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Preview: Life On the Wicked Stage: Act 2

Life On the Wicked Stage: Act 2



Musings on a Life in the Theatre, Tablet PC's, Cultural Issues, (oh, and the occasional emu sighting...)



Updated: 2013-10-15T19:09:24-04:00

 



So, Congress Can't Act, All Hell Breaks Loose, What Do You Teach Your Children?

2013-10-15T19:09:24-04:00

So, here's a question for friends of mine and readers of this blog with small children. Over the last weeks we've seen the complete collapse of what the founders envisioned as Representative Democracy. It was a noble experiment. I think...

(image) So, here's a question for friends of mine and readers of this blog with small children. Over the last weeks we've seen the complete collapse of what the founders envisioned as Representative Democracy. It was a noble experiment. I think we've seen it finally fail. If what we're hearing tonight as I compose this post is true, a right wing think tank, The Heritage Foundation, sent out a missive to Republican House members that buckled their knees so much, we won't see a vote in the House on what looked like was going to be yet another feckless attempt to accomplish something or anything. That could still change, but the bald face bullying as sent the cowards scampering to their corners. Some would argure that democracy is always messy. It is. But I don't think this quailifies as messy or democracy.

Oh, that question? What do you teach your children these days when it comes to things like reciting the Pledge of Allegiance? You remember what that is don't you. Originally composed by a Baptist minister and Christain Socialist, Francis Bellamy, that's the pledge we should all be able to recite by memory from about the first grade on, if not sooner. But haven't the actions of our Congress critters (on both sides) proven that it is just a hollow incantation, even considering the blood that has been shed over the flag we pledge to and the nation and ideals it represents? That last part is key.

I don't ask this question in jest, or with snark. I ask it sincerely. Given that it is difficult to justify the actions, words, and dare I say, intelligence, of the folks we elect and pay as leaders, what do you say to your children about this?

 

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Check out Southern Crossroads in the Midwest

2013-08-22T18:05:35-04:00

OK, Chicago and Midwest family and friends, here's your shot(s). We're inside of a week before we pack up the truck and move back to the Great Midwest. But while you're waiting for us to hit town, you can check... OK, Chicago and Midwest family and friends, here's your shot(s). We're inside of a week before we pack up the truck and move back to the Great Midwest. But while you're waiting for us to hit town, you can check out one of two Midwest productions of Southern Crossroads, the original musical that I wrote with Steve Przybylski. Up and running at Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse in Rock Island, Illinois, Southern Crossroads is back for the second time at this great theatre. It was an audience favorite there the first time around, so, hey, why not an encore. Here are some links to the reviews of the show. From the Quad City Times and from the River City Reader. I'll be in Rock Island beginning September 16 to direct the comedy Things My Mother Taught Me. That's the last week of the run of Southern Crossroads, so if you're coming down to see the show that week or weekend, let me know and we'll hang out. And if you'd like to head to Indiana, you can check out Southern Crossroads at the Derby Dinner Playhouse in Clarksville, Indiana. The show opens there this weekend and runs through September 29. Hope you can check out the show.     [...]



