallpaper



Morning Light

2012-06-03T07:32:38.232-07:00

Long Meadow North. 2005. Photograph by Joseph O. Holmes.Jan 17, according to a recent study, has been deemed the "most depressing day of the year". This finding by social psychologists was made by calculating how long it takes for us to break our New Year's resolutions, for the holiday bills to pile up, and the effect of the weather and the dark. Not surprisingly, January is also considered the most depressing month and according to my own highly unscientific study, this January in particular is dragging along at a much slower pace than most Januaries. There are, however, a few metaphorical (as well as actual) bright clouds and one of them for me is walking my dog in the morning when Central Park is still blanketed with white snow and before the dirt of the city turns everything to grey slush. I try to time my walk so that I get into the park just as the sun is rising and this week with its pale blue morning skies and golden red sunrises has been particularly beautiful. Add to this that after 11 years our semi-wild collie/lab/sheperd/chow mix has finally mellowed enough to be let off the leash and not take off for parts unknown and you get a morning walk that is at once serene, invigorating, and joyful. There's nothing quite like seeing a happy dog bounding through snow! Another bright cloud is seeing a good show by a friend and I finally got the chance this week to catch up with Joseph Holmes current exhibition “The Urban Wilderness” at the Jen Bekman gallery in Soho. It’s up until January 23 so there’s still time to catch it.Joe’s pictures were taken in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, not Central Park, but they convey the same magical feeling of the urban metropolis transformed into a wintery Eden. And they’re nearly all about dog walking! (As well as about light, and color, and composition.) Joe values may be old-fashioned – he’s someone looking to find the sublime or the memorable in the everyday – but his pictures have a nice contemporary feel due to their color and scale. And the show is a sure cure for those January blues!Above and below from the current show:NethermeadAnd two brand new photographs from this December:Long Meadow North No. 2The White Oaks.[...]



Dark Flower of Fire Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.662-07:00

Dark Flower of Fire Wallpaper



Montana Fire by John McColgan Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.764-07:00

Montana Fire by John McColgan Wallpaper



Water and Fire Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.872-07:00

Water and Fire Wallpaper



Burning Card Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:57.973-07:00

Burning Card Wallpaper



Fire Soccer Ball Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.096-07:00

Fire Soccer Ball Wallpaper



Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:38.341-07:00


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Just saw Sofia Coppola's new movie "Somewhere". I loved it but I can fully understand how some people would find it aggravating. First, while the film is about connection (or the lack of), it's cast in a louche world of fame, privilege and indolence. Secondly, Coppola has a still photographic style that any one addicted action and fast cuts would have trouble sitting through. Coppola sets up the frame (beautifully), allows a scene to leisurely unfold, and then is on to the next wry vignette. What no-one could quibble with is Coppola's taste in music and how she uses it. All her movies have original song choices and I came out of this film stuck on the song "I'll Try Anything Once" by Julian Casablancas of The Strokes which is used as a something of a refrain throughout the film.

So here's the song (above) and the trailer (below). For readers of this blog (i.e. intelligent, visual, open-minded people) the film is a good bet!


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Christmas Ball Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.208-07:00

Christmas Ball Wallpaper



Golf Sports Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.314-07:00

Golf Sports Wallpaper



Boulevard

2012-06-03T07:32:38.447-07:00

When I spoke about surprises in my recent Top Ten, I didn’t expect to be surprised so quickly and as dramatically as I was when I opened up an envelope from the Fraenkel Gallery to find a card with the image above on the cover announcing Katy Grannan’s new show (opening on Saturday in San Francisco). Do click on the image to see it in a larger size.I’ve written admiringly about Katy Grannan before, but her new series, BOULEVARD, takes her work to a whole new level. As Fraenkel’s website describes the work, these pictures were made over the past three years in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Shooting against white stucco walls in strong midday light, the city streets became Grannan’s outdoor studio. The characters who populate Grannan’s Boulevards are a parade of down and outers and eccentrics – the lady above being (I think) an exception. But every picture is shot with mesmerizing intensity and shocking jolts of color.What was most surprising to me, though, was that I normally HATE this type of photography. The passion for displaying photographs of low-lives and losers is so far from my aesthetic I can never understand how people could ever want to live with these kind of pictures. But to me Grannan’s photographs are about something else. First, they seem to belong more to the school of street observation in the tradition of Evans and Callahan and De Corcia than to the freak school of Arbus (who admittedly was a genius) and more recently Robert Bergman. Note how in Grannan’s pictures no-one is making direct eye contact with the camera. The subjects are aware they are being photographed, but they are more rooted in their own world and their own reality than the photographer's. Secondly, the color and light in these pictures is just extraordinary. It must have taken some technical expertise to get it just right. Lastly, there is a humanism in these pictures that makes them extraordinarily complex. Everyone seems to contain a story. Take the woman pictured above. Is she rich? Is she poor? Is she beautiful or ugly? Is she proud of her color co-ordination, her lipstick, her hair? Is her expression the result of a life well-lived or one of regrets? Whatever the answers, the pictures are masterpieces.(FYI – there’s a wonderful large format catalog available for $45. Only 2000 were printed and they’ll probably sell out fast so hurry!)[...]



War of Rider Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.415-07:00

War of Rider Wallpaper



A Cautionary Tweet

2012-06-03T07:32:38.557-07:00


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Recently sent to me, this picture posted by Russell Brand on his Twitter page shows his wife, Katy Perry, waking up without a scrap of make-up. As you can see below, this is not Ms. Perry usual look. Apparently, she was less than pleased with the posting, as it was quickly deleted from Russell's Twitter page. But as most of us hopefully know, the internet is an unforgiving environment. Once posted, never forgotten.


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Amazing River Streamline Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.538-07:00

Amazing River Streamline Wallpaper



Amazon Small Waterfall Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.641-07:00

Amazon Small Waterfall Wallpaper



Glow Stars Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.742-07:00

Glow Stars Wallpaper



Butterfly and Stars Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.844-07:00

Butterfly and Stars Wallpaper



Best Red Rose Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:58.955-07:00

Best Red Rose Wallpaper, here you can see Best Red Rose Wallpaper or download Best Red Rose Wallpaper on this Free Best Wallpaper website