The End of Arguing, The Rise of the Caterwaul

2013-08-01T09:53:13-04:00

It started quite a bit ago. Probably with some of the first arguements between humans. So, there's nothing strange about how humans interact with each other when they disagree. Where there is strangness is that unlike the days when ignornance,... It started quite a bit ago. Probably with some of the first arguements between humans. So, there's nothing strange about how humans interact with each other when they disagree. Where there is strangness is that unlike the days when ignornance, hatred, lack of facts, overheated emotions, and bull shit used to be called out for what they were, or dismissed by those who knew better, the currency of debating or arguing points now rises and falls with how well the individuals ignore reason and rely on the things listed above. Our culture these days seems to reward those who are good at ignoring facts and rationality. Nuance? Forget about that. There's just no room for something that requires any degree of nuance. Yell loud enough and you win. Insult the other side and watch the arguement spin uncontrollably away from the topic at hand. Again, this has gone on for as long as humans have argued. But it has developed into such a science and such acceptable behavior these days that we don't argue anymore, we just lob words and emotion back and forth and walk away like some gorilla roaring out loud after marking his territory. Would that be evolution or devolution? I don't think it was any part of anyone's Intelligent Design. Sure, this shows up in our politics (there was never much room for rationality there in the first place), and it shows up in arguing about which gadget is better. It shows up in reviews of all sorts of products online, and when it comes to religion, well, we've been waging wars supposedly about that topic as long as we've been able to wage war. Watching this occur over topics that involve any mention of science has become almost like watching a Road Runner cartoon. Only problem is the coyotes are winning because they make more noise more efficiently. There used to be a day when the art of the orator or the actor required one to have a big resonating voice in order to be heard. Well, in both instances, now that technology has allowed those with quiet voices to be heard, being loud doesn't count for much anymore in those fields when it comes to getting ahead. The tiniest voices can be amplified and modified, often masking the tiniest brains and the tinest of talents. The difference, these days, isn't about how much sound you can produce, it is about how much noise you can make without saying anything of substance regarding the point at hand. [...]



On Dicks and Dongles

2013-07-30T13:22:32-04:00

Starting to get back into the swing of things a bit after some life altering news of late. That said, the swing set here has been dormant for quite some time, so it will take a bit to knock the...Starting to get back into the swing of things a bit after some life altering news of late. That said, the swing set here has been dormant for quite some time, so it will take a bit to knock the rust off. There's been so much water under so many bridges since I had to semi-retire from writing for this blog and others that if I tried to catch up, well, let's just say that would be as futile as a certain Virginia governor trying to salvage what is left of his career by giving back a Rolex. So, we'll move on and pick up anew. That said, the headlines of today look pretty much the same. Only the names and circumstances change in the ridiculous rat race that we somehow still like to call human. But maybe that's the point. Human nature is what it is all about and human nature has more of an interest in the dark than the light. So, this blog was always about culture, politics, things I found entertaining and a bit of tech. We'll try to get back to some of that in the days ahead. So, let's kick off by saying you won't find much talk about a certain idiot in New York City, who likes to send pictures of himself around to women, and then seems to think he can still run for mayor of that city. If nothing else, change your damn name.  All you are doing is reducing the Internet to a level below its prepubescent preponderance for dick jokes and other puerile predilections. Actually, it isn't just the Internet. We long ago dismissed shame as something we would brandish on those who deserved it, in lieu of profiting on their stupidity for our own sakes. That, though, doesn't give you permission to jerk off in public, even if those looking for links will join in and make it a circle; or that voters in South Carolina and other places have proven that we don't care about the smarts of those we elect, have short memories, or just find the whole thing more entertaining than the latest failed movie blockbuster. On to a bit of technology. Google has released Chromecast, a dongle that dangles out of an HDMI port and allows you to use mobile devices and computers to throw video to your big screen. Huzzah! Maybe the third time will be the charm for Google and TV because it has failed at least twice. The Chromecast concept at least looks like it has promise and the price ($35) is certainly right. That is until those who control the content start to do a little squeezing. Content providers and pipe purveyors certainly recognize Google's play here and gosh, golly gee, they don't want you to watch their stuff with somebody else's ads on it. They've lost the time shifting and place shifting battles and I don't think they want to loose the dongle dance that should lead to this technology being built into TVs down the road. I may be wrong, but as exciting as Chromecast looks to be, I bet we see a backlash from the content providers that will affect all streaming services. Short memories easily forget how DRM schemes forced on computer manufacturers crippled computers (and in some cases still do). I mean let's get serious. The next time some dickhead politician pops his head up (or other things) and the ratings war games begin on that news, they want you tuning into their coverage today, not streaming it through your browser tomorrow. But then the term "breaking news" is a broken cliché and has as much currency as the stuff the content providers willingly let you stream on existing services. And for those who might be offended at the headline of this post, keep in mind what the Urban Dictionary lists as its 15th definition of dongle. [...]



Plans, We're Making Plans

2013-07-27T08:57:40-04:00

Plans are slowly beginning to take shape for our next adventure. We are indeed moving back to Chicago. Timeline is the last week of August. We're taking inventory of our stuff, doing some downsizing and will be holding a yard...Plans are slowly beginning to take shape for our next adventure. We are indeed moving back to Chicago. Timeline is the last week of August. We're taking inventory of our stuff, doing some downsizing and will be holding a yard sale of some sort before we go. We've also got some amazing offers from friends to host farewell parties. That's getting worked on currently so more news on that when we have it. We have a lot of folks to touch base with before we leave. This all got more real yesterday when I gave notice to terminate our lease and last night we picked up a motherlode of moving boxes from a nice lady who had just moved into the area and was giving them away for free. So, for the next month or so, it is all about stuff, moving stuff, storing stuff, getting rid of stuff, and well…. stuff. It's also about breaking up with doctors, pharmacists, and other relationships as well. As to the work thing, we're putting out feelers on a number of fronts and have some interesting discussions going on. Beyond the already mentioned gig directing Things My Mother Taught Me at Circa 21 in September, there's nothing solid to share yet. Also don't forget that fans of Southern Crossroads will have two opportunities the next two months to see that show at Derby Dinner Playhouse (August 20-September 29) and at Circa 21 (August 14-September 21). The run at Murry's Dinner Playhouse has just concluded and was so successful they've expressed interest in the prequel Steve and I wrote, Southern Crossroads: The New Orleans Adventure. The success that theaters are having with Southern Crossroads is leading to more interest for next season so we remain excited about that potential. Folks like shows that make money and make audiences stand up and cheer.I keep getting questions wondering if I'm looking to run a theatre again. The answer at the moment is a firm "no." It's not that I've been there and done that, but it is. Quite honestly with things as unsettled as they seem to be around the country with board leadership (or lack thereof), financial pressures, and more things that have less to do with doing theatre than keeping them alive, in my mind I've got enough bruises on my head to think about giving that a go again. At least for the moment. Never say never, right? I also think this is a younger person's game these days, or at least a person younger than me. Quite honestly I enjoyed very much directing my last show at Wayside Theatre, Boeing Boeing. The reason? All I did was direct the show. I wasn't responsible for the myriad of other duties that come with running a theatre. Quite a few folks have commented to me that this showed positively n the work. That's flattering on the one hand and pisses me off on the other. Again, thanks to all of the true friends and family who have been supportive through the beginning of this transition. When you are skating on thin ice it is nice to know you've got a few folks hanging on to a tether line in case the ice breaks. Oh, and a good friend challenged me last night about something I've always said during my many adventures at Wayside Theatre. As we faced many challenges along the way, I'd say about some of the crazier ones that they would make an interesting chapter in the book I'll write someday. My friend asked if I was really going to do that. The answer is yes. I mean, think about it. The last few chapters are going to be quite interesting don't you think? [...]