The 2010 Top Ten list

2012-06-03T07:32:38.660-07:00

What is December 31 without a top ten list?It’s been an odd year. A recovery year where it seemed like there were fewer highs and lows as everyone hunkered down with fingers crossed. Photographers being the creative people they are, however, signs of life could not be kept down and so in no particular order here are my top ten visual pleasures of 2010.1. Richard Learoyd. Working with a self-made camera that creates highly detailed near life-size images by projecting an image directly onto photographic paper without any interposing negative – Learoyd has invigorated at least three genres at once – cameraless (or more accurately film-less) photography, portraiture, and still life. 2. Auctions.Continuing to make inroads into what was traditionally gallery territory, the auction houses (particularly Christies and Phillips) are putting on more interesting, original, and varied sales. And for the astute collector there are always bargains. This Irving Penn self-portrait from 1948 went for what I’m sure will be seen as a buy at $45,000 at Christies in London this past spring. I'd say it's worth at least double.3. Mickalene Thomas.The connections between contemporary art and traditional photography continue to intertwine as seen here in Mickalene Thomas’ bad-ass tribute to Seydou Keita. Jumping between painting, appliqué, and photography, Mickalene Thomas is just one of the new breed of hyphenates making waves as the art and photography world continue to grow closer together.4. Susan Derges.After a relatively quiet period, Susan Derges – one of the fab four of British camera-less photography – has re-emerged with a series of new photograms based around the idea of rock pools. In this image, Jackson Pollock meets Turner as light, color, and line intersect in a glorious mixture of fresh photographic ideas.5. Tokyo Photo.Gaining strength and energy – Tokyo Photo is fast emerging as the go-to fair of the east. Founder Tomo Harada, pictured above, has made it his mission to make the event a must see and entering year three the mix of American and Japanese dealers is creating an ever more exciting cultural exchange.6. Patrick Smith. Top of the list of new(ish) names that have emerged in photography this year is French photographer Patrick Smith. While clearly working in the tradition of Vitali and Niedermayr, Smith’s pictorial eye and immaculate exposures have a purity all their own.7. Surprises.No matter how much you think you know about photography, there are always surprises. Going through Art Miami I came across a group of pictures of Elizabeth Taylor by Frank Worth. I don’t know how I had never seen or heard of these images before but that is what makes life so interesting. (And boy, was she a beauty!)8. Bruce Weber.One of the best museum shows around (and up thro[...]



Sponge Bob and Patrick Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:59.080-07:00

Sponge Bob and Patrick Wallpaper



Smiling Moon Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:59.217-07:00

Smiling Moon Wallpaper



Black Stars Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:59.321-07:00

Black Stars Wallpaper



Amazing Fantasy Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:59.422-07:00

Amazing Fantasy Wallpaper



A Winter's Tale

2012-06-03T07:32:38.779-07:00

Yuji Obata. Homage to Wilson A. Bentley #1. 2005 - 2006.My latest enthusiasm is for the work of Yuji Obata who we are now lucky enough to represent. I was introduced to Obata’s work by Yoshiko Suzuki, curator of the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, who kindly gave me a rare copy of Obata’s study of winter in the Hokkaido Province titled “Winter Tale”.Yuji Obata was born in Japan in 1962. He attended the Nihon University College of Art and currently resides in Tokyo. In 2003, Obata was compelled to photograph winter scenes in Japan as he stood in front of Pieter Bruegel's painting "The Hunters in the Snow" in Vienna's Museum of Art History. Upon returning to Japan, he traveled to the country's northernmost island, Hokkaidō, known for its cold and snowy winters. As he worked there photographing ice skaters at a middle school rink and a local speed skating team, his enchantment with images of winter deepened. Traveling around different regions of the island in winter, he began noticing the varied qualities of the snow itself, and finally became fascinated with the unique challenge of photographing snowflakes in motion as they fell from the sky.Obata was inspired by the story and works of W.A. Bentley, an American farmer and photographer who adapted a camera and microscope to photograph a single snow crystal for the first time in 1885. Bentley went on to photograph more than 5,000 snowflakes in his lifetime, and his technique was so successful that it continues to be used today. Like Bentley, Obata was obsessed with the challenge of doing something no one had done before – in his case photographing snowflakes in freefall rather than on a flat surface without digital or any other manipulation. It took Obata five years to achieve but his breakthrough resulted in the capture of pictures that allow the snowflakes to relate to each other in space and size, creating dynamic compositions and scenes. Obata chose to shoot the series in the mountains of Hokkaidō, based on its extreme cold and its history as the place where Dr. Ukichiro Nakaya did research that led to his invention of artificial snow. And while Obata is properly reverent to those who inspired him in this project, his photographs stand alone as fresh and original works.I hope you enjoy them and if I don’t get around to posting again for a while I hope you'll find these pictures seasonally cheery and appropriate. Happy Holidays!Homage to Wilson A. Bentley #4. 2005 - 2006.Homage to Wilson A. Bentley #10. 2005 - 2006.Homage to Wilson A. Bentley #7. 2005 - 2006.Homage to Wilson A. Bentley #8. 2005 - 2006.[...]



Allienware Wallpaper

2012-06-03T07:30:59.523-07:00

Allienware Wallpaper



Weekend Video - Special Thanksgiving Edition

2012-06-03T07:32:38.888-07:00

Antony and the Johnsons performing on David Letterman.This Thanksgiving Holiday I can’t think of a more appropriate song title than Antony and The Johnsons “Thank you for your love”. I’ve been vaguely aware of the band’s songs for a while as well as their indie critical reputation but seeing Antony Hegarty perform on Letterman a few weeks ago showed me what all the fuss was about.The song is simply about the power of love to rescue you from pain. But in a time of as much global and national distress as we’re in now, this message shouldn’t ever be considered trite or sappy.It’s a tradition in our family for each member to make a toast at Thanksgiving dinner saying what they have to give thanks for. But this year I would like to make a toast for the blog:Thank you to the many readers who e-mail or come up to me out of the blue to say how much they enjoy The Year in Pictures. Thank you to the photographers whose work inspires all of us. (I know the pace of my postings has slowed down after nearly three years and over a million visits but I’ll continue to keep posting anything that seems noteworthy.) Thank you to my staff (past and present) whose professionalism and positive attitude make the gallery such a happy place. Thank you to our clients who appreciate all that the gallery stands for. Thank you to my friends - especially to the ones who love to talk about photography! Thank you to my running partners (about whom more later). And finally thank you to my children Julian and Josie and my wife Lucy for their love and for the way they put at least 110 percent into everything they do.If there’s one miracle this Thanksgiving, it’s that this past July one of my running partners was biking in Central Park when a dog ran out in front of her causing her to flip onto her head, break her pelvis, and have a quarter of her skull removed in order to allow her brain not to compress. She was in hospital for nearly for a month and came out a little wobbly but exactly the same bright and cheerful person she was before the accident. Yesterday, along with our other running partner, we ran a full loop around the reservoir. And if that wasn’t enough another friend who had been in a coma for two weeks woke up on Monday! Light is coming out of the darkness. Life is beginning to imitate Avatar. Happy Thanksgiving!Below, special bonus official video.Antony and the Johnsons official video[...]



Street Viewed

2012-06-03T07:32:38.992-07:00

Michael Wolf. A Series of Unfortunate Events #49. 2010Across the road from us is an excellent new show at Bruce Silverstein. Covering four bodies of work by the photographer Michael Wolf, all dealing with the modern urban condition, the heart of the show is comprised of a series of large blow-ups of images Wolf has taken from Google’s “Street View”. For those not up to speed on Google’s latest good/evil technology, "Street View" is a feature in Google Maps and Google Earth that provides panoramic views from various positions along many streets in the world. It was launched in 2007 in several cities in the United States, and has since expanded to include cities and rural areas worldwide. Google "Street View" displays images taken from a fleet of specially adapted cars. On each of these vehicles there are nine directional cameras for 360° views, GPS units for positioning, and three laser range scanners for the measuring of up to 150 feet and 180° in the front of the vehicle.Due to an initial outpouring of privacy concerns, in 2008, Google announced that it was testing face-blurring technology on its photos of the busy streets of Manhattan. This technology uses a computer algorithm to search Google's image database for faces and blurs them. Sadly, if you visit "Street View" today you will find it much in evidence.A quick search will also find the web full of sites where someone has scoured "Street View" for scenes a little less aesthetic and artful than Wolf - at least that's how I see it. And like Gursky's "Oceans", it's who sees the art in the everyday first that counts. But to test this theory, below you'll see four more pictures by Michael Wolf and three images from random websites having fun with "Street View". See if you can tell which are which. Answers to follow in a couple of days.Picture 1Picture 2Picture 3Picture 4Picture 5Picture 6Picture 7[...]



Lights! Color! Abstraction!

2012-06-03T07:32:39.094-07:00

It’s never easy to write about abstract photography – the impact is in the seeing. However, if the response of the viewers who have come into the gallery over the last week is anything to go by, our just opened show of new work by Garry Fabian Miller is having quite an impact. (And it’s up until December 23, so there’s plenty of time to see it.)GFM (as we’ll refer to him from now on) is another of the artists in the Victoria and Albert’s “Shadow Catchers” show, but he has been a presence on the English art scene for quite a while. Highly intellectual and somewhat reclusive, GFM prefers to work in the relative isolation of his studio near the rocky tors of Dartmoor where his daily walks inform his sequential experiments shining light through various forms and vessels onto to cibachrome paper. Picking up where abstract painters like Albers, Rothko, and Judd left off, GFM is the rare photographer whose abstract work is created rather than observed. Added rather than reduced. Bringing the elements of light and time to photographic paper, GFM’s prints glow and shimmer in a way that only be achieved in the darkroom.GFM’s earliest work explored the abstract possibilities of landscape in a more traditional way. His minimal sky and seascapes of 1976 in fact pre-date similar work by Hiroshi Sugimoto by several years. Following that, GFM created a beautiful and now very rare botanical series made by shining enlarger light through various translucent plants. From then on, the work became increasingly abstract and exclusively camera-less. But as Martin Barnes, curator of the V&A’s show points out, unlike most photograms, in GFM’s work, no objects touch the paper. It’s only light.Our exhibition focuses largely on the recently created body of work titled "Year Two". Following the form of a previous body of work titled "Year One", GFM devoted himself to making 12 different monthly series, each exploring how individual elements such as color, edge, and border affect a specific geometric composition. At the end of the year, he selected the ten images from each month that worked best as a complete chapter. Taken as an autonomous body of work, we have not only a highly personal and rigorous exploration of color and shape, but also the thought and association such forms bring forth.I’ve illustrated this post with installation shots, because in some way, it feels like less of a reduction than a j-peg of an individual piece, and it conveys something of the constant experimentation that is the core of GFM’s work. (But if you must se[...]



The Shooting Gallery

2012-06-03T07:32:39.208-07:00

1973Shooting yearly self-portraits is nothing new to photography, but a rather extraordinary series has just been discovered and published in The Netherlands in a book titled "Almost Every Picture #7". Starting in 1936, the then 16-year-old Ria van Dijk went into a shooting gallery - one of those fair booths where every time you hit the target it triggers a camera shutter and you win a portrait of yourself in firing pose. This series documents almost every year of Van Dijk's life (there is a conspicuous pause from 1939 to 1945) up until present times. But at the age of 88, Ria van Dijk is still shooting!1936. The picture that started it off.193819491958196719892006[...]



Camera-less

2012-06-03T07:32:39.316-07:00

It can't have escaped those of you who follow the photography scene that there's a lot going on in the"camera-less" photography world. Adam Fuss at Cheim and Read, Christopher Bucklow at my gallery with Garry Fabian Miller coming up next, and the major exhibition "Shadow Catchers" which just opened at The Victoria and Albert Museum in London. One of the lesser known artists in the V&A show, but equally worthy of attention, is the German photographer Floris Neusüss. Neusüss was one of the first contemporary artists to return to camera-less photography, one of the medium’s earliest forms. In 1978, Neusüss created a piece that paid specific homage to William Henry Fox Talbot's 1835 image of a window in Lacock Abbey and last year he re-created the piece specifically for the V&A show.As curator Martin Barnes explains: “Talbot’s Latticed Window anticipated the notion that photographs are often perceived as windows on the world. And yet, Talbot seems to have understood that it was rather the window itself – half way between interior and exterior – that was as beguiling as any view beyond.”“This particular subject”, adds Neusüss “was, for us, not just a window in a building but an iconic window, a window on photography. Lacock’s discovery became a window on the world. Back in 1978, when we first photographed the window, that was the first time I worked outside of the studio, on location. It was the start of our adventures in making photograms of large objects in the places we found them".As you'll see from these pictures, the piece that Neusüss made is extraordinarily beautiful and resonant, innovative, and chock full of ideas - a description that applies equally to the other artists in the show, So if you're in London, be sure not to miss the exhibition.(All photographs via the London Daily Telegraph. Unfortunately no photographer's credit was attached.)In collaboration with his wife Renate Heyne, also an artist, Neususs covered the interior of the window with photographic paper at night, before exposing the paper by shining a light from outside.Some of the test prints are laid out on the floor of the abbey.Floris NeusüssThe finished Neusüss piece.Photogenic drawing negative by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877). Taken with the Camera Obscura, this photograph is the earliest camera negative in existence.[...]



Weekend Video Face-off. Dance v.s. Story-telling.

2012-06-03T07:32:39.417-07:00


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Stiff competition in the family as my brother and daughter both submit videos for the "Weekend Video". I won't say who submitted which but please vote on your favorite by posting a comment.

Above a new concept of "Dancing in the Rain" featuring dancers, No Noize (red jacket), Man (back jacket), BJ (striped shirt), and Dreal (white shirt). Video directed and edited by Yoram Savion

Below a french fairy tale by the extraordinarily imaginative Capucine:

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Fore- ctd.