Great Opening, Amazing Party, and Now We Move On

2013-07-15T19:43:18-04:00

Call it a wake, call it a send off, call it whatever you wish to, but last night's opening night of Boeing Boeing at Wayside Theatre was, even with all of the emotions surrounding my departure, one that those who...Call it a wake, call it a send off, call it whatever you wish to, but last night's opening night of Boeing Boeing at Wayside Theatre was, even with all of the emotions surrounding my departure, one that those who were there, in body or in spirit, will remember for some time to come. It was indeed a night filled with emotions. Long time Wayside Theatre stalwart Cephe Place received recognition for her amazing service to the organization by being honored with a Leo Award. Saying that honor was well deserved is an understatement to end all understatements. Before the show the many friends who came to the see my last opening night at Wayside Theatre brought treasured memories with them to this special night. But, most importantly, the amazing cast of Boeing Boeing, (Leslie Putnam, Don Denton, Dan Westbrook, Shirley Proctor, Theresa McQuirk, and Karen O'Connell,) took the stage, whipped the audience into a frenzy of laughter, and brought the focus right back to where it should be: on the show and the amazing work within. If the show biz maxim, "always leave 'em laughing" is true, that cast certainly took that to a new level last night. I have to tell you watching them perform this insane farce with such amazing skill and polish was a great "final opening" for me to remember. I'll treasure it always. Quite a few folks remarked that it was one of the best shows I've directed at Wayside in quite some time. My response was, well, when all you have to do is focus on the directing of a show, instead of the many gazillion other things that my previous job entailed, well... you get the picture. Maybe that should be a lesson for someone. Hmm? Thomasin and I were delighted to be surrounded by so many wonderful friends and great colleagues who have helped make our life at Wayside Theatre worthwhile these past years. Seeing each one before or after the show brought back such a rush of memories it almost became overwhelming. Those who made it last night and those who couldn't (because many of them are working! Yea!) please know that you have left an indelible mark on that tiny stage and also with me. We'll do it again sometime, on some other stage, but, in the meantime, we all share the specialness that were those years at Wayside Theatre. So many words, so many memories came flooding out in the after parties (I think one may still be going on someplace). Vaughn Irving, who has his own show going up in the DC Fringe fest touched Thomasin and I tremendously with his words. But, then what would you expect from someone who is playing Disco Jesus. But Vaughn wasn't and isn't alone. This Wayside Family that did amazing things in some of the most challenging circumstances anyone can face is spread all over this biz. They are all doing what they were born to do, which is, for a few brief moments, brighten the lives of others with their artistry and talent. Lord knows, they certainly have brightened mine. For that I will always be grateful for all we have shared. Onward. [...]



Another Opening of Another Show for the Last Time

2013-07-14T08:08:52-04:00

So. Here we are. Tonight marks my last opening night at Wayside Theatre, with what I think is a very, very funny production of Boeing Boeing. The cast is sensational and together we felt the show grow into its own...So. Here we are. Tonight marks my last opening night at Wayside Theatre, with what I think is a very, very funny production of Boeing Boeing. The cast is sensational and together we felt the show grow into its own during the two preview performances yesterday. It sure was great to hear some laughs after a week of tech rehearsals where no one laughs at anything anymore. I'm sure tonight will be full of all sorts of mixed emotions. I know quite a few friends are coming in for this final opening and I'm greatly appreciative of all of the good thoughts and words that have been coming our way since I made the decision to resign from my position as Artistic Director at Wayside Theatre on June 28 and from those who can't make it to the opening. It is times like these when you find out who your friends are. I'm imagining tonight's after party will go on a bit longer than most. And I have to admit, I'm looking forward to that. Not so sure I'm looking forward to the mixed emotions though. As Berthe says at the close of Act 1 in Boeing Boeing, "It's going to be a bumpy night." As for Act 2, Thomasin and I are still in the process of working out our options for the future. Until we make firm decisions on that, though, the next gig is directing the comedy Things My Mother Taught Me in September for Circa 21, which follows Circa's production of Southern Crossroads, which I wrote with Steve Przybylski. By the way, there is a production of Southern Crossroads playing at Murray's Dinner Theatre in Arkansas currently, and one coming up at the Derby Dinner Playhouse in Indiana later this summer. We're taking some time down this week to make those decisions, drink a bit, and wrap our heads around what's next. There will be some writing mixed in there, along with directing and who knows what else. A bunch of folks in the community are talking about some kind of party in the next few weeks, and we'll probably take them up on that. We'll let you know if it happens. In the meantime, there's a show to open tonight. So, time to plan the final tuneup. But before I turn to that, here's a curious observation. At least I think it is curious. So many folks can't wrap there heads around the distinctions between what an Artistic Director and a director does. Those of us in the biz understand this. But the number of folks who I've talked to these past weeks who don't have a clue as to how the magic arrives on stage is more overwhelming than I ever imagined. Perhaps, that's as it should be. After all it is supposed to look effortless. [...]



Doors Close, Doors Open

2013-06-30T08:33:09-04:00

Here's hoping that the adage in the headline of this post is true. In case you've missed the news, Friday was my last day as Artistic Director at Wayside Theatre. I will be continuing to direct the next show, Boeing...

(image) Here's hoping that the adage in the headline of this post is true. In case you've missed the news, Friday was my last day as Artistic Director at Wayside Theatre. I will be continuing to direct the next show, Boeing Boeing, which starts performances on July 13 and opens on July 14.

Thomasin and I have no immediate plans to share at the moment, but I imagine one of the things I will be doing is returning to this blog more frequently, hopefully about new adventures. For the hundreds who have already called, emailed, or reached out via Facebook, Twitter, and other ways, thanks for your comments and support now, and through the years. We're blessed with great family that includes a very large and wonderful family of artists who we have had the distinct pleasure and privilege to work with through 15 seasons at Wayside Theatre. Together we created a lot of joy, shared a lot of pain, and built memories that will last a lifetime. We have also been blessed with the opportunities we have had to share some wonderful theatre memories and by those we have shared them with. Being a part of a performance as an artist or an audience member has always been a truly special thing. 

We will miss the many who love Wayside Theatre. We will miss the great times, the difficult and often excruciating challenges, and we'll miss more than we can possibly think of right now I'm sure. But that's life.

Now, where is that door?

 

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A Day at Wayside Theatre that Shows Us at Our Best

2013-02-17T09:32:21-05:00

Yesterday was an amazing day at Wayside Theatre and in the campaign to keep the theatre's doors open. We had two wonderful performances of Smoke on the Mountain Homecoming. The talented cast and the audience bridged that small gulf between...Yesterday was an amazing day at Wayside Theatre and in the campaign to keep the theatre's doors open. We had two wonderful performances of Smoke on the Mountain Homecoming. The talented cast and the audience bridged that small gulf between the edge of the stage and the auditorium in both shows and together created a magical musical experience. Watching the conclusion of both shows you got the sense that no one wanted the experience to end. Second, once again, children involved with Wayside Theatre were out in force trying to raise funds and awareness. The Suzuki Violin Class was playing at the Espresso Bar and Cafe in downtown Winchester. If you check out our Facebook page you'll see pictures of their efforts yesterday. Bravo kids! Third, in our Curtain Call Cafe, the artwork that is on display is proving to be a big hit. Artist Loretta Bailey organized 15 local artists to donate paintings or prints to Wayside Theatre to help the campaign. I believe we've sold 6 or 7 of the paintings so far, and people are talking about the art during the intermission and after the show. This exhibition is also helping us drive conversations about the campaign and our efforts there. Again check out our Facebook page or website to learn more about the wonderful efforts of these artists and how they are helping. I'm sure we passed the $60,000 mark during all that was happening yesterday and of course we'll post an accurate update in the next few days. But if you are one of those who wonder was Wayside Theatre is important, why it is necessary, why you should lend your support, if you had stopped by the theatre yesterday you would not be wondering anymore. I was lucky. I got to experience the entire day at the theatre in ways most never do. But, as one patron said on leaving the evening performance last night, "there really is something special to be loved and cherished here." There really is. Come see for yourself. If you'd like to read more about this campaign please check out more infomation here on this blog, on Facebook, or at Wayside Theatre's website. If you'd like to help or share your story we'd be very grateful. [...]