2012-06-03T07:32:39.521-07:00

To the astute observers who commented on one particular spectator in the background of the Tiger Woods photographs: you are not alone! While his identity is still not known, the man pictured wearing a ginger-coloured wig, fake moustache and chomping on a large Havana (in tribute to Spanish golfer Miguel Angel Jimenez) has become an internet sensation nicknamed "Cigar Guy". Below, a selection of some of the viral images that have begun to appear on the web![...]



Straight from the Heart

2012-06-03T07:32:39.632-07:00

A new website that's a treasure trove for those who like vernacular photography and a good story - Pictures of My Mother.com posts pictures people have submitted of their mothers along with a story or recollection of the subject. It's surprising how moving these little vignettes can be, but that's the power of words and pictures that come from the heart. Perhaps that's something that should be added to the rules I posted about what it takes to make it as a photographer![...]



Fore!

2012-06-03T07:32:39.734-07:00


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You can't plan these things! Photographer Mark Pain was on assignment for Britain's Daily Mail newspaper at the Ryder Cup when Tiger Woods attempted to chip his third shot on to the green. But Woods hit the ground behind the ball and duffed the shot straight at Pain who held his ground as the ball went straight for him, hit his camera, bounced on to his chest and came to rest at his feet.

Woods was furious, but neither he nor caddie Steve Williams objected to Pain's position. The shot from the rain-soaked rough, was just badly struck. Tiger and Stricker went on to win the match, but Pain got the best shot of the tournament!

For camera buffs, Pain was using a Nikon D3S camera, with a 24-70 mm lens and a shutter speed of 1/1000 of a second.





Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:39.836-07:00


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For the return of the Weekend Video, the music video for OK Go's new single, 'White Knuckles' , directed by Trish Sie and OK Go.





Tokyo Snaps

2012-06-03T07:32:39.955-07:00

Looking at Andy Warhol polaroids.It should be pretty clear that I'm crazy about Tokyo. Unfortunately this last trip was nearly all work, but here a few snaps of some of the things and people who caught my eye.Burberry baby.Louise Bourgeois sculpture at the Mori plaza.Yoshioka Tokujin installation at the Mori Museum. The artist uses technology to recreate natural phenomena such as the snowstorm pictured here.Murakami dolls in the museum shop.Mika Ninagawa books and merchandise.The pool and whirlpool at the Grand Hyatt.My last breakfast at the hotel.[...]



Meet Lloyd Ziff

2012-06-03T07:32:40.068-07:00


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In what is fast becoming a "Meet the Legendary Art Directors" series, tonight we are having a book signing for Lloyd Ziff. The former art director of magazines including Vanity Fair, House & Garden, and Travel & Leisure, Ziff has always been a keen snapper and his new book "Near North" presents a collection of photographs shot in Alaska and the Yukon. Not surprisingly, Ziff brings his graphic sense to the remote and vast wilderness, along with a strong sense of the strangeness and uniqueness of the place.

The book signing is from 6 to 8 p.m..




A Few Pictures That Caught My Eye

2012-06-03T07:32:40.182-07:00

Like any art fair, Tokyo Photo has a real mix. Many of the big international names are being shown - Eggleston, Friedlander,Cartier-Bresson, Chris Bucklow - but what interests me are things that seem uniquely Japanese in an original way. And you have to hunt for those. Nevertheless, here are a few things that caught my eye. Above "Form #1" by Miwa Nishimura. Click on the image to see the wigs that have been digitally added to each seagull.Below: From Sohei Nishino's ongoing series of dioramas done in cities all over the world. It's a painstaking process where he spends weeks photographing the city from many hundreds of different vantage points. Then back in the studio he begins to assemble the individual frames from the contact strips into a collage that takes several months to create. The collage is then photographed and editioned into three sizes.London Diorama by Sohei Nishino.Detail from the above diorama.Two prints from Haruko Nakamura's 19 print series "The Gift from the Sea".What's selling is sex. Misato Kuroda's series "Sawako".And last but not least - an early Chicago picture by the master photographer Yasuhiro Ishimoto.[...]



How Cool Is This?

2012-06-03T07:32:40.293-07:00

Yesterday, my new friend Mr. Masanori Hashimoto was kind enough to give me the latest version of the Ricoh GR Digital camera. It's a camera with a cult following based on it's lightness, speed, and quality. I've just started to try it out and it seems great, but the coolest thing of all (to me) is a function called "Skew Correct Mode". Turn it on to this mode, take a picture, and the camera looks for an object with four corners which it will then correct the perspective on. If you don't like the four corners it has selected press an arrow and it goes to the next option of a four cornered object. Select "O.K." and the camera instantaneously processes the image to crop and straighten the perspective. For a blogger like me this is heaven!Here's an example, below. This photograph is on the wall of my hotel room. In "skew" mode it can pick out the whole triptych or just one part. I selected just the middle. Hit the button - and voila! I'm now saying the GR stands for "Gallery Robot". Very Japanese.The straight shot.What the camera did to the above shot in "skew" mode!My new best friend, Masanori Hashimoto of Ricoh.[...]



Tokyo Lecture - The Rules

2012-06-03T07:32:40.402-07:00


As a preface to my talk at Tokyo Photo (see below) I articulated four rules that I thought were essential for any young photographer trying to survive.

Here are the rules:

1. Have talent. (Talent is not when your friends tell you they love your work, but when people who don't like you have to admit it's good.)

2. Understand how the world works. (Not just globally, but on a macro level. Understand what people need and don't need. Understand when to approach people and when not to. Develop social skills.)

3. Choose good friends. (There's nothing like an effective network.)

4. Be modern. (Don't do anything that looks like it's someone else's work. Stay on top of technology. Engage on multiple platforms.)





Tokyo Photo - The List

2012-06-03T07:32:40.514-07:00


I have been asked by the organizers of Tokyo Photo to engage in a discussion with the famous editor and art director Masanobu Sugatsuke on the subject "How to survive as a photographer on 2010s".

As part of this, I made up a list of 10 different photographers whose careers I felt offered some guidance. Each are relatively new (or at least particularly modern and original) to the photo scene and each have developed incredibly successful careers. So for easy reference, I wanted to post a list on the blog so people could easily reference the names.

In no particular order they are:

Ryan McGinley

The Sartorialist

Massimo Vitali

Juergen Teller

Alec Soth

Richard Learoyd

Idris Khan

Tim Walker

Sze Tsung Leong

Susan Derges





Tokyo Photo 2010

2012-06-03T07:32:40.631-07:00


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On my way to Tokyo to participate in the second Tokyo Photo fair where I'm sure there will be much to blog about. In the meantime, this is my favorite of the pictures I took on my visit last year. Just some unknown hipster at a little nightclub mesmerized by the light show and his own shadow. Love the purple!