Campaign Update

2013-02-16T09:25:18-05:00

Campaign Update We are just about to complete six weeks in the campaign to save Wayside Theatre. It has been a real roller coaster ride. We are just shy of raising $60,000, which means we've had an average of about...Campaign UpdateWe are just about to complete six weeks in the campaign to save Wayside Theatre. It has been a real roller coaster ride. We are just shy of raising $60,000, which means we've had an average of about $10,000 a week in donations come in. Thank you to those who have stepped up so far. We've obviously got a ways to go. There's momentum building towards the Town Hall meeting this Wednesday, February 20 at 6:30pm. We hope we have great attendance and encourage you to attend. We plan on answering questions about this fix we're in and the steps we're taking to fix it. It should be an important night. While there is some momentum, and we keep getting wonderful offers of support from folks like the artist Loretta Bailey and children from all over, I have to say that I'm only cautiously optimistic that we're going to meet our goals. Why the caution?Try as we might, we can't talk to every person who has questions or frustrations. Those who care enough to ask us tough questions get straight answers. And in just about every case that has helped us gain some new support. Don't assume after reading that last sentence that I mean to say that others don't care. I don't. Many do care but are unable to help at this time. But there are some out there who are spending time talking amongst themselves about Wayside Theatre's financial problems and choosing not to engage with us. Those closed conversations ask the questions we're ready to answer, but assume answers that aren't real. I guess on some level it is easier, and perhaps entertaining, to complain and guess than it is to actually spend the time to get to the truth. How do we know this is going on? Well, others who do choose to engage relate those conversations to us. This is already a difficult challenge and as we've said many times these questions aren't easy ones to answer. The challenge is made more difficult when we have to break through improper assumptions and information. The challenge is made impossible when folks don't give us the chance to engage before making assumptions.To a certain extent that is just human nature doing its thing, so don't read this as complaining. Instead, read this as yet another set of invitations. If you've stepped up and joined the team, know we value your support and invite, encourage, and ask you to help us not only spread the word, but help get others involved. Invite them to attend the Town Hall meeting or call or write us. If you are sitting on the fence, or know someone who is, please know that we're willing to talk with you about your frustrations or uncertainty. We won't pretend we'll change everyone's mind. But we do know that the chance we have to try is right now. We're offering that chance and want you to take us up on it. Help us not miss this chance by choosing to talk with us.I was asked by an audience member attending last night's show what happens if we don't meet our goals. I told them what we've said all along. Wayside Theatre closes. They responded that they didn't want this to happen and donated $20 to the cause. Doing some quick math after the show last night, I I realized that if half of our 20,000 patrons who came to Wayside Theatre last year donated $20 each, we would have raised $200,000. With grants and other funding efforts that would put us over our $250,000 goal for long term sustainability. That simple math solution sounds so simple it almost seems unreal. But it could be attainable with your help and your willingness to engage in discussion with us. Come see Smoke on the Mountain Homecoming. Come talk to us before the show, during intermission, or afte[...]



A Supporter of Wayside Theatre Speaks Out

2013-02-06T09:01:21-05:00

Yesterday we received this letter of support from one of Wayside Theatre's supporters, Jim Stutzman, Jr. Jim's family have been supporters of Wayside Theatre for quite some time as the letter will explain. I hope you read this and take...Yesterday we received this letter of support from one of Wayside Theatre's supporters, Jim Stutzman, Jr. Jim's family have been supporters of Wayside Theatre for quite some time as the letter will explain. I hope you read this and take what he says to heart. WHY WAYSIDE?   In our many years of community partnership, one of the organizations my family has always tried to support is the Wayside Theatre.  My father was a long time board member in our early years, hard worker and advocate of the Theatre.  My first real exposure to live productions came in that tiny little theater in Middletown, VA and I have since shared that experience with all of my children, extended family of employees and customers, and  the community at large. As Wayside has struggled for years financially, it has only been of more recent times that it has become so public and I have been asked on many occasions why I continue to provide funds to support the theater.  Certainly a fair question in these challenging economic times, so after some introspective reflection, here is my answer: I have never been a gifted actor or had a passion to even attempt acting on an amateur or professional scale, but I have been deeply moved by many live performances I have had the good fortune to witness whether on Broadway, SU Summer Music Theater or Wayside.  As our resources for public education have continued to dwindle the last 3 decades, the first programs to be eliminated from most public school curriculums are the arts and music programs….lately; we even find our schools struggling to support sports programs.  So without local community/summer stock type of theater programs, where will our young people ever have the opportunity to express themselves or learn to hone a God given talent?  Let’s go back to the sports issue for a moment.  Does anyone actually think our area could produce the string of state championship runs our region has been able to achieve (in multiple sports, at different schools, I might add) without strong youth programs developing this young talent?  The Kelly Washington’s, Erick Green’s, Devon McTavish’s, etc.  may never have had the drive, exposure and motivation to compete at a higher level.  Who knows where our next generation’s great actors will come from?  I know one thing for certain, I have never read a biography or seen a documentary about the life of an actor that didn’t mention years of honing their craft in community theater and summer stock….theater’s like Wayside offer those opportunities.  Not to mention the greats who struggled as kids to “find their path” or “deal with a challenging home life” or a myriad of other emotional and behavioral situations.  Many “found themselves” in their craft and went on to develop into contributing members of society who have the compassion and social conscience to give back and attempt to make a difference.  That next great actor could be your neighbor. These are just a few positives that I see an organization like Wayside contributing to our community and why I feel a passion to try and help them not just survive, but thrive in the future.  We have progressed to an age where our attention spans are growing short.  We live in a world of instant gratification and special effects.  Live theater is not just entertaining, but it forces the actors, producers, directors and set and costume designers to work together to reach into the heart and soul of the viewer.  Wayside Theatre offers that oppor[...]



Important Facts about Wayside Theatre: Making It Look Easy is Hard

2013-02-04T10:53:39-05:00

Here's a link to a great review of Wayside Theatre's Smoke on the Mountain Homecoming from the Northern Va Daily. I'm going to pull a couple of choice quotes that speak to not only the excellence of the artists performing...Here's a link to a great review of Wayside Theatre's Smoke on the Mountain Homecoming from the Northern Va Daily. I'm going to pull a couple of choice quotes that speak to not only the excellence of the artists performing the show, but life in live professional theatre in general. Here's te first one: Watching "Homecoming" is like witnessing a masterpiece constructed live on stage -- having no idea what goes into it until you see it performed, and afterward still not knowing how they made it all work. And another: The ability of the actors to not only perform the script so well, but simultaneously play an instrument version of musical chairs, is stunning. Our job always has been and always will be to make it look easy, effortless, and magical. That's the fun part of our challenge. We're blessed with the quality of professional talent that comes to play for our audiences here in the Northern Shenandoah Valley. They love doing so and you can feel that love in every note, every line, or every second of every performance. I hope you make the effort to come and see these efforts these wonderful artists make to help create a little magic for you.  If you'd like to read more about this campaign please check out more infomation here on this blog, on Facebook, or at Wayside Theatre's website. If you'd like to help or share your story we'd be very grateful.   [...]



An Actor Speaks about Wayside Theatre

2013-01-31T08:05:04-05:00

During this campaign to save Wayside Theatre we've heard from many individuals on both side of the footlights about why Wayside Theatre is important. This bit of testimony is from actor Elliot Dash. Elliot has become a fan favorite with...During this campaign to save Wayside Theatre we've heard from many individuals on both side of the footlights about why Wayside Theatre is important. This bit of testimony is from actor Elliot Dash. Elliot has become a fan favorite with his performances in Hank Williams: Lost Highway, Driving Miss Daisy, and Othello. He's one of a kind and one of the actors who loves to come to Wayside Theatre to create and perform for our community.   My favorite place to work. You need testimony from me? You are asking me about The Wayside Theatre? What it means to me? There is your answer. Regardless of when you ask or where I am or the current production I'm performing in . . . . The Wayside Theatre is hands down my favorite place to work. Every single time I've done any kind of show at The Wayside the results are magical enjoyment. Skeptical? Think I'm just saying it to help out?? Nope. It is absolutely true. I love every minute of every day that I have had to park myself in Middletown to do a show for the enjoyment of others. Perhaps it is the absolute abandonment of personal ego for the incredibly talented performers that I have come to know as friends. Perhaps it is the wonderful director / artistic director Mr. Warner Crocker who has guided me into some of my personal best performances ever. Perhaps it is the absolute celebrity I feel walking in the area having folks recognize who I am sometimes years after a show is over. Perhaps it is the incredible accommodations while I stay as a performer which have yet to be beaten by any other company. Perhaps it is the present friendships with former interns who are now excellent performers in their own right. Perhaps it is the love and joy I have for the young company . . . many of whom babysat my dog as I did my evening performances. Perhaps?? Nah! It is all them things . . . .*heh* I cannot lie . . . I brag about my experiences at The Wayside. Do I want to do more productions at the Wayside? Hell Yes ! Do I want it to stick around?? Hell Yes ! Do I want support for the theatre to last a damn long time??? Hell Yes ! I sincerely hope if you have the means to keep these doors open please help in whatever way you can. If so then I can promise each and every time I'm allowed to step foot on this stage a performance that will leave you smiling full of the same magical enjoyment I've experienced for more than seven years. Hugs and Kisses Elliot Dash If you'd like to read more about this campaign please check out more infomation here on this blog, on Facebook, or at Wayside Theatre's website. If you'd like to help or share your story we'd be very grateful. [...]