Tomorrow's the Night!

2012-06-03T07:32:40.747-07:00

I'm back!And tomorrow (Friday) we open our show of Christopher Bucklow's photographs. 6 to 8 p.m. for those who would like to attend the opening.Bucklow's work is one of the pillars of the British "cameraless" photography movement which you'll be hearing a lot about this fall. It's at once luminous, spiritual, scientific, and metaphysical. And did I say gorgeous?Bucklow's other-worldly photographs of radiant men and women set against grounds of color are made through a multi-step process that is both complex and laborious. Bucklow begins by projecting the shadow of his sitter on a large sheet of aluminum foil and tracing its outline. He then makes about twenty thousand small pinholes in the foil silhouette (one for each day of the average human lifespan). Using a contraption of his own device that places the foil over a large sheet of photographic paper, Bucklow wheels his homemade "camera" out into daylight and pulls the "shutter" to briefly expose the paper to direct sunlight. Thus each finished picture becomes a kind of photogram silhouette composed of thousands of pinhole photographs of the sun. The intensity of light on a given day and the length of exposure create unique color variations on how the resulting piece appears.Following the artist's particular ground rules, and connecting Bucklow to the mystical tradition of British artists, in particular to the work of William Blake, Bucklow does not picture anyone he has not dreamed of. In this way, the works connect more deeply to both the artist's unconscious and the unknown. Part quantum physics (in particular the light bending phenomenon of the double slit experiment) and part zen philosophy, the thousands of suns not only shine out from the paper but are a window into the soul or anima of both subject and artist, and an appreciation of the individuality and preciousness of each day.Bucklow's explorations into avoiding the negative are both literal and figurative, connecting light and art, with the Other. We may not readily associate photography and the mystical or spiritual, but Bucklow's work asks us to start by appreciating the surface and then to dig down into all the layers that li[...]



Celebrating the Chainsaw

2012-06-03T07:32:40.874-07:00

Sugimoto by BrownOne more show to point out before I take a real summer break. It’s a show I saw in Los Angeles a few weeks ago and was incredibly impressed with. And it’s up until the end of the month.Showing at the Robert Berman gallery in Santa Monica, it’s the work of Hugh Brown – an artist, and as you’ll see an obsessive chainsaw collector and aficionado. The show is comprised entirely of Brown’s appropriation of famous artworks into which Brown has inserted a variety of chainsaw references from the obvious to the subtle.So we have Brown’s version of photographs by such heavy hitters as Diane Arbus, Harold Edgerton, Walker Evans, and Robert Mapplethorpe and painters like Matisse, Ed Ruscha, Jackson Pollack and dozens more. The works are so convincing that many mistook them for authentic pieces when shown last year at the California State University Fullerton Grand Central Art Center. While the images stand on their own, there is humor and wit and intelligence behind every image. Take Brown’s Hiroshi Sugimoto piece entitled “Vista Theater (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2)”. For this image Brown rented out the theatre and used a large format camera and an extremely long exposure to capture the entire film, just as Sugimoto did in his photographs of old American movie palaces and drive-ins. A photographer, printmaker and assemblage artist for over 35 years, Brown has exhibited widely on the west coast, but claims his standout achievement was his prize in the “Design a Chair for Barbie” competition – not because of the second place finish but because the entry caused a fist fight amongst the judges!
Ruscha by BrownHockney by BrownArbus by BrownEdgerton by Brown[...]



More Video

2012-06-03T07:32:40.978-07:00


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As you may have noticed, I'm on something of a summer hiatus, but I'll try to post a few things from my summer break. In the meantime, this Canadian ad takes full advantage of high-def slow-motion.




Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:41.081-07:00


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Sent to me by Jim Krantz, the highly talented photographer who is one of the original Marlboro photographers (and much of whose work was borrowed by Richard Prince). This ad promoting the launch of the Polaroid SX-70 reminds us of one of those magical moments when it seemed like the future had arrived and it was all good. What's particularly surprising is the degree to which the history and art of photography is referenced. And while photography is much more appreciated, studied, and written about today - it's highly unlikely that a digital camera would be promoted in this way.




Addendum

2012-06-03T07:32:41.185-07:00


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An anonymous but knowledgeable tipster points out that in lighter prints of the Bill Dane image, Garry Winogrand can be seen in the background.

This can be verified by looking at the clearly recognizable figure on the right in the variant image below.


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Bill Dane

2012-06-03T07:32:41.300-07:00


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Also seen at the "Exposed" exhibition at the Tate Modern, this late 70s/early 80s picture by Bill Dane seems every bit as good as the picture it reminds me of, "Satiric Dancer" by Andre Kertesz.


(image) Satiric Dancer by Andre Kertesz. 1927.




Exposed

2012-06-03T07:32:41.404-07:00

What museum exhibition would you find the above picture of Paris Hilton on her way to jail in? 10 points if you guessed "Exposed" - a show originated by SF MoMA and now at the Tate Modern in London.The exhibition offers a fascinating and original look at pictures made without the explicit permission of the people depicted. With photographs from the late nineteenth century to present day, the show tackles its voyeuristic theme in a way that's at once serious and pleasurable.Beginning with the idea of the 'unseen photographer', "Exposed" presents 250 works by celebrated artists and photographers including Brassaï's erotic Secret Paris of the 1930s images; Weegee's iconic photograph of Marilyn Monroe on the set of "Some Like It Hot"; and both Nick Ut's Paris Hilton picture and his more famous image of children escaping napalm attacks in the Vietnam War. At a time where organized surveillance is dramatically increasing and reality (or faux-reality) t.v. is the mainstay of cable, the issues raised by "Exposed" are timely and provocative. So drop by if you're in London. If not, there's an excellent catalog readily available.The Contessa Castiglione by Pierson.Liz Taylor and Richard Burton caught by a paparazzi.Helmut Newton's famous image of Lisa Taylor, considered to be the first image where the female gaze was allowed to appear as predatory as a man's.[...]



Two London Shows

2012-06-03T07:32:41.736-07:00

Mick Jagger by David BaileyOn a flying visit to England I stopped in to Hamilton's Gallery to see the show of David Bailey's enlarged contact sheets. They're very large, effective, a trip down memory lane, and a reminder of his place as the English Avedon. Here are a few of my favorites:Jean ShrimptonJohn Lennon and Paul McCartneyThe Rolling StonesCatherine DeneuveNext door to Hamilton's the Timothy Taylor Gallery had an original Diane Arbus show tucked away in the back - a selection of her most summery pictures. I guess it's not surprising that a photographer who roamed the streets would do well in the summer but Arbus is in some ways so dark one wouldn't always put the two together. Anyway, a selection of known and unknown:[...]



Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:41.842-07:00


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Another weekend video courtesy of my contributing editor, Josie Danziger. In case you don't recognize the song it's Jason Mraz's "I'm Yours". But in addition to this highly original interpretation, have you noticed how good the video quality is on YouTube these days?

More on Jason to come as he's not only a great singer and songwriter but also a photographer. FYI - here's the original song below.


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A Vampire Chronicle

2012-06-03T07:32:41.951-07:00

An interesting story by Lyndsey Parker from Yahoo's music blog:While debate regarding unauthorized use of Facebook pics rages on, a photograph from the pre-digital age has gotten one indie group in some serious trouble. Former fashion model Ann Kirsten Kennis is suing buzz band Vampire Weekend for a cool $2 million, claiming a 1983 photo of her was used in their Contra album cover art without her consent.Kennis, who currently resides in Fairfield, Connecticut, with her family, was reportedly very surprised to see her doe-in-headlights likeness in a preppy Polo shirt on the Contra cover, when her daughter showed her the disc earlier this year. "Her daughter came home one day and said, "Hi, Mom, see your picture?'" Kennis's lawyer, Alan Neigher, told Entertainment Weekly. Neigher also told EW that the photo was never intended for professional use. "It was taken by her family. It was a Polaroid, not a modeling picture," he insisted. "Her mother was a chronic Polaroid snapshot-taker, and used to sell whole archives of photographs to these shops, five bucks a hundred or whatever. Her mother may have given away to a charity bazaar a whole ream of photographs. We just really don't know...[Kennis] has no idea how that photograph got into the photographer's hands."The photographer in question is Tod Brody, who along with Vampire Weekend's record label, XL Recordings, is also named in Kennis's $2 million misappropriation-of-identity lawsuit. See, Kennis claims Brody duped Vampire Weekend into believing he was the photographer who had shot the Polo pic, and that he forged her signature (as "Kirsten Johnson" in one spot and "Kirsten Johnsen" in another, Neigher says) on the photo's release form. Brody of course has denied this, telling EW: "Ms. Kennis's claim that I didn't take the photo is blatantly false. I took the photo in 1983. The photo was in my possession the entire time, for 26 years, until it was delivered [...]



Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:42.061-07:00


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This high testosterone video is a promo for Versus TV, a cable sports channel in the U.S and Canada (where it's known as OLN - the Outdoor Life Network).

It's so retro and un-artsy that it's artful (if you follow me), And an interesting motivational speech for me as I'm doing the Montauk Triathlon this weekend. Another slightly less aggressive but also effective Versus video below.


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Noted With Pleasure

2012-06-03T07:32:42.178-07:00

Elliott Erwitt. Sicily 1965.The Chelsea Market on West 15th Street is a block long pass through of mouth watering food shops developed within the site of the former Nabisco Factory. Over the last few years, they have been putting up free photo shows of a mixed quality, but up right now is their best show to date - a selection of Elliott Erwitt photographs shot in Italy over the last 50 years. I was particularly taken by this stylish picture taken in Sicily in 1965. I'm not sure who the gentleman is but it is definitely Sartorialissimo!Elsewhere around town, the theme seems to be women in danger. Above from Aperture's "States of Flux" show - Jun Ahn creates a striking performance piece confronting the encroaching urban environment of Seoul.Meanwhile on a chance visit to my neighboring gallery Fredericks & Freiser my eye caught this catalog by the front desk with this startling image by Josephine Meckseper. Meckseper is a U.S. based German contemporary multi-media artist so you can be sure this image is a comment on American culture. (Feel free to offer your own interpretation.)This month's British VOGUE offers up these striking photographs by Josh Olins. The "Contributor's Notes" explained that the pictures were inspired by the British painter Euan Uglow - certainly not a household name but as you'll see below, it's actually an interesting source and a good example of an artist being inspired by rather than copying someone else.Below - two Uglow paintings.To finish off the week, a chance encounter with Lisa Atkin, who manages the advertising and design company Baron & Baron, brought up this adorable picture of her brand new puppy, Max. I forgot to ask if the composition of this iPhone photo was also inspired by Uglow.[...]



RISD Graduate Photo Show at Danziger Projects

2012-06-03T07:32:42.294-07:00

Sonya German's video work is based in the embarrassment, confusion, and joy of our sexual lives. Her investigation into our relationship with sex and love exploits her own vulnerabilities.When I was approached out of the blue by this year's graduating RISD (Rhode Island School of Design) photo students about showing their work, I was happy to offer them a mid-summer week. They are a diverse and interesting group, and have been a complete pleasure to work with.Anyway, we hang the show next week and due to the abbreviated schedule (July 13 - 17) we're having a Tuesday night opening so mark this in your datebook. Heather Johnson is inspired by the visual cues of Pop Art. She exploits the theory of post-black America by appropriating and digitally manipulating photographic images of the African American elite, with a specific focus on actors and various media moguls who have crushed the glass ceiling of race, class, and culture.Ki Ho Park documents what is left behind in the storefronts across America. He examines vacant retail stores left in a hurry—evidence of the decline of American prosperity .Louisa Marie Summer’s focus is on portraiture and social documentary. Through intimate images of unpolished life, Louisa’s photographs and most recent video explore issues of social inequity and survival.Isaac Wingfield grew up in rural Western North Carolina. He is using a study of the landscape to search for a way home, from urban New England back to his roots in the rural Southeast.[...]



Levinstein at The Met

2012-06-03T07:32:42.409-07:00

This tightly edited and excellent show recently opened at The Metropolitan Museum and runs through October 17, so no excuse for missing it if you’re in town.Leon Levinstein is something of an insider’s choice – being much more known and appreciated by dealers and curators than collectors or even photographers. But he’s the real deal – as almost every picture in this show demonstrates.Based on a large donation to The Met, the exhibition features 44 prints covering the range of street people Levinstein was drawn to in the ‘60s and ‘70s. “Hipsters, Hustlers, and Handball Players” is the show title, but it might be more accurately called “Fatties, Floozies, and Fashion”. However the strange thing about the images is that however outlandish Levinsteins subjects may be, there is a generosity and a vitality to his eye that makes his characters seem almost stylish! If you look at the pictures illustrated here, I feel that Levinstein is actually celebrating rather denigrating his subjects’ individuality and how they present themselves. It’s just that his taste is much broader than most. I think, for example, he really likes the outfit below and was simply ahead of his time in appreciating 70s fashion. As it’s pretty easy to make people look freakish, I also particularly admired Levinstein’s skill and generosity. Ken Johnson writing in The New York Times responded in totally the opposite way. For his review click here. Let me know what you think. But to me Leon was a softie playing in a hardball world.[...]



Summer Shows

2012-06-03T07:32:42.518-07:00

Mitch Epstein. New York City. 1978It's corny, but what else are you going to do? When summer rolls around and business slows down, galleries and museums roll out the summer snaps. This year looks like a particularly engaging crop and I noticed lots of great images advertising the shows. This selection comes from that invaluable guide to exhibitions Photograph Magazine. Above - Mitch Epstein's polka-dotted street shot from the Princeton University Art Museum's "Starburst: Color Photography in America 1970-1980". Opens July 11.Chelsea in the Summer. Jean-Philippe Delhomme.On our invitation card for the first of our two summer shows, I went with Jean-Philippe Delhomme's gouache of West 24th Street which pefectly captures the mood, look, and feel of the summer. You may wonder why I would use a painting but it's easy to explain - Jean-Philippe thinks he's a photographer!Lucile Brokaw on Long Island Beach, 1933. Martin Munkacsi.I'm still working on the exact parameters of our second summer show but there's a good chance it will include this classic summer image by Martin Munkacsi, usually credited as being the first fashion picture employing deliberate movement. It's also the image The Met are using to illustrate their show at The Costume Institute, "American Woman".Jeanne and Longboard. 1963. Ron Church.Meanwhile, Scott Nichols Gallery in San Francisco goes retro-sexy with a show of summer favorites and this shot by the great surf photographer, Ron Church. For those interested in seeing more of Church's work, my friend Tom Adler has produced two books - Ron Church: California to Hawaii 1960 to 1965 , and Surf Contest. Both seminal surf photo books.Jim Pond. Family in Convertible Somewhere in Texas. 1968The George Eastman House in Rochester presents "Colorama" an e[...]



Pierson Installation

2012-06-03T07:32:42.785-07:00

So many people asked for installation shots of the new Jack Pierson show at Borotolami that I hightailed it over as soon as they opened today. I also should mention that the prints were made by David Adamson of Adamson Editions in Washington D.C.. Apart from being a good friend of mine, David happens to be considered the master printer of the digital age. The photographers he has printed for read like a Who's Who of the photo/contemporary art world (just click on the link above). And he's great at finding a solution so that everyone's prints look distinct. So much so that the prestigious Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris recently did a show based only on work Adamson had printed for different artists.[...]



Picture of the Day!

2012-06-03T07:32:42.909-07:00


(image) Piotr Redlinski for The New York Times

The Gay Pride Parade in New York is obviously quite a photogenic affair, but kudos to The New York Times for publishing this picture of Marlo Fisken, 27, showing off her pole dancing skills! And kudos to Redlinski for getting such a great shot. Other papers published pictures of Fisken but none from this angle and certainly none with quite the same snap!





More Pierson

2012-06-03T07:32:43.029-07:00

Eden Roc, 2010. 83 x 62 inches.Here as promised are more Jack Pierson images from his new show. I thought I would explain why I liked these pictures so much. Again, as with much contemporary art, or indeed any "new" art today - it's often the idea and the execution rather than the degree of technical skill that make the work interesting. Pierson's pictures are indeed nicely composed and colored, but in their large scale (up to 50 x 80 inches) and in their form as folded pigment prints the images are transformed. In the gallery, these are not just pictures to examine, they are experiences to get lost in. Photographs as sculpture. Photographs as pigment. Photographs as at once enduring and ephemeral.It's like the Gursky "Oceans". You look at the work (and this is where seeing things online only can be limiting) and you think "I could have done that!". But the point is you didn't. It took someone with Pierson's eye, and experience, and background, and willingness to take a risk and do it. Gold, 2010. 83 x 62 inches.Torse d'athlete en marble. 2010. 83 x 62 inches.Bird in Flight. 2010. 63 x 63 inches.God is Love. 2010. 57 x 42.5 inches.[...]



Weekend Video - World Cup edition.

2012-06-03T07:32:43.144-07:00


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Watching Landon Donovan’s game winning goal on Wednesday Purdue University senior Robby Denoho and decided it merited an instant tribute which he posted to YouTube. Within hours, the video had gone viral, and as the American players headed to bed on Friday night ahead of their round-of-16 match against Ghana in Rustenburg, more than 350,000 viewers had tuned in.

It also didn’t take long for the video to get to Donovan himself. For all of the plaudits the American soccer star received after his moment of glory, it was seeing the reaction his goal provoked that touched him the most. "Not sure if you guys saw this but it brings tears to my eyes every time,” Donovan wrote on his Facebook account.





Jack Pierson

2012-06-03T07:32:43.270-07:00


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Just came from the opening of Jack Pierson's new show at Bortolami Gallery on 25th Street where the ever-inventive artist has experimented with a new form - very large folded prints made on lightweight digital paper. Pinned to the wall, they have an original and effective sculptural quality, although I imagine if you bought one, you would want to house it in a nice clean box frame.

The gallery has forgotten to update their website, so this is the only image I have for now, but I'll try to post more next week





Friends with Cameras - Part 2

2012-06-03T07:32:43.400-07:00

Some of you may remember a previous post about my friend Leslie Simitch of Trunk Archive, the new powerhouse photo agency. Leslie is rarely without a camera and is something of a specialist at catching romantic couples on the fly.Case in point, her latest snap (above) shot at some seedy club last night. Leslie, who is also an early adopter par excellence, now swears by the Canon S90 which she was turned on to by her old classmate, the great fashion photographer Pamela Hanson. That kind of recommendation is hard to ignore, so I guess we'll all have to try the camera (below) out.And if you're in need of a refresher on Leslie's previous shots, here they are again:You can't say the girl doesn't have talent![...]



Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:43.502-07:00


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Healthier than the smoking toddler, more authentic than the roller-skating Evian babies, for Father's Day weekend we present the Brazilian samba dancing baby!




Get High!

2012-06-03T07:32:43.608-07:00

A couple of weeks ago, this photograph by Mark Seliger in New York Magazine of actress Paz De La Huerta leapt off the page at me. I liked the attitude, the curves, and the grit of it. And it reminded me of another favorite photograph - Helmut Newton's shot of Elsa Peretti (below).. The differences are as interesting as the similarities.Helmut Newton. Elsa Peretti in a 'Bunny' costume by Halston, New York , 1975 Newton's is high fashion, Seliger's is downtown cool, but the elevated perspective gives a fresh look to the background and brings a slight sense of danger to both pictures.Marilyn Monroe on the balcony of the Ambassador Hotel, New York City, 1955. Photograph by Ed Feingersh.What always happens once you take note of a particular type of picture is that they start popping up all over. And so it has been with balconies. A random e-mail about an auction of Marilyn Monroe memorabilia led me to this picture. A quick search of Magnum Photos website pulled up the two pictures below by Inge Morath - one of the most overlooked photographers to be a member of the famous photojournalist organization.Inge Morath. Saul Steinberg. 1962.Inge Morath. Norman Mailer. 1966.I didn't catch the credit and now can't find it, but last but not least, this from the Styles section of The New York Times. O.K - we've caught on to the trick![...]