An Actor Speaks about Wayside Theatre

2013-01-31T08:05:00-05:00

During this campaign to save Wayside Theatre we've heard from many individuals on both side of the footlights about why Wayside Theatre is important. This bit of testimony is from actor Elliot Dash. Elliot has become a fan favorite with...During this campaign to save Wayside Theatre we've heard from many individuals on both side of the footlights about why Wayside Theatre is important. This bit of testimony is from actor Elliot Dash. Elliot has become a fan favorite with his performances in Hank Williams: Lost Highway, Driving Miss Daisy, and Othello. He's one of a kind and one of the actors who loves to come to Wayside Theatre to create and perform for our community.   My favorite place to work. You need testimony from me? You are asking me about The Wayside Theatre? What it means to me? There is your answer. Regardless of when you ask or where I am or the current production I'm performing in . . . . The Wayside Theatre is hands down my favorite place to work. Every single time I've done any kind of show at The Wayside the results are magical enjoyment. Skeptical? Think I'm just saying it to help out?? Nope. It is absolutely true. I love every minute of every day that I have had to park myself in Middletown to do a show for the enjoyment of others. Perhaps it is the absolute abandonment of personal ego for the incredibly talented performers that I have come to know as friends. Perhaps it is the wonderful director / artistic director Mr. Warner Crocker who has guided me into some of my personal best performances ever. Perhaps it is the absolute celebrity I feel walking in the area having folks recognize who I am sometimes years after a show is over. Perhaps it is the incredible accommodations while I stay as a performer which have yet to be beaten by any other company. Perhaps it is the present friendships with former interns who are now excellent performers in their own right. Perhaps it is the love and joy I have for the young company . . . many of whom babysat my dog as I did my evening performances. Perhaps?? Nah! It is all them things . . . .*heh* I cannot lie . . . I brag about my experiences at The Wayside. Do I want to do more productions at the Wayside? Hell Yes ! Do I want it to stick around?? Hell Yes ! Do I want support for the theatre to last a damn long time??? Hell Yes ! I sincerely hope if you have the means to keep these doors open please help in whatever way you can. If so then I can promise each and every time I'm allowed to step foot on this stage a performance that will leave you smiling full of the same magical enjoyment I've experienced for more than seven years. Hugs and Kisses Elliot Dash If you'd like to read more about this campaign please check out more infomation here on this blog, on Facebook, or at Wayside Theatre's website. If you'd like to help or share your story we'd be very grateful. [...]



The Community Rallies Around Wayside Theatre

2013-01-29T09:04:35-05:00

Check out this article in the Northern Va Daily today. It's about some of the efforts going on in our community to rally around Wayside Theatre and help us meet our fundraising goals.Visual artists, groups of young people and more...

(image) Check out this article in the Northern Va Daily today. It's about some of the efforts going on in our community to rally around Wayside Theatre and help us meet our fundraising goals.Visual artists, groups of young people and more are stepping up to keep the professional performing arts alive at Wayside Theatre and we are so grateful for their efforts.

If you are a part of a group and would like to help, we'd love to work with you to make this possible. Collaboration is a big part of what we do and working together we can do more for our community.

If you'd like to read more about this campaign please check out more infomation here on this blog, on Facebook, or at Wayside Theatre's website. If you'd like to help or share your story we'd be very grateful.

 

 

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