Weekend Video

2012-06-03T07:32:43.714-07:00

While all eyes are turned on South Africa for The World Cup, this video, sent my way by Josie Borain (who some of you might remember as the tomboy haired Calvin Klein "Obsession" model) reminds us of South Africa's amazing musical culture.Speaking of Josie Borain (who along with my favorite movie - Clint Eastwood's "The Outlaw Josey Wales" inspired my daughter's name) she published a book a number of years ago called "Josie You and Me". A collection of self-portraits, portraits, and behind the scenes reportage of the modeling world - it's the best of its genre and still available if you do a bit of web searching.[...]



Save The Dates

2012-06-03T07:32:43.819-07:00

June 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. is a book signing at my gallery for a good friend - the legendary art director Ruth Ansel. I've written about Ruth several times so just click here and here if you need to refresh your memory. But she will be signing a new monograph, a booklet that is the first in a series on great women graphic designers by the Swedish design group Hjarta Smarta. (I kid you not.) It's seminal reading for anyone interested in superlative book and magazine design and sublime art direction.Marina Abramovic at MoMA by Jean-Philippe Delhomme.Also:Tomorrow (Thursday, June 10) from 6 to 8 we'll be having an opening reception for our first summer show "The Art Fair is Present".A playful reference to the just finished Marina Abramovic retrospective at MoMA (titled "The Artist is Present") the exhibition is comprised of work exhibited by the gallery in recent art fairs mixed with new work by Jean-Philippe Delhomme that comments on the New York art world. While Jean-Philippe (who is an old friend) is an illustrator whose medium is gouache, the joke is that he thinks he's a photographer. And his work is often mistakenly credited "Photograph by Jean-Philippe Delhomme" even though it's in no way photo-realistic.The show also includes work by Bernd & Hilda Becher , Christopher Bucklow, Paul Fusco, Ormond Gigli, Jim Krantz, , Annie Leibovitz , Robert Mapplethorpe, Ryan McGinness, Len Prince & Jessie Mann, Viviane Sassen, Ezra Stoller, and George Tice.While on one hand a sampling of what the gallery show[...]



Brian Duffy - R.I.P.

2012-06-03T07:32:43.925-07:00

Brian Duffy, whose photographs helped define the look of London's Swinging Sixties, has died aged 76.Along with David Bailey and Terence Donovan, Duffy was a key part of the group of young working class British photographers who revolutionized the image of the profession and became as famous as the models, musicians and film stars they worked with.He was born in London's East End, studied dress design at St Martin's School of Art, and worked as a fashion illustrator for Harper's Bazaar before turning to photography. He was one of just a handful of photographers to shoot two Pirelli calenders, and was known for his clean and graphic approach to fashion photography.His work also spanned reportage and advertising, and he shot three David Bowie album covers, including Aladdin Sane.In 1979, Duffy decided to give up photography and burned many of his negatives, but he resumed taking pictures just last year.[...]



My Pie Town

2012-06-03T07:32:44.037-07:00

Ruth Leonard Secures a Calf in Her PastureContinuing my look at graduating student work, from the SVA (School of Visual Art) MFA program, this provocative group of images by Debbie Grossman. Based on Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee's classic 1940 portrait of Pie Town, New Mexico, Grossman appropriates and photoshops Lee's photographs to re-imagine Pie Town as a homestead community populated exclusively by women. Grossman's website is also worth checking out for a few more Pietown images and a sad but moving work that's a poignant tribute to her mother.Jessie Evans-Whinery with Her Wife Edith and Their BabyCommunity MeetingCouple at a Square DanceJean and Virginia Norris, Homesteaders and Town FoundersAnd the Russell Lee original:This also brings to mind this piece by Kathy Grove - a professional retoucher and artist whose conceptual work involved retouching iconic images. Here her ironic prettifying of Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother".[...]



Emer Gillespie

2012-06-03T07:32:44.147-07:00

The Photographers' Gallery in London is currently showing a selection of student work by recent graduates of English art schools. Among the 27 entries, this one in particular caught my eye (and my heart)."Two Homes" by Emer Gillespie documents the parallels of the two separate households in which the artist’s child lives. In a rare example of the diptych form being used to its best advantage (a form much abused by student photographers) Gillespie pairs scenes of seemingly mundane objects and routines that make up the life of a child living with separated parents.While on one hand, the images illustrate subtle connotations of gender distinction - what's most affecting is the straightforward observation of what must be undoubtedly confusing for a young child.[...]



Weekend Video - Memorial Day Edition

2012-06-03T07:32:44.253-07:00

I get a lot of press releases suggesting I put various things on this blog but this one seemed straightforward and appealing and it's happening tonight in Brooklyn. The e-mail said:Hi there,My name is Jenny and I work with Rooftop Films (rooftopfilms.com), a summer film series dedicated to showcasing new, independent films and emerging bands in unique outdoor locations. This is our 14th year of Underground Movies Outdoors.THIS WEEK’S SHOWS:Thursday, May 27ETIENNE!NY Premiere! A quirky slacker road movie comedy about a man and his hamster.Directed by Jeff MizushimaWhere:On the roof of Brooklyn Technical High School (29 Fort Greene Pl., Fort Greene)When:8:00 Doors Open8:30 Live Music by Natureboy9:00 Films BeginFollowing was this synopsis:Etienne! tells the story of Richard, a shy type who spends his days taking care of his best friend, Etienne, a dwarf hamster. One day Richard finds out that his hamster has terminal cancer. The veterinarian recommends euthanasia before the animal begins to suffer. Before he lets his best friend go, Richard decides to take Etienne on a bicycle road trip and show it the world.I dug up the trailer above on YouTube. And if my daughter wasn't in the middle of studying for exams, you would probably see us there. (She loves hamsters.) Maybe we'll even sneak out!I'll be back next week with some serious photography.[...]



More Water

2012-06-03T07:32:44.356-07:00

Photographs by Geoffrey Swaine/Rex Features.Impressive - but in a different way from the Gursky water shots. These pictures from London's Daily Mail show a Canada goose minding a brood of 40 goslings on the Thames river. Although these geese 'creches' - where the offspring of different parents get mixed up - are not uncommon, ornithologists say this is one of the largest they have seen. [...